Category Archives: Headlines

THE OSTROMS ARE THE KINGS OF THE REACH. THOR, KARL AND JACOB WON THE 2ND ANNUAL HANFORD REACH FALL CHINOOK LIVE CAPTURE DERBY WITH 52 DURING THE TWO-AND-A-HALF-DAY EVENT IN LATE OCTOBER. THE FAMILY ACCOUNTED FOR ONE SIXTH OF THE 300 WILD-ORIGIN CHINOOK CAUGHT BY THE 64 ANGLERS FISHING CLOSED WATERS FOR USE AT THE PRIEST RAPIDS HATCHERY. THE EVENT IS PUT ON BY CCA-WASHINGTON, GRANT COUNTY PUD AND WDFW. (THOR OSTROM)

Record Hanford Reach Fall Bright Harvest, Escapement

THE FOLLOWING FACTOIDS COME FROM PAUL HOFFARTH, WDFW, AND WERE FORWARDED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

*         An estimated 183,749 fall Chinook spawned naturally in the Hanford Reach this year (152,464 adults, 31,285 jacks).

*         New record for overall escapement but adult returns were slightly lower than last year.

THE OSTROMS ARE THE KINGS OF THE REACH. THOR, KARL AND JACOB WON THE 2ND ANNUAL HANFORD REACH FALL CHINOOK LIVE CAPTURE DERBY WITH 52 DURING THE TWO-AND-A-HALF-DAY EVENT IN LATE OCTOBER. THE FAMILY ACCOUNTED FOR ONE SIXTH OF THE 300 WILD-ORIGIN CHINOOK CAUGHT BY THE 64 ANGLERS FISHING CLOSED WATERS FOR USE AT THE PRIEST RAPIDS HATCHERY. THE EVENT IS PUT ON BY CCA-WASHINGTON, GRANT COUNTY PUD AND WDFW. (THOR OSTROM)

THE OSTROMS ARE THE “KINGS OF THE REACH.” THOR, KARL AND JACOB WON THE 2ND ANNUAL HANFORD REACH FALL CHINOOK LIVE CAPTURE DERBY WITH 52 DURING THE TWO-AND-A-HALF-DAY EVENT IN LATE OCTOBER. THE FAMILY ACCOUNTED FOR ONE SIXTH OF THE 300 CHINOOK CAUGHT BY THE 64 ANGLERS FISHING CLOSED WATERS OF THE COLUMBIA FOR USE AT THE PRIEST RAPIDS HATCHERY. THE EVENT IS PUT ON BY CCA-WASHINGTON, GRANT COUNTY PUD AND WDFW. (THOR OSTROM)

*         However, the adults are primarily Age 4 this year compared to Age 3 last year so much higher number of females on the spawning grounds this year.

*         Record return to Priest Rapids Hatchery at 76,666.

*         14,254 chinook returned to Ringold Hatchery which was just slightly lower than last year.

*         New record for harvest in the sport fishery at 32,427 fish.

*         Huge jack return to the Reach and Priest Rapids Hatchery. Could be another big return year next year!

BLAKE RAMSEY AND CHRIS SESSIONS SHOW OFF SOME NICE RAINBOW TROUT FROM ROWLAND LAKE, WHICH WAS STOCKED FOR THE FISH FRIDAY EVENT. BUZZ RAMSEY SAYS THE MAG LIP 3.0, COMING SOON TO STORE SHELVES, DID THE DAMAGE. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

SW WA, Columbia Fishing Report (12-15-14)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORTS ARE FROM JOE HYMER, PSMFC, AND TANNA TAKATA, ODFW

SALMON AND STEELHEAD

Cowlitz River – Some coho and steelhead are being caught.

During six days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered:
*   2,735 coho adults and 38 jacks
*   5 summer-run steelhead
*   207 winter-run steelhead
*   19 cutthroat trout

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released:
*   458 coho adults, 14 jacks, five cutthroat trout and one steelhead into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton
*   96 coho adults into Lake Scanewa above Cowlitz Falls Dam
*   253 coho adults and one steelhead into the Cispus River above the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 10,100 cubic feet per second on Monday, December 15.

