Category Archives: Headlines

IDFG Pitches Another Fee Increase Idea, $5 Charge On Resident Adult Licenses

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission today directed Fish and Game staff to develop a proposed bill for consideration by the Idaho Legislature that would create a new $5 charge to purchase an Adult Resident annual hunting, fishing or trapping license.

Revenue from the proposed fee would be used for three purposes:

  • Provide additional money to compensate landowners for depredation damages
  • Create more resources for preventing big game depredations
  • Increase funding for more hunting and fishing access

The proposed fee would generate an estimated $2 million annually.  Here’s how the funds would be utilized:

  • $500,000 more funding to compensate for crop damages caused by wildlife up to $1.5 million annually based on available cash balance
  • $500,000 more funding to prevent crop damage from big game herds
  • $1 million to improve access to private land from willing landowners for hunting and fishing.

Fish and Game’s depredation compensation law has been in effect for nearly 30 years.  The new fee not only improves Fish and Game’s ability to compensate for, and prevent damages, it also helps the agency provide more and better hunting and fishing opportunity across the state.

The Fish and Game Commission recognizes that managing for abundant big game herds comes with responsibility to address impacts those herds cause to privately owned farms and ranches.

More information about the proposed new fee is posted on the Fish and Game website at https://idfg.idaho.gov/new-fee-proposal

The proposed new fee would be paid prior to purchasing an annual license and does not change Fish and Game’s Price Lock Revenue proposal currently under consideration.  More information about Price Lock is posted on the Fish and Game website: https://idfg.idaho.gov/pricelock

Tribal PDA Exemption Bill Swapped For Fish, Shellfish Task Force

An interesting end this afternoon at the final Senate Natural Resources and Parks meeting before the cutoff to get legislation out of policy committees in Olympia.

A bill that would have exempted certain information about tribal fishermen from Public Disclosure Act requests was, well, gillnetted and then gutted by the committee chair in favor of his amendment to set up a task force to look at related issues instead.

SEN. JOHN McCOY (RIGHT) LOOKS ON AS SEN. KIRK PEARSON GAVELS THE NATURAL RESOURCES AND PARKS COMMITTEE TO ADJOURNMENT. (TVW)

Sen. John McCoy, a Democrat who represents the Tulalip Reservation and Everett area, sponsored SB 5761, which had a public hearing on Tuesday in which representatives of many tribes supported it.

An amendment McCoy offered today would have hidden information about a tribal fisherman’s name, signature, total harvest value per species and overall value, price per pound, and tribal tax information from disclosure requests.

McCoy said it would align state law with federal law.

Tribal fish tickets were the subject of a PDA filed with WDFW late last fall by a fisheries watchdog blog, which drew a lot of attention from both sides.

But Sen. Kirk Pearson, a Republican who represents the sprawling district east and northeast of McCoy’s, had other things in mind, and it gave him another chance to effect his displeasure at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

His amendment sets up a legislative task force to review fish and shellfish enforcement, recordkeeping and public records.

It calls for two members from both parties from both chambers of the legislature, a representative from the Governor’s Office and WDFW, as well as members from the sportfishing, commercial fishing and shellfishing communities, and six representatives from the tribes.

During discussion of their competing amendments, both senators spoke to unnamed groups that “didn’t have the intestinal fortitude” to speak against the bill publicly, but Pearson took umbrage at McCoy’s suggestion he’d been swayed by their backroom arguments.

“With this, I think we can do much more for state-tribal relations,” Pearson said, “and that was my intent all along.”

It received a do-pass recommendation from a majority of the five-member committee and goes to Rules.

In other NRP business, the committee gave Senate Joint Memorial 8009, which calls on Congress to provide the National Marine Fisheries Service with “sufficient resources” to move quickly on its reviews of Puget Sound salmon and steelhead hatchery and genetic management plans, a do-pass recommendation and sent it to Rules.

Bill Could Help Enshrine Washington Fishing, Hunting Rights In Constitution

A resolution introduced in the Senate this morning would preserve Washingtonians’ right to fish and hunt, if approved by voters.

