Tag Archives: Oregon

ODFW Extends Nehalem Wild Chinook Limit Reduction Onto Ocean Waters Off Jaws

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Following conservation measures adopted last week to reduce catch limits in the Nehalem Basin itself, ODFW has implemented a temporary rule modifying catch limits for adult wild Chinook salmon in the ocean immediately off the mouth of Nehalem Bay. 

MIKE SMITH SNAPPED THIS PIC OF THE SUN RISING OVER THE ENTRANCE TO NEHALEM BAY DURING THE 2017 FALL CHINOOK SEASON. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Effective July 1, ocean anglers fishing inside the special ocean management area (defined below) will be required to abide by the same catch limits as anglers fishing inside the Nehalem River basin. Under these new temporary rules, take of adult wild Chinook salmon in this ocean area and the Nehalem Basin combined is restricted to one adult wild Chinook salmon for the period of July 1-Sept. 15, 2019.

The rule changes do not affect other existing regulations in this ocean area. In particular, anglers will still be required to follow federal rules and use no more than two single point barbless hooks. Catch limits for hatchery salmon and legal size limits also remain unchanged. Salmon caught in this area will still be recorded on the combined angling tag as code “2”, not code “66” (see page 90 of the 2019 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations for location codes).

“During recently held public hearings, one of the concerns we heard was specifically about the ocean immediately outside of the bay, where an opportunity exists for anglers to harvest Chinook salmon bound for the Nehalem Basin,” says Robert Bradley, District Fish Biologist for ODFW’s North Coast Watershed District. “This special ocean management area is intended to ensure that conservation measures needed for the Nehalem Basin are achieved. The action will also make enforcement of the reduced limits more straightforward.”

Bag limit and other restrictions for fall-run Chinook salmon in Oregon coastal basins, including the Nehalem River and this special ocean management area after Sept. 15, will be announced later this summer. For more information about upcoming North Coast fishing seasons, including regulation updates, visit ODFW’s online fishing reports at https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/northwest-zone

Nehalem Bay special ocean management area

The affected area is a seaward rectangle, approximately 0.4 miles south and 0.7 miles north of the center of the channel and 0.5 miles seaward from the mouth of the Nehalem River, defined by the following GPS points:

Point 1: 45° 39’ 00” Latitude and 123° 56’ 31” W Longitude

Point 2: 45° 39’ 00” Latitude and 123° 57’ 15” W Longitude

Point 3: 45° 40’ 00” Latitude and 123° 57’ 15” W Longitude

Point 4: 45° 40’ 00” Latitude and 123° 56’ 24” W Longitude

AN ODFW MAP OUTLINES THE AREA OFF THE MOUTH OF NEHALEM BAY WHERE THE CHINOOK BAG LIMIT IS BEING REDUCED TO ONE WILD KING FOR THE SEASON. (ODFW)

ODFW Leftover Tag Sales Delayed Till Aug. 1; Will Be Online Only

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The sale of about 200 leftover controlled big game hunt tags will be delayed until Thursday, Aug. 1.

AMONG THE 217 LEFTOVER TAGS THAT WILL BECOME AVAILABLE AUG. 1 ON A FIRST-COME, FIRST-SERVE BASIS ARE THREE FOR ANTLERLESS ELK ON THE ZUMWALT PRAIRIE OF NORTHEAST OREGON IN MID-DECEMBER. MELISSA LITTLE BAGGED THIS COW THERE DURING A SLIGHTLY LATER HUNT SEVERAL YEARS AGO. (HUNTING PHOTO CONTEST)

The process for these tags is changing this year due to ODFW’s new electronic licensing system, with leftover tags being sold exclusively online, rather than at license sale agents/vendors.

ODFW is delaying the date of the sale (from July 1 to Aug. 1 at 10 a.m.) to allow more time for staff to complete User Acceptance Testing of the new process before the sale takes place.

The delay also provides additional time for hunters who want to try for a leftover tag to get ready for the new process. Hunters will need to have an active and verified MyODFW online licensing account, including a username and password, to purchase a leftover tag this year. (If you don’t have an online account yet, visit MyODFW.com and click “Buy a License” and then follow the steps to verify your account.)