TODAYS FACTIOD – As of Dec. 10, Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery had just over 100,000 adult coho return!

Lewis River – Bank anglers are catching some coho while boat anglers are mainly catching fall Chinook.

Klickitat River – Including fish released, bank anglers on the lower river averaged over 3 coho per rod.

Bonneville Pool – Boat anglers averaged just over a coho per rod.

BLAKE RAMSEY AND CHRIS SESSIONS SHOW OFF SOME NICE RAINBOW TROUT FROM ROWLAND LAKE, WHICH WAS STOCKED FOR THE FISH FRIDAY EVENT. BUZZ RAMSEY SAYS THE MAG LIP 3.0, COMING SOON TO STORE SHELVES, DID THE DAMAGE. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

BLAKE RAMSEY AND CHRIS SESSIONS SHOW OFF SOME NICE RAINBOW TROUT FROM ROWLAND LAKE, WHICH WAS STOCKED FOR THE FISH FRIDAY EVENT. BUZZ RAMSEY SAYS THE MAG LIP 3.0, COMING SOON TO STORE SHELVES, DID THE DAMAGE. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

SALMON, STEELHEAD AND SHAD

The salmonid creel program on the lower Columbia has ended for the year and will resume February of 2015.

John Day Pool (Columbia River above John Day Dam and John Day Arm): Weekly checking showed six adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus 14 unclipped steelhead released for 14 boats.

STURGEON

A hearing is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. Thursday, December 18, 2014 (via teleconference) to consider recreational sturgeon retention fisheries in Bonneville Pool.

Catch-and-release only. No report.

Ho Ho Ho Ho Ho! 5-day Pre-Christmas Clam Dig

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH & WILDLIFE

Clam diggers will get another chance to dig some fresh razor clams for the holidays during an opening Dec. 19-23 at several Washington beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the opening after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends clam diggers bring lanterns for these evening digs and come prepared for cold, wet weather.

“This late December opener will be a great time to stock up on razor clams,” he said. “Smoked razor clams can make a tasty appetizer at a holiday gathering.”

Ayres noted that smoked clams will keep in the refrigerator for two or three weeks. Recipes for razor clams can be found on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/recipes.html .

The best digging typically occurs one to two hours before low tide, said Ayres, noting that digging is not allowed at any beach before noon.

Upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

Dec. 19, Friday; 4:41 p.m., 0.0 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
Dec. 20, Saturday, 5:23 p.m., -0.6 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis
Dec. 21, Sunday, 6:06 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
Dec. 22, Monday, 6:48 p.m., -1.3 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
Dec. 23, Tuesday, 7:31 p.m., -1.3 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For additional information about upcoming razor clam digs, see WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.htm

RICH HUTCHERSON OF BROOKINGS, ORE., LEFT, MEASURES A FALL CHINOOK CARCASS BESIDE THE CHETCO WHILE ODFW FISHERIES BIOLOGIST JOHN WEBER TAKES A SCALE SAMPLE FROM ANOTHER SALMON. BEHIND THEM IS THE BOAT OF GUIDE ANDY MARTIN, WHO FLOATED THEM DOWN THE RIVER (ANDY MARTIN, WILD RIVERS FISHING)

Local Guides Help Out On Chetco King Carcass Survey

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM WILD RIVERS FISHING

Several fishing guides who regularly fish the Chetco River teamed up with volunteer anglers and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists last week to help document information about this year’s fall salmon run.

The guides donated their boats and time for the day on Dec. 9 to float biologists and members of the local fishing club down the Chetco to collect scale samples and measurements from spawned out salmon along the river.

With a major storm approaching the Southern Oregon coast, the teams of guides, volunteers and biologists had to move fast to gather the information before rains blew the Chetco out for several days, washing many of the salmon carcasses out to sea.

