Category Archives: Headlines

Head’s Up, Wingshooters, Hevi-Shot Issues Recall Notice

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE.

At temperatures below freezing, our 12-gauge, 3-inch HEVI-Metal® and HEVI-Steel® shotshell wads may crack on ignition. This may cause a “squib load”, with an off sound and reduced power.

While this squib load will not damage your gun in any way, it can result in a wad stuck in your barrel, because the force of some of these shells may not be strong enough to push the wad all the way out of the muzzle.

The danger comes if you fire again without clearing a stuck wad from your barrel. This can cause barrel damage or injury. If you hear an off sound with no power, please stop shooting! First, unload your gun – and then check your barrel for obstructions before you fire again!

Please do not shoot these shotshells. Instead, please contact us for replacement shells. We have fixed this problem in current production.

After we were contacted about squib loads, we began an intensive investigation that led to an understanding of the problem by the evening of 19 November. We want to get this notice out to our customers immediately. Please share it with your hunting friends.

The wads we bought between July and mid-November used a low-density polyethylene plastic. We switched yesterday to a linear low density polyethylene, which performs safely in all weather, including very cold weather. To understand the difference, please go to:

http://www.primepolymer.co.jp/english/technology/material/pe/05.html

Only 12-gauge, 3-inch HEVI-Steel or HEVI-Metal® shotshells with these lot numbers may have the problem:

201576 – 201584 301571 – 301609 401335 – 401345 500001 – 500016
201600 – 201637 301643 – 301659 401381 – 401422
201640 – 201659 301672 – 301689 401437 – 401463
201665 – 201671 301698 – 301701 401466 – 401486
201677 – 201680 301713 – 301722 401489 – 401504
201683 – 201699 301725 – 301726 401507 – 401519
201702 – 201722 301730 – 301734
201732 – 201736

The lot number is stamped on the inside top flap of your box of shotshells.

Our highest priories are your safety and your satisfaction with our products. We will do everything we can to get you the product you deserve if you contact us for replacement shells. For your safety, when you contact us we will arrange to have UPS pick up your unused shells (please put them in a shippable cardboard box such as our master carton) at no charge to you, and we will ship your replacement shells to you at no charge. Contact Kelly Sorensen, VP of Sales and Marketing by phone: 541.367.3522, or by email: sales@hevishot.com.

Ralph Nauman
CEO

SEN. KIRK PEARSON OF MONROE HAD TOUGH QUESTIONS FOR THE WILD FISH CONSERVANCY DURING THE HEARING HE CALLED. (TVW)

Wild Fish-grilling State Senator Named CCA-WA Legislator Of 2014

State Senator Kirk Pearson, who grilled the Wild Fish Conservancy over its Puget Sound hatchery steelhead lawsuit this summer, was named Legislator of the Year by the Washington chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association.

“Senator Pearson has been a champion of the immense economic, social, and conservation benefits of recreational fishing here in Washington, efforts to restore the popular sockeye fishery to Lake Washington, and defending the important role that well-managed hatcheries play in sustaining our salmon and steelhead fisheries,” said the organization’s Nello Picinich, according to a report yesterday in the Tacoma News Tribune.

SEN. KIRK PEARSON OF MONROE HAD TOUGH QUESTIONS FOR THE WILD FISH CONSERVANCY DURING THE HEARING HE CALLED. (TVW)

STATE SENATOR KIRK PEARSON, A REPUBLICAN, REPRESENTS THE 39TH DISTRICT IN NORTHERN PUGET SOUND.

CCA pointed to the Monroe Republican’s efforts during this past legislative session to secure funding to study northern pikeminnow and cutthroat trout predation on sockeye smolts during their year in Lake Washington.

Not enough of the red salmon have come back to allow for the popular fishery since 2006, a season that yielded an estimated $8.6 million in economic benefits.

Pearson, whose 39th District includes famed steelheading rivers such as the Skagit, Stillaguamish, Sauk and Skykomish, among others, also took WFC as well as WDFW and NMFS to task in a special hearing in July.

The Duvall-based organization sued WDFW in federal court over lack of federal permits for its Chambers Creek hatchery winter steelhead program on Puget Sound rivers, leading to an out-of-court settlement that saw 80 percent of this year’s planned smolt release put into landlocked lakes such as Green, Cranberry, Sprague and others.

