Category Archives: Headlines

Oregon Boaters Caught Way Overlimit On Rockfish

An extra rockfish in the cooler suggested things might be a little fishy aboard the boat coming back into the Hammond Marina one recent evening.

(OREGON STATE POLICE)

Oregon fish and wildlife troopers had initially contacted the four occupants as they returned from bottomfishing at the South Jetty, at the mouth of the Columbia River.

After finding that 21st fish, the officers decided a fuller search of the boat just might be in order.

In a plastic tote, they found the rest of the crew’s booty — 53 more fish, mostly black rocks but also a small lingcod and a cabezon.

Troopers report they cited and released one person criminally for overlimits of black rockfish and lingcod, unlawfully keeping an undersized ling, and closed-season harvest of cabezon.

The other three were also cited and released criminally for overlimits of rockfish.

The 54 extra fish were all donated to a food bank.

The case is reported in the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division’s latest newsletter, for April, and just posted today.

It also includes details on several Winchester Bay crab scofflaws, including one caught with 17 undersize Dungies and another with 10, and a Brookings kayak angler who’d stashed a couple extra lingcod in his gear bag.

There’s also a clam caper with Washington suspects sans licenses but with 41 gapers, a Newport-area angler who claimed to have forgotten his license at home but a record check for which found he hadn’t bothering buying one since 2013, and details on several case resolutions.

Keep up the great work, officers!

Summer 2018 Puget Sound Crab Seasons Announced; No Crabbing Weds., July 4

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today announced Puget Sound summer crab-fishing seasons, which get underway June 16 with an opening in two marine areas.

MARINE AREA 8-2, WHERE LOGAN, CHAD, KYLE AND PAYSON HAULED THESE DUNGIES LAST YEAR, IS AMONG THE MARINE AREAS WHERE CRABBING SEASON WILL OPEN JUNE 30. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Marine areas 4 (Neah Bay – East of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line) and 5 (Sekiu) open for sport crabbing Saturday, June 16.  Many other areas of the Sound will open for recreational crab fishing on June 30, although two areas around the San Juan Islands open later in the summer to protect molting crab.

Summer seasons for the upcoming fishery are posted on WDFW’s crab-fishing website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/crab/. The website includes details on fishing regulations, as well as an educational video on crabbing.

WDFW continues to monitor crab abundance throughout Puget Sound and manages crab fisheries to maintain healthy populations, said Bob Sizemore, shellfish policy lead for WDFW.

“Crabbing should be good again this year in several areas of Puget Sound,” he said.

Recreational crabbing will be open Thursdays through Mondays each week. Crabbing is closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays each week, which means crabbers should be aware that no sport crab fisheries will be open Wednesday, July 4. All shellfish gear must be removed from the water on closed days.

Crab seasons are scheduled as follows:

  • Marine areas 4 (Neah Bay east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line), and 5 (Sekiu): Open June 16 through Sept. 3.
  • Marine areas 6 (East Juan de Fuca Strait), 8-1 (Deception Pass), 8-2 (Port Susan/Everett), 9 (Port Gamble and Admiralty Inlet), 10 (Seattle/Bremerton), and 12 (Hood Canal):  Open June 30 through Sept. 3.
  • Marine Area 7 South (San Juan Islands/Bellingham): Open July 14 through Sept. 30.
  • Marine Area 7 North (Gulf of Georgia): Open Aug. 16 through Sept. 30.

The following areas are closed this season:

  • Marine areas 11 (Tacoma-Vashon Island) and 13 (south Puget Sound): These areas are closed to promote recovery of Dungeness crab populations in those areas. WDFW provided more information about the closure in a previous news release available online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/news/may1018a/.

The daily limit throughout Puget Sound is five Dungeness crab, males only, in hard-shell condition with a minimum carapace width of 6¼ inches. Fishers may catch six red rock crab of either sex per day, provided those crab measure at least 5 inches across.