SJR 8206, sponsored by five Republicans and one Democrat (five from the Westside, one from 509), calls for a vote during the next general election to amend the state constitution to enshrine hunting, fishing and harvesting wildlife.

SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION 8206 IS COSPONSORED BY SENS. BARBARA BAILEY, JOHN BRAUN, PHIL FORTUNATO, KIRK PEARSON, MARK SCHOESLER AND DEAN TAKKO. (STATE LEGISLATURE)

It also promotes the conservation and management of wildlife and says fishing and hunting are the “preferred means” for managing critters.

The bill was referred to the Senate Natural Resources and Parks Committee, which is headed up by one of the cosponsors, Sen. Kirk Pearson.

It has until tomorrow afternoon to get out of that committee and into Rules to meet legislative deadlines for nonbudget bills.

Congressmen Call Federal Lands ‘National Treasure’ To Hold Onto

A Washington Republican and California Democrat teamed up today to introduce a resolution in the U.S. House that terms our federal lands a “national treasure that belong to all Americans and which should be maintained for future generations.”

The bill from Rep. Dave Reichert of eastern King County and Rep. Alan Lowenthal of the Los Angeles area say the public lands provide “invaluable” fish and wildlife habitat and “world-class hunting and fishing opportunities.”

REP. DAVE REICHERT.

“From Mount Rainier National Park, the Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, to the Wenatchee National Forest, our region, our state, and our country are blessed with beautiful feats of nature,” said Reichert in a press release. “As Washington residents we have enjoyed these treasures hiking with our families, taking swims in the lake, and looking out our windowsills at the beautiful landscape. It is our duty to make sure our children and grandchildren are afforded the same experiences and to support our local economies who depend on their natural beauty to attract tourists and visitors from across the globe. We must continue to protect and preserve our federal lands.”

REP. ALAN LOWENTHAL.

“Our country’s most important natural places provide many benefits to all Americans, and Congress has the responsibility to oversee the proper management of these lands for generations to come,” said Lowenthal. “This resolution signifies our continued intention to keep America’s public lands in the public domain for all to enjoy and benefit from.”

Backcountry Hunters and Anglers was buoyed by the move.

“This bipartisan effort by members of Congress sends a strong message regarding the value of U.S. public lands, the outdoor opportunities they offer and the economic power they represent. BHA looks forward to continuing to collaborate with forward-looking decision makers to assure the future of our public lands legacy – for our kids and the generations that follow,” said Land Tawney, president of the Missoula-based organization that has pushing back at land transfers.

Earlier today BHA pointed to an Oregon land board’s decision to sell off the Elliott State Forest as a “shocking reminder of how susceptible state lands are to fiduciary and political pressures – and how quickly we can lose our traditional public access when states are faced with such pressure.”

The Congressmen’s resolution comes out two weeks after Utah Republican Jason Chaffetz withdrew a bill that would have required the disposal of 180,000 acres of federal, public land in Idaho and Oregon as well as millions more acres elsewhere in the West. He dropped it after outcry from sportsmen and others.

814 Washington Spring Bear Permits Available; Aps Open Thru Feb. 28

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Hunters may now purchase and submit applications for a 2017 spring black bear hunting permit, applicable to specific areas of western and eastern Washington.

To be eligible for a permit, hunters must purchase and submit an application to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) by midnight Feb. 28.

DEVIN SCHILDT HARVESTED THIS SPRING BLACK BEAR ON A SPECIAL PERMIT HUNT NEAR MONROE IN 2013. (BROWNING PHOTO CONTEST)

A drawing will be held in mid-March for 305 permits in western Washington and 509 permits for hunts east of the Cascade Range. Permit winners will be notified no later than March 31. Applicants may also check the results of the drawing by accessing their account on the WDFW licensing website at http://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/

To apply for a permit, hunters must purchase a special permit application and a 2017 hunting license that includes bear as a species option. Hunting licenses, bear transport tags and bear permit applications may be purchased:

Special permit applications, which require a correct hunt choice number, may be submitted online at http://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/ or by calling (866) 246-9453

Hunters should be aware that private timberland owners in some hunt areas are limiting access or charging fees for access. If you cannot secure access in advance, do not apply for these hunts.