During that hearing, Pearson asked WFC’s Jamie Glasgow if the litigious group planned to continue using the courts to ax releases of salmon and steelhead which power recreational and tribal fisheries.

“Do you plan more lawsuits, and are you going to try to cut hatchery production in other parts of the state?” the Monroe Republican asked.

“The answer to that question is quite simple,” said Jamie Glasgow, WFC’s science adviser. “It depends. We need to see how the Department of Fish and Wildlife and how NOAA decides to moves forward, and whether or not they are considering the science as they make these policy decisions.”

Pearson followed up with, “Are there any hatcheries you do support in the state?”

Glasgow’s answer was astonishing, even if obvious by the numerous lawsuits WFC has filed over the past decade.

“There are several that have closed over time – those would be ones that we support,” he said.

“That are closed. Which means you don’t support any hatcheries,” summarized Pearson.

“There is a very limited roll for hatchery production in this state, we feel,” responded Glasgow. “They are going to be very kind of extreme situations where conservation hatchery may provide some benefit if they’re used for a very limited duration. For the most part, the way we seem to be using hatcheries I think is an abuse of the wild fish that they impact.”

Thanks to hatcheries and smart management, winter steelhead and summer chum runs are rebuilding in Hood Canal, and most notably this year, the Nez Perce Tribe’s use of coho eggs from Lower Columbia stocks resulted in the best return on record to Central Idaho, allowing for tribal and sportfishing seasons.

The Western Washington-based Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission has also questioned WFC’s arguments.

STEVE MICEK AND THE NEW IDAHO STATE RECORD COHO, AN 11.8-POUNDER CAUGHT NOV. 8. (IDFG)

New Record Idaho Coho 2.4 Pounds Bigger Than Last Month’s Record

The bar for biggest Idaho coho has been raised again.

Idaho Falls angler Steve Micek caught a new state-record 11.8-pounder Nov. 8, the second in the past month.

STEVE MICEK AND THE NEW IDAHO STATE RECORD COHO, AN 11.8-POUNDER CAUGHT NOV. 8. (IDFG)

STEVE MICEK AND THE NEW IDAHO STATE RECORD COHO, AN 11.8-POUNDER CAUGHT NOV. 8. (IDFG)

The 33-incher was one of a record 18,050 that have been counted at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake, the last before the run hits Idaho.

The resurgence, largely due to Nez Perce work to restore the native salmon to Central Idaho using eggs from Lower Columbia stocks, led to the first directed coho fishery in over 40 years.

Fishing was allowed in much of the Clearwater system, with season wrapping up Nov. 16.

It took all of one day after the Oct. 17 opener for an angler to top the standing state record, which was actually a landlocked coho caught out of Lake Cascade. Ethan Crawford’s fish went 9.4 pounds.

IDFG says it expects new records will be set in the future as returns allow harvest opportunities.

(WDFW)

WDFW Reports Two Asotin Bighorns Poached

THE FOLLOWING REPORT COMES FROM WDFW FISH AND WILDLIFE OFFICER PAUL MOSMAN

This last weekend we had two trophy class Bighorn Sheep rams killed up Asotin Creek on the Asotin Creek Wildlife area.   One was shot and wounded and we just found it today (probably died Saturday or Sunday and was possibly seen last Wednesday with an injured shoulder).  The second ram had a radio collar and the only thing we found was the collar cut off and thrown in the brush.   Anybody that has information regarding these can call Officer Matt Sabo at 509-780-9843 or myself at  509-710-5707.

(WDFW)

(WDFW)

We currently have only one Bighorn Sheep permit for the area, so this level of harvest is unstainable on the Asotin Creek herd over the long run.

(WDFW)

(WDFW)

There was a third ram killed in the same vicinity this weekend by a Nez Perce tribal hunter exercising his tribal hunting rights and one of the Nez Perce Tribal Conservation Officers dropped off the associated collar for that one.

Hunters, Anglers Respond Strongly To ODFW Director Survey

When ODFW asked for input on who its new director should be and what challenges they would face over the next decade, Oregon hunters chimed in — and how.

No other group of Beaver Staters responded better to the call for comments than its camo’ed crew.

