Tag Archives: fishing

Southwest Washington Fishing Report (9-20-17)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS COLLECTED BY ODFW AND WDFW STAFF AND TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Lower Columbia mainstem sport update

Last week on the lower Columbia, anglers made 15,120 trips and caught 6,350 adult Chinook (5,765 kept and 585 released) 358 adult coho (188 kept and 170 released) and 165 summer steelhead (123 kept and 42 released)..

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – From the I-5 Bridge downstream:  12 boats/42 rods kept 13 adult and 2 jack Chinook and released 42 adult and 4 jack Chinook.  5 bank anglers had no catch.  No anglers were sampled upstream from the bridge.

ANOTHER GREAT OUTING OFF DRANO LAKE FOR WILLIAM AND HIS DAD, CLAY HULL. THEY WERE AGAIN FISHING WITH JOE MCCARL AND REPORT GOING TWO FOR FOUR. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 188 fall Chinook adults, 20 fall Chinook jacks, 18 summer-run steelhead, 62 spring Chinook adults, two spring Chinook jacks, 65 coho adults, two coho jacks, and 14 cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 40 spring Chinook adults, one spring Chinook jack, five coho adults and one cutthroat trout into the Cispus River near the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek and they released 16 spring Chinook adults, one coho adult and one cutthroat trout at Franklin Bridge in Packwood.

Tacoma Power released 137 fall Chinook adults, 19 fall Chinook jacks, four coho adults, one coho jack and nine cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 2,720 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, September 18. Water visibility is 13 feet and water temperature is 54.9 degrees F. River

Lewis River – No report on angling success.  On the mainstem and North Fork Lewis rivers, any Chinook, adipose fin clipped or not, may be retained effective September 23.

Drano Lake – 33 boats/75 anglers kept 33 adult Chinook and adult coho and released 3 steelhead.  There were 65 boats were here last Saturday morning.

Bonneville Pool – 18 boats/43 anglers kept 22 adult Chinook.  Last Saturday morning there were 75 boats off the Klickitat, 40 off the White Salmon, and 30 off Drano Lake.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (9-20-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (9/16) flight, 939 salmonid boats and 10 Oregon bank anglers were counted from Tongue Point to Corbett; and 196 Oregon boats were counted at Buoy 10.  Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 0.12 Chinook and 1.62 coho caught per boat.  In the gorge, boat anglers averaged 1.10 Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.44 Chinook and 0.01 coho caught per boat.  In the Portland to Westport area, boat anglers averaged 0.74 Chinook, 0.05 coho and 0.01 steelhead caught per boat.  In the Bonneville Pool, boat anglers averaged 1.67 Chinook, 0.02 coho and 0.02 steelhead caught per boat, while anglers fishing in The Dalles Pool caught 1.24 Chinook and 0.06 coho caught per boat.  In the John Day Pool, boat anglers averaged 0.17 Chinook caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.44 Chinook and 0.11 coho caught per angler.

FALL SALMON ARE MOVING UP THE COLUMBIA. WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM DAUGHTER CASSIDY, 13 MONTHS OLD, AUSTIN BOWEN SHOWS OFF A FALL CHINOOK HE PICKED UP LAST WEEKEND FISHING A PRAWN SPINNER BEHIND A FISH FLASH. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Gorge Bank: No report.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed 32 Chinook adults and two Chinook jacks kept for 29 boats (81 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed 74 Chinook adults, four Chinook jacks and one coho adult kept, plus two Chinook adults and one pink released for 172 boats (383 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed one coho adult kept, plus four Chinook adults released for nine bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed 154 Chinook adults, three Chinook jacks, five coho adults and two steelhead kept, plus six Chinook adults, one Chinook jack and five coho adults released for 215 boats (489 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Above Tongue Point): Weekend checking showed four coho adults kept, plus one coho adult released for one boat (two anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 161 coho adults kept, plus 20 Chinook and 101 coho released for 162 boats (486 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed 158 Chinook adults, 14 Chinook jacks, two coho adults and two steelhead kept, plus six Chinook adults released for 98 boats (234 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed 21 Chinook adults, three Chinook jacks and one coho adult kept for 17 boats (47 anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for three bank anglers; and five Chinook adults and one Chinook jack kept for 29 boats (54 anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed four sublegal and eight legal white sturgeon released for two boats (seven anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Closed for retention. No report.

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention. Weekly checking showed three sublegal, one legal and five oversize sturgeon released for one boat (two anglers).