Those interested in hunting on the Kapowsin Tree Farm should contact the tree farm to determine which areas are open before submitting an application. Hunters selected for the Kapowsin Tree Farm hunt must purchase an access permit from Hancock Forest Management by calling (800) 782-1493.

Hunters selected for the Copalis hunt must obtain a Recreational Use Permit and should contact Rayonier at (855) 729-4868 during regular business hours or online at http://www.rayonierhunting.com/

More information about hunts scheduled on both sides of the state is available on page 70 of the 2016 Big Game Hunting Rules pamphlet (http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulations/).

Any legal weapon that can be used for big game seasons can be used for spring black bear hunts. Bait or hounds are not allowed in these hunts.

Editor’s note: A previous headline stated that spring bear hunt permit applications were available through February 128. 

From Army Base To Wildlife Area: History of ODFW’s EE Wilson WA On Display

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Before it was a wildlife area, EE Wilson near Corvallis was Camp Adair, a U.S. Army training base, hospital and Prisoner of War Camp during World War II. Help ODFW conserve its history by joining us at a public meeting on Wednesday, March 1 from 6-8 p.m. at the Siuslaw National Forest Headquarters, Room 20, 3200 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis.

DURING WORLD WAR II, SOLDIERS WHO TRAINED AT CAMP ADAIR WENT TO FIGHT ON OKINAWA, IN ITALY AND THE WESTERN FRONT. (BENTON COUNTY MUSEUM)

Veterans, local residents and others are encouraged to attend the meeting and bring their photos and stories of Camp Adair. Volunteers will be on hand to digitize historic documents related to the base. Ideas on how to preserve the memory of Camp Adair at EE Wilson Wildlife Area are also welcome.

About Camp Adair

In 1942 the United States Army purchased the small town of Wells, just north of Corvallis, and 50,000 acres of surrounding farmland for a new training base. In just six months 1,800 buildings were constructed on the newly christened Camp Adair. During its short history over 100,000 soldiers lived and trained there. They went on to fight in the European, Italian, and Okinawa campaigns. After the last divisions left for combat, Adair continued in use as a hospital and a Prisoner Of War camp for the duration of World War II.

A SIGN MEMORIALIZED THE CAMPAIGNS OF UNITS THAT TRAINED AT CAMP ADAIR, TODAY’S EE WILSON WILDLIFE AREA. (BENTON COUNTY MUSEUM)

When the base was decommissioned in 1946, most of the land was sold back to former owners, returning veterans, and other private parties. Base buildings were auctioned off and moved whole or salvaged for lumber. A portion of the former base cantonment, too disturbed from roads and buildings to return to agricultural use, was deeded to the Oregon State Game Commission (now ODFW) for the “conservation of wildlife, other than migratory birds.” The EE Wilson Wildlife Area opened in 1950.

Today, EE Wilson serves as a sanctuary for local wildlife, “outdoor school” for many local schools and universities, and recreational area for fishing, hunting, hiking, and wildlife photography. The Camp Adair memorial garden, pheasant pens, bass pond, and a new archery range provide opportunities to interact with both the natural environment and history of Camp Adair. Major annual events at EE Wilson include a pheasant hunt in October, Youth Outdoor Day in June, and archery, shooting, and hunting trainings throughout the year.

Elk Hoof Rot Bill Tweaked; Would Put WSU In Study Lead, Strikes Open Season On Limpers

An open season on limping elk was taken out of a Senate bill, while wording that would put Washington State University in charge of studying why the state’s wapiti are being stricken with hoof rot and what to do about it was added.

A substitute version of SB 5474 with those elements was given a do-pass recommendation from Sen. Kirk Pearson, the bill’s sponsor, and his Natural Resources and Natural Parks Committee today.