Crab fishers may not set or pull shellfish gear from a vessel from one hour after official sunset to one hour before official sunrise.

Puget Sound crabbers are required to record their harvest of Dungeness crab on their catch record cards immediately after retaining crab. Separate catch record cards are issued for the summer and winter seasons.

Catch record cards are not required to fish for Dungeness crab in the Columbia River or on the Washington coast, where crabbing is open year-round.

You Might Not Want To ‘Lanuch’ Here, Folks, WDFW Advises

This world is full of warnings, and there’s a particularly unusual one in these parts.

“Lanuch at your own risk,” reads a sign in Washington.

(DAVE VEDDER)

Yes, you read that correctly — lanuch.

Say what?!

Is that like the latest Fortnite dance craze?

One of those new viral internet challenges?

What with the crazy things the kids are doing these days, no wonder that to lanuch is such a potentially dangerous gamble!!!

All kidding aside, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife actually meant “launch” — as you’ve likely figured out by now — when they put up the sign at a water access site.

Dave Vedder, an outdoor writer living in the Wenatchee area and who roams widely across Central Washington, came across it, snapped a pic and posted it to Facebook this morning.

WENATCHEE-AREA OUTDOOR WRITER DAVE VEDDER CAME ACROSS THIS WDFW WATER ACCESS SITE SIGN WITH JUST A SLIGHT MISSPELLING. (DAVE VEDDER)

Lord knows that this so-called editor has misspelted more than his fair share of words and transposed enough letters to fill a piggy bnak, but the mistake is drawing laughs, thumbs up and cranky faces, as well as chagrin from the guilty agency.

After it was pointed out, a WDFW spokesman says that a regional manager plans to send out a staff reminder to check spelling before ordering signs like this.

No word on whether the bullet holes in the sign can be attributed to pissed-off but poorly shooting copy editors at the Wenatchee World.

WDFW Sets Last Halibut Days For Areas 1-10

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE CHANGE NOTICE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Action: Sets the final season dates of recreational halibut fishing for marine areas 1-10.

THE BARNDOOR OF THE YEAR MAY HAVE ALREADY BEEN CAUGHT, BUT WASHINGTON HALIBUT ANGLERS LIKE TAMMY FINDLAY WILL HAVE A FEW MORE DAYS TO TRY FOR FAT FLATTIES. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Locations and effective dates:

Marine Area 1 (Columbia River): The nearshore fishery, which has been open seven days a week, will close for the season at the end of the day on June 20.

The all-depth fishery, which has been closed, will reopen June 21 only.

Marine Area 2 (Westport): The nearshore fishery, which has been open seven days a week, will close at the end of the day on June 6.

Both the nearshore and all-depth fisheries will reopen for a single day on June 21, then close for the season at the end of the day on June 21.

Marine areas 3-10: Will open June 16, June 21, and June 23.

Species affected: Pacific halibut

Reason for action: There is sufficient quota remaining to open recreational halibut fisheries in Marine Area 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah Bay) and Marine Areas 5-10 (Puget Sound) on Saturday, June 16 and Saturday, June 23.

In addition, in order to maximize all-depth fishing opportunity, the nearshore area in Marine Area 2 will close at the end of the day Wednesday, June 6, and recreational halibut fishing will re-open at all depths in coastal marine areas 1-4 (with the exception of the Marine Area 1 nearshore fishery) and Puget Sound marine areas 5-10 on Thursday, June 21.

Additional information: As previously announced, recreational halibut fishing is already scheduled to be open June 7 and June 9 in marine areas 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah Bay) and marine areas 5-10 (Puget Sound)

The nearshore fishery in Marine Area 1 (Columbia River) remains open seven days per week until the end of the day June 20.

This rule conforms to federal action taken by the National Marine Fisheries Service and the International Pacific Halibut Commission.

