Category Archives: Headlines

(SALTPATROL.COM)

Ilwaco Opening For 2 Kings; WA Ocean Salmon Fishing Report (8-11-16)

THE FOLLOWING ARE A WDFW EMERGENCY RULE CHANGE NOTICE,  A WEEKLY WDFW OCEAN SALMON FISHING UPDATE, AND JOHN KEIZER’S SALTPATROL WESTPORT FISHING REPORT

Anglers can keep 2 chinook in Marine Area 1 beginning Aug. 16

Action: Anglers will be allowed to keep two chinook daily as part of their two salmon daily limit in Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco). Anglers must release wild coho.

Effective Dates: August 16, 2016

Species affected: Chinook

Locations: Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco)

Reason for action: The fishery has enough chinook remaining under the guideline for Marine Area 1 to allow anglers to retain two chinook daily without much risk of having to close early. The current limit is two salmon, one of which can be a chinook, release wild coho.

Other information: The changes announced today do not affect ocean salmon fisheries off Westport (Marine Area 2), La Push (Marine Area 3), or Neah Bay (Marine Area 4).

The daily limits in Marine Areas 2, 3 and 4 will remain at two salmon. Anglers must release coho in all three areas and must release chum in Marine Area 4.

Marine Area 1 is scheduled to close Aug. 31 while marine areas 2, 3 and 4 are scheduled to close Aug. 21. Fisheries may close sooner than scheduled if the quota is met.

NOF ocean recreational salmon fishery update

Columbia Ocean Area (including Oregon)

A total of 3,185 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery August 1-7, landing 447 Chinook and 1,332 coho.  Through Sunday, August 7, a total of 3,191 Chinook (31% of the area guideline) have been landed in the area, and 7,002 coho have been landed coastwide (37% of the coho quota).

Westport

A total of 3,055 anglers participated in the salmon fishery August 1-7, landing 2,463 Chinook.  Through Sunday, August 7, a total of 6,678 Chinook (40% of the area guideline) have been landed.

La Push

A total of 201 anglers participated in the salmon fishery August 1-7, landing 20 Chinook.  Through Sunday, August 7, a total of 241 Chinook (12% of the area guideline) have been landed.

Neah Bay

A total of 263 anglers participated in the salmon fishery August 1-7, landing 128 Chinook.  Through Sunday, August 7, a total of 3,144 Chinook (51% of the area guideline) have been landed.

……………….

By John Keizer, SaltPatrol.com

Fished Evinrude rep James Safronek and his wife Shelley at Westport Saturday, we landed six to limit, with a 25 and 20 our largest for the day.

(SALTPATROL.COM)

(SALTPATROL.COM)

Most of the action was just north of harbor in 240 feet of water. We had top action fishing 100 feet down on the Scotty downriggers with whole herring behind a Fish Flash.

When we ran out of bait we switched to a Silver Horde 3-inch Kingfisher (kitchen sink), and it worked quite well, producing our largest fish of the day.

Westport remains open until 21 Aug. for two chinook a day.

 

(ODFW)

Pheasant Hunting For Families Workshops Coming To Portland, Corvallis

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW will host three pheasant hunting workshops ideal for families this fall: Sept. 10 and Sept. 11 at Sauvie Island Wildlife Area in Portland and Sept. 17 at EE Wilson Wildlife Area near Corvallis. All the workshops begin at 7 a.m. and end at noon.

These family workshops are open to everyone age 9 and older and are perfect for beginners or people getting back to hunting after an absence. Instructors emphasize safety and ODFW provides all necessary equipment, including firearms, ammunition, eye and ear protection and hunter orange clothing. Trained hunting dogs and guides accompany hunters, increasing participants’ chances of success and allowing them to see these canine athletes at work.

(ODFW)

(ODFW)

These workshops cost just $52 for adults and $22 for children with paying adult and include lunch. Before the class, participants also need to purchase a 2016 hunting license ($32 for adults/$10 for children) and 2016-17 upland game bird validation ($9 for adults/$4 for kids age 12-17).

Participants are required to take a shotgun skills class before the workshop. ODFW schedules the shotgun skills section on a different day prior to the workshop, so hunters, dogs and handlers can hunt in the morning and be finished before it gets too hot.