John Day Pool: Closed for retention. No report.

WALLEYE

Gorge:  No report.

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (two anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point:  Weekend checking showed one walleye kept for two boats (three anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 24 walleye kept, plus one walleye released for three boats (nine anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one bank angler; and 53 walleye kept, plus 16 walleye released for 15 boats (28 anglers).

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (9-13-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Weekend Fishing Opportunities:

*         The fall salmon season is open from Buoy 10 upstream to the Oregon/Washington Border above McNary Dam (see Sport Fishing Regulation Updates page for retention details).  An estimated 613,800 fall Chinook and 319,300 coho are expected to return to the Columbia River this fall.

*         White sturgeon retention is closed from Buoy 10 upstream to the Oregon/Washington Border above McNary Dam, but remains an option for catch and release fishing.

ALEXCIS HIGGINBOTHAM IS ALL SMILES AFTER CATCHING HER FIRST STURGEON, A 50-INCHER HELD BY HER DAD, JAROD HIGGINBOTHAM OF YAKIMA BAIT. (JAROD HIGGINBOTHAM)

*         Walleye angling is good in the John Day pool.

Current Columbia River regulations for salmon, steelhead, shad and sturgeon can be found at the Sport Fishing Regulation Update<http://www.dfw.state.or.us/resources/fishing/reg_changes/index.asp> page.

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (9/9) flight, 991 salmonid boats and nine Oregon bank anglers were counted from Tongue Point to Bonneville Dam; and 221 Oregon boats were counted at Buoy 10.  Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 5.24 coho and 0.45 Chinook caught per boat.  In the gorge, boat anglers averaged 2.33 Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.32 Chinook caught per boat.  In the Portland to Tongue Point area, boat anglers averaged 0.85 Chinook and 0.01 coho caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.07 Chinook caught per angler.

Gorge Bank: No report.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed seven Chinook adults and two Chinook jacks kept for three boats (nine anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed 30 Chinook adults and two Chinook jacks kept for 93 boats (215 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed one Chinook adult and one Chinook jack released for 15 bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed 89 Chinook adults, three Chinook jacks and one coho adult kept, plus 57 Chinook adults, two Chinook jacks and one coho adult released for 172 boats (430 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Above Tongue Point): Weekend checking showed six coho kept for six boats (18 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 510 coho kept, plus 381 coho, 77 Chinook and one steelhead released for 170 boats (498 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed 25 Chinook adults, six Chinook jacks and one steelhead kept, plus eight Chinook adults released for 57 boats (130 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed 14 Chinook adults and one Chinook jack kept for 25 boats (53 anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for seven boats (18 anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed one sublegal sturgeon released for two boats (five anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

John Day Pool: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed 30 sublegal and six legal white sturgeon released for three boats (eight anglers).

WALLEYE

Gorge:  No report.

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed 13 walleye kept, plus one walleye released for eight boats (15 anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point:  No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (one angler).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for five bank anglers; and 31 walleye kept, plus 35 walleye released for 19 boats (42 anglers).

Catches Sparkling For Angler Taping His Lures With New Product

Editor’s note: The following blog was written and submitted by reader Kelly Corcoran of Boston Harbor, near Olympia.

by Kelly Corcoran

He’s put more smiles on fishermen’s faces than he will ever know. Who? That would be Otto Lagelbauer, an 81-year-old tackle inventor and fisherman who created the Grim Reefer jig and now a super-sparkly tape for lures.

Ask any fisherman from Alaska to the lower Puget Sound and they will tell you that Otto’s jigs will catch everything from rockfish to salmon and more.

I first met Otto about nine years ago, while he was doing a seminar for the Puget Sound Anglers’ South Sound Chapter.

OTTO LAGELBAUER. (HYPER-BLING.COM)

Otto explained in great detail how flash and action excite fish and trigger strikes, especially in low-light conditions where most predator fish prowl. He shared why his jigs were so effective, the “hyper-vis painting process” he developed and field tested for many years with excellent results.

Most fishermen who find a lure that consistently catch fish get lockjaw and aren’t willing to share their secrets. Not Otto; he wants you to catch fish, as well as learn why fish react in different conditions.