AN ELK’S HOOF AFFECTED BY THE CONDITION. (WDFW)

The bill originally would have allowed licensed hunters as well as required WDFW employees to shoot any limpers they saw to keep the problem from spreading out of Southwest Washington.

But during a public hearing last week sportsmen and others voiced concern that that would effectively turn every big bull into a target.

“All they have to say is when they killed this elk, it was limping,” Anis Aoude, WDFW’s Game Division Manager said.

Pearson has been unhappy with the agency’s management of elk and has sponsored several bills during recent sessions towards that displeasure.

“I think it’s a very serious issue or I wouldn’t bring it in front of this committee,” he said last week of HB 5474.

The substitute bill was tweaked to allow WDFW to translocate elk from infection areas only for monitoring or management. Before it had a blanket ban.

And it “designates” WSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine as the “state lead” in studying the problem, implementing a monitoring program and reporting to the legislature.

The bill was referred to Senate Ways and Means.

In other Natural Resources and Parks business, the committee held a public hearing on SB 5761, which would exempt certain details of tribal fish catches from being disclosed by WDFW, including the fisherman’s name, address, harvest weight and value, and tax info.

Sponsor Sen. John McCoy, a member of the Tulalip Tribes, said that fisheries comanagement doesn’t require disclosure of “private information” about the treaty fisherman.

The bill was supported by representatives of numerous tribes, including Squaxin Island Tribe, Muckleshoot Tribe, Puyallup Tribe, Stillaguamish Tribe, as well as the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.

A representative of the Allied Daily Newspapers and Washington Newspaper Publishers Association signed in as “other” and pointed to a substitute bill that the organizations were more comfortable with and would shield information that “isn’t needed for management or transparency.”

And the committee heard Senate Joint Memorial 8009, which calls on Congress to provide the National Marine Fisheries Service with “sufficient resources” to move quickly on its reviews of Puget Sound salmon and steelhead hatchery and genetic management plans.

According to Senate staffers, of 51 HGMPs submitted to NMFS for review, 17 have been approved.

The bill is sponsored by Sen. Maralyn Chase who recognized that salmon harvest provides a $1 billion impact to the state’s economy through recreational, commercial and treaty harvest.

“I intend to move this forward in the next several days,” said Pearson.

Columbia, SW WA Fishing Report (2-14-17)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ORIGINATED WITH ODFW AND WDFW AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

Salmonid catch and effort is slow but should gradually improve as the salmon migrate into the Columbia.

Gorge Bank: No report.

Gorge Boats: No report.

Troutdale Boats: No report.

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekly checking showed no catch for 21 bank anglers.

Portland to Westport Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for seven boats (16 anglers).

Estuary Bank (Clatsop Spit to Wauna Powerlines): No report.

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Wauna Powerlines): No report.

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): No report.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam):  Weekly checking showed no catch for four bank anglers; and two steelhead kept, plus four steelhead released for two boats (three anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam):  Weekly checking showed one steelhead released for two boats (four anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. No report.

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for one bank angler; and two legal and 52 sublegal sturgeon released for six boats (13 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam):  Weekly checking showed two sublegal sturgeon released for two bank anglers; and nine sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for two boats (five anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam):  Weekly checking showed no catch for four bank anglers; and no catch for two boats (three anglers).

WALLEYE

The Dalles Pool:  Weekly checking showed four walleye kept for two bank anglers; and no catch for two boats (five anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 11 walleye kept for seven boats (15 anglers).

JASMINE RODRIGUEZ WRESTLED THIS WALLEYE OUT OF THE COLUMBIA’S HANFORD REACH LAST MONTH WHILE FISHING WITH GUIDE GERARDO REYES. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

……………………………………………………………

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – 2 boat anglers had no catch.  24 bank anglers kept 1 steelhead.

Last week Tacoma Power employees recovered 64 coho adults, two jacks, five winter-run steelhead and two cutthroat trout in five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released four coho adults and one winter-run steelhead into Lake Scanewa behind Cowlitz Falls Dam.

