Category Archives: Headlines

CODY WRIGHT'S 21.93-POUND CHINOOK WAS THE BIGGEST AT 2015'S SOUTH KING COUNTY PUGET SOUND ANGLERS SALMON DERBY, SCORING HIM THE GRAND PRIZE OF $3,500. (SKCPSA)

15th Annual South King County PSA Salmon Derby Coming Up Aug. 6

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM SOUTH KING COUNTY CHAPTER OF PUGET SOUND ANGLERS

The largest salmon derby in the Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia area will once again be held by South King County Puget Sound Anglers on August 6, 2016, at the Point Defiance Marina in Tacoma.

“We have increased the prize pool again this year so that everyone has an opportunity to win,” notes derby chairman Terry Wiest.  “The angler with the largest fish will take home at least $3,500, sponsored by 7UP, the 2nd largest $1,500, sponsored by SKC Puget Sound Anglers, and the 3rd largest $1,000, sponsored by Denali Federal Credit Union.”

 CODY WRIGHT'S 21.93-POUND CHINOOK WAS THE BIGGEST AT 2015'S SOUTH KING COUNTY PUGET SOUND ANGLERS SALMON DERBY, SCORING HIM THE GRAND PRIZE OF $3,500. (SKCPSA)

CODY WRIGHT’S 21.93-POUND CHINOOK WAS THE BIGGEST AT 2015’S SOUTH KING COUNTY PUGET SOUND ANGLERS SALMON DERBY, SCORING HIM THE GRAND PRIZE OF $3,500. (SKCPSA)

Five hundred dollars will also be awarded to the Puget Sound Anglers member with the largest fish.

To honor our military, we will continue to offer a $500 prize for the largest salmon caught by an active duty military or veteran.

Youth 14 and under may fish for free and the youth with the largest fish will take home $300.

In addition, there will be a huge raffle so everyone has an opportunity for a prize. The prize pool is over $25,000, with every prize valued at a minimum of $50.

As a part of the Northwest Salmon Derby Series, each paid ticket holder will again be entered to win a 21-foot Hewescraft boat fully rigged and valued at $65,000.

The derby, which draws anglers from all over the Pacific Northwest, will have weigh stations at Point Defiance Boathouse, Des Moines Marina and Narrows Marina. The main weigh station and awards ceremony will be held at Point Defiance Boathouse.

“This is our main fundraising event and supports our efforts to improve fisheries resources in the Pacific Northwest,” said derby cochair Bill Lee. “Proceeds from the derby benefit fisheries conservation and youth conservation education programs.”

Tickets may be purchased at: Point Defiance Boathouse, Narrows Marina, Sportco, Outdoor Emporium, C-J Marine, Auburn Sports and Marine, Sportsman’s Warehouse, and online at pugetsoundanglers.net.

JERRY HENDERSON HOISTS A COUPLE CHINOOK HE AND BOATMATES CAUGHT OFF WESTPORT LAST WEEKEND. (SALTPATROL.COM)

Westport Opens For 2 Chinook A Day Starting Saturday

THE FOLLOWING IS A WDFW EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE

Anglers can keep two chinook off Westport beginning July 23

Action:  Anglers will be allowed to keep two salmon daily in Marine Area 2 (Westport). Anglers will be allowed to keep up to two chinook daily but must release coho.

Effective date: July 23, 2016.

Species affected: Chinook.

    JERRY HENDERSON HOISTS A COUPLE CHINOOK HE AND BOATMATES CAUGHT OFF WESTPORT LAST WEEKEND. (SALTPATROL.COM)

JERRY HENDERSON HOISTS A COUPLE CHINOOK HE AND BOATMATES CAUGHT OFF WESTPORT LAST WEEKEND. (SALTPATROL.COM)

Locations:  Marine Area 2 (Westport), marine waters stretching from the Queets River to Leadbetter Point.

Reason for action: The fishery has sufficient chinook remaining within the guideline to increase the daily limit without much risk of having to close early. Through July 17, anglers had caught 13.9 percent (2,305 fish) of the 16,600 chinook guideline for Marine Area 2.The current limit is one salmon, no coho retention.

 Other information: The changes announced today do not affect ocean salmon fisheries off Ilwaco (Marine Area 1), La Push (Marine Area 3) or Neah Bay (Marine Area 4).