States Add Columbia Springer, Sturgeon Days

THE FOLLOWING IS ODFW PR

Fishery managers from Oregon and Washington extended the ongoing recreational spring Chinook fishing season on the lower Columbia River, set a one-day white sturgeon season  in the estuary, and approved a two-fish bag limit on Chinook above Bonneville Dam today during a joint state hearing.

Andy Schneider holds a Columbia Estuary Sturgeon caught on a recent retention day. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

 Downstream of Bonneville Dam, the states approved a nine-day extension to the ongoing spring Chinook season starting June 7 and continuing through June 15. The effective area is from the Tongue Point/Rocky Point line up to the boat and bank deadlines near Bonneville Dam. The bag limit is up to two adult salmonids (Chinook, coho, or steelhead) per day, and only hatchery fish may be kept.

From Bonneville Dam upstream to the OR/WA border, the ongoing spring Chinook season was modified to allow fishermen to keep two adult hatchery Chinook per day instead of one beginning June 7.

The spring Chinook seasons were approved in light of catch and fish passage information that affirmed a previous forecast of 116,500 upriver spring Chinook returning to the river mouth, leaving additional fish for harvest.

Fishery managers from the two states also set a one-day white sturgeon retention season for Saturday, June 9, ending at 2 p.m. on that day. The open area is the mainstem Columbia River from Wauna powerlines downstream to the river mouth at Buoy 10, including Youngs Bay and all adjacent Washington tributaries.

The legal size slot for this fishery is 44-inch minimum and 50-inch maximum fork length, with a daily bag limit of one fish and an annual limit of two fish.  Anglers are reminded that green sturgeon may not be retained.  Identification signs have been posted at local launching ramps.

For more information about upcoming Columbia River seasons, including regulation updates, visit ODFW’s online fishing reports atwww.myodfw.com.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (6-5-18)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED WITH ODFW AND WDFW AND WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Estuary [white sturgeon] update

On June 2 and 4, estuary sturgeon anglers made 2,964 trips and kept 660 white sturgeon.

DAVE ANDERSON CAUGHT THIS STURGEON IN THE COLUMBIA ESTUARY OVER THE RECENT HOLIDAY WEEKEND. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

SALMON, STEELHEAD AND SHAD

Salmonid angling was fair this past weekend in the lower Columbia River.  On Saturday’s (6/2) flight, 199 salmonid boats and 237 Oregon bank anglers were counted from Tongue Point to Bonneville Dam.  Boat anglers fishing in the Portland to St. Helens area, averaged 0.09 Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing from Goble to Beaver averaged 0.11 Chinook caught per boat.  Boat anglers fishing in the estuary averaged 0.15 Chinook and 0.22 steelhead caught per boat. Bank anglers fishing in both the gorge averaged 0.07 Chinook caught per bank angler, while anglers fishing the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.07 Chinook and 0.02 steelhead caught per angler.

Gorge Bank:

Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook kept for 15 salmonid anglers; and 693 shad kept for 93 shad anglers.

Gorge Boats (below Beacon Rock):

Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (five anglers).

Troutdale Boats:

Weekend checking showed no catch for 11 salmonid boats (29 anglers); and one shad kept, plus 75 shad released for two boats (four anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank:

Weekend checking showed nine adult Chinook, one jack Chinook and four steelhead kept, plus five adult Chinook released for 208 salmonid anglers; and no catch for one shad angler.

Portland to St. Helens Boats:

Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook kept for 11 salmonid boats (22 anglers); and 14 shad kept for five shad boats (17 anglers).

Goble to Beaver (Clatskanie) Boats:

Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook kept for nine salmonid boats (22 anglers); and 72 shad kept for two shad boats (eight anglers).

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank:

No report.

Westport to Buoy 10 Boats:

Weekend checking showed two adult Chinook, one jack Chinook and eight steelhead kept for 13 boats (36 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam):

No report.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam):

Weekly checking showed four adult Chinook kept for 19 bank anglers.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam):

Weekly checking showed 11 adult Chinook and two jack Chinook kept, plus six adult Chinook released for 56 boats (151 anglers).