Just shy of 26 percent of the 2,000-plus people who took up the agency’s request earlier this fall identified themselves first and foremost as hunters.

Oregon anglers were no slouches either.

Nearly 13 percent said they were recreational fishermen, the second largest group of respondents.

When hunting and sportfishing organizations, guides, commercial fishermen and trappers are included, more than 42 percent of identified themselves as consumptive users of the resources.

It’s an interesting result. While we don’t make up a large percentage of the general population these days, who leads our fish and wildlife agencies is a matter near and dear to our hearts.

As for other respondents, just over 12 percent said they were members of the public while 10 percent said they were ODFW’s own employees.

More on the results of the survey and specific comments can be found here.

The search began after Roy Elicker announced he was moving to a new position earlier this year. Since then, the Fish & Wildlife Commission has launched a nationwide recruitment.

According to ODFW, the position will pay from $98,000 to $145,000 a year, and whomever’s selected will be responsible for overseeing 1,232 employees, 25 offices, 33 hatcheries, dozens of wolves, hundreds of thousands of deer and elk, 160,000 acres, and providing opportunity for Oregon’s 617,000 anglers and 259,000 hunters.

The public will get a chance to meet finalists in Salem on Feb. 12, the same day that those who want the hot seat will be interviewed by the governor’s office.

The following day the commission hears from them, and unless another round of interviews is needed, would extend an employment offer.

WDFW’s Black Friday Deal Set For 6 SW WA Lakes

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is offering prospective anglers opportunities for tight lines rather than long lines on the day after Thanksgiving.

The “holiday specials” include thousands of large trout each averaging 15 to 16 inches and 1-1/4 pounds. Those fish will be stocked in six southwest Washington lakes in time for Black Friday, Nov. 28.

“Fishing is a fall and winter tradition for many Washington anglers,” said Chris Donley, WDFW inland fish program manager. “These fisheries offer a great excuse to skip the malls and enjoy a fun day out on the water with family and friends.”

The six southwest lakes scheduled to receive fish before Black Friday include:

  • Battleground Lake and Klineline Pond in Clark County
  • Kress Lake in Cowlitz County
  • Rowland Lake in Klickitat County
  • Fort Borst Park Pond and South Lewis County Park Pond in Lewis County

All those lakes will be closed to fishing Nov. 24-27, when they will be stocked with hefty trout from the Mossyrock and Goldendale fish hatcheries.

The Black Friday fishing opener is one of several fishing opportunities made available this fall thanks to the department’s extensive fish stocking efforts, said Donley.  In total, WDFW has been stocking 47 western Washington lakes with some 340,000 catchable trout during the fall and winter seasons. 

A list of lakes stocked and the department’s stocking plan is available for viewing at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/fall-into-fishing/ .

For up-to-date stocking information this fall, anglers should follow the department on Twitter or Facebook, accessible from http://wdfw.wa.gov , or see the department’s weekly catchable trout stocking report at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/

Anglers must have a current Washington freshwater fishing license valid through March 31, 2015, to participate in these events.

Licenses can be purchased online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov ; by telephone at 1-866-246-9453; or at hundreds of license vendors across the state. For details on license vendor locations, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/ .

(USFWS)

Duck Stamp Increase Passes US House, Instantly Politicized

On a voice vote last night, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill increasing the price of a duck stamp.

If passed by the Senate and signed by the president, it would raise the price of the federal endorsement from $15 to $25, the first hike since 1991, and bring in an estimated $119 million a year.

(USFWS)

(USFWS)

According to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, 98 cents out of a every buck spent on duck stamps is plowed right back into the wetlands. The agency reports that since 1934, stamps have raised north of $800 million  and have helped buy or lease 6 million acres of quacker habitat across the country.

Unfortunately, in these overpolicized times, the increase (the Times-Picayune reports that $15 in 1991 dollars equals $26.21 today, meaning it’s a decrease) was instantly attacked.

I was alerted to the vote by an email from Politico, which I neither read nor subscribe to. They wanted to cackle that the Koch Brothers had been end-arounded.

Responding to the vote, the website Americans For Prosperity blogged, “Just weeks after voters repudiated the liberal agenda of high taxes and out of control spending, the scrooges in Congress want to ask American families for even more of their paycheck to help fund a bloated, oversized government that cannot properly do the few things it is supposed to be doing, never mind all of the things it is not supposed to be doing.”