BACKED BY VERY STICKY TAPE, HYPER-VIS+ IS DESCRIBED AS A “MULTI-AXIS VISUAL ATTRACTANT” THAT YOU CAN APPLY TO FISHING LURES — IT’S THE SUPER-SPARKLY STRIP ON THE SIDE OF THE JIG THAT THIS CHINOOK BIT. (HYPER-BLING.COM)

As a fish junky I asked a lot of questions and he had fast replies that all made perfect since. At the end of his talk he came over to me and gave me a 2 2/5-ounce Grim Reefer jig and, with a big ol’ smile, told me, “Give this a try.”

A week later, I was in the East Cape of Baja, Mexico, fishing the Sea of Cortez, casting from the beach into exploding fish with no results. Then I remembered that I had brought that jig with me.

First cast I hooked a beautiful roosterfish, or pez gallo as it’s known in Mexico.

For the next couple of hours the catching continued. Now I know why Otto had had that big ol’ smile on his face when he gave me the jig. He knew that smile was contagious.

AUTHOR KELLY CORCORAN BEGAN TO THINK HE WAS ONTO SOMETHING AFTER A TRIP ON A LOCAL LAKE YIELDED BASS AND A LOT MORE. (KELLY CORCORAN)

When I made it home, I called Otto to tell him what happened. His response: “I’m not surprised; I get letters all the time from people all over telling me the same thing.

In April of this year the phone rang and it was Otto, who asked me how the fishing was. My reply was that it had been good and we were catching fish.

“I have a new product out; you interested?” he asked.

Somehow I knew we were both smiling at the same time.

As fishermen, we all want to learn and have that extra advantage with the time spent on the water.  Of course I was interested, Otto!

Otto drove to my house that day. “What I have here will help you catch more fish, and I’m going to tell you why,” he explained.

He showed me his new invention, did a complete demonstration and had my head spinning around like a No. 6 Vibrax spinner.

PAULA CORCORAN SHOWS OFF THE FRUITS OF A SUCCESSFUL SURF PERCH FISHING TRIP. (KELLY CORCORAN)

Again I asked questions and got fast replies that made perfect sense — deja vu all over again from nine years ago.

Otto left me some samples and said he would wait for my call.

As soon as he left I headed for the nearest lake to give it a go. It wasn’t the first cast but the second, third … and for the next two hours I caught fish — four different species.

Being skeptical I wanted to test it again the next day, so my wife and I drove to the ocean to fish redtail surf perch.

It turned out to be one of our best days of fishing the surf; we left the beach with easy limits and big ol’ smiles. Otto strikes again, I thought.

Since April we have caught 25 different species of fish in all conditions using his new product. Our catch ratio has more than doubled.

CORCORAN HAS DRESSED UP HIS SALMON LURES WITH HYPER-VIS+ TAPE TO DEADLY EFFECT AS A GOOD RUN OF NISQUALLY CHINOOK HAVE RETURNED TO HIS HOME WATERS IN SOUTH PUGET SOUND. (KELLY CORCORAN)

What is Otto’s new product? It’s called Hyper-vis +. I’m going to let Otto tell you what the hype is all about.

You can contact him at www.hyper-bling.com.

A big thank you to Otto Lagelbauer for sharing secrets that
help fishermen and fisherwomen catch more fish.

And for the Big Ol’ Smile.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (9-6-17)

THE FOLLOWING IS THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE’S WEEKLY RECREATION REPORT

SALMON, STEELHEAD AND SHAD

Five hundred thirteen Oregon boats were counted at Buoy 10 this past Saturday. Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 1.73 Chinook and 1.71 coho caught per boat. In the gorge, boat anglers averaged 1.00 Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.11 Chinook caught per boat. In the Portland to Tongue Point area, boat anglers averaged 0.44 Chinook and 0.01 coho caught per boat, while anglers fishing in the estuary above Tongue Point averaged 1.42 Chinook and 0.56 coho caught per boat. Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.07 Chinook caught per angler.