STURGEON

Gorge Boats:  Closed for retention.     

No report.

Troutdale Boats:  Closed for retention.

Weekend checking showed five sublegal and two oversize sturgeon released for two boats (five anglers).

Portland to Wauna Powerlines:  Closed for retention.

Weekend checking showed nine sublegal, six legal and 13 oversize sturgeon released for seven boats (24 anglers).

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank:  Closed for retention.

Weekend checking showed one sublegal and three oversize sturgeon released for 19 bank anglers.

Buoy 10 to Wauna Powerlines Boats:  Closed for retention.

Weekend checking showed 195 legal white sturgeon kept, plus 321 sublegal, 294 oversize and two green sturgeon released for 196 boats (675 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam):

Closed for retention.  No report.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam):

Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed two sublegal sturgeon released for three bank anglers.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam):

Closed for retention.  No report.

 

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool:

No report.

The Dalles Pool:

Weekly checking showed 87 walleye kept for 18 boats (36 anglers).

John Day Pool:

Weekly checking showed 146 walleye kept, plus 35 walleye released for 40 boats (97 anglers).

OSP Looking For Tips On Harney Co., Toledo Doe Poachings

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRESS RELEASES FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

OSP SEEKS PUBLIC ASSISTANCE IN HARNEY COUNTY POACHING CASE

The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help to identify the person(s) responsible for the unlawful taking and wasting of a doe antelope in Harney County.

(OSP)

On the morning of April 23rd, 2018 the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division was notified of a deceased doe antelope off of Crane-Buchanan road on county road #9. The deceased doe antelope was discovered by a local resident who noticed the antelope in a field as he was driving on county road #9. An OSP Fish & Wildlife Trooper responded to the scene and discovered the doe antelope appeared to have been shot with a high powered rifle sometime early that morning. The doe antelope did not have any meat removed and was left to waste.

If you have any information regarding this incident please contact F&W Trooper Dean Trent through the Turn In Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or 541-589-2547

OSP IS SEEKING PUBLIC ASSISTANCE WITH INFORMATION REGARDING POACHED BLACKTAIL DOE DEER THAT WAS SHOT

On May 25, 2018, Newport Fish and Wildlife Troopers were called to an area outside of Toledo to investigate a poached deer.  Investigation has shown the deer was shot in the head with a small caliber rifle.  The remains of the deer were located on Sunnyridge Road near the 1000 line road.

A reward of up to $500 is offered for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or and arrest made in this case.  The reward is comprised of $500 from the Oregon Hunting Association Turn-In-poachers (TIP) program.

The Oregon Hunters Association offers rewards to persons, through their T.I.P. fund, for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or an arrest made of a person(s) for illegal possession, killing, or taking of bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose, elk, deer, antelope, bear, cougar, wolf, furbearers and/or upland game birds and water fowl. T.I.P. rewards can also be paid for the illegal taking, netting, snagging, and/or dynamiting of game fish, and/or shell fish, and for the destruction of habitat.

Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to contact OSP Trooper Jason Adkins through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888

SW WA Fishing Report (6-5-18)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS CONTRIBUTED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Lower Cowlitz River (I-5 Br downstream) – 30 bank rods had no catch.

Upper Cowlitz River (above the I-5 Br.) – 55 bank rods kept 8 adult spring Chinook and 2 steelhead.  31 boat rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook and 14 steelhead.

Kalama River – 12 bank and 3 boat anglers released 1 steelhead.

Lewis River (mainstem) – 4 bank rods had no catch.

Lewis River (North Fork) – 15 bank rods had no catch. 5 boat rods kept 5 spring Chinook.

Wind River (mouth) – 8 boat rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook.

Drano Lake – 40 boat rods kept 16 adult spring Chinook and released 2 adult spring Chinook.