See below for tips on purchasing a leftover tag, and the MyODFW.com website for a step-by-step guide.

·        Check the list of tags available first. Note some of the hunts are on private land, and permission from the landowner is required to hunt with the tag. See the 2019 Big Game Regulations for more information about each hunt.

·        Be logged in by 10 a.m. on Aug. 1. Leftover tags sell out in minutes and in the past, hunters needed to be first or second in line at a vendor at 10 a.m. for a reasonable chance of purchasing one. ODFW anticipates leftover tags will sell out quickly online, too.

·        Get a 2019 annual hunting license before Aug. 1. Hunters need to have an annual hunting license to be eligible to buy a leftover tag.

·        Youth must purchase leftover tags from their own account. Parents can create an online account for their children and the purchase must be completed from the child’s account.  

Leftover tags provide an additional hunting opportunity for hunters, as they can be purchased in addition to a regular controlled or general season big game tag.

ODFW To Hold 20 Meetings Around Oregon On 2020 Hunt Reg Proposals

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Join ODFW district staff at one of 20 meetings happening around the state in July.

A BLACK-TAILED BUCK IN WESTERN OREGON. (KEITH KOHL)

The meetings will focus on big game regulations and are a great chance to come and hear about changes proposed for the 2020 seasons, comment on those changes and ask questions of district wildlife biologists.

As part of a multi-year process to review, simplify and improve the Big Game Hunting Regulations, ODFW is proposing some major changes for 2020, including changing the Western Oregon centerfire bag limit to a buck with a visible antler and offering a new general season antlerless elk damage tag. Get more details on these proposals at the meetings or look for an online summary next week.

Public comment about the proposals and other issues related to big game regulations will be taken at these meetings, or email comments to odfw.commission@state.or.us. Final 2019 Big Game Hunting Regulations will be adopted at the Sept. 13 Commission meeting in Gold Beach.

2019 Big Game Public Meeting Schedule

City

Date

Time

Location

 

Burns July 2 7:00 pm Harney County Community Center

484 N Broadway, Burns OR

Pendleton July 2 4:00-7:00 pm Pendleton Convention Center

1601 Westgate, Pendleton OR

Lakeview July 8 8:00 am – 5:00 pm ODFW Lakeview

18560 Roberta Rd., Lakeview OR

Newport July 8 6:00 pm ODFW Newport

2040 SE Marine Science Dr., Newport OR

Clackamas July 9 5:00-8:00 pm ODFW Clackamas District Office, Large Conference Rm

17330 SE Evelyn St., Bldg. 16

Clackamas OR

Charleston July 9 6:00 – 8:00 pm OIMB Boathouse

63466 Boat Basin Rd., Charleston OR

Gold Beach July 9 6:00 pm Gold Beach Library

94341 3rd St., Gold Beach OR

John Day July 9 5:30 – 7:00 pm Grant County Extension Service Office

116 NW Bridge St. Ste. 1

John Day OR

Redmond July 9 6:00 – 8:00 pm Redmond High School

675 SW Rimrock Way, Redmond OR

Roseburg July 9 6:00 – 7:30 pm Backside Brewing

1640 NE Odell Ave., Roseburg OR

Heppner July 10 6:00 – 9:00 pm ODFW Heppner

54173 Hwy 74, Heppner OR

Springfield July 10 7:00 – 8:00 pm Gateway Sizzler

1010 Postal Way, Springfield OR

Albany July 11 7:00 – 8:30 pm Old Armory Building

104 4th Ave SW, Albany OR

Central Point July 11 7:00 pm ODFW Central Point

1495 East Gregory Rd., Central Point OR

Klamath Falls July 11 6:00 pm Shasta Grange Hall

5831 Shasta Way, Klamath Falls OR

La Grande July 12 6:00 – 9:00 pm La Grande City Library, Community Rm

2006 Fourth St., La Grande OR

Grants Pass July 18 7:00 pm Elmer’s Restaurant

175 NE Agness Ave., Grants Pass OR

Ontario July 18 7:00 pm (MDT) OSU Extension

710 SW 5th Ave., Ontario OR

Seaside July 18 4:00 – 7:00 pm Seaside Convention Center

415 First St., Seaside  OR

The Dalles July 18 6:00 pm The Dalles Screen Shop

3561 Klindt Dr. , The Dalles OR

Northwest States, Tribes Apply To Feds For OK To Kill More Columbia Sea Lions

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), along with a consortium of state and tribal partners, today submitted an expanded application to lethally remove California and Steller sea lions preying on threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead runs in the Columbia River and its tributaries.