SALMON FISHING BEGINS IN EARNEST IN THE COLUMBIA ABOVE BUOY 10 AND ITS COLUMBIA GORGE TRIBS AS THE RUN PROCEEDS UPRIVER. WILLIAM HULL, 6, HAD QUITE A TUSSLE WITH THIS CHINOOK OUTSIDE DRANO LAKE WHILE FISHING WITH HIS DAD, CLAY, AND CLAY’S FRIEND JOE McCARL OUT OF JOE’S BOAT.  (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed one Chinook adult kept for 14 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed seven Chinook adults and one Chinook jack kept for seven boats (24 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed four Chinook adults kept for 37 boats (72 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for four bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed 97 Chinook adults, three Chinook jacks, and two coho adults kept, plus three Chinook adults and one Chinook jack released for 225 boats (556 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Above Tongue Point): Weekend checking showed 74 Chinook adults, seven Chinook jacks and 16 coho adults kept, plus one Chinook jack and 13 coho released for 52 boats (168 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 522 Chinook adults and 390 coho kept, plus 65 Chinook adults and 191 coho released for 339 boats (1,149 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for three bank anglers; and 45 Chinook adults and four Chinook jacks kept, plus 12 Chinook adults released for 81 boats (185 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed 38 Chinook adults, five Chinook jacks and one steelhead kept, plus one steelhead released for 64 boats (168 anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for two bank anglers; and no catch for two boats (four anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. No report.

Bonneville Pool: Closed for retention. No report.

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention. Weekly checking showed 13 sublegal sturgeon released for one boat (two anglers).

John Day Pool: Closed for retention. Weekly checking showed 20 sublegal, 13 legal and 14 oversize sturgeon released for seven boats (15 anglers).

WALLEYE

Gorge: No report.

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed one walleye kept for two boats (four anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point: No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 29 walleye kept, and seven walleye released for nine boats (22 anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for two bank anglers; and 27 walleye kept, plus 39 walleye released for 17 boats (33 anglers).

 

Late Humptulips Regs Tweak: Release Wild Kings, WDFW Says

THE FOLLOWING IS A 5 P.M. FRIDAY AFTERNOON EMERGENCY RULE CHANGE NOTICE FROM WDFW

Anglers fishing the Humptulips River must release wild chinook

Action: Anglers fishing the Humptulips River must release all wild chinook salmon.

THOUGH WDFW’S PRINTED FISHING PAMPHLET ALLOWED FOR THE RETENTION OF ONE WILD HUMPTULIPS KING A DAY STARTING TODAY, AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE OUT IN LATE AFTERNOON SAYS THEY MUST BE RELEASED EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY. DARREL SMITH CAUGHT THIS ONE FROM THE SOUTH OLYPEN RIVER SEVERAL SEASONS AGO. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Effective dates: Immediately, until further notice.

Location:  Humptulips River, from the mouth to the confluence of the East and West forks, in Grays Harbor County.

Reason for action:  The Department is in the process of adopting permanent rules that are necessary to implement the personal use fishing plans developed through North of Falcon proceedings.

Other Information:  Salmon daily limit is 6 fish; up to 2 adults may be retained. Release wild coho and wild chinook. Trout and gamefish fisheries remain as listed in the 2017/2018 fishing pamphlet.

Buoy 10, Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (8-28-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (8/26) flight, 853 salmonid boats and 38 Oregon bank anglers were counted from Tongue Point to Bonneville Dam; and 756 Oregon boats were counted at Buoy 10.  Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 2.17 Chinook and 0.73 coho caught per boat.  In the gorge, boat anglers averaged 0.58 Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.17 Chinook and 0.04 coho caught per boat.  In the Portland to Tongue Point area, boat anglers averaged 0.27 Chinook and 0.01 steelhead caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.03 Chinook caught per angler.

A NETTER REACHES FOR A SALMON HOOKED IN THE BUOY 10 FISHERY AT THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA EARLIER THIS MONTH. (JIM AND JENN STAHL, NWFISHINGGUIDES.NET)

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed one Chinook adult kept for 31 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed seven Chinook adults kept for 12 boats (31 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed four Chinook adults and one Chinook jack kept, plus one steelhead caught for 24 boats (60 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for five bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed 36 Chinook adults and two Chinook jacks kept, plus two Chinook adults, one Chinook jack and one steelhead released for 139 boats (353 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 921 Chinook adults and 249 coho kept, plus 123 Chinook, 103 coho and one steelhead released for 481 boats (1,639 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for four bank anglers; and two Chinook adults kept, plus three steelhead released for 19 boats (35 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed 44 Chinook adults and five Chinook jacks kept, plus three Chinook adults released for 39 boats (99 anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for two boats (four anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed three sublegal and seven legal white sturgeon released for two boats (five anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed two sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for two boats (three anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

John Day Pool: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed 13 sublegal, three legal and one oversize sturgeon released for two boats (eight anglers).

WALLEYE

Gorge:  No report.

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed three walleye kept for three boats (five anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point:  Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (two anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 14 walleye kept, plus one walleye released for five boats (11 anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 38 walleye kept, plus 13 walleye released for 20 boats (43 anglers).

