Category Archives: Headlines

Seeking To Inspire, Fishing Addicts NW Looks For Film Supporters In Kickstarter Campaign

A group of Southwest Washington-based anglers is taking their brand of fishing education and inspiration on the road and is looking for your support.

Fishing Addicts NW recently launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise $10,000 to make their first-ever feature film, Addicted Alaska, and they’re closing in on their goal.

A SCREEN SHOT FROM FISHING ADDICTS NW’S KICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN FOR A FEATURE FILM ON FISHING IN ALASKA. (FISHING ADDICTS NW)

Marlin LeFever says the effort isn’t about getting you to pay for the trip — the tickets to Southeast Alaska are bought and paid for, the trip is all planned out, he says.

Rather, it’s to help pay for the filming, editing and graphics work needed to ensure a high-quality production.

“I really hope what we can create with Addicted Alaska is some inspiration. What I’m looking to do is inspire all the anglers out there in the communities, you know, guys that are thinking about fishing or parents who are thinking about wanting to get their kids fishing. I want them to watch this video and know that fishing is a healthy and awesome sport to get into. And not only that it teaches you so many life lessons,” LeFever says in a video pitch.

They’re asking for donations from as little as a buck on up, with various rewards for different levels of support.

Fishing Addicts NW came onto the scene around a decade ago or so, and from a humble start LeFever has grown the brand into a remarkable force.

He was the subject of a February 2014 article in this magazine, in which he told writer Jeff Holmes, “My whole goal with Fishing Addicts … is to be positive at all times, help people learn to fish or learn to fish better, and to get new people into the sport of fishing.”

Mason Co., North Sound GMUs Added To Elk Hoof Restriction Zone

Hoof rot in Western Washington elk is back in the news after the Fish and Wildlife Commission earlier this month expanded the area where hooves must be left in the field, while an advisory panel is set to hold a work session tomorrow in a hard hit part of the state.

Starting with next month’s archery season, elk hunters will need to leave the hooves of any wapiti they harvest in two Mason County game management units and four in the North Sound at the site of the kill.

A WDFW MAP SHOWS AREAS OF WESTERN WASHINGTON WHERE ELK HUNTERS PREVIOUSLY (GREEN) HAD TO LEAVE THEIR KILLS’ HOOVES IN THE FIELD AS WELL AS SIX NEW UNITS (BLUE) WHERE THEY WILL HAVE TO BEGINNING THIS YEAR. (WDFW

Not many elk were killed in GMUs 633 and 636 last year — just five, according to WDFW stats — but a total of 127 were taken in 407, 418, 437, and 454, North Sound, Nooksack, Sauk and Issaquah.

The move follows on similar previous efforts in Southwest Washington, where hoof rot was first reported. It’s believed to be caused by a bacteria common to the livestock world and is spread as elk move around. The condition makes it increasingly difficult for elk to walk, leading to them limping around the landscape. TAHD, or treponeme-associated hoof disease, has been confirmed in all six of the new GMUs.

As for that work session, WDFW’s advisory Elk Hoof Disease Public Working Group is holding that from 1 to 4 p.m. tomorrow, Tuesday, Aug. 15, at WDFW’s new Region 5 office in Ridgefield (5525 11th St.).

The public is welcome to attend, but comments are limited to the end of the meeting.

For more on the working group, go here.

For more on elk hoof disease, go here.

Hells Yeah, WA Snake Opening For Fall Kings From Mouth Into Canyon

THE FOLLOWING IS A WDFW EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE

Snake River to open for fall chinook salmon fishing

Action: The Snake River will open for harvest of fall chinook salmon.

HATCHERY FALL CHINOOK WILL BE FAIR GAME ON WASHINGTON’S SNAKE RIVER BETWEEN THE MOUTH AND UP INTO HELLS CANYON. BILL STANLEY OF SPOKANE LANDED THIS ONE BELOW LOWER GRANITE DAM A FEW SEASONS BACK. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Locations: The Snake River from the mouth (Burbank-to-Pasco railroad bridge at Snake River mile 1.25) to the Oregon state line (approximately seven miles upstream of the mouth of the Grande Ronde River).