The daily limit in Marine Area 1 remains at two salmon, only one of which can be a chinook, release wild coho.

The daily limits in marine areas 3 and 4 remain at two salmon, no coho retention. Release chum in Marine Area 4 beginning Aug. 1.

Information Contact: Wendy Beeghley, ocean salmon manager for WDFW, (360) 249-1215.

SHERRYL CHRISTIE WAS AMONG THE LUCKY ANGLERS LANDING CHINOOK DURING LAST WEEKEND'S HATCHERY OPENER IN AREA 9. SHE CAUGHT THIS ESTIMATED 24-POUNDER, HER FIRST SALMON, OFF BUSH POINT. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

1,000 Kings Kept Opening Weekend Of Area 9-10 Hatchery Fishery

State fishery managers estimate central Puget Sound anglers landed just over 1,000 hatchery Chinook over opening weekend.

That’s about 22 percent of the overall quota of 4,451 marked kings available this summer in Marine Areas 9 and 10, but represents about a third of the northern water’s quota and less than 10 percent of the southern’s.

According to WDFW, 902 were landed in Area 9, which has a quota of 3,056, and 106 were in Area 10, which has a quota of 1,395.

SHERRYL CHRISTIE WAS AMONG THE LUCKY ANGLERS LANDING CHINOOK DURING LAST WEEKEND'S HATCHERY OPENER IN AREA 9. SHE CAUGHT THIS ESTIMATED 24-POUNDER, HER FIRST SALMON, OFF BUSH POINT. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

SHERRYL CHRISTIE WAS AMONG THE LUCKY ANGLERS LANDING CHINOOK DURING LAST WEEKEND’S HATCHERY OPENER IN AREA 9. SHE CAUGHT THIS ESTIMATED 24-POUNDER, HER FIRST SALMON, OFF BUSH POINT. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

Creel stats show that 96 kings were counted at the Everett ramp on Saturday, July 16, 44 at Shilshole and 36 at Fort Casey, while 79 were on Sunday, July 17, at Everett, 45 at Fort Casey and 29 at Shilshole.

WASHINGTON SEA GRANT’SAARON BARNETT PREPARING TO DISTRIBUTE SMALL OIL SPILL KITS. (MARYANN WAGNER, WASHINGTON SEA GRANT)

Free Kit Available To Puget Sound Fishermen Sops Up Oily Bilge Water, Prevents Pollution

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM WASHINGTON SEA GRANT

To paraphrase an old saying, “There’s no use crying over spilled oil.” Yet many are concerned with oil pollution in Puget Sound. What people don’t realize is that the biggest source of spills so far in the Sound has not been tankers and freighters, but small recreational and commercial vessels. Small spills, such as oily bilge discharge, account for 75 percent of the oil dumped into local waters over the last 10 years.

In the future, however, there may be a lot less to cry about, thanks to a simple remedy called the Small Oil Spills Prevention Kit consisting of a small absorbent pillow that is placed alongside bilge pumps to prevent oily discharge from entering the water. Washington boaters will be seeing and using a lot more of the kits in the coming months.

WASHINGTON SEA GRANT’SAARON BARNETT PREPARING TO DISTRIBUTE SMALL OIL SPILL KITS. (MARYANN WAGNER, WASHINGTON SEA GRANT)

WASHINGTON SEA GRANT’SAARON BARNETT PREPARING TO DISTRIBUTE SMALL OIL SPILL KITS. (MARYANN WAGNER, WASHINGTON SEA GRANT)

The Clean Marina Program, a partnership of the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance, the Northwest Marine Trade Association and Washington Sea Grant, has worked for 20 years to minimize small vessel spills. But this summer marks a change: for the first time the partners are targeting private boaters, rather than marina managers. Washington Sea Grant, the Washington Department of Ecology and Washington’s District 13 Coast Guard Auxiliary have launched the Small Spills Prevention Program to provide boaters with the knowledge and tools they need to stop oil pollution at the source. Last year, in a trial run, Washington Sea Grant Boating Program Specialist Aaron Barnett succeeded in distributing 1,000 spill prevention kits. This year that labor is bearing fruit: according to Coast Guard Auxiliary Instructor Mike Brough, more and more boaters are requesting kits after seeing their friends and other boaters use them. As Barnett explains, the success of the program depends on first, getting the kits out to boaters, and second, word of mouth—with boaters educating each other about oil spills.