Twenty-two coho adults, one cutthroat trout and one winter-run steelhead were released on the Cispus River at Yellow Jacket Creek.

Last week, Tacoma employees released 38 coho adults, two coho jacks, one cutthroat trout and one winter-run steelhead adult into the Tilton River located at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 7,910 cubic feet per second on Monday, February 13. Visibility is at five feet and water temperature 40.3 degrees F.

Lower Columbia mainstem from the I-5 Bridge downstream – A couple hardy anglers in the Woodland area had no catch.  Still only a dozen bank anglers on each side of the river and a half dozen boats on the river last Saturday.

Bonneville Dam upstream to McNary Dam – The few bank anglers sampled in The Dalles and John Day pools had no catch.

Sturgeon

Bonneville Pool – A few legals were released by boat anglers.

The Dalles Pool – Bank anglers caught some legals.  Through January, an estimated 11 (11%) of the 100 fish guideline had been taken.

John Day Pool – Slow for legal size fish.  An estimated 7 (6.7%) of the 105 fish guideline had been taken through January.

Walleye and Bass

Bonneville Dam upstream to McNary Dam – Boat anglers in The Dalles and John Day pools averaged nearly a walleye kept/released per rod.  No effort was observed for bass.

Trout

Recent plants of catchable size and brood stock rainbows averaging 5 pounds each into SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish per pound
Hatchery
Notes

* BATTLE GROUND LK (CLAR)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=BATTLE%20GROUND%20LK%20(CLAR)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Feb 07, 2017
Rainbow
2,960
2
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

Feb 02, 2017
Rainbow
75
0.2
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

* KLINELINE PD (CLAR)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=KLINELINE%20PD%20(CLAR)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Feb 07, 2017
Rainbow
1,500
2.3
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

Smelt

Commercial catches improved yesterday but still below the 150 pounds per delivery minimum goal.  Lots of sea lions reported on the docks at the Port of Rainier.    Stay tuned.

Series Of Safety, Mechanical Workshops Coming Up For Boaters

Washington Sea Grant is holding a series of upcoming workshops that may be of interest to Puget Sound anglers. Here are more details:

(Photo courtesy of Washington Sea Grant, 2016)

Learn First Aid for the Sea in Port Townsend, WA

Be safe on the water.

Washington Sea Grant, WSU Jefferson County Extension, and the Northwest Maritime Center are co-sponsoring a Coast Guard-approved First Aid at Sea course on Thursday, March 2, 2017 in Port Townsend.

Topics covered include CPR, patient assessment, hypothermia, cold water, near drowning, shock, trauma, burns, fractures, choking, immobilization, and essentials for first aid kits.

WHEN:     

Thursday, March 2, 2017
8 a.m. 5 p.m.

WHERE:     

NW Maritime Center
431 Water Street
Port Townsend, WA

FEE:       $100 ($50 for commercial fishermen)

To register, contact Sarah Fisken at Washington Sea Grant, 206-543-1225 or 360-379-5610, ext. 204 or sfisken@uw.edu.

DEADLINE TO REGISTER:

February 28

Diesel Engine Troubleshooting and Maintenance

Learn techniques to prevent common problems.

Port Townsend – Washington Sea Grant and WSU Jefferson County Extension are cosponsoring a Diesel Engine Troubleshooting and Maintenance workshop for commercial fishermen and recreational boaters on March 18, Walt Trisdale’s Shop, 81 Workman St. #7 in Port Townsend.

This course covers troubleshooting and maintenance of fuel, lubrication, electrical, cooling, and exhaust systems in marine diesel engines.

WHEN: 

Saturday, March 18, 2017
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

WHERE:

Walt Trisdale’s Shop
81 Workman St. #7 (building with big red “7” on the building)
Port Townsend, WA

FEE:             $60

To register or for more information, contact Sarah Fisken, Washington Sea Grant, 206-543-1225 or sfisken@u.washington.edu

DEADLINE TO REGISTER:

March 10

Marine Corrosion Protection Workshop

Learn techniques to prevent common corrosive problems on your vessel.