ODFW collects the information from the spawned salmon to get an idea of the run size each year, along with the age classes of the returning salmon and the hatchery to wild ratio.

They found a broad age class of carcasses, meaning the Chetco had a strong return of 2-, 3-, 4- and 5-year old salmon, indicating a diverse and healthy salmon population. The vast majority of the spawned fish also were wild salmon, indicating the Chetco has a strong run of native kings.

RICH HUTCHERSON OF BROOKINGS, ORE., LEFT, MEASURES A FALL CHINOOK CARCASS BESIDE THE CHETCO WHILE ODFW FISHERIES BIOLOGIST JOHN WEBER TAKES A SCALE SAMPLE FROM ANOTHER SALMON. BEHIND THEM IS THE BOAT OF GUIDE ANDY MARTIN, WHO FLOATED THEM DOWN THE RIVER (ANDY MARTIN, WILD RIVERS FISHING)

RICH HUTCHERSON OF BROOKINGS, ORE., LEFT, MEASURES A FALL CHINOOK CARCASS BESIDE THE CHETCO WHILE ODFW FISHERIES BIOLOGIST JOHN WEBER TAKES A SCALE SAMPLE FROM ANOTHER SALMON. BEHIND THEM IS THE BOAT OF GUIDE ANDY MARTIN, WHO FLOATED THEM DOWN THE RIVER (ANDY MARTIN, WILD RIVERS FISHING)

Guides who volunteered their boats for the day included Travis Sallander, David Castellanos, Andy Martin, Gary Early and Val Early, all Brookings-based guides who spend most of their time on the Chetco.

Most of the other volunteers were from the Oregon South Coast Fishermen club, whose main purpose is fishery enhancement work on the Chetco and other Southern Oregon rivers.

ODFW biologists also have been conducting spawning surveys on tributaries flowing into the Chetco River in recent days. They have found strong spawner escapement this year, good news for salmon fishing in years to come.

Steelie Limit Upped On Cascade, Tokul Opening Early, Nooksack, Whatcom Closing

UPDATED With no reason to set aside returning hatchery steelhead for broodstock, WDFW is upping the daily limit to three on the Cascade River.

The change goes into effect between the mouth and Rockport-Cascade Road Bridge next Tuesday, Dec., 16, and runs through the end of the season in mid-February.

“The Marblemount Hatchery will not be taking broodstock in the 2014-15 season, therefore all hatchery steelhead returning are harvestable. Increasing the steelhead daily limit in the Cascade River will provide additional angling opportunity,” WDFW explained in an e-reg out this afternoon.

No mention was made of why the agency isn’t collecting clipped chromers, but it involves the lawsuit settlement earlier this year with the Wild Fish Conservancy in which the parties agreed to not stock hatchery steelhead smolts into the Cascade-Skagit for 12 years.

In other winter steelheading news, WDFW opened Tokul Creek from the Fish Hatchery Road Bridge up to the deadline for fishing starting this Saturday, Dec. 13, about a month earlier than usual.

“This section of Tokul Creek is closed in the permanent regulations until Jan.  15 to allow for winter steelhead broodstock collection at the Tokul Creek Hatchery. However, the Tokul Creek Hatchery facility has met its egg take goals for winter steelhead, allowing for expanded fishing opportunity in Tokul Creek,” WDFW said.

Editors’ note: On Dec. 11, WDFW announced that all of the Nooksack River system as well as Whatcom Creek was closing for steelhead next Tuesday, Dec. 16, to “collect sufficient fish to meet egg take needs” for the hatchery programs, which have struggled in recent years to meet those goals.

“When the combined broodstock needs of Kendall Creek Hatchery, and Whatcom Creek Hatchery are met, the fishery will be reopened and revert to seasons as listed in the Washington Sport fishing Rules 2014/2015 pamphlet,” WDFW said.