Dates:  Aug. 18 through Oct. 31, 2017.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Reason for action: The 2017 Columbia River forecasted return of upriver bright adults is 260,000, with a significant portion of these fish expected to return to the Snake River. Retention of hatchery fall chinook is not expected to increase impacts to ESA-listed wild fall chinook. Therefore, hatchery fall chinook, marked by a clipped adipose fin, and all jack chinook over 12 inches can be retained in the Snake River.

Daily limits: The salmon daily harvest limit is six (6) hatchery (adipose fin-clipped) fall chinook adults (24 inches in length and larger) and 6 clipped or unclipped jack fall chinook (less than 24 inches). Minimum size for chinook that can be retained in the Snake River is 12 inches. Anglers must cease fishing for salmon and steelhead once they have retained their daily limit of either steelhead or adult salmon.

Other information: The fishery is open seven days per week. Adipose fin-clipped fish must have a healed scar at the location of the missing fin.  All adult chinook and steelhead with unclipped adipose fins must be immediately released unharmed. WDFW is requiring that all Washington licensed anglers cease fishing for the day once they have retained their daily limit of either steelhead or adult salmon as a method to reduce catch and release mortality on steelhead. In addition, anglers must use barbless hooks when fishing for chinook or steelhead in the Snake River. Anglers cannot remove any chinook or steelhead from the water unless it is retained as part of the daily bag limit.  Anglers should be sure to identify their catch because returning unmarked chinook salmon, coho salmon and steelhead are also in the Snake River during this fishery.

Anglers are reminded the Snake River is closed to steelhead fishing from Bridge St. Bridge in Clarkston to the Oregon/Idaho Border. WDFW is working with Idaho Fish and Game to set a steelhead fishery on this section of the river by Sept. 1.

Low returns of steelhead have been predicted for the Snake River and tributaries for this return year. Low adult steelhead abundance may create the need for fishery closures to minimize angling impacts.  Anglers should continue to check emergency regulations for new and changing seasons. In addition, anglers are reminded to refer to the 2017/2018 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for other rules and regulations.

Shark Week Addendum: AZ Angler’s WA Blue Shark Sets State Record

THE FOLLOWING IS A WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

An Arizona angler fishing out of Westport has established the sport fish record for the largest blue shark caught in Washington waters, fishery managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) confirmed today.

ZACHARY JACKSON HOLDS WASHINGTON’S STATE RECORD BLUE SHARK, THE FIRST IN ITS CATEGORY. (WDFW)

Zachary Jackson, from Show Low, Arizona, caught the 27.63-pound blue shark on July 30. Jackson caught the fish, which measured 55 ¾ inches, while fishing for albacore tuna using anchovies as bait.

“We were mainly trying to keep the bait away from the shark,” said Jackson. “The shark bit my friend’s line, then I noticed my line going in the wrong direction and kept thinking he would cut it, but eventually I slowly brought him to the boat.”

This was the first blue shark submitted for a state record in Washington. Jackson was fishing in the Pacific Ocean 57 miles off Washington’s coast.

Jackson makes the trip to Washington to fish for albacore tuna out of Westport about every other year, and describes Westport as “one of the more consistent places to catch albacore on the West Coast.”

WDFW Offering Free Bird Hunting Clinics, Mentored Hunts

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Hunter Education program is offering free hunting clinics geared towards teaching participants the basics of hunting turkey, waterfowl and upland game birds in southcentral and southwest Washington.