Pollution prevention, pollution management

Washington boaters understand the importance of keeping our waterways clean. As frequent users of our region’s waters, they serve as the first line of defense against pollution and with the 2016 boating season now underway, this is an ideal time to set the Small Oil Spills program in motion.

Instructor Brough, a Seattle-based sailor and boating educator, is a leading proponent of the program. Brough recently handed out spill prevention kits at a local marina on National Marina Day. “It’s like handing out candy on Halloween,” he says. “Anyone with a bilge and inboard engine will take one. Boaters want to do the right thing, and these [kits] make it easier.”

Brough also got a chance to see the kits in action. “At the marina office, one boater was getting a new bilge sock to replace his old one,” he recounts. “The guy had gotten a crack in the lubrication oil line during a trip on the Sound. The broken line dumped a significant amount of oil into the bilge. The bilge sock he had been using caught all of the oil, and none went over board.”

Small spills can be expensive for boaters to clean up, and often cost is the first question boaters ask. In the state of Washington the kits are funded by the Barrel Tax and made available to boaters at no cost, through the Small Oil Spills Program.

Getting your own kit

This summer, the program hopes to hand out another 1,000 kits. Kits may be obtained during U.S. Coast Guard boat inspections or at marinas throughout the Puget Sound. If you or your organization would like to have kits sent directly to you, contact WSG’s Aaron Barnett at aaronb5@uw.edu.

Washington Sea Grant, based at the University of Washington, provides statewide marine research, outreach and education services, helping people understand and address the challenges facing our ocean and coasts. The National Sea Grant College Program is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. Visit www.wsg.washington.edu for more information or join the conversation with @WASeaGrant on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

fees

WDFW Wants To Talk About That Proposed License Increase At 6 August Meetings

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has scheduled six public workshops in early August at which the public can comment on the department’s proposals to expand conservation programs and provide more fishing and hunting opportunities through a combination of state funding and license fee increases.

The workshops are part of WDFW’s multi-year initiative, “Washington’s Wild Future: A Partnership for Fish and Wildlife,” an effort to strengthen the department’s relationships with communities, increase support for conservation and outdoor recreation, and help ensure WDFW programs and services meet the public’s needs.

fees

Last fall, thousands of Washingtonians shared their ideas at seven public open houses, through email submissions, social media and online comments, and during meetings with advisory committees and other groups.  The proposals being prepared for submission to the Governor and Legislature in September would enable the department to continue to meet its legal responsibilities and to respond to public input.

“We heard many good ideas last fall, and almost all of them called for more outdoor opportunities and expanded conservation efforts,” said WDFW Director Jim Unsworth.  “The Wild Future package reflects the input we received and identifies both our spending priorities and how we could pay for them. The workshops offer a great opportunity for Washingtonians to help us refine these strategies.”

Documents describing the draft spending and revenue proposals are available on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/wildfuture/, where people can also provide comments.

Each of the following workshop will take place from 6 to 8 p.m.:

Aug. 2 – Center Place, 2426 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley.
Aug. 3 – Selah Civic Center, 216 S 1st St, Selah.
Aug. 8 – Water Resources Education Center, 4600 S.E. Columbia Way, Vancouver.
Aug. 9 – Chelan County Public Utility District Auditorium, 327 N. Wenatchee Ave, Wenatchee.
Aug. 10 – WDFW Mill Creek Office, 16018 Mill Creek Blvd, Mill Creek.
Aug. 11 – Willapa Harbor Community Center, 916 W. First St., South Bend.

The workshops will include a brief presentation from a WDFW regional director, describing proposals to maintain and improve fish, habitat, and wildlife management in Washington. Participants will be invited to talk in greater detail with representatives of the department’s Fish, Wildlife, Enforcement, Licensing, and Habitat programs.

(DONSFISHINGGUIDESERVICE.COM)

Sockeye Biting For Anglers At Lake Wenatchee Opener

UPDATED 4 P.M., JULY 20, 2016, AT BOTTOM WITH GUIDE DON TALBOT’S AFTERNOON REPORT

Anglers are finding good fishing at today’s opener on Lake Wenatchee.