Port Hadlock – Washington Sea Grant, WSU Jefferson County Extension and the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding are cosponsoring a Marine Corrosion Protection Workshop on March 19, 2017. This is a hands-on class for marine professionals and boat owners (both commercial and recreational).

Topics covered include:

Galvanic corrosion of aluminum, steel and bronze; crevice corrosion of stainless steel; poultice corrosion of aluminum; corrosion-potential testing; potential monitoring systems for aluminum and bronze; advantages and disadvantages of different types of anodes; analysis of wood damage from too much zinc; controlled potential systems for wood boats; coatings for propellers and prop shafts; test methods for detecting AC / DC stray current and more. The workshop is taught by Kevin Ritz, a certified instructor in electrical, corrosion and systems

WHEN: 

Sunday, March 19, 2017
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

WHERE:           

Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding
42 N. Water Street (across from the Ajax Café)
Port Hadlock, WA

FEE:             $60

To register or for more information, contact Sarah Fisken, Washington Sea Grant, 206-543-1225 or sfisken@u.washington.edu

DEADLINE TO REGISTER:

March 10

Marine Weather Workshop for the Northwest Boater

Learn how to read the weather before you go.

Anacortes, WA – Washington Sea Grant and the Port of Anacortes are cosponsoring a Marine Weather Workshop. Topics covered include:

  • Relationships of atmospheric pressure and wind
  • Determining the path and speed of squalls
  • Strong wind systems in the Northwest and offshore and how to avoid them
  • Key features of low pressure systems
  • 500mb wind patterns and how they can help you find “weather windows” for safe passages
  • Pressure gradients and how they affect wind in Washington waters
  • Computer models: How do they work and what can they give you?
  • Ways to get NWS and associated weather, forecast and  model data on your  computer

WHEN:   

Thursday, March 30 2017
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

WHERE:   

Seafarer’s Memorial Park Building
601 Seafarer Way
Anacortes, WA 98221

FEE:    $60

For more information and to preregister contact Sarah Fisken  206-543-1225

sfisken@u.washington.edu

DEADLINE TO REGISTER:

March 23

ODFW Hosting Advisory Committee Meeting Tuesday On Columbia Reforms

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will host a Columbia River Fisheries Reform Rules Advisory Committee meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017 from 3 to 5 p.m. to consider new staff recommendations designed to ensure orderly fisheries with Washington. Rules  that the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission may consider for rule-making at their March 17 meeting in Corvallis.

The Committee will be comprised of invited representatives from interested groups potentially effected by new rules, such as sport and commercial fishers, fish processors and fish conservation. This rules advisory committee meeting is intended to provide recommendations to the Department regarding potential rulemaking related to Columbia River Fisheries reform. The Commission may adopt rules after consideration of additional information and/or further analysis that has occurred since Jan. 20, 2017, to address, among other considerations, whether modifications to existing rules are necessary to “[p]romote orderly fishery management with the State of Washington.” See ORS 508.980(1)(d). This rules advisory committee will meet to provide the Department its recommendations on (1) the text of potential rule(s) and (2) the fiscal impact of potential rule(s) in terms of (a) whether there will be a fiscal impact; (b) extent of it; and (c) how to reduce that impact on small businesses, if any, in a manner consistent with the public health and safety purpose of the rule(s).

The public is invited to listen/watch the meeting, but there will not be an opportunity for public comment.

To watch or listen in, members of the public may:

  • attend the meeting, which will be held in the Commission Room at ODFW headquarters, 4034 Fairview Industrial Dr. SE in Salem,
  • call to listen in, (866) 590-5055, Participant code: 485123
  • watch a live stream via Periscope, follow the link found on the ODFW Columbia River Web page at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/fish/OSCRP/CRM/index.asp

 

An audio record of this meeting will be located at https://www.periscope.tv/ODFW/1kvJpnNewodKE.