Mid-Valley Shooting Clays in Gervais will host a basic shotgun workshop on three days: Aug. 13, Aug. 27 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and Sept. 9  from 4-7 p.m. EE Wilson Wildlife Area will also host a workshop on Sept. 16 from 4-7 p.m. Prior registration for these events is required and the cost is $10.

For more information, click on links above or go to www.odfwcalendar.com People can register for the pheasant hunt workshops and the shotgun skills classes at ODFW’s license sales site online (click View All Classes Workshops/Outdoor Skills), at a license sales agent or at an ODFW office that sells licenses

ERIC GORMAN WITH A BUOY 10 CHINOOK TAKEN ABOVE THE ASTORIA BRIDGE WHILE TROLLING AN ANCHOVY IN COMBINATION WITH A FISH FLASH IN THE MIRACLE MAN FINISH. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

Columbia, SW WA Fishing Report (8-9-16)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA AND WDFW SOURCES AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

During August 1-7, anglers on the lower Columbia made 5,151 trips and caught 164 adult Chinook and 741 summer steelhead (422 kept and 319 released).

ERIC GORMAN WITH A BUOY 10 CHINOOK TAKEN ABOVE THE ASTORIA BRIDGE WHILE TROLLING AN ANCHOVY IN COMBINATION WITH A FISH FLASH IN THE MIRACLE MAN FINISH. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

ERIC GORMAN WITH A BUOY 10 CHINOOK TAKEN ABOVE THE ASTORIA BRIDGE WHILE TROLLING AN ANCHOVY IN COMBINATION WITH A FISH FLASH IN THE MIRACLE MAN FINISH. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (8/6), 233 salmonid boats and 73 Oregon bank anglers were counted from Tongue Point to Bonneville Dam; and 608 Oregon boats at Buoy 10.  Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 0.50 Chinook and 0.03 coho caught per boat.  In the gorge boat anglers averaged 0.67 fall Chinook and 0.33 steelhead caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.15 fall Chinook and 0.04 steelhead caught per boat.  In the Portland to Tongue Point area, boat anglers averaged 0.05 fall Chinook and 0.12 steelhead caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.02 fall Chinook and 0.11 steelhead caught per angler.

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed one fall Chinook adult, one fall Chinook jack and three steelhead kept, plus four steelhead released for 64 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed four fall Chinook adults, one fall Chinook jack and two steelhead kept for six boats (19 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed four fall Chinook adults kept, plus one fall Chinook jack and one steelhead released for 27 boats (59 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for seven bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed three fall Chinook adults and five steelhead kept, plus three steelhead released for 65 boats (154 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 126 fall Chinook adults and seven coho kept, plus 51 fall Chinook adults and four coho released for 355 boats (1,174 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed one fall Chinook jack and one steelhead released for three bank anglers.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for four bank anglers; and no catch for two boats.

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed seven sublegals, 16 legals and one oversize sturgeon released for three boats (four anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention. Weekly checking showed two sublegal and one legal white sturgeon released for nine bank anglers.

WALLEYE

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed 26 walleye kept, plus two walleye released for 18 boats (43 anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point: Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (two anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed 28 walleye kept, plus 14 walleye released for 15 boats (26 anglers).

………………………………………………….

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – 51 boat anglers kept 47 steelhead.  42 bank anglers kept 14 steelhead and released 1 adult Chinook.  Most of the catch is still from Mission Bar to the salmon hatchery though some steelhead are being caught by boat anglers near the mouth of the river.

Last week Tacoma Power employees recovered 175 spring Chinook adults, 47 jacks, 34 mini-jacks, eight fall Chinook adults, five jacks, 958 summer-run steelhead, and six cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 51 spring Chinook adults, 19 spring Chinook jacks, and two fall Chinook adults into the Cispus River upstream of the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek near Randle, 113 spring Chinook adults, 20 spring Chinook jacks, one fall Chinook adult and one jack at Franklin Bridge in Packwood, and five fall Chinook adults, three jacks and three cutthroat trout into the Tilton River located at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton.

Since June 15, Tacoma Power employees have floy-tagged and recycled 2,803 summer-run steelhead to the I-5 bridge boat launch. A total of 802 (29%) of the recycled steelhead have either been reported as harvested or returned back to the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 2,470 cubic feet per second on Monday, Aug. 8. Visibility is at 13.5 feet.
Lewis River – 8 bank anglers had no catch.