More Tips For Catching ‘Prison-break Atlantics’

BY RORY O’CONNOR

If you’re heading out after the prison-break Atlantics, here’s how I had success (there could be better ways).

RORY O’CONNOR HOLDS AN ATLANTIC SALMON HE JUST CAUGHT WHILE CASTING AND RETRIEVING. (RORY O’COONOR)

The salmon are in tight to the shoreline, and not necessarily *just* at Secret Harbor!  I motored around on my main looking for jumpers, then dropped the kicker to stay in place around the schools.  Anchoring was effective for alot of people, but only if you are in a spot they are holding.  They will hold to specific areas, and those areas change with the tide, so you have to keep moving til you find them. And move on when they clear out.  Blind casting was not effective at all, you have to find the jumpers.

I pitched alot of different things, but a pink/silver size 3 or 4 Vibrax with a small crescent sinker about 2-3 feet up the line seemed most effective.  The sinker was key, straight Vibrax didn’t work well.

The retrieve was lift-n-reel, then drop. They almost always hit on the drop. I also saw some guys pitching Krocodiles and they were slaying ’em.  Buzz Bombs worked but were less effective.

For rod/reel, I was using pink salmon gear which was too light (these fish average 10lbs!). I think your average steelhead gear would be perfect.

The fish are not shy at all; you can roll up right right on top of them, and use 30lb test and a large hook.

The bite turns on and off, and can go off even when they are still jumping everywhere.  Basically, this is straight-up coho fishing. (I only tried trolling a bit, and didn’t get a bump, but I didn’t really give it an honest go)

They will short-bite like crazy. And I wouldn’t say they crush the bait, but when they are hooked they fight HARD and will peel drag and jump. Keep the line tight, the will throw the hook easily!

It really is a blast!

THE FOLLOWING IS FROM WDFW:

Regulations are (again) for fishing in the saltwater:

  1. License plus salmon catch record card
  2. Open only where salmon is open
  3. Must stop fishing once the appropriate salmon daily limit is reached (Chinook, coho, pink)
  4. No limit on Atlantic Salmon or size limit
  5. Be prepared to be sampled at the boat ramp per our baseline creel sampling staff – and if you have tips on how to catch them, please share that information with staff

EDITOR’S NOTE: Be sure to check the regs for whether salmon fishing is open or any emergency rule changes. For example, not all of Area 7 is open for salmon fishing right now and Area 9 is closed boat fishing then closes to all fishing after September 4th.

Try Mimicking Dinner Time At Netpens For Atlantics

UPDATED 330 PM WITH WDFW INFO AT BOTTOM

Who needs pink salmon when there are gobs of hungry Atlantics swimming around out there?!

Kevin Klein, a San Juan Islands salmon angler, reports a friend got into a whole pile of the net-pen escapees yesterday.

(KEVIN KLEIN)

“The Atlantic Salmon that escaped form a net pen in the San Juan Islands are now spread across the area. Reports have come in of Atlantics caught as far South as Bush Point on Whidbey Island. Folks are out there catching them, and forty in a day is not uncommon. There is no limit, but current WDFW rules for other species must be followed while targeting them,” he reports.

Note that boat fishing is closed in Marine Area 9, Admiralty Inlet, due to low Coho returns to the Skagit and Stillaguamish Rivers, but the shorelines of Whidbey Island and the Kitsap Peninsula are open for bank fishing through September 4th.

“Once you find them on the troll, try casting spinners or Buzz Bombs to them while throwing pea gravel near the boat. Seriously, it mimics feeding time at net pens. These invasive fish need to be caught before they can spread disease, eat native smolts, or mix with natural Pacific stocks,” Klein reports.
The following is information from WDFW:

I do not have any more information on the details behind the escaped Atlantic Salmon.  However we do have quite a few folks heading north interested in catching these fish.  The common question is where and how.

 

Where is again primarily around the release site but don’t be surprised to see them spreading out (i.e., Bellingham Bay).

 

The how is still a bit of an unknown but from the most recent report I have is a few folks have had great success casting spinners.  Being these are pen raised fish, they are likely not strong swimmers and will orient themselves to the top of the water column looking for the easy meal.  Casting spinners into jumping/congregated fish near the surface has already worked for some anglers (and will avoid Chinook and coho).  I have also heard that flies often used for sea-run cutthroat trout has been known to work in the past for those who flyfish.  Our test fisher was out recently and saw plenty of fish near the site within Secret Bay.  Trolling does not appear to work.  However casting chrome-colored buzz bombs, rotators, and spinners had some success in shallow water (less than 3 feet and tight to shore).  Fish were seen finning and jumping near the shore and seem to be particularly attracted to eel grass beds.