SEA LIONS GATHER INSIDE THE MOUTH OF THE COWEEMAN RIVER AT KELSO, MOST LIKELY FOLLOWING THE 2016 RUN OF ESA-LISTED EULACHON, OR SMELT, UP THE COLUMBIA RIVER. (SKYLAR MASTERS)

California sea lions — and increasingly, Steller sea lions — have been observed in growing numbers in the Columbia River basin, especially in the last decade. These sea lions prey heavily on salmon and steelhead runs listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), including thousands of fish at Bonneville Dam each year.

The impacts come at a time when many Chinook salmon runs are already at historic lows.

The recovery of sea lions since the passage of the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) in 1972 is a success story, said Kessina Lee, Region 5 director with WDFW. But that recovery has also brought challenges.

“The vast majority of these animals remain in coastal and offshore waters, but several hundred have established themselves in upriver locations,” Lee said. “Where salmon and steelhead numbers are low, any unmanaged increase in predation can cause serious problems.”

Predator management is a key part of a multi-faceted effort to restore salmon and steelhead populations in the Pacific Northwest.

“For decades, we’ve made strides in habitat restoration, hydropower policy, hatchery production, and fishery management, and we continue to work with our partners to further those initiatives,” Lee said. “Predator management remains an essential part of the equation.”

The application submitted to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) by WDFW and its partners is the first since Congress passed an amendment to the MMPA in December 2018. That amendment, spearheaded by the Pacific Northwest congressional delegation, passed with strong bipartisan support and offers greater flexibility to wildlife managers when determining if a sea lion should be lethally removed in waters that host ESA-listed runs of salmon or steelhead.

“Based on years of experience working within the bounds of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Columbia River fishing tribes contend that predator management is necessary to restore balance to the Columbia River system,” said Ryan Smith, chairman of the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. “Strong partnerships and collaboration with the states, northwest congressional delegation, federal authorities, and nongovernment organizations resulted in this amendment, which applies robust tools to manage sea lions in the lower Columbia River and recognizes tribal sovereignty in that management.”

WDFW and its partners have taken steps to deter California sea lions in the Columbia River basin for more than a decade, but non-lethal measures have proven largely ineffective, driving animals away for only short periods. These hazing measures appear similarly ineffective against Steller sea lions. Non-lethal measures continue to be used as a short-term deterrent when appropriate.

Wildlife managers have conducted lethal removal operations of California sea lions in the Columbia River basin since 2008, when NMFS first issued a letter of authorization under section 120 of the MMPA. From 2008-2019, wildlife managers removed a total of 219 California sea lions that met the federal criteria for removal below Bonneville Dam.

Steller sea lions have not previously been subject to lethal removal.

“Prior to this legislation, wildlife managers were severely limited in their ability to effectively manage sea lions in these areas,” Lee said. “Additional action is required to protect these troubled fish stocks before they are completely eliminated. This is an unfortunate, but necessary step in the salmon recovery process.”

If approved, WDFW expects to begin humanely removing animals under the terms of the expanded application beginning in 2020. The application is subject to a public comment period and review by NMFS. Members of the public can review the application at https://wdfw.wa.gov/sites/default/files/2019-06/MMPA-120f-application.pdf.

Other entities submitting the application with WDFW include the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR), the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSR), The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, and the 3.6.D Committee, which includes ODFW, CTUIR, CTWSR, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community, and the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians of Oregon.

Volunteers Needed To Help Raise Winter Steelhead At South Umpqua Facility

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Volunteers are needed to help the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife raise hatchery winter steelhead at Barrett Creek near Winston. This project is an opportunity to work directly with fish and help produce hatchery winter steelhead for anglers.