Wind River – 2 bank anglers released 1 steelhead.  2 boat anglers had no catch.

Drano Lake – 9 bank anglers had no catch.  232 boat anglers kept 17 adult Chinook and 80 steelhead plus released 88 steelhead.   Boaters using downriggers to troll lures are catching fall Chinook while those anchored and using bobbers and dyed prawns are catching steelhead.

Despite being breezy, 43 boats were counted here last Sunday morning.

Buoy 10 – Both Washington and Oregon report a Chinook kept per every 10 rods last week.  A few coho are also appearing in the catch.

Washington daily sampling summaries can be found@ http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/creel/buoy10/.  For Oregon summaries, see http://www.dfw.state.or.us/fish/OSCRP/CRM/sport_fishery_updates.asp.

Boat anglers should be aware of Oregon’s sport fishing closure at the mouth of Young’s Bay that runs through September 15.  The Young’s Bay Control Zone includes waters from the Highway 101 Bridge crossing Young’s Bay northerly to a line originating on the Oregon shore at the east end of the seawall at the Warrenton Fiber log yard (approximately river mile 10.1) northeasterly through green navigation buoys 29, 31, 33, and 35A to the center of the Astoria-Megler Bridge abutment adjacent to, and north of the ship channel, and continuing southerly in line with the center of the Megler Bridge span to the Oregon shore.  See below and attached.

THE NO-GO ZONE.

THE PORT OF ASTORIA OFFICIAL FISH-CLEANING ZONE.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Like Buoy 10, fishing for fall Chinook was slow and steelhead angling was only fair.  Last week we sampled 1,405 salmonid anglers (including 245 boats) with 30 adult and 4 jack fall Chinook, 151 steelhead but no coho.  All of the adult Chinook and 83 (55%) of the steelhead were kept.

Bonneville Pool – 4 boat anglers kept 1 steelhead and released 2 fish.

Effort was light with only a single boat counted outside Drano and 1 off the White Salmon River last Sunday morning

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam from the Marker 82 line downstream – We sampled 15 sturgeon anglers (7 boats) with 33 legals released. Fish were caught from Vancouver downstream to Longview.

Walleye

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – We sampled 31 walleye anglers (16 boats) with 15 fish kept and 9 released.  Almost all of the anglers and all of the catch were sampled from the Camas/Washougal area.

Trout

Tacoma Power released 4,000 rainbow trout into Mayfield Lake. This week they will release another 4,000 rainbow trout into the lake.  No report on angling success.

By the end of this month, an estimated 72,000 catchable size rainbows will have been released into Mayfield Lake this year.

Lewis River reservoirs  – Notice – Updated August 4, 2016: Designated swimming areas at Swift Forest Campground, Cougar, Beaver Bay, Yale and Saddle Dam Parks are all closed due to low water. The boat launch at Cougar Park is also closed due to low water, however, kayaks can be easily portaged for launch. All other boat launches are available for use.

ERIC SHORT SHOWS OFF HIS SOUTH KING COUNTY PUGET SOUND ANGLERS SALMON DERBY-WINNING CHINOOK. (SOUTH KING COUNTY PSA)

17.3-pounder Wins SKC-PSA Derby

A 17.3-pound Chinook won last Saturday’s big South King County Puget Sound Anglers Salmon Derby.

Eric Short was the lucky angler, taking home a check for $3,500 at the 15th annual event.

ERIC SHORT SHOWS OFF HIS SOUTH KING COUNTY PUGET SOUND ANGLERS SALMON DERBY-WINNING CHINOOK. (SOUTH KING COUNTY PSA)

ERIC SHORT SHOWS OFF HIS SOUTH KING COUNTY PUGET SOUND ANGLERS SALMON DERBY-WINNING CHINOOK. (SOUTH KING COUNTY PSA)

Forty-one fish were weighed in and organizers reported that all of those fishermen collected prizes worth a minimum of $100.

Second place and $1,500 went to Greg Casade, who caught a 16.8-pounder, while third and $1,000 went to Tony Frigerio for his 16.55, which was also the biggest landed by a PSA member.

Jobe Henderson’s 10.85-pounder was the largest landed by a member of the military, good for $500, while Savannah Meir took first place in the kids division with her 8.35-pound Chinook, scoring her $300.