 

Regulations are (again) for fishing in the saltwater:

  1. License plus salmon catch record card
  2. Open only where salmon is open
  3. Must stop fishing once the appropriate salmon daily limit is reached (Chinook, coho, pink)
  4. No limit on Atlantic Salmon or size limit
  5. Be prepared to be sampled at the boat ramp per our baseline creel sampling staff – and if you have tips on how to catch them, please share that information with staff

Break Out The Hatchery Pellet Spoon? Tips For Possibly Catching Atlantic Escapees

By Kevin Klein, Puget Sound Anglers

With the unintentional release of thousands of netopening of fishing for them with no limits by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife…I know you’ve got one question. How do I catch them?

After talking to a couple folks who were around when this happened last in Puget Sound, I’ve come up with some saltwater tips and tactics.

For trolling in the Saltwater look for jumpers. These fish travel in huge schools. When you find them either by sight or bite, stay on them. Circle or figure eight through the school. Try depths from 20-80 feet and troll slow. They are net pen lazy and stupid.

For terminal tackle, try Silver Horde Mini Ace Hi Flies in purple or red 36″ behind a dodger. Silver Horde 2″ Kingfisher Spoons in Cookies and Cream should also work with a longer leader. We’re trying to match their feed, which is hatchery pellets. Silver Horde Salmon Scenter hatchery pellet bags clipped to your downrigger balls would also be an excellent idea.

As funny as it sounds, try throwing some gravel in the water. This will mimic the sound of  pellet feeding time at the pens. Also casting anything shiny to them once you find the fish may work.

These fish are around 10 lbs so our regular salmon rods and reels should should do the trick. It will be interesting to see how they fight.

Lets get out there and try to get these fish out of the water. Who knows what repercussions this release may have. It may be crucial to catch them before they hit the rivers.

When fishing for Atlantic Salmon make sure you do your research and inspect any fish well before you keep it. Proper identification will ensure you don’t keep a non legal species. The biggest give away that a fish in an Atlantic Salmon is the large black spots on it’s gill covers. This distinguishes it from all Pacific species. An Atlantic will also have black X shaped spots above the lateral line, a slender base of the tail and may or may not have spots on the tail. Study some good identification pictures and description before you go.

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM WDFW

State salmon managers are encouraging anglers to fish for thousands of Atlantic salmon that escaped recently from a salmon farm near the San Juan Islands.

Cooke Aquaculture notified the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) of a net pen failure on Aug. 19 that caused the release of Atlantic salmon from the Cypress Island location. About 305,000 salmon were in the net pen at the time, though the company initially estimated that only 4,000-5,000 fish have escaped. Cypress Island lies along Rosario Strait between Guemes and Blakely islands

“Our first concern, of course, is to protect native fish species,” said Ron Warren, head of WDFW’s Fish Program. “So we’d like to see as many of these escaped fish caught as possible.”

Warren said there is no evidence that these fish pose a threat to native fish populations, either through disease or crossbreeding with Pacific salmon. To date, there is no record of Atlantic salmon successfully reproducing with Pacific salmon in Washington’s waters, he said.

“It will be some time before we know how many fish escaped the net pens,” Warren said. “That’s why we’ve authorized Cooke Aquaculture to fish with beach seine nets and we’re encouraging anglers to go out and harvest these fish.”

The escaped fish are estimated to be eight to 10 pounds in size and are safe to eat.

There is no size or catch limit on Atlantic salmon. However, anglers may only fish for Atlantic salmon in marine waters that are already open to fishing for Pacific salmon or freshwater areas open for trout fishing. Anglers also must stop fishing for Atlantic salmon once they’ve caught their daily limit of Pacific salmon.

To help anglers identify Atlantic salmon, WDFW has posted a salmon identification guide on its webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/salmon/atlantic.html

Anglers must have a current fishing license and must also observe gear regulations identified in the 2017-18 sport fishing rules pamphlet. Anglers do not have to report Atlantic salmon on their catch record cards.

WDFW shares management authority with the state Department of Agriculture for monitoring fish diseases. Other state departments, local governments and tribal governments have authority related to the siting of marine aquaculture and water quality.