The vote in the House was a voice one, so no names were recorded for political cat-o-ninetailing.

Ducks Unlimited called the legislation “critically important” and strongly supported it.

“The additional duck stamp funding provided by waterfowl hunters and other conservationists will not only conserve critical waterfowl habitat, but will also help ensure the future of our waterfowling traditions,” said DU president Chris Hall.

The Senate is expected to take up the bill this year.

Yo, USFWS, sign me up for two stamps.

PEYTON WHITE POSES WITH THE COWLITZ SYSTEM COHO HE AND HIS GRANDFATHER, BRUCE REED, CAUGHT TWO WEEKENDS AGO. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

SW WA, Columbia Fishing Report (11-17-14)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT IS FROM JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon/Steelhead

Mainstem Grays from Hwy. 4 Bridge to South Fork and West Fork Grays River from mouth to 300 yards below hatchery road bridge – Opens to fishing for hatchery steelhead, hatchery coho, and adipose and/or ventral fin clipped Chinook beginning December 1. Mainstem Grays below the Hwy. 4 Bridge and West Fork from 300 yards below the salmon hatchery road bridge upstream to the hatchery intake/footbridge are already open.

Green River, North Fork Toutle River, and mainstem Toutle River from mouth to forks – November 30 is the last day to fish for hatchery steelhead and hatchery salmon.

South Fork Toutle River – From 4100 Bridge upstream, November 30 is the last day to fish for hatchery steelhead. The mouth to the bridge remains open with selective gear rules in effect beginning December 1.

Cowlitz River – Boat anglers averaged an adult coho per rod while bank anglers averaged just over 2/3 fish per rod.  Though fish are still being caught in the lower river, the barrier dam area has produced the best results for coho.  Some winter run steelhead and sea run cutthroats are being caught, mainly around the trout hatchery.  River has been turbid from the mouth of the Toutle downstream.

PEYTON WHITE POSES WITH THE COWLITZ SYSTEM COHO HE AND HIS GRANDFATHER, BRUCE REED, CAUGHT TWO WEEKENDS AGO. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

PEYTON WHITE POSES WITH THE COWLITZ SYSTEM COHO HE AND HIS GRANDFATHER, BRUCE REED, CAUGHT TWO WEEKENDS AGO. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

Under permanent rules, Nov. 30 is the last day of the night closure and anti-snagging rule from Mill Creek to the barrier dam.

During five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered:
*   37 summer-run steelhead
*   two winter-run steelhead
*   62 fall Chinook adults and two jacks
*   9,096 coho adults
*   189 coho jacks
*   52 sea-run cutthroat trout

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released:
*   2,191 coho adults and 42 jacks into Lake Scanewa
*   515 coho adults and five jacks into the Cispus River above the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek
*   30 fall Chinook adults, two jacks; 1,574 coho adults, 45 jacks, seven cutthroat trout and one winter-run steelhead into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton
*   20 fall Chinook adults; 1,373 coho adults and 29 jacks at Franklin Bridge in Packwood

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 13,500 cubic feet per second on Monday, November 17. River visibility is 13 feet.

Bonus Factoid:  Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery adult coho returns (79,174) to date are the highest since at least 1969.  The previous record through early-mid-November was 68,901 fish (2009).

Mill Creek (tributary to Cowlitz River) – Beginning December 1, opens to fishing for hatchery steelhead from the mouth to the salmon hatchery road crossing culvert. Night closures and anti-snagging rules will be in effect for the one month fishery

Kalama River – Effort and catch remains light from the Modrow Bridge downstream.

Through Nov. 11, a total of 1 hatchery and 6 wild late winter steelhead had returned to Kalama Falls Hatchery.

Lewis River – Bank and boat anglers on both the mainstem Lewis are catching some coho.  Boat anglers on the North Fork Lewis area also catching some fall Chinook.

Under permanent rules, the night closure and anti-snagging rule are lifted on the North Fork Lewis from Johnson Creek to Colvin Creek beginning December 1.

Wind River – Under permanent rules, November 30 is the last day of the catch and release game fish season above Shipherd Falls.

Klickitat River – Bank anglers on the lower river continue to catch some coho but at a little slower rate than previously.