THE CHAMPOUX FAMILY OF THE YAKIMA VALLEY SHOW OFF THEIR HARVEST FOLLOWING A LATE 2015 UPLAND BIRD HUNTING CLINIC AND MENTORED HUNT PUT ON BY WDFW. (WDFW)

The clinics, which run on various dates through Oct. 31, will last two to four hours and cover the basics of hunting. In addition to classroom time, the clinics may include range time for patterning shotguns, said Aaron Garcia, WDFW Hunter Education coordinator.

Some clinics provide opportunities for beginning hunters to learn under the guidance of volunteer hunter education instructors, Master Hunters, and local hunting organizations. Participants in these mentored hunts must have valid hunting licenses.

Classes can fill fast and registration is first come, first served online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/huntered/clinics.

The schedule is as follows:

Aug.12, 2 p.m. – Fall Turkey Clinic at Cabelas in Union Gap, Yakima County in partnership with the National Wild Turkey Federation.

Aug. 13, 2 p.m.  – Fall Turkey Clinic at Cabelas in Union Gap, Yakima County in partnership with the National Wild Turkey Federation.

Aug. 27, 12-noon – Waterfowl Hunting Clinic at the Vancouver Trap Club in Clark County.

Sept. 2, 6 a.m. – Mentored Dove Hunting at the Sunnyside Wildlife Area Headquarters Unit in southeast Yakima County.

Sept. 23, 6 a.m. – Mentored Upland Bird Hunting for youth only (15 and under). Mentors with dogs will be at the Sunnyside Wildlife Area pheasant release sites in southeast Yakima County.

Sept. 23, 6 a.m. – Mentored Upland Bird Hunting for youth only (15 and under). Mentors with dogs will be at the Cottonwoods pheasant release site on the Wenas Wildlife Area in Kittitas County.

Sept. 23 – Oct. 31, Mentored Early Fall Turkey Hunts on multiple days at multiple locations across the state. WDFW is matching registrants with First Hunt Foundation (http://www.firsthuntfoundation.com/) mentors.

Sept. 30, 7 a.m. – Mentored Pheasant Hunt for youth only (15 and under), followed by Upland Bird Hunting Clinic, at Reds Fly Shop/Canyon River Ranch in Ellensburg, Kittitas County.  The clinic after the youth hunt is open to all age registrants.

Garcia notes that youth hunters who attend with adult guardians and their own bird dogs, and do not require help from WDFW mentors can register for the Sept. 23 pheasant hunts at Sunnyside and Cottonwoods release sites.

USFWS Proposes Adding More Hunting, Fishing Ops At 2 Western Oregon Refuges

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

Oregon hunters and anglers could have additional opportunities on two National Wildlife Refuges as early as this fall.

In the proposal announced Wednesday by U.S. Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke, Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge would open bank fishing access on the Siletz River, and Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge would add a youth waterfowl hunt beginning in 2018.

GEESE FLY OVER BASKETT SLOUGH NWR, WHERE FEDERAL MANAGERS WANT TO ADD YOUTH WATERFOWL HUNTING OPPORTUNITIES. (GEORGE GENTRY, USFWS)

“We’re always looking for opportunities to expand public access at our National Wildlife Refuges, and these are two great opportunities,” said Kevin Foerster, Chief of Refuges for the Pacific Region. “Because of our focus on habitat management, we have some of the best hunting and fishing opportunities on public land. Some of the most prized hunting tags in the state of Oregon are on refuges, including antelope at Hart Mountain and mule deer at Umatilla.”

Secretary Zinke’s proposal would open or expand opportunities at 10 national wildlife refuges nationwide. If finalized, this would bring the number of refuges where the public may hunt up to 373, and up to 312 where fishing would be permitted.

“I grew up in the mountains of northwest Montana, where I spent my time hunting and fishing on our shared public lands. I was lucky to take my boys out on the same land that my dad and granddad took me,” Secretary Zinke said. “As the steward of our public lands, one of my top priorities is to open up access wherever possible for hunting and fishing so that more families have the opportunity to pass down the heritage. The last thing I want to see is hunting and fishing become elite sports. These 10 refuges will provide incredible opportunities for sportsmen and anglers across the country to access the land and connect with the wildlife.”