The derby was held on Areas 10, 11 and 13. Fish size was down compared to recent years’ events. Organizers report 224 anglers purchased tickets.

MORE RECENT RESULTS
* Aug. 4-6: 11th Annual Brewster Salmon Derby, Brewster Pool: First place (King of the Pool): Mindy Webster, 26.06 pounds; second: Les Willet, 24.77 pounds; third: Cody Simmons, 22.4 pounds

2016 NORTHWEST SALMON DERBY SERIES
The derby will go on – for the most part.

Organizers of the Everett Coho Derby, held annually in September, saw their event scrubbed due to this year’s low silver forecast, but they came up with a fix: the Everett No-Coho Blackmouth Derby.

It’s slated for midfall, and will also be when the Northwest Salmon Derby Series grand prize, a Hewescraft 220 OceanPro complete with a Mercury 225 Verado, 9.9 ProKicker, EZ-Loader tandem-axle galvanized trailer, Scotty downriggers, Lowrance electronics – and more will be awarded.

Here’s the rest of 2016’s schedule of events.
* Sept. 3: Willapa Bay Salmon Derby, Willapa Bay
* Nov. 5-6: Bayside Marine Salmon Derby, Areas 8-9
* Dec. 1-3: Friday Harbor Salmon Classic, Area 7
* Dec. 2-3: Resurrection Salmon Derby, Area 7
For more info, see northwestsalmonderbyseries.com.

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WA Fish Commission OK’s All-inclusive Fishing License

THE FOL.LOWING IS  A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Washington sport anglers soon will have two new options for fishing licenses after action taken by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission at its August meeting.

The commission, a citizen panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), voted to establish an all-inclusive, annual fishing license at its meeting in Olympia.

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The Fish Washington license will allow anglers to fish in both freshwater and saltwater and to harvest shellfish and seaweed, and includes endorsements for fishing with two poles and harvesting Puget Sound Dungeness crab and Columbia River salmon and steelhead.

The commission also approved a new combination fishing license for Washington residents 70 years and older. The license will allow senior anglers to fish in freshwater and saltwater and to harvest shellfish and seaweed.

The new licenses will be available for purchase this fall. The Fish Washington license will cost $79.62, including taxes and fees, while the senior combination license will be priced at $19.05.

In other business, commissioners voted to keep the Columbian white-tailed deer and the Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly listed as endangered species in Washington, as recommended by WDFW staff. Draft status reviews for both species can be found online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/endangered/.

The state’s population of Columbian white-tailed deer occupies the northern shores and islands of the lower Columbia River in Washington. The population has fluctuated from a low of 545 in 2002 to 966 in 2015. Despite activities to protect and restore habitat, much of the upland prairie that Columbian white-tailed deer prefer has been lost.

Taylor’s checkerspot butterflies were historically found in 45 Washington locations. Only eight populations can be found in the state today. Factors affecting these butterflies in Washington include the decline of grasslands, the invasion of non-native plant species and increased human development on the butterflies’ habitat.

Also at the August meeting, WDFW staff gave briefings to commissioners on the management of Pacific halibut, Willapa Bay area hatchery programs, and proposals to change the daily catch limit on Lake Roosevelt trout

KARI, AND CLIENT OF JIM AND JENN STAHL OF NW FISHING GUIDES, SHOWS OFF HER BEAUTIFUL FALL CHINOOK, CAUGHT LATE LAST WEEK. (NWFISHINGGUIDES.NET)

Good Tides At Buoy 10 This Week

It’s all about the tides at Buoy 10, and this week’s are lining up to be more productive for fall Chinook than the opening week at the mouth of the Columbia, according to an expert angler.

“This week’s morning tides are 5:30 today, 6:30 tomorrow, 7:30 on Wednesday — that should be really great — 8:45 on Thursday and 10 on Friday — that’ll be really good fishing,” says Buzz Ramsey of Yakima Bait.

He likes those softer tides — the ones with less exchange between high and low as the fish don’t get pushed through as fast and far.

Last week saw some 10-foot exchanges, which is a lot of water, but this week’s are as little as just 4 and 5 feet.

“Each day it seems to get better, and with the shallow tides this next week, I expect it to get real good,” reported Jim and Jenn Stahl of NW Fishing Guides over the weekend.

They really like the tides two weeks from now, which should coincide with the biggest push of salmon past Buoy 10.