Under permanent rules, the Klickitat (except for the salmon fishery from the Fisher Hill Bridge downstream) closes to fishing for trout including hatchery steelhead and salmon beginning December 1. The salmon season from the Fisher Hill Bridge downstream remains open through January 1.

The whitefish only season from 400 feet above Fishway #5 upstream to the Yakama Reservation boundary begins December 1. Whitefish gear rules will be in effect.

Bonneville Pool – Boat anglers continue to catch some coho at the mouth of the Klickitat.

Another Bonus Factoid – The 63,419 adult fall Chinook that have returned to Priest Rapids Hatchery to date are the highest since at least 1971.  The previous record was 34,789 fish set just last year.

Trout

Swift Reservoir from dam to 3/8 mile below Eagle Cliff Bridge – Remains open to fishing through November 30. Until then, the daily limit is 10 trout (except closed to fishing for bull trout and wild steelhead). Landlocked rules will be in effect (salmon count towards the trout daily limit); however, all salmon larger than 15 inches must be released.

Six SW Washington ponds and lakes are closed to fishing Nov. 24-27. The following waters are scheduled to reopen Nov. 28 and each will receive plants of 2,000 rainbow trout averaging 15-16 inches and 1¼ pounds apiece:

Battleground Lake and Klineline Pond in Clark County

Kress Lake in Cowlitz County

Fort Borst Park Pond and South Lewis County Park Pond in Lewis County

Rowland Lake in Klickitat County

Fewer Late Whitetails Turn Up At NE WA Check Stations

Riflemen still have two and a half days of rut hunting for Northeast Washington whitetails, but the last full weekend of the late season saw fewer harvested than last November, though sportsmen stopping at the Deer Park check station enjoyed a higher success rate than 2013.

Here’s the report from WDFW regional wildlife manager Kevin Robinette:

The final Northeast Washington Deer Check Stations concluded this weekend with voluntary check stations at the Chattaroy weigh station on Saturday and at the Deer Park weigh station on Sunday.

Weather was sunny and cold.  WDFW Biologists Dana Base and Annemarie Prince  led the efforts with assistance from other agency staff and a cadre of volunteers.

At Chattaroy (Nov 15) the crew interviewed 52 hunters and inspected 11 white-tailed deer (2013 numbers were 88 hunters with 22 wtd).

At Deer Park (Nov 16) 93 hunters were interviewed with 25 white-tailed deer (2013 – 134 hunters with 30 deer).

BLACKENED SOIL IS TOPPED BY PONDEROSA NEEDLES THAT HAVE FALLEN OFF

How To Donate To Okanogan Deer Work If You Can’t Make The Dinner

Organizers of the Nov. 22 dinner benefiting habitat restoration and other work to help out the Okanogan County mule deer herd, which saw large parts of its winter range burned last summer, need to know if you’re coming by tomorrow, the 16th, but if you can’t make the shindig in Winthrop, you can help out in other ways.

Already, local folks have been out reseeding cat tracks and other disturbed areas with native grasses, but for those of us stuck on the west side of the hills, you can send checks.

BLACKENED SOIL IS TOPPED BY PONDEROSA NEEDLES THAT HAVE FALLEN OFF

BLACKENED SOIL IN THE CARLTON FIRE ZONE IS TOPPED BY PONDEROSA NEEDLES THAT FELL OFF THE PINES IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE QUARTER-MILLION-ACRE BLAZE, THE LARGEST IN WASHINGTON HISTORY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“Folks could send donations to one of a couple options,” says Dan McKinley, regional director for the Mule Deer Foundation. “Jim Mountjoy is the chapter chair; PO Box 1178, Twisp, WA.  98856. Or they could send donations to: Hanks Market, ATTN: Mule Deer Benefit, 410 E. Methow Valley Hwy., Twisp, WA. 98856″

“Either place will get donations to the special account set up for the work we’ll be doing there,” McKinley says.

But if you can make it, the dinner will include prime rib for dinner, both live and silent auctions, raffles, as well as gun and optics giveaways.

The evening is set to begin at 5 p.m. at the big Red Barn, just west of downtown Winthrop along Highway 20. Tickets are $25 per person.

For info on tickets, contact the foundation’s regional director Dan McKinley at (509) 995-0819.