Siletz Bay NWR, located south of Lincoln City, proposed walk-in access for bank fishing on the Siletz River, which has coho and Chinook salmon, steelhead and cutthroat trout. The refuge opened the Alder Island trail this spring, which offers easy access to the river.  The 568-acre refuge also offers seasonal waterfowl hunting in designated areas.

“We’re excited that more people will be able to use the refuge for fishing,” said Kelly Moroney, project leader for the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex. “We hope to get it approved in time for fall fishing.”

Baskett Slough, a 2,492-acre refuge located west of Salem, proposed to add a 10-person youth waterfowl hunt beginning in fall of 2018. The hunt would follow Oregon state hunting regulations.

“This is a great opportunity to introduce the next generation to quality hunting,” said Laila Lienesch, deputy project leader for the Willamette Valley Refuge Complex. “We already have fantastic elk and black-tail deer hunting at William L. Finley Refuge, so this adds another hunting opportunity to our refuge complex in the Willamette Valley.”

Hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities contributed more than $144.7 billion in economic activity across the United States, according to the Service’s National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, published every five years. More than 90 million Americans, or 41 percent of the United States’ population 16 and older, pursue wildlife-related recreation.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages hunting and fishing programs to ensure sustainable wildlife populations while also offering other traditional wildlife-dependent recreation on public lands, such as wildlife watching and photography. The unparalleled network of 566 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts means there is a national wildlife refuge within an hour’s drive of most major metropolitan areas.

For the national news release, go to http://bit.ly/2vPpMi6.

Fishing Guide Pleads Not Guilty To More Federal Charges

When Billy Jim Swann was sentenced this March to pay a $7,500 fine for killing two wild coho caught by his clients on the Cowlitz in October 2014 there was a hint that the feds had even bigger fish to fry with the fishing guide.

Court documents alleged the Yelm-based operator of Swanny’s Guided Fishing had lied under oath several years before to try and get disability payments while he was actively running hundreds of trips and managing an Alaskan salmon camp.

BILLY JIM SWANN RUNNING HIS SLED ON THE COLUMBIA ABOVE THE I-5 BRIDGE IN SPRING 2008.

The papers were introduced late in his case and were meant to provide background for U.S. District Court Judge Karen L. Strombom in Tacoma as she weighed federal prosecutor Seth Wilkinson’s recommendation Swann be fined the upper end of the $5,000 to $10,000 range following Swann’s guilty plea to one count of violating the Endangered Species Act.

Wilkinson had originally asked for somewhere around the midpoint, but shortly after Swann entered his plea the previous November, the attorney learned of Swann’s long appeal of a denial for Social Security benefits.

Swann applied for them in 2006, claiming, according to charging papers from a federal grand jury, “that his daily activities were limited to eating, resting and ‘try[ing] to do a few things around the house.'”

“Billy Jim Swann further represented that his disability interfered with his ability to stand, sit, or walk, and that he had difficulty carrying on a conversation because of his inability to concentrate. Billy Jim Swann failed to disclose anywhere in his application materials that he was operating a professional fishing guide service,” read the documents.

When that was denied, he appealed to US District Court in 2009 and allegedly “falsely testified that his only work activity consisted of temporary ‘volunteer’ work at a fishing camp in Alaska for several weeks in summer.”

When the court remanded his application back to the Social Security Administration, in 2012 Swann told the federal agency that “his work as a fishing guide was ‘an unsuccessful work attempt’ and that ‘he is not performing any [substantial gainful activity] at the present time.”

According to papers, before another federal judge later in the year, Swann “testified that he [had] not performed any work other than a 2007 fishing engagement in Idaho and temporary volunteer work in Alaska.”

But court papers allege that he was actually leading “fishing excursions approximately 300 days per year in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska. Defendant served as a professional representative for fishing supply companies, maintained his own website, and appeared on television and as a speaker at fishing seminars. Between 2006 and 2016, the business earned revenues in excess of $750,000.”

Yesterday, Swann was arraigned by a grand jury on federal charges that include wire fraud, mail fraud, Social Security fraud and perjury.

He plead not guilty, according to The Seattle Times.

Washington Ocean Salmon Update (8-9-17)

THE FOLLOWING REPORT IS FROM WENDY BEEGHLEY OF WDFW

Columbia Ocean Area (including Oregon)

A total of 4,709 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery July 31-August 6, landing 732 Chinook and 3,293 coho.  Through August 6, a cumulative total of 4,082 Chinook (31% of the area guideline) and 10,999 coho (52% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

HUNTER HIGGINBOTHAM SHOWED OFF HIS SKILLS WHILE SALMON FISHING OUT OF WESTPORT WITH FAR CORNERS ADVENTURE FISHING. THIS COHO BIT A HERRING BEHIND A FISH FLASH FOR THE LAD. (VIA JAROD HIGGINBOTHAM)

Westport

A total of 4,444 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery July 31-August 6, landing 789 Chinook and 4,114 coho.  Through August 6, a cumulative total of 5,032 Chinook (24% of the area guideline) and 10,771 coho (69% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

La Push

A total of 226 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery July 31-August 6, landing 43 Chinook and 223 coho.  Through August 6, a cumulative total of 259 Chinook (10% of the area guideline) and 394 coho (36% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

Neah Bay

A total of 778 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery July 31-August 6, landing 465 Chinook and 398 coho.  Through August 6, a cumulative total of 6,843 Chinook (87% of the area guideline) and 2,210 coho (51% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

SE WA Man Appointed Head Of State Salmon Recovery Office

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE

Steve Martin, a resident of Dayton, WA and a long-time salmon advocate, has been selected to lead the Governor’s Salmon Recovery Office, which coordinates regional efforts to return salmon from the brink of extinction.

The Governor’s Salmon Recovery Office coordinates the efforts of 25 community-based watershed groups and 7 regional organizations across the state that are charged with implementing federally approved recovery plans for salmon, steelhead and bull trout.

STEVE MARTIN. (RCO)

“Steve has been and will continue to be a great leader of Washington’s salmon recovery effort,” said Kaleen Cottingham, director of the Recreation and Conservation Office, which oversees the Governor’s Salmon Recovery Office. “He understands the very complicated world of salmon recovery and what it takes to return this iconic fish to healthy levels.”

Martin has been the executive director of the Snake River Salmon Recovery Board since 2001. Before that, he was a biologist with the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife for many years. He has bachelor and master degrees in biology from Eastern Washington University.

“Steve has been in the trenches of salmon recovery since the beginning,” Cottingham said. “He brings great enthusiasm, energy and knowledge to the role.”

Across the Pacific Northwest, salmon populations have been decimated. As the number of people grew and demands for water, power and land increased, salmon habitat was altered. In the early 1990s, the federal government began listing salmon species as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. By 1999, some salmon populations had disappeared completely and listings affected nearly three-fourths of the state. Today, federal agencies have listed 18 species of salmon, steelhead and bull trout as either threatened or endangered.

The federal Endangered Species Act and Washington State law require development of plans to recover salmon. Washington residents have been working for nearly 20 years to reverse the fate of salmon, and those efforts are beginning to pay off. Visit the State of Salmon Web site.

In addition to an iconic fish, salmon are big business in Washington. Many businesses, such as bait and tackle shops and charter fishing companies, rely on the world-renowned Pacific salmon. Today, commercial and recreational fishing are estimated to support 16,000 jobs and $540 million in personal income.

Raised in Dayton, in Columbia County, Martin is married with four children. He enjoys spending time with his family and is very active in his community. His hobbies include hunting, fishing and snow skiing.