Bear Hauls Dead Deer Through Woodinville Backyard

A video of a black bear hauling a dead deer through a north King County resident’s lakeside backyard is catching eyes this morning.

It was shared late last night by Q13 reporter Steve Kiggins, who received it from a viewer known only as Gwen.

A SCREEN SHOT OF A KCPQ VIEWER KNOWN ONLY AS GWEN AND SENT TO REPORTER STEVE KIGGINS SHOWS THE BEAR WALTZING ACROSS A WOODINVILLE LAKESIDE LAWN WITH A DEAD BLACKTAIL DEER. (FACEBOOK)

Marked with a graphic content warning (it’s not really), the 68-second-long clip shows the bruin first trot onto a lawn, glance around, then amble back to some trees at the side of the frame.

There it picks up the carcass of a blacktail, turns around and begins to recross the lawn, stopping once to apparently take a breather and get a better grip on its prize.

Then it continues on its way around the shore of the lake before disappearing off camera.

The video is described as having been taken in the Woodinville area, which is where I did a fair amount of growing up, and if I had to guess — note the word “guess” — I’d say it occurred at Tuck Lake.

There are other lakes in the area, of course, but few with anything like the cove seen in the video.

I couldn’t tell you whether the bear killed the deer, some other animal did and the bear subsequently claimed it, or if it was hit on a nearby road and salvaged by the bear.

And while it’s nowhere close to as violent as the deer in 2015 that was attacked by a bruin in a Colorado backyard, it’s still fairly remarkable.

Another reminder from recent weeks that, more and more, we’re sharing some neighborhoods with wild animals.

Editor’s note: Here are tips for dealing with bear encounters.

Yuasa: South Sound Crab Aside, Lots Of Good Fisheries To Hit

Editor’s note: The following is Mark Yuasa’s monthly fishing newsletter, Get Hooked on Reel Times With Mark, and is run with permission.

By Mark Yuasa, Director of Grow Boating Programs, Northwest Marine Trade Association

Hold on! Wait a minute! It’s truly hard to believe the calendar already reads June as the days are flying by at warp speed.

Spring was a blur, and by now many have already made their early summer salmon fishing trips to southeast Alaska; opening day of trout season is a distant memory; pots have been filled with spot shrimp and topped on salads or grilled on the BBQ; razor clams are now vacuum sealed in the freezer; and lingcod and halibut fishing was decent from the coast clear into open areas of Puget Sound.

This is time of year when turning over a new leaf on another season is set to take place with anglers switching into summer fishing mode.
But, before we get too deep into what opportunities exist we should weigh-in on a dire situation facing Puget Sound Dungeness crab.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

It appears the glory days of Puget Sound Dungeness crab fisheries could momentarily be in the rear-view mirror as areas south of Seattle (Marine Catch Areas 11 and 13) are closed this summer due a dramatic dip in population levels. Tribal fisheries are also shutdown in those areas.

Don Velasquez, a WDFW Puget Sound shellfish biologist says anglers haven’t been faced with such a low abundance since 2012 and lousy success in 2017 were a signal of what was to come.
Dungeness crab abundance test fishing in early spring around south-central and southern Puget Sound found the situation wasn’t very rosy.

What fishery experts are seeing – or in this matter aren’t seeing – in those two areas is a two- and three-year-old male Dungeness crab class (averaging 4.4 inches) and four-year-old class (averaging 5.4 inches) are also greatly reduced. Legal-size is usually the five-year-old and older age class crabs averaging 6 ¼ inches or more.

“We’ve had some pretty extreme surface water events in 2014 and 2015, and it is a possibility the abnormally high-water temperatures could have played a role in the downtrend,” Velasquez said. “When young of the year Dungeness crab are faced with these types of conditions they tend to die at a much higher rate.”

Other reasons for the decline are a distant source of brood stock for larval production and inconsistent larval advection; low dissolved oxygen levels; ocean acidification; restricted water flow south of the Tacoma Narrows; and excessive harvest.