 

SW WA Waterfowl Refuge LWCF Projects Go Unfunded By Congress

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON WILDLIFE & RECREATION COALITION

Congress will leave DC with a spending bill that maintains previous-year funding levels for the nation’s premier program for outdoor recreation and conservation, but falls short of reauthorizing the program. The Land and Water Conservation Fund’s (LWCF) many bipartisan champions in the House and Senate had urged for full funding and renewal of the program.

“Many members of Washington’s congressional delegation worked hard to pass sufficient funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, and we’re grateful for their fervent leadership. But our work is not over—in our state alone, Congress left $10.2 million in projects unfunded and the program faces expiration next year,” said Joanna Grist, executive director of the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition, which advocates for the fund. “Without continued leadership, we not only risk losing the state’s natural treasures but also the 227,000 jobs that depend on the kind of outdoor recreation projects the Fund supports.”

Maintaining last year’s level of funding provides LWCF with $306 million to support crucial conservation and recreation projects nationally. While an improvement over the House’s original $150 million proposal, the final level is barely a third of the full funding level envisioned by the program. LWCF is not funded by taxpayer dollars.

Some Washington projects will receive funding. These projects include:

  • Washington Cascades-Yakima River Watershed

  • South Puget Sound Coastal Forest

Projects left without funding include:

  • Pysht Coastal Forest

  • Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge

  • Willapa National Wildlife Refuge

  • Expansion for Olympic National Park

Created by Congress in 1965, the Land and Water Conservation Fund is the nation’s premier federal grant program for conservation and outdoor recreation. The program uses no taxpayer dollars. Instead, $900 million in offshore oil and gas lease revenue is meant to be invested in parks and outdoor recreation opportunities each year. However, a majority of LWCF funds continue to be diverted for unrelated purposes.

Editor’s note: Frances Chiem of the Washington Wildlife & Recreation Coalition said this about how the Willapa and Ridgefield projects wou:d have benefited fish and wildlife, not to mention hunters and anglers:

“Both of the projects represent migration corridors and breeding ground for waterfowl, which is critical to their longterm population stability. The Willapa project would also restore the watershed, which contains two fish-bearing streams.”

Lake Co. Ranchers Win ODFW/Cattlemen’s Wildlife Stewardship Award

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Lake County ranchers Don and Diana Robinson were awarded this year’s Riley Freeman Award at the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) meeting in Bend on Dec. 6.

THE (VIA ODFW)

THE ROBINSONS. (VIA ODFW)

“The Robinsons are actively involved in protecting and enhancing habitat for fish and wildlife on their land,” said ODFW Interim Director Curt Melcher when presenting the award in Bend.

The award is given annually by ODFW and OCA in memory of Riley Freeman, a past chairman of the Oregon Cattlemen’s Wildlife Committee. While defending private property rights, Freeman also advocated for partnerships between private landowners and state and federal natural resource agencies to promote good land stewardship.

The Robinsons raise cattle on 3,000 acres near Adel, where Don’s family has ranched since the 1890s. Examples of the Robinsons promoting stewardship of fish and wildlife habitat on their property include:

  • Worked with ODFW to assess the distribution, abundance, and movements of the federally threatened Warner sucker in Twentymile Creek.
  • Worked with Lake County Watershed Council, BLM, and ODFW to replace an aging and ineffective fish ladder, and provide fish screening at the Dike Diversion so that sucker and redband trout upstream and downstream access to upper Twentymile and Twelvemile Creeks is restored.
  • Allowed ODFW Native Fish Project access to their property to assess the abundance, distribution, and seasonal movements of fish and install antennas on an irrigation canal to assess the timing and magnitude of fish movement.
  • Helped salvage redband trout that got stranded behind their Big Valley ranch head gate. Also worked with ODFW fish biologists and with the Lake County Watershed Council to improve fish passage here to prevent the need for fish salvage in the future.
  • Improved fish passage on another tributary on their property in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service.
  • Restored habitat for mule deer and other wildlife on their property through a 50-acre aspen stand enhancement project in Big Valley (2010-2011) and a 100-acre juniper removal project with the Lake County Watershed Council (2009).

“The Robinsons are exceptional people whose legacy will include a long list of actions to protect and restore fish and wildlife habitat on their lands,” said ODFW Native Fish Research Biologist Paul Scheerer. “They are truly a pleasure to work with.”

IDFG RECOVERED THE FOUR-POINT BUCK AS WELL AS SEIZED THE RIFLE USED TO ILLEGALLY SHOOT IT. (IDFG)

Hunters’ Tip Leads To Fines, Jail Time For Boise-area Buck Poachers

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME

Convicted of poaching a mule deer buck this fall, a father/son duo from Kuna now face heavy fines and must serve jail time for their respective roles in the incident which occurred near Danskin Peak north of Mountain Home. A tip from hunters who witnessed the poaching incident brought the case to a successful conclusion.

IDFG RECOVERED THE FOUR-POINT BUCK AS WELL AS SEIZED THE RIFLE USED TO ILLEGALLY SHOOT IT. (IDFG)

IDFG RECOVERED THE FOUR-POINT BUCK AS WELL AS SEIZED THE RIFLE USED TO ILLEGALLY SHOOT IT. (GREG MILNER, IDFG)

Appearing before Magistrate Judge George Hicks on December 3, David Howell (53) of Kuna, and his son Adam (29) also from Kuna, were ordered to pay fines and civil penalties totaling more than $1,400. David Howell received a 10-year hunting license revocation, two years of probation and surrendered a Ruger M77 rifle used to commit the poaching crime. He also received 180 days in jail (165 suspended), and was ordered to serve five days in jail immediately. For the next two years, he will return to jail for the first five days of October to complete his jail sentence. It is no coincidence that early October signifies the beginning of Idaho’s big game hunting season.

In addition to his fines and penalties, Adam Howell received a three-year hunting license revocation, 90 days in jail (88 suspended) and two years of probation.

On November 17th, two hunters participating in the Unit 39 archery-only season watched two men use a rifle to poach a mule deer, then load the animal in their vehicle. The hunters called Fish and Game staff, and Mountain Home conservation officer Greg Milner, together with Nampa conservation officer Brian Marek responded. Milner soon contacted the witnesses who showed him photos of the vehicle, the suspects with the deer and the vehicle license plate. The witnesses also confirmed that the suspects were still in the area.

A short time later, Milner contacted the suspects. “They knew they were caught red-handed, and neither one made much of an attempt to lie about the situation,” Milner noted. The pair told Milner that they went out that morning intent on shooting a mule deer with a rifle, knowing full well that only the bow season was open. “This poaching incident was 100 percent intentional,” Milner added.

This case demonstrates the importance of public involvement in the protection of Idaho’s wildlife. “Simply stated, without critical, timely information provided by local citizens, this case might never have come to a successful conclusion,” Milner commented.

Persons with information regarding a possible wildlife violation are encouraged to call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline at 1-800-632-5999 twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

WHITEFISH AND GILLNETS SEIZED DURING UNDERCOVER GAME WARDEN OPERATIONS AT THE NORTH END OF BANKS LAKE. (WDFW)

December Brings Back Banks Gillnetters

Like clockwork, illicit gillnetters have returned to Banks Lake.

Last December saw four Westside men, all sporting Eastern European surnames, captured there, and later found guilty of illegally gillnetting 194 whitefish and other crimes. Their getaway driver, who nearly ran down a game warden, was sentenced to three months in prison.

The local prosecutor, Grant County’s Angus Lee, had hoped that would send a message that the activity wouldn’t be tolerated.

Sadly, it appears to have fallen on deaf ears.

Here’s the report on the latest incident from WDFW Law Enforcement:

WDFW Police Detachment 16 who patrol Douglas, Grant and Adams Counties focused on Banks Lake for the “annual” whitefish netting and snagging season. The fish are nearing the peak of the spawn and gathering in large numbers along the rocky shorelines.