“I am very excited about taking on this new role,” Martin said. “We have made a lot of progress in salmon recovery during the past two decades but there are still many challenges ahead of us. We know how to recover salmon and we have the people and resources in place. Salmon are ours to save.”

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools, SW WA Fishing Report (8-8-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (8/5) flight, 105 salmonid boats and 23 Oregon bank anglers were counted from Tongue Point to Bonneville Dam; and 641 Oregon boats at Buoy 10.  Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 0.52 Chinook and 0.06 coho caught per boat.  In the Portland to Tongue Point area, boat anglers averaged 0.16 Chinook and 0.03 steelhead caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.17 steelhead caught per angler.

A HERRING BEHIND A FISH FLASH SERVED UP SUPPER FOR SALT LAKE CITY’S RAMONA PAULSON NEAR BUOY 10. SHE WAS FISHING WITH GUIDE MIKE KELLY. (VIA BUZZ RAMSEY)

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed three steelhead released for 18 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (three anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for 10 boats (16 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for seven bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed five Chinook adults kept, plus one Chinook adult and one steelhead released for 37 boats (86 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 138 Chinook adults and 12 coho adults kept, plus 28 Chinook and six coho released for 318 boats (972 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for six bank anglers; and two steelhead released for one boat (two anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (one angler).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekly checking showed four sublegal, one legal and one oversize white sturgeon released for four boats (nine anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed one oversize sturgeon released for one boat (three anglers).

The Dalles Pool: No report.

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 28 sublegal, 13 legal and three oversize sturgeon released for five boats (14 anglers).

WALLEYE

Gorge:  Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (two anglers).

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed five walleye kept, plus two walleye released for six boats (11 anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point:  Weekend checking showed four walleye kept for three boats (five anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 43 walleye kept, plus six walleye released for four boats (eight anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 20 walleye kept, plus one walleye released for seven bank anglers; and 155 walleye kept, plus 52 walleye released for 25 boats (54 anglers).

……………………………………………………

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – Above the I-5 Bridge – 26 boats/75 rods kept 26 steelhead and released 26 cutthroats.  84 bank rods kept 19 adult spring Chinook and 6 steelhead and released 3 adult and 3 jack spring Chinook and 1 cutthroat.  I-5 Bridge downstream – 3 bank and 2 boats/6 rods had no catch.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 224 spring Chinook adults, eight spring Chinook jacks, 12 mini-jacks , 105 summer-run steelhead adults, one fall Chinook adult and two fall Chinook jacks in five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 78 spring Chinook adults and two spring Chinook jacks into the Cispus River near the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek and they released 128 spring Chinook adults and six spring Chinook jacks at Franklin Bridge in Packwood.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,160 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, August 7. Water visibility is 12 feet and water temperature is 58.3 degrees F.
Drano Lake – 4 boats/8 anglers kept 3 adult and 2 jack fall Chinook and released 2 steelhead.  27 boats trolling were observed here last Saturday morning.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam During the first 6 days of the fall sport season on the lower Columbia below Bonneville Dam, we sampled 400 salmonid anglers (including 90 boats) with 4 adult and 2 jack fall Chinook, 11 steelhead, and no coho.

Effort is relatively light with just over 100 boats and 141 bank anglers counted during last Saturday’s flight.

3 (75%) of the adult fall Chinook were kept though anglers may retain any fish.  All of the steelhead were released as required.  6 of the fish were wild, 4 hatchery, and 1 unknown origin.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Marker 82 line downstream – We sampled 30 sturgeon anglers (including 7 boats) with 26 legals released.

Walleye

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – 2 walleye anglers (1 boat) had no catch.   Quite a bit of effort in the Camas/Washougal area last Saturday were 18 boats were counted.

Trout

Tacoma Power released 3,700 rainbow trout into Mayfield Lake this past week.