To make matters worse extremely low density of Dungeness crab could affect successful mating for future generations.

In Puget Sound catch areas, the total Dungeness crab harvested was 9,285,912 pounds during 2017 in all fisheries compared to 10,645,000 pounds in 2016.

The record catch was 2015 when state and tribal Puget Sound fisheries landed 11.8 million pounds, exceeding the previous 2014 record by 1.2 million pounds.

While crab opportunities have declined I must go back to my one of my old mantras: “You can gripe about where you can’t fish or head to greener pastures.”

And in this case those greener pastures will likely be found in northern Puget Sound and San Juan Islands. Specific dates haven’t been determined but fishing usually gets underway in early July. For details, go to http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/crab/.

Many other fishing options abound this summer

Now let’s move onto what’s happening this month and beyond.

The WDFW statewide trout derby is happening on 100 lakes now through Oct. 31. A common theme since opening day – which seems more pronounced than last year – is the number of tagged derby fish caught of late. Last year more than 50 percent of the tags were turned in so if it’s better so far this season that is great news!

More funding was diverted into 2018 with about $38,000 in donated prizes and more than 1,000 tags of which one-third (300 total) were placed in 22 Puget Sound region lakes.

Prizes range from gift cards to fishing gear, plus one tag lurking in a local lake is a getaway to Roche Harbor Resort in San Juan Islands.

Trout action remains steady and should continue until it heats up although deep-water bodied lakes will be good clear into summer. Bass, walleye and perch are also gaining more traction.

Shore-bound anglers shouldn’t overlook coastal surf perch fishing, which has been good since early spring from Neah Bay south along the Oregon coast.

The hatchery chinook season in Tacoma area of south-central Puget Sound (Area 11) reopened June 1. Since the winter/spring season ended on a high note with baitfish teeming off the Clay Banks it should no doubt attract some early-feeding kings into the area this month.

Southern Puget Sound (Area 13) chinook fishing in May was better than it had been in previous years with good catches off Point Fosdick, and Fox Island’s east side at Gibson Point, Toy Point and Fox Point.

Other marine salmon fisheries on horizon include Sekiu, San Juan Islands and a portion of Hood Canal all opening July 1 for hatchery chinook; and Port Angeles opening July 3. The Tulalip Bubble fishery is open Fridays to Mondays of each week but closed on June 9.

Central Puget Sound is open in June for coho only and I’d earmark the shipping lanes off Jefferson Head. On coast, Ilwaco, Neah Bay and La Push open for salmon on June 23; and Westport on July 1.
On river scene, the Cascade, the Skagit above 530 Bridge and Skykomish opened June 1 for hatchery chinook; and a section of Skagit opens June 16 for sockeye.

Word on NW Salmon Derby Series

Next up on Northwest Salmon Derby Series is PSA Bellingham Salmon Derby on July 13-15 and Big One Salmon Derby July 25-29 at Lake Coeur d’Alene in Idaho.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

It’s also not too soon to start getting excited about a coho season in central and northern Puget Sound during the prime fishing month of September. I’ve confirmed the PSA Edmonds Coho Derby is Sept. 8, and the biggest derby on West Coast – the Everett Coho Derby is date stamped for Sept. 22-23.

That is where we’ll draw the lucky name to win a grand-prize KingFisher 2025 Falcon Series boat powered with a Honda 150hp and 9.9hp trolling motors on an EZ-loader galvanized trailer. It is fully rigged with Scotty downriggers, Raymarine electronics, a WhoDat Tower and a Dual Electronic Stereo – for a $65,000 value. Not bad to get your name pulled out of a hat or maybe a cement mixer like we did last year in Everett. Details: www.NorthwestSalmonDerbySeries.com.

Now excuse me while I tie a bunch of leaders, prep the boat and zoom out the door to go fishing. See you out on the water soon!