“Nineteen sockeye and plenty more on the line,” reported guide and Northwest Sportsman columnist Don Talbot around midday.

CLIENTS OF GUIDE DON TALBOT POSE WITH THEIR LAKE WENATCHEE SOCKEYE, CAUGHT ON TODAY'S OPENER. (DONSFISHINGGUIDESERVICE.COM)

CLIENTS OF GUIDE DON TALBOT POSE WITH THEIR LAKE WENATCHEE SOCKEYE, CAUGHT ON TODAY’S OPENER. (DONSFISHINGGUIDESERVICE.COM)

More than 32,000 have crossed Tumwater Dam, a few miles below the Chelan County lake, and the daily limit is six per angler.

A photo on Facebook showed one young local angler with a half dozen on his punchcard from today, while shortly before 1 p.m. WDFW reported a “record attendance of some 450 happy anglers.”

State fishery managers expect 60,000 back to the lake, though the dam count appears to be slowing down.

“Caught most of the fish 60 feet down in the upper end of the lake out toward the middle,” Talbot says, adding that the red salmon are big and fight hard.

“We lost two flashers that wrapped around the downrigger ball at the boat,” he says.

He suggests using a rigging diagram he ran in his Basin Beacon column last summer.

lk2

Per WDFW, selective gear rules are in effect on the lake and allow for up to three barbless hooks per line. But to protect listed stocks, anglers can’t use bait or scent like on the Brewster Pool and Baker Lake. Knotless nets are required, and bull trout, Chinook and steelhead must be kept in the water. The fishery is open until further notice.

Talbot runs quickie four-hour trips on Lake Wenatchee for around $100. For more, give him a jingle at (509) 679-8641.

…..

After running another trip on today’s opener, Talbot sent an us an update:

“Second trip at 1:30 this afternoon. Wow!!! This lake is on fire.  My boat is 100 percent dialed in.

“We caught a dandy 26-inch, 6 1/2-pound whopper and a 5-pound Dandy that Dave Getzin is holding.”

(DONSFISHINGGUIDESERVICE.COM)

(DONSFISHINGGUIDESERVICE.COM)

“Getting calls from all over the Northwest. This is hot!!!”
KAYAK ANGLER JEFF ANDERSON FOUND A PAIR OF NICE KINGS OFF THE NORTHWEST COAST THIS PAST WEEKEND, INCLUDING THIS WILD CHINOOK. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

Washington Coast Salmon Fishing Report (7-20-16)

THE FOLLOWING REPORTS ARE FROM WENDY BEEGHLEY, WDFW, AND JOHN KEIZER, SALTPATROL.COM

by Wendy Beeghley, WDFW

Columbia Ocean Area (including Oregon)

A total of 2,156 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery July 11-17, landing 811Chinook  and 1,467 coho.  Through Sunday, July 17, a total of 1,025 Chinook (10% of the area guideline) and 4,624 coho (25% of the area sub-quota) have been landed

KAYAK ANGLER JEFF ANDERSON FOUND A PAIR OF NICE KINGS OFF THE NORTHWEST COAST THIS PAST WEEKEND, INCLUDING THIS WILD CHINOOK. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

KAYAK ANGLER JEFF ANDERSON FOUND A PAIR OF NICE KINGS OFF THE NORTHWEST COAST THIS PAST WEEKEND, INCLUDING THIS WILD CHINOOK. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

Westport

A total of 2,331 anglers participated in the salmon fishery July 11-17, landing 1,192 Chinook.   Anglers fishing in the Columbia Ocean area also landed 215 coho into Westport.  Through Sunday, July 17, a total of 2,305 Chinook (14% of the area guideline) have been landed

La Push

A total of 109 anglers participated in the salmon fishery July 11-17, landing 44 Chinook.  Through Sunday, July 17, a total of 115 Chinook (6% of the area guideline) have been landed

Neah Bay

A total of 1,942 anglers participated in the salmon fishery July 11-17, landing 998 Chinook.  Through Sunday, July 17, a total of 2,227 Chinook (36% of the area guideline) have been landed\

…….