VOLUNTEERS CARE FOR HATCHERY WINTER STEELHEAD AT A REARING FACILITY ON BARRETT CREEK, NEAR WINSTON, OREGON, IN THE SOUTH UMPQUA RIVER DRAINAGE. (ODFW)

Responsibilities include fish feeding, recording data, cleaning fish holding troughs and inspecting the site. Some volunteers are also asked to respond to on-site alarm systems at any hour. All volunteers must follow protocols to ensure good fish health. Volunteers must provide their own transportation and a high clearance vehicle is necessary as the site is on a steep hill.

“We’ve had some issues in the past meeting our production goals of hatchery winter steelhead for the South Umpqua River,” said Evan Leonetti, ODFW Salmon Trout Enhancement Program biologist. “We designed this rearing project to hold the fish in a cold water area that will help increase their survival and directly benefit anglers.”

Those interested are asked to volunteer for at least three consecutive days. In the past, volunteers have contributed up to two weeks. The project began in late May and runs through September.

Anyone over 18 interested should contact Evan Leonetti at 541-464-2175 or evan.leonetti@state.or.us.

ODFW’s Commission Adopts Updated Wolf Management Plan

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Commission adopted a Wolf Plan at its meeting in Salem in a 6-1 vote after hearing from 44 people who came to testify and reviewing thousands of public comments.

OREGON WOLF TRACKS IN MUD. (ODFW)

Allowing controlled take (limited regulated hunting and trapping of wolves) was one of the most controversial topics in the new Wolf Plan. The original Plan adopted in 2005 allowed for controlled take only in Phase 3 (currently eastern Oregon), in instances of recurring depredations or when wolves are a major cause of ungulate populations not meeting established management objectives or herd management goals. While ODFW believed it needed to remain a tool available for wolf management, the department has not proposed any controlled take of wolves and has no plans to at this time.

Commissioners made some changes related to “controlled take” from the proposed Plan.  An addendum was added clearly stating that “Use of controlled take as a management tool requires Commission approval through a separate public rulemaking process” and the definition of controlled take was modified.

Additional minor changes were made to emphasize the importance of non-lethal tools to address wolf-livestock conflict and easy access to this information. Non-lethal measures to prevent wolf-livestock conflict continue to be emphasized in all phases of the Plan, and required before any lethal control is considered.

After some discussion, Commissioners revised the definition of chronic depredation (which can lead to lethal control of wolves if non-lethals are in use and not working) in Phase 2 and 3 from two confirmed depredations with no specific time frame to two confirmed depredations in nine months.

The Wolf Plan will be filed with the Secretary of State and posted on the ODFW Wolves webpage (www.odfw.com/wolves) within the next few business days.

In other business over the two-day meeting June 6-7, the Commission also:

  • Allocated big game auction and raffle tags for 2020.
  • Heard a briefing on the crab fishery and reducing the risk of whale entanglements.
  • Adopted harvest limits for Pacific sardine in state waters for July 2019-June 2020 based on federal regulations.
  • Approved funding for Access and Habitat projects that provide hunting access or improve wildlife habitat on private land.
  • Heard a briefing on proposed changes to 2020 big game hunting regulations as part of efforts to improve and simplify the Big Game Hunting Regulations

The Fish and Wildlife Commission is the policy-making body for fish and wildlife issues in Oregon. Its next meeting is Aug. 2 in Salem.

Bonneville Shad Count Skyrocketing; Will It Top 2018’s Record 6.1 Million?

Updated: 8:45 a.m., June 7, 2019 with more comments from the Army Corps of Engineers

A record set just last year at Bonneville could soon be broken as the Columbia River’s shad count has surged to highs never seen so early.

Through Thursday, June 5, a whopping 2,875,519 have been tallied at the dam, with 86 percent of those fish — 2.5 million — coming in just the past seven days, a meteoric rise captured by a Fish Passage Center graph.