KARI, AND CLIENT OF JIM AND JENN STAHL OF NW FISHING GUIDES, SHOWS OFF HER BEAUTIFUL FALL CHINOOK, CAUGHT LATE LAST WEEK. (NWFISHINGGUIDES.NET)

KARI, AND CLIENT OF JIM AND JENN STAHL OF NW FISHING GUIDES, SHOWS OFF HER BEAUTIFUL FALL CHINOOK, CAUGHT LATE LAST WEEK. (NWFISHINGGUIDES.NET)

While fishing last week was slower, at least compared to recent past years, fishery managers are standing by their predictions of another huge run of fall brights, in part based on commercial troll catches off Southeast Alaska earlier this year.

Ramsey was down at the mouth of the Columbia last Friday, and with the most productive part of the tide not until afternoon, he and his crew didn’t get on the water till the crack of 11 a.m., putting three in the boat by 5, when they returned to the dock.

RANDY WOOLSEY AND GUIDE BILL MONROE WITH A BUOY 10 CHINOOK CAUGHT AUGUST 5. IT BIT AN ANCHOVY BEHIND A MONEY-PATTERN BIG AL'S FISH FLASH. “FROM EVERYTHING WE SAW AND EXPERIENCED THE FISHING SHOULD STEADILY IMPROVE AS THE MILLION-FISH RUN BUILDS AND OCEAN TIDES BECOME MORE FAVORABLE TO ANGLERS,” SAYS BUZZ RAMSEY. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

RANDY WOOLSEY AND GUIDE BILL MONROE WITH A BUOY 10 CHINOOK CAUGHT AUGUST 5. IT BIT AN ANCHOVY BEHIND A MONEY-PATTERN BIG AL’S FISH FLASH. “FROM EVERYTHING WE SAW AND EXPERIENCED THE FISHING SHOULD STEADILY IMPROVE AS THE MILLION-FISH RUN BUILDS AND OCEAN TIDES BECOME MORE FAVORABLE TO ANGLERS,” SAYS BUZZ RAMSEY. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

Ramsey says he wished he’d stayed on the water too because a buddy of his landed three after quitting time.

He recommends fishing the middle part of the Columbia River’s broad estuary. He says the most productive time is the latter half of the incoming and first part of the outgoing.

Remember that on Sundays and Mondays, only hatchery Chinook (adipose or ventral fin clipped) can be kept.

CHINOOK ARE BITING ANCHOVIES AND HERRING BEHIND FISH FLASHES. (NWFISHINGGUIDES.NET)

CHINOOK ARE BITING ANCHOVIES AND HERRING BEHIND SPREADERS AND FISH FLASHES. (NWFISHINGGUIDES.NET)

One note if you’d planned on cleaning your catch in Astoria’s mooring basins: The facilities have closed down “due to environmental concerns.”

CLIENTS OF GUIDE DON TALBOT SHOW OFF A PORTION OF THE SOCKEYE THEY HOOKED AT LAKE WENATCHEE THIS MORNING. (DONSFISHINGGUIDESERVIC.COM)

‘One Of The Better Seasons’ On Lake Wenatchee Sockeye So Far

Sockeye anglers are doing well this summer on Lake Wenatchee, where season should run through the rest of this month, thanks to a run of at least 62,000 headed back to the Chelan County water.

“It’s one of the better seasons so far,” says state fisheries biologist Travis Maitland in Wenatchee.

CLIENTS OF GUIDE DON TALBOT SHOW OFF A PORTION OF THE SOCKEYE THEY HOOKED AT LAKE WENATCHEE THIS MORNING. (DONSFISHINGGUIDESERVIC.COM)

CLIENTS OF GUIDE DON TALBOT SHOW OFF A PORTION OF THE SOCKEYE THEY HOOKED AT LAKE WENATCHEE THIS MORNING. (DONSFISHINGGUIDESERVIC.COM)

He says that around 9,000 sockeye have been harvested so far, and that effort has been high — 4,600 angler trips since the lake opened two weeks ago.

Maitland says there’s a good possibility that the catch might even top 2014’s 16,255, caught over a 45-day season and six-fish limits.

“We might even see 20,000,” he says.

Last year, 8,000 were harvested during an 18-day season with four-fish limits.

Guide Don Talbot (509-679-8641) reported that his six clients from Seattle landed 18 sockeye by 11 this morning.