By John Keizer, Saltpatrol.com

Westport was still great king fishing for the Salt Patrol team. We fished 12 miles SW of the harbor mouth and found lots of kings in the 17-20 pound range.

Most of our action came in the early AM hours fishing 90 ft on the downriggers and later in the day 120-150ft.

Top producers setups were a Yakima Bait Fish Flash with an anchovy or a Silver Horde Kingfisher Lite Spoon. Brine up the anchovies in Pro-Cure Brine N Bite Complete it gave them that extra flash and out fished plain bait 3-1.

Bottom fishing is still excellent in the area too with lots of black bass and ling cod. Lost one fish to the Tax Man.

(STEVE JEFFRIES, WDFW)

‘Colossal’ Raft Of Sea Otters Spotted Off Hoh Head

UDPATED: 8:40 A.M. JULY 20, 2016

Sea otters are rebounding off the Washington Coast, but this is kinda crazy.

An aerial survey in late June turned up a staggering number rafted up off the Olympic Peninsula — 687, according to a state biologist’s count off an aerial photo.

(STEVE JEFFRIES, WDFW)

(STEVE JEFFRIES, WDFW)

They were lounging in open water a mile or so offshore and south of Hoh Head, near the mouth of the Hoh River, for three days.

“I think it’s the biggest raft we’ve seen in Washington,” says U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Deanna Lynch, who quickly corrected herself to say, “Matter of fact, I know it’s the largest raft we’ve seen in Washington.”

In an email that found its way to Northwest Sportsman, WDFW biologist Steve Jeffries said it was the largest he’s seen in surveying all the way back to the late 1970s.

Lynch says that during annual early summer survey’s since 1989, they’ve seen up to 300 or 400 near Destruction Island, but those have all been juvenile males.

What makes this “colossal” raft so unusual is that it included females and pups.

“We rarely see them comingled,” Lynch says.

So … why were there so many together?

“We have no idea,” admits Lynch. “We were all flabbergasted.”

What makes it odder is that ground counters tallied typical numbers in other waters off the peninsula, she says.

Sea otters, which technically are overgrown saltwater weasels, primarily eat crabs, clams, urchins, even octopus — “anything they can pry off,” Lynch says.

According to Jeffries, this particular spot is “a razor clam and Dungeness crab hot spot.”

Rapidly building numbers in Vancouver Island have caused concern for shellfish harvesters. Stories we’ve run on the fishing there have used the term overabundant to describe sea otter numbers.

“Razor clams are big. If the population expands in any great numbers farther south, I think it will become an issue,” Lynch told OPB for a 2009 story. “The crab may be an issue, although nobody has really said anything about that currently.”

Responding to our Facebook post on this, reader Keith Paddock posited, “It would be nice to see them make it around the corner, into the Straits and back in the San Juans and Puget Sound. Help thin out the urchins, which in turn develops more kelp beds and creates more habitat for forage fish and a healthier ecosystem.

According to WDFW, the growth of the state’s sea otter population appears to be slowing.

You want to say that summer 2016 is a return to normal after the hell that was 2015, but then something like 687 sea otters kegged up in a raft off the Washington Coast makes you wonder.

But maybe that — and the whales in the Straits and Columbia mouth — are a good sign that once again there’s lots to eat.

DUE TO THIS YEAR'S LOWER COLUMBIA COHO FORECAST, HATCHERY LIMITS HAVE BEEN REDUCED FROM SIX TO TWO ON A NUMBER OF SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON STREAMS. KURT SARKELA HOOKED THIS VERY NICE SILVER ON A POPULAR RIVER WHILE BACK-TROLLING A MAG LIP 3.5 WHILE FISHING WITH JASON RESSER. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

Fall Salmon Rule Tweaks For SW WA, Plus 7-19-16 Fishing Report

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED WITH WDFW AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSFMC

Fall salmon regulation changes scheduled to begin August 1:

With the forecasted reduced run size, anglers will be limited to two hatchery adult coho (was previously 6 fish) on all tributaries to the lower Columbia River. Those rivers include:

Deep River
Mainstem Grays River, including West Fork
Elochoman River
Cowlitz River
Toutle River
North Fork Toutle River
Green River (Cowlitz Co.)
Tilton River
Cispus River
Kalama River
Lewis River including North Fork
Washougal River
Klickitat River