A FISH PASSAGE GRAPH SHOWS HOW QUICKLY THE 2019 SHAD RUN AT BONNEVILLE DAM RAMPED UP (RED LINE) VERSUS LAST YEAR’S RECORD RUN (BLUE LINE) AND THE 10-YEAR AVERAGE. (FPC)

The run so far has already topped the 10-year average overall return, hit 2.5 million fish four days faster than the next closest run, and set a new best seven-day count ever.

One observer thinks that 2018’s high mark of 6.1 million could be exceeded by 5 million, give or take, at this pace.

However, it’s also early and unclear if the 2019 return will exhibit the multiple peaks across much of June that other years’ returns have. If it doesn’t, this rocket could fall short.

This morning Jeffrey Henon, a spokesman for the Army Corps of Engineers’ Portland District, says the contractor that performs the fish counts for federal dam operators was asked to double check the numbers.

He said that 250,000 shad is the daily capacity of a “crowder” device at the fish-counting station, and counts above that can diminish the accuracy.

In June 2017, what at first appeared to be a 497,000-fish day was revised to 247,366 after a “a technical glitch in (the Corps’) count recording system” was corrected for.

But a short while later Henon called back to say the review had been finished.

“Bottom line, the numbers are accurate,” Henon said.

A CHART SHOWS ALL THE YEARS SINCE 1938 THAT THE SHAD COUNT AT BONNEVILLE HAS EXCEEDED 2.5 MILLION, THE DATE THAT MARK WAS FIRST HIT, EACH RUN’S TOP SEVEN-DAY STRETCH AND THE FINAL RUN SIZE. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

It also represents good news for the fishermen who gather on the bank below Bonneville to drift shad darts along bottom, or anchor on seams below there and well downriver to run Dick Nites and other small spoons behind lead droppers.

The bony fish are played for sport and quite a few are taken home to be canned or used for sturgeon or crab bait.

In his outdoor report yesterday, Terry Otto at The Columbian in Vancouver noted that 1,730 were kept last weekend by 212 anglers on the Washington bank in the gorge, with fish also being caught in the Bonneville, The Dalles and John Day Pools.

Nearly 180,000 are already above McNary Dam, over 5,000 are above Ice Harbor on the Snake.

According to the 2019 WDFW and ODFW joint staff report for Columbia spring and summer fisheries, last year’s sport kept catch of 250,000 shad below Bonneville was the highest on record. With low market demand, commercial fisheries are minimal.

Washington anglers won’t need a license to fish for them this Saturday and Sunday as it’s Free Fishing Weekend. There is no size, daily or possession limit on shad.

SHAD SWIM PAST A WINDOW AT BONNEVILLE DAM. (ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS)

Not much is known about the Columbia’s shad or where they go in the Pacific, much less why their returns are surging.

“I don’t have a great answer for that, and I’m not sure anyone does,” says ODFW’s Tucker Jones, who manages the big river for Oregon.

While he and much of the rest of Northwest anglerdom would probably prefer to see daily Chinook, coho, sockeye and steelhead counts as astronomical as those we’re seeing with shad, the nonnative species that feeds on plankton throughout its anadromous lifecycle may be benefiting in part from warmer waters and ocean conditions that negatively impacted salmonids.

While 2004’s and 2005’s big shad runs occurred in years that also saw high overall Chinook returns, that coincidence didn’t repeat last year nor is it expected to this year.

Jones says there’s no research backing this up, but it’s possible that young shad and young salmon could be competing for the same forage in the Columbia and ocean before Chinook and coho switch to a different diet as they grow larger.

LOWER COLUMBIA SHAD COLLECT IN A COOLER DURING A PAST RUN. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Per a species profile put together by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, from 10 million to 20 million shad may annually actually enter the Columbia, with most spawning below Bonneville, meaning the dam count reflects a fraction of the overall run.

Shad can also bypass the counting windows by going through the locks.

Even if no other shad crossed the dam this year, 2019 would still go down as 10th best since shad began to be tallied in 1946, primarily on the strength of the last seven days, which includes the third best one-day count.

While Wednesday’s 412,448 shad was nothing to shake a stick at, the largest daily passages on record occurred on June 5 and 6, 2003, when 504,724 and then 520,664 were tallied.

How high will this year’s run go? Stay tuned.

ELLIE, BOO BOