Category Archives: Headlines

Westport Salmon Fishing Reports (8-18-14)

Editor’s note: We’ve got a pair o’ salmon fishing reports for Westport anglers, the first from the Westport Charterboat Association on the summerlong Chinook derby, the second from SaltPatrol

by Bob Codiga, Westport Charterboat Association

One of the many beautiful chinook caught during the past week netted angler Richard “Wink” Winkelman of Olympia a daily derby prize of $500.  Fishing Saturday with Captain Kevin Vasereno on the Charterboat Gold Rush “Wink” managed to haul in this 27 pound 15 ounce chinook winning the derby prize with ease.

(WESTPORT CHARTERBOAT ASSOCIATION)

(WESTPORT CHARTERBOAT ASSOCIATION)

There are a lot of these chinook to be caught before the salmon season ends at the end of September.  Effective Monday, August 18 the daily limit will change to the point that you may retain two chinook as your daily limit or one plus a coho (hatchery) or two coho.

Our current monthly chinook leader is still Mindee Rawson of Bonney Lake with a chinook weighing 29 pounds 13 ounces and our coho leader is Paul Koehl of Seattle at 10 pounds 10 ounces.  The current tuna leader is Ted Schultz of Palo Cedro, California at 34 pounds 6 ounces and on the ling cod front Jeremy Hageness of Libby, Montana remains on top with a ling weighing 42 pounds.

by John Keizer, SaltPatrol.com

Fished Westport this past weekend with Jerry Henderson and Roger Chapman. Saturday the ocean was like a mill pond, a little AM thick fog but a great day. We fished north up by Ocean Shores in 40ft of water. We had all but one salmon in the box by 8 AM and ran out and did some bottom fishing. Took a few limits of sea bass and ling cod. We ran back up on the beach and fish for our last king. They were there, we hooked up two and but both came unhooked. We then landed a nice hatchery coho and ended the day.

JERRY HENDERSON WITH A NICE OCEAN CHINOOK. STARTING MONDAY, AUG. 18, THE LIMIT IS UP TO TWO KINGS A DAY. (SALT PATROL)

JERRY HENDERSON WITH A NICE OCEAN CHINOOK. STARTING MONDAY, AUG. 18, THE LIMIT IS UP TO TWO KINGS A DAY. (SALT PATROL)

The charters have been running south off the Willapa in 300ft of water about 27 miles down and having good success.

Sunday weather changed and we had a little lump and wind chop with thick fog. Fished the same area and took a couple of kings and some coho. You really had to fish the little pockets of bait and stay on them to hookup on any salmon. The Lowrance Structure Scan set on 50ft Side Scan help a lot locating the bait. Still a great fishing day.

Most of our action was on a whole herring behind a Fish Flash. The herring were brined in Pro-Cure Brine N Bite Complete in green. The other setup was a green Silver Horde Gold Star squid behind a flasher. The squid was scented with Pro-Cure Bloody Tuna Jell scent.

(JOHN KEIZER, SALT PATROL)

(JOHN KEIZER, SALT PATROL)

For you tuna guys lots of great tuna action happening the fish are starting to move in closer in again.

WESTPORT JOINS LA PUSH AND NEAH BAY AS OPEN FOR TWO KINGS A DAY STARTING AUG. 18. DAVE ANDERSON'S BOAT PICKED UP THIS BRACE LAST SEASON. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

Two-king Limits Off Westport Start Aug. 18!

THE FOLLOWING IS A TERRIFIC PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Starting Monday, Aug. 18, anglers fishing in ocean waters off Westport can keep up to two chinook salmon as part of their two-salmon daily limit.

With that change, anglers will be allowed to keep two chinook per day in ocean waters off Westport (Marine Area 2), La Push (Marine Area 3) and Neah Bay (Marine Area 4).

WESTPORT JOINS LA PUSH AND NEAH BAY AS OPEN FOR TWO KINGS A DAY STARTING AUG. 18. DAVE ANDERSON'S BOAT PICKED UP THIS BRACE LAST SEASON. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

WESTPORT JOINS LA PUSH AND NEAH BAY AS OPEN FOR TWO KINGS A DAY STARTING AUG. 18. DAVE ANDERSON’S BOAT PICKED UP THIS BRACE OUT OF THE WASHINGTON COAST HARBOR LAST SEASON. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

Those fishing Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) will continue to be limited to one chinook as part of their two-salmon daily limit.

All ocean areas are open to salmon fishing seven days per week. Wild coho must be released in all four areas.

Ron Warren, fisheries policy lead for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), said the previous daily limit of one chinook off Westport was designed to ensure the fishery would remain open the entire season.

“We’ve kept a close eye on the pace of catch in the area,” Warren said. “With sufficient quota remaining, we want to maximize the recreational fishing opportunity through the rest of the season.”

Ocean salmon fisheries are scheduled to continue through Sept. 30 in marine areas 1 and 2 and through Sept. 21 in marine areas 3 and 4. However, a portion of Marine Area 3 will reopen Sept. 27 through Oct. 12.

Fishery managers will continue to monitor the ocean salmon fishery throughout the season and will announce any other changes on WDFW’s website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/rules_all_saltwater.j .

Additional information on the ocean fishery, including minimum size limits and catch guidelines, is available in the Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ .

MATT BAUDER OF CANBY (LEFT) RECEIVES A NEW SAVAGE .17 HMR RIFLE FROM MATT KEENAN, ODFW ACCESS AND HABITAT PROGRAM COORDINATOR, AT THE GUN BROKER IN CLACKAMAS THE RIFLE WAS THE PRIZE IN A DRAWING FROM COMPLETED HUNTER SURVEYS SPONSORED BY THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION REDMOND CHAPTER. (ODFW)

Oregon Hunter Scores Brand-new Varmint Rifle For Just Filling Out A Form

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

It pays to be a conscientious hunter.

Matt Bauder can attest to that. He was awarded a brand new Savage .17 HMR rifle for completing a permit designed to help ODFW better manage private hunting lands.

MATT BAUDER OF CANBY (LEFT) RECEIVES A NEW SAVAGE .17 HMR RIFLE FROM MATT KEENAN, ODFW ACCESS AND HABITAT PROGRAM COORDINATOR, AT THE GUN BROKER IN CLACKAMAS THE RIFLE WAS THE PRIZE IN A DRAWING FROM COMPLETED HUNTER SURVEYS SPONSORED BY THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION REDMOND CHAPTER. (ODFW)

MATT BAUDER OF CANBY (LEFT) RECEIVES A NEW SAVAGE .17 HMR RIFLE FROM MATT KEENAN, ODFW ACCESS AND HABITAT PROGRAM COORDINATOR, AT THE GUN BROKER IN CLACKAMAS THE RIFLE WAS THE PRIZE IN A DRAWING FROM COMPLETED HUNTER SURVEYS SPONSORED BY THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION REDMOND CHAPTER. (ODFW)

Bauder’s name was drawn from a pool of hunters who filled out daily use permits last year at ODFW’s Access and Habitat areas. The rifle was purchased by the Oregon Hunters Association Redmond Chapter and offered as an incentive for hunters to complete the permits when they hunt on private A and H program lands.

Access and Habitat areas are private lands open to hunting through an agreement between ODFW and the landowners. The A and H Program is interested in knowing which properties hunters use and like the most. A and H pays landowners for hunter access, either in cash or by providing wildlife habitat improvements on site. The program also funds law enforcement projects on industrial timberlands open to public hunting.

“Daily use permits are a good tool for helping us decide where to invest in access,” said Matt Keenan, ODFW’s Access and Habitat Program Coordinator.

ODFW now places self-serve permit stations at the entrances to private lands enrolled in the Access and Habitat Program to estimate hunter use and satisfaction. Bauder hunted at the Lost Valley Ranch near Fossil and filled out one of the A and H permits when he and his buddies were hunting. Bauder gave the area high marks, even though he didn’t bag an elk.

The A and H program was established in 1993 by the Oregon Legislature, and is funded primarily by a $4 surcharge on all hunting licenses and the sale of deer and elk auction and raffle tags. It currently operates on an annual budget of about $1.25 million, which is used to maintain public access to approximately 5 million acres of private land each year.

For more information about the Access and Habitat program and hunter access to private lands, visit the program website at www.AccessAndHabitatHunts.com

Chance To Comment On WDFW Hunt Proposals Next Week, Beyond

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is seeking comments on proposed alternatives for 2015-17 hunting seasons, and has scheduled several meetings this month to discuss the proposals with the public.

The alternatives will be posted by Aug. 18 on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulations/seasonsetting/, where people can also provide comments. The Game Management Plan and scoping criteria for the 2015-17 season-setting process is available on the website as well.

WDFW is accepting comments on the alternatives through Sept. 20.

The department has also scheduled a series of public meetings in August to discuss the alternatives. The meetings will run from 7-9 p.m. and are scheduled for:

·         Aug. 19 – Spokane: Centerplace Regional Events Center, 2426 N Discovery Place, Spokane Valley, Great Room.
·         Aug. 20 – Moses Lake: Big Bend Community College ATEC Building, 7611 Bolling St. NE, Moses Lake, Masto Conference Center.
·         Aug. 21 – Ellensburg: CWU Campus 400 E University Way, Ellensburg, Wellington’s Event Center.
·         Aug. 26 – Everett: Holiday Inn Downtown, 3105 Pine St., Everett, Everett Ball Room 2.
·         Aug. 27 – Tacoma: Pacific Grill Event Center, 1530 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, Chinook/Klickitat Conference Room.
·         Aug. 28 – Vancouver: Heathman Lodge, 7801 NE Greenwood Dr., Vancouver, Pacific Ballroom

Issues currently under consideration by the department for upcoming seasons include:

·         Setting spring and fall black bear seasons.
·         Early archery elk seasons.
·         Modern firearm mule deer seasons.
·         Hunting equipment, including non-toxic ammunition, expandable broadheads and crossbows.
·         Special permit drawings.
·         Baiting big game.

Dave Ware, WDFW game program manager, said comments received from the public will be used to develop specific recommendations for 2015-17 hunting seasons, which will be available for further review in January.

Final recommendations will be presented to the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission for adoption next spring.

Fishing Pier Going To Pot — For A Weekend Anyway

Seattle pier anglers’ buzz was harshed today.

OK, maybe not, but WDFW did announce that its popular Pier 86 will be closed this weekend as something like 85,000 Hempfest goers descend on town.

The pier is just north of the grain terminals on the waterfront. While Elliott Bay is closed to salmon fishing now, it and the Seacrest Pier remain open for kings and coho.

WDFW’s Russell Link explained in a press release that the Aug. 15-17 closure is on the recommendation of Hempfest’s producer “who expressed concerns about public safety and the possibility of litter blowing into Puget Sound if the pier remained open.”

The pier will re-emerge from the haze and open for fishing at 9 a.m. this Monday.

How To Tell Wild Chinook At Buoy 10 Apart

In hopes of getting more of the ESA-listed Chinook on the spawning grounds, NSIA is encouraging anglers who fish the big Buoy 10 Salmon Challenge in two Fridays to familiarize themselves with wild tules.

But it’s also an instructive lesson for the rest of the horde that will descend on the Lower Columbia in the coming weeks of August.

“While it may be impossible to be 100 percent accurate with visual identification, we know that every single lower river tule we protect is valuable,” says the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association in an email this afternoon.

The Portland-based fish- and fishing-advocacy group created a poster and last year held a clinic to help anglers better see the differences between the Chinook stocks mixing in the Columbia’s estuary this time of year.

(NSIA)

(NSIA)

Besides tules, which return to rivers such as the Lewis and constrain the Buoy 10 and Lower Columbia fisheries, upriver brights headed for the Hanford Reach and Snake, and Rogue brights returning to off-mainstem commercial fisheries are in attendance at Buoy 10 through the month.

While the Rogue fish are missing their left ventral and sometimes their adipose fins, and other hatchery tule and bright stocks are ad clipped, wild brights and tules have all their fins.

But there are differences to look for, such as a bronzy tinge, larger, more developed teeth, a “sharper” back, and a pinkish hue to the dorsal fin in tules.

Brights will be, well, just brighter, more silvery salmon with rounded backs and less-developed teeth.

Another way to tell, though one that only works after bonking, is to look at the egg sac. WDFW’s Ron Roler says that a tule’s eggs will be larger and more developed while a bright’s will be small and undeveloped.

While it’s legal to keep any wild Chinook you reel in at Buoy 10 (daily limit one hatchery or wild) and would be really hard to let a nice big hawg go — especially for those coming from some distance — knowing the difference and releasing tules may help their recovery and one day lead to less strict fishing regulations here.

Those become less restrictive above the mouth of the Lewis, where two adult Chinook can be kept, and even less so above the Washougal where three may be.

Rayonier Opens Up 175,000 Acres — For A Fee

As Rayonier sues a county that’s striking back at the timber industry’s growing fee-entry recreational access, the company today announced it will also charge hunters and others $65 to get onto 175,000 acres in Southwest Washington.

Branded as “low cost,” a permit will allow you and one other person under 18 access onto red- or green-dotted lands in Grays Harbor, Jefferson, Clallam, Pacific and Wahkiakum Counties between Aug. 1 and Dec. 31.

Previously, Rayonier offered leases in this part of the state, but the move follows Weyerhaeuser’s decision to charge for access to many of its Northwest tree farms. Those permits run from $75 for general access to parts of the Aberdeen for the season to a whopping $550 a month to get onto the Molalla.

“We value our partnerships with local hunters, who have been great stewards of our properties throughout Washington State,” said Bill Monahan, a Rayonier official, in a press release.

A WDFW honcho said they’d heard the longtime Washington outfit to do something like this.

Grays Harbor County had recently passed an ordinance barring tax breaks for companies charging for recreational access, but that is being challenged by the Washington Forest Products Association, of which Rayonier is a member.

(ODFW)

How To Hunt Ed Coming To Oregon

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Are you new to hunting or out of practice? Let ODFW help show you how to enjoy this sport before fall hunting seasons kick off later this year. Register for one of our upcoming August and September hunting workshops now.

“Most people are taught to hunt by parents or other family members. But if you didn’t grow up in a hunting family, it can be hard to know how to get started,” said Mark Newell, ODFW outdoor skills coordinator. “ODFW’s workshops can fill the gap. We teach people of all ages how to hunt and fish.

“We have found that some women prefer to learn among other women, some people want to bring their families and others just want to hunt with other adults,” continued Newell. “That’s why we have three different types of workshops – Family, Women’s or Adult.”

(ODFW)

(ODFW)

ODFW provides all the gear and equipment needed at these workshops including bows, arrows, firearms, shells, eye and ear protection, and hunter orange clothing. Safety is emphasized and each class begins with a safety talk.

Pre-registration is required for all workshops. Visit ODFW’s license sales page to register.

For workshops that include an actual hunt, participants also need to purchase a hunting license, upland game bird validation and HIP validation before the class. (Resident prices are $29.50 for an annual hunting license, $8.50 for an upland game bird validation and HIP is free.) These items can be purchased online or at a license sales agent.

For more information, see the links below or contact Janice Copple, tel. 503-947-6019 or Mark Newell at (503) 947-6018. To see other fishing, hunting and outdoor skills workshops, visit ODFW’s Event Calendar.

Gervais (Mid-Valley Clays), Aug. 23 – Family Turkey Hunting Workshop.

Learn the tricks, tips, and strategies you need to know to become a successful turkey hunter. Experiment with a variety of calls and learn turkey identification, behavior, scouting techniques, and how to locate turkeys in the woods. Learn how to pattern your shotgun, establish effective ranges and shoot accurately in a hands-on session. Cost:  $25.00/Adult, $10.00/Youth, minimum age 9 years old.

Dallas (Luckiamute Valley Pheasants), Aug. 30-31, Family Fish, Hunt, Explore Workshop  

Bring your family and enjoy two days of muzzleloading, archery, fly fishing, trap shooting and a pheasant hunt. All participants will receive a safety briefing and practice trap shooting Saturday morning. Saturday afternoon, one group will pheasant hunt with a volunteer hunting guide and hunting dogs while the other tries archery, muzzleloading, and fly-fishing; the groups switch for the Sunday morning session. Event co-hosted by Owen Denny Chapter of Pheasants Forever, and the private game preserve Luckiamute Valley Pheasants. Cost: $62.00 per adult and $22.00 per youth (ages 9- 17). Participants need hunting license, upland game bird validation and HIP.

Eugene (Fern Ridge Wildlife Area), Friday, Sept. 5, Women’s Pheasant Hunting Workshop

Half-day session of shotgun skills training followed by afternoon pheasant hunt with a guide and hunting dog. Cost: $62.00, minimum age 18. Participants need hunting license, upland game bird validation and HIP.

Eugene (Fern Ridge Wildlife Area), Saturday, Sept. 6, Adult Pheasant Hunting Workshop.

Half-day session of shotgun skills training followed by afternoon pheasant hunt with a guide and hunting dog. Cost: $62.00, minimum age 18. Participants need hunting license, upland game bird validation and HIP.

Portland (Sauvie Island Wildlife Area), Friday, Sept. 12, Adult Pheasant Hunting Workshop

Half-day session of shotgun skills training followed by afternoon pheasant hunt with a guide and hunting dog. Cost:  $62.00, minimum age 18.  Participants need hunting license, upland game bird validation and HIP.

Portland (Sauvie Island Wildlife Area), Saturday, Sept. 13, Family Pheasant Hunting Workshop

Half-day session of shotgun skills training followed by afternoon pheasant hunt with a guide and hunting dog. Cost:  $62.00/Adult, $12.00/Youth, minimum age 9. Participants need hunting license, upland game bird validation and HIP.

Corvallis (EE Wilson Wildlife Area), Friday, Sept. 19, Women’s Pheasant Hunting Workshop

Half-day session of shotgun skills training followed by afternoon pheasant hunt with a guide and hunting dog. Cost: $62.00, minimum age 18. Participants need hunting license, upland game bird validation and HIP.

Corvallis (EE Wilson Wildlife Area), Friday, Sept. 26, Adult Pheasant Hunting Workshop

Half-day session of shotgun skills training followed by afternoon pheasant hunt with a guide and hunting dog. Cost: $62.00, minimum age 18. Participants need hunting license, upland game bird validation and HIP.

A ZOOMED-IN VIEW OF HICKMAN AND HIS PENDING RECORD. (DAVE HICKMAN)

Pair Of Sculpins Join 37.88-pd Tiger Muskie In WA Record Books

Together they weigh just one-thirtieth of David Hickman’s record tiger muskie, but a pair of sculpins caught over the last month have earned the same accolade. They are now official state-record fish.

WDFW announced the new high marks this morning:

Prickly Sculpin
Weight – 0.45 lbs
Columbia River (Rock Island Pool),  Chelan County
July 1, 2014
Caught trolling ¼ to ½ mile below Rocky Reach Dam using shrimp.
Shaylynn Bird Sullivan

Pacific Staghorn Sculpin
Weight – 0.76 lbs, Length – 11.25”, Girth – 7.16”
Tramp Harbor, King County
August 3, 2014
Caught bottom fishing using herring
Josiah Brenner (9 years old) – father is Charles Brenner

The former fish was four-hundredths of an ounce larger than the previous record, while the latter nearly tripled the old high mark of .26 pounds.

They join Hickman’s 37.88-pound tiger, caught at Curlew Lake the morning of July 26 on a small white spinnerbait.

A ZOOMED-IN VIEW OF HICKMAN AND HIS PENDING RECORD. (DAVE HICKMAN)

A ZOOMED-IN VIEW OF HICKMAN AND HIS PENDING RECORD. (DAVE HICKMAN)

That fish, which topped a 31.25-pounder from 2001, also sparked a bit of debate.

Should muskies, which are planted in small numbers at only seven lakes across the state and which can take half a decade to reach the minimum size for retention — 50 inches — be measured another, less lethal way to get into the record books?

By length, for example.

Quickly get the fish onto a measuring device while in the company of another angler, take pics, let it go.

WDFW’s tiger handler, Bruce Bolding, says he’s pitched that at the honchos, but hasn’t gotten any traction.

30-10 Chinook Weighed In Westport Derby

Mindee Rawson took advantage of some good salmon fishing out of Westport to pick up a 29-pound, 13-ounce Chinook — and the pole position in the charterboat association’s monthly derby for big king, a contest with a top prize of $1,000.

(WESTPORT CHARTERBOAT ASSOCIATION)

(WESTPORT CHARTERBOAT ASSOCIATION)

The Bonney Lake angler caught her slab while fishing with Capt. Geoff Grillo of the Advantage on Saturday.

It was estimated to weight 34 pounds before gutting and gilling.

A 30-pound, 10-ounce fish, caught in late July, is in the overall lead for the top prize of $2,500 for biggest king of the summer, but if last year’s August catches are any indication, there may be bigger ones on the way this month.

“Fishing continues to be fantastic out of Westport with a lot of nice Chinook in the range of 16 pounds and up,” reports Bob Codiga of the association.