He says he was fishing 80 to 110 feet down with some sort of super-secret new set-up.

Maitland says that the Tumwater Dam count should now be up around 64,000 or 65,000 since its last update in late July.

He says the fishery will probably go through Labor Day, though salmon quality will decline and require anglers to be more selective in what they keep the closer we get to the holiday.

 

 

JAMES HANTHRO VENTURED FAR TO THE NORTH OF WASHINGTON'S COAST TO FISH VANCOUVER ISLAND'S PORT HARDY FOR SALMON AND LINGCOD, AND IS NOW HOOKED, REPORTS FISHING PARTNER MARK REYNOLDS. HE PLANS TO TAKE JAMES TO BUOY 10 THIS MONTH. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

Washington Coast Salmon Fishing Report (8-4-16)

THE FOLLOWING REPORT IS FROM WENDY BEEGHLEY OF WDFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

By Wendy Beeghley

Attached, for the week of July 25-31.  Note that weather limited effort substantially last week.

Columbia Ocean Area (including Oregon)

A total of 1,694 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery July 25-31, landing 334 Chinook and 243 coho.  Through Sunday, July 31, a total of 2,744 Chinook (27% of the area guideline) have been landed in the area, and 5,662 coho have been landed coastwide (30% of the coho quota).

Westport

A total of 1,070 anglers participated in the salmon fishery July 25-31, landing 420 Chinook.   Anglers fishing in the Columbia Ocean area also landed 4 coho into Westport.  Through Sunday, July 31, a total of 4,214 Chinook (25% of the area guideline) have been landed.

La Push

A total of 31 anglers participated in the salmon fishery July 25-31, landing 2 Chinook.  Through Sunday, July 31, a total of 221 Chinook (11% of the area guideline) have been landed.

Neah Bay

A total of 894 anglers participated in the salmon fishery July 25-31, landing 190 Chinook.  Through Sunday, July 31, a total of 3,016 Chinook (49% of the area guideline) have been landed.

JAMES HANTHRO VENTURED FAR TO THE NORTH OF WASHINGTON'S COAST TO FISH VANCOUVER ISLAND'S PORT HARDY FOR SALMON AND LINGCOD, AND IS NOW HOOKED, REPORTS FISHING PARTNER MARK REYNOLDS. HE PLANS TO TAKE JAMES TO BUOY 10 THIS MONTH. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

JAMES HANTHRO VENTURED FAR TO THE NORTH OF WASHINGTON’S COAST TO FISH VANCOUVER ISLAND’S PORT HARDY FOR SALMON AND LINGCOD, AND IS NOW HOOKED, REPORTS FISHING PARTNER MARK REYNOLDS. HE PLANS TO TAKE JAMES TO BUOY 10 THIS MONTH. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

Register Now For ODFW’s Free Youth Pheasant Hunts Next Month

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Registration is now open for ODFW’s free pheasant hunts for youth (age 17 and under) happening around the state in September.

The events are being held in Baker City, Central Point, Corvallis, Eugene, Hermiston area, John Day, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Portland, The Dalles (Tygh Valley). See dates below and register online (click View All Classes Workshops/Youth Upland Hunts), at a license sales agent or at an ODFW office that sells licenses.

ELLIOTT J. AND DOG LEAP WITH A PHEASANT TAKEN AT THE LADD MARSH WILDLIFE AREA YOUTH HUNT A FEW YEARS AGO. (VIA ODFW)

ELLIOTT J. AND DOG LEAP WITH A PHEASANT TAKEN AT THE LADD MARSH WILDLIFE AREA YOUTH HUNT A FEW YEARS AGO. (VIA ODFW)

ODFW and partners stock pheasants at these special hunts that give youth a head start on regular pheasant seasons, which don’t begin until October. Quail and dove may also be hunted. Volunteers often bring their trained hunting dogs to hunt with participants. Some events also begin with a shotgun skills clinic, so participants can practice clay target shooting before hunting.

These events are only open to youth who have passed hunter education. (ODFW has hunter education classes and field days available before the events.) An adult 21 years of age or older must accompany the youth to supervise but may not hunt.

“If your child made it through hunter education but is still new to the sport, this is a great way to get them started,” says James Reed, ODFW hunter education coordinator. “These events happen before regular pheasant seasons open and are a great opportunity for kids to get out hunting.”