DUE TO THIS YEAR'S LOWER COLUMBIA COHO FORECAST, HATCHERY LIMITS HAVE BEEN REDUCED FROM SIX TO TWO ON A NUMBER OF SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON STREAMS. KURT SARKELA HOOKED THIS VERY NICE SILVER ON A POPULAR RIVER WHILE BACK-TROLLING A MAG LIP 3.5 WHILE FISHING WITH JASON RESSER. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

DUE TO THIS YEAR’S LOWER COLUMBIA COHO FORECAST, HATCHERY LIMITS HAVE BEEN REDUCED FROM SIX TO TWO ON A NUMBER OF SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON STREAMS. KURT SARKELA HOOKED THIS VERY NICE SILVER ON A POPULAR RIVER WHILE BACK-TROLLING A MAG LIP 3.5 WHILE FISHING WITH JASON RESSER. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

In an effort to remove stray hatchery fish from the spawning grounds, for the first time ever hatchery Chinook and hatchery coho will be allowed to be retained during hatchery steelhead seasons on:

Delemeter Creek
Olequa Creek
Stillwater Creek
Lacamas Creek (Lewis Co.)
Salmon Creek (Lewis Co.)
Outlet Creek (Cowlitz Co.)
South Fork Toutle River
Blue Creek (Lewis Co.) from mouth to posted sign above rearing pond outlet
Mill Creek (Lewis Co.) from mouth to hatchery road crossing culvert
East Fork Lewis River from mouth to 400 feet downstream of Horseshoe Falls
Salmon Creek (Clark Co.) from mouth to 182 Ave.
Little Washougal River
West (North) Fork Washougal River
Hamilton Creek
Lower Rock Creek (Skamania Co.) from mouth to falls
White Salmon River from county road bridge upstream to 400 feet below Big Brother Falls

In an effort to further reduce snagging, fish must be hooked inside the mouth when the anti-snagging rule is in effect on several additional lower Columbia River tributaries including:

Grays River from mouth to Hwy. 4 Bridge and West Fork
Grays River from Hwy. 4 Bridge to South Fork
Elochoman River from mouth to West Fork
White Salmon River from the mouth upstream to the county road bridge below the former location of the powerhouse
Drano Lake
Mainstem Columbia from Bonneville Dam upstream to McNary Dam

This would make the anti-snagging rule with the hooked inside the mouth restriction consistent in the Washington tributaries from the Grays River upstream to the Klickitat River.

Buoy 10 – The Buoy 10 fishery will begin on August 1 with a two fish of which one may be an Chinook daily limit through September 5 (Labor Day). Chinook retention on Sundays and Mondays during this timeframe will be limited to hatchery fish with an adipose fin clip. From September 6-30, Chinook retention is closed. From October 1 through December 31, the daily limit will be two adults.  From August 1 through December 31, only one hatchery steelhead may be kept.

Catch (and release mortality) expectations total 48,500 Chinook and 22,700 Coho (including 2,460 unmarked mortalities).

Mainstem Columbia from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam – Will be open August 1 through December 31 but only one hatchery steelhead may be retained and Chinook retention seasons and daily limits vary by river section. The following describes the expected season and daily limits separated by area:

o From the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to the Lewis River/Warrior Rock line, any Chinook retention is allowed August 1 through September 9 is followed by a Chinook Mark Selective Fishery (adipose fin clip only) from September 10 – 14. The daily limit for both fisheries is two adults of which only one may be a Chinook.  The area will be closed for Chinook retention from September 15-30.

o From the Lewis River/Warrior Rock line upstream to Bonneville Dam, any Chinook retention allowed will be August 1 through December 31 with a two adult daily limit.

Harvest (including release mortality) expectations include 33,620 adult Chinook and 1,570 adult Coho.

Mainstem Columbia from Bonneville Dam to the Highway 395 Bridge in Pasco – Will begin be open August 1 with a two adult  daily limit through December 31. Beginning September 1, only one hatchery steelhead may be kept from Bonneville Dam upstream to McNary Dam and from McNary Dam upstream to the Highway 395 Bridge beginning November 1.

The total catch expectation is nearly 8,000 adult Chinook.