Patrols were conducted in two-man teams throughout the night and into the early morning hours utilizing covert surveillance techniques to observe numerous shore fishermen and boats at the north feeder canal. One individual using a gill net was apprehended by officers.

WHITEFISH AND GILLNETS SEIZED DURING UNDERCOVER GAME WARDEN OPERATIONS AT THE NORTH END OF BANKS LAKE. (WDFW)

WHITEFISH AND GILLNETS SEIZED DURING UNDERCOVER GAME WARDEN OPERATIONS AT BANKS LAKE. (WDFW)

On Sunday night/Monday morning (12/8), Sergeant Jewell along with Officers Smith, Busching, Steffler, and Varyvoda, focused their attention on Banks Lake near Coulee City. Officer Smith observed three men fishing with gill nets from the rock face along Dry Falls Dam. Their van was hidden in the sagebrush nearby and the men were fishing in an area where it would have been impossible to apprehend them safely while also preventing them from destroying evidence. Officer Smith stayed hidden in the rocks above them for several hours, relaying their activity to other Officers until they finally gathered up all of their fish and nets to leave. As they returned to their vehicle, Officers swept in and took all three into custody as they attempted to flee on foot. Officer Varyvoda did an outstanding job conversing with the suspects in Ukrainian and Russian to obtain statements.

A total of seven gill nets were seized which were used to harvest 376 whitefish and one trout. All three men were booked into the Grant County Jail on multiple charges. The fish were donated to charity.

BRAD SCHOENBORN WITH THE NORTHWEST SPORTFISHIING INDUSTRY'S LIZ HAMILTON. (NSIA)

NSIA Honors Brad Schoenborn With Buzz Ramsey Foot Soldier Award

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE NORTHWEST SPORTFISHING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

Industry leaders honored one of their own at the 16th Annual Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association Banquet held Saturday, December 6.

NSIA Executive Director Liz Hamilton presented Brad Schoenborn with the Buzz Ramsey Foot Soldier Award for his continued support of NSIA.

BRAD SCHOENBORN WITH THE NORTHWEST SPORTFISHIING INDUSTRY'S LIZ HAMILTON. (NSIA)

BRAD SCHOENBORN WITH THE NORTHWEST SPORTFISHIING INDUSTRY’S LIZ HAMILTON. (NSIA)

Brad is owner of Brad’s Lures and buyer for Bob’s Sporting Goods in Longview, WA. and on top of that, is a committed leader of the NSIA. Brad doesn’t stop at supporting NSIA financially, but he shows up to testify at every significant hearing and works tirelessly to elect sportfishing champions.

When Brad was named, there was a standing ovation and an overwhelming sense of respect for such a dedicated man. “It came as a complete surprise,” Brad said at the end of the night, accompanied by his son Austin.

Nearly 225 business owners attended the event, which was held at the Portland Sheraton Airport Hotel. Title sponsors for the event were Pro-Cure and Cabela’s.

The night consisted of two silent auctions, raffle, games, dinner and a live auction. NSIA’s Oregon Banquet is a major fundraiser for the organization, and creates a fun environment for industry leaders to get together and celebrate the year’s fishing. Also, in attendance was Congressman Kurt Schrader and Representative Bill Kennemer.

“NSIA’s Annual Oregon banquet was an incredible celebration of N.W. Sportfishing and the litany of accomplishments we’ve enjoyed over the years,” said Trey Carskadon of BDC Advertising. “It was wonderful seeing the industry so well-represented and so many of our partner organizations in attendance…it was a night to be remembered!”

Proceeds from the event benefit The Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association which was founded in 1993 by a group of sport fishing industry business leaders who understood the need for a strong voice in the local, state, regional and federal governments. The NSIA is dedicated to the preservation, restoration and improvement of sport fisheries and the businesses dependent upon them.