ODFW stresses safety during the hunts. Both hunter and supervisor must wear a hunter orange hat, eye protection and a hunter orange vest—equipment provided by ODFW at the clinics to anyone who doesn’t have it. Hunters also need to check in and out of the hunt.

The hunts are free, though participants need a valid hunting license ($10 for youth 12 – 17, free for age 11 and under) to hunt. Youth hunters age 12-17 also need an upland game bird validation ($4). Purchase online, at a license sales agent or ODFW office that sells licenses. Licenses and tags will not be sold at the events.

While most areas have a hunt both Saturday and Sunday, youth hunters may only sign up for one hunt. They are welcome to hunt stand by on the other day.

See the links below or www.odfwcalendar.com for more details including who to contact for more information.

  • Baker City area, Sept. 24 and Sept. 25
  • Central Point, Denman Wildlife Area, Sept. 17 and Sept. 18.
  • Corvallis (near Camp Adair), EE Wilson Wildlife Area, Sept. 24 and Sept. 25.
  • Eugene, Fern Ridge Wildlife Area, Sept. 10 and Sept. 11.
  • Hermiston, Irrigon Wildlife Area, Sept. 24 and Sept. 25, sign up for morning or evening hunt.
  • John Day area, Sept. 17 and 18.
  • Klamath Falls, Klamath Wildlife Area, Sept. 17 and Sept. 18.
  • La Grande, Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, Sept. 17 and Sept. 18.
  • Madras, Gateway Canyon Preserve, Sept. 17 and Sept. 18, sign up for one of several three-hour hunting shifts.
  • Portland, Sauvie Island Wildlife Area, Sept. 17 and Sept. 18
  • Tygh Valley/The Dalles, White River Wildlife Area, Sept. 17 and Sept. 18.
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ODFW Extends Second Rod Ops To Coastal Fall King Rivers, Others

UPDATE: 10:45 A.M. AUG. 4, 2016: ODFW ISSUED AN UPDATED VERSION OF THIS PRESS RELEASE, WHICH FOLLOWS; CHANGES FROM THE ORIGINAL OCCUR IN THE PHRASINGS IN THE LAST SEVERAL PARAGRAPHS

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Oregon’s popular two-rod fishing validation will be extended to coastal streams open to salmon and steelhead fishing this fall to help anglers take advantage of expected strong Chinook salmon returns.

“We are expecting another strong return of fall Chinook this season, and allowing the expanded use of two rods for coastal rivers and bays will give anglers a great opportunity to harvest these fish,” said Mike Gauvin, manager of ODFW’s recreational fishing program.

The temporary rule is effective Aug. 4 – Oct. 31 in nearly all coastal rivers, bays, and estuaries open to angling for Chinook salmon, hatchery coho, and hatchery steelhead. Only a single rod can be used for any other game and non-game fish species.

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Two-rod validations are nothing new. ODFW has been gradually opening more waterways to the use of two rods. For $21.50, licensed anglers can purchase the right to use a second rod in certain locations of the state, including most ponds and lakes, and now coastal streams.

Gauvin noted that anglers whom have already purchased a 2016 Two-Rod Angling Validation do not need another one for the coastal openings. Also, youth anglers under 12 years of age are permitted under the rules to use two rods where allowed without purchasing a fishing license or a two-rod validation.

Two rods can be used in all coastal rivers in the Northwest Zone from Aug. 4 to Oct. 31 with the exception of the Nehalem River Basin where two rods may only be used from Sept/ 16 to Oct. 31

Additionally, in the Northwest Zone, two rods may not be used in the lower Columbia tributaries including Bear Creek, Big Creek, Gnat Creek, John Day River, Klaskanine River Basin (including north and south forks), Lewis and Clark River, Youngs River and Bay, Beaver Creek, and the Clatskanie River.

Two rods can be used in all coastal rivers in the Southwest Zone from Aug. 4 to Oct. 31; however the two-rod rule does not apply to some portions of the Umpqua, Rogue and Chetco Rivers, where only a single rod may be used. Only the following areas are open to the use of two rods in these rivers:

·        Umpqua River upstream to Scottsburg Bridge (Hwy. 38).

·        Rogue River upstream to the upstream deadline at the Ferry Hole Boat Ramp.

·        Chetco River upstream to the Harbor Water Intake.