From Buoy 10 upstream to the Oregon/Washington border – Each angler aboard a vessel may deploy recreational salmon/steelhead gear until the daily salmonid limit for all anglers aboard has been achieved.

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – No creel sampling last week.

Wind River – Effort an catch is light at the mouth.  2 boat anglers had no catch.

Drano Lake – Effort is light but steelhead catch is good, especially for boat anglers averaging a fish per rod when including fish released.  7 bank anglers released 1 wild steelhead.  42 boat anglers kept 29 steelhead and released 16 fish.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Last week we sampled 1,466 salmonid anglers (including 223 boats) with 56 adult and 9 jack summer Chinook, 192 steelhead, and 30 sockeye.  Just 23 (41%) of the adult Chinook were kept.  101 (53%) of the steelhead and all of the sockeye were kept.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem from the marker 82 line downstream –  We sampled 28 sturgeon anglers (including 6  boats) with 27 legals released.  The majority of the fish were caught in the Kalama area.

Walleye

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – We sampled 16 walleye anglers (12 boats) with 9 fish kept and 18 released.  All the catch was sampled in the Camas/Washougal area.

BLUE LAKE, WHERE IAN BIRMINGHAM TIED INTO THIS NICE BROWN TROUT SEVERAL OPENERS AGO, WOULD BE ROTENONED TO REMOVE BASS, BULLHEADS AND OTHER UNWANTED SPECIES, UNDER A WDFW PROPOSAL. BIRMINGHAM CAUGHT THE TROUT ON A FLY TIED BY HIS DAD, DAVE. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

WDFW Proposes Rotenoning Sun Lakes Chain Waters, Looking For Comments

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

State fishery managers will host three public meetings in late July to discuss plans to treat several lakes and a stream in eastern Washington with rotenone, a naturally occurring pesticide commonly used to remove undesirable and illegally stocked fish species from lakes and streams.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is proposing to treat Park, Blue, Vic Meyers and Mirror Lakes in Grant County this fall to remove species ranging from bass and bullhead to stunted panfish. The department is also proposing to treat a five-mile section of Smalle Creek in Pend Oreille County.

BLUE LAKE, WHERE IAN BIRMINGHAM TIED INTO THIS NICE BROWN TROUT SEVERAL OPENERS AGO, WOULD BE ROTENONED TO REMOVE BASS, BULLHEADS AND OTHER UNWANTED SPECIES, UNDER A WDFW PROPOSAL. BIRMINGHAM CAUGHT THE TROUT ON A FLY TIED BY HIS DAD, DAVE. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

BLUE LAKE, WHERE IAN BIRMINGHAM TIED INTO THIS NICE BROWN TROUT SEVERAL OPENERS AGO, WOULD BE ROTENONED TO REMOVE BASS, BULLHEADS AND OTHER UNWANTED SPECIES, UNDER A WDFW PROPOSAL. BIRMINGHAM CAUGHT THE TROUT ON A FLY TIED BY HIS DAD, DAVE. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

“The goal is to restore trout populations by removing competing species that have essentially taken over these waters,” said Bruce Bolding, WDFW warmwater fish program manager. “Illegally stocked fish compete with trout fry for food and prey upon them, rendering efforts to stock trout ineffective. At Smalle Creek, we are proposing to remove non-native eastern brook trout in order to restore a population of native westslope cutthroat.”

WDFW has scheduled public meetings to discuss the planned lake and stream treatments as follows:

  • Olympia: 6 to 7 p.m. Friday, July 22, in Room 175 of the Natural Resources Building, 1111 Washington St.
  • Ephrata: 6 to 8 p.m. Monday, July 25, at the Grant County Public Works Department Building, 124 Enterprise St. SE
  • Newport: 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 28, at the Create Art Center, 900 W 4th St.

In addition to input received at the public meetings, WDFW will consider written comments received through Aug. 4. Comments should be addressed to Bruce Bolding, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA 98501-1091.

A decision on whether to proceed with the planned treatments will be made by the WDFW director in early September.

Rotenone is an organic substance derived from the roots of tropical plants, which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved for use as a fish pesticide. It has been used by WDFW in lake and stream rehabilitations for more than 70 years, and is commonly used by other fish and wildlife management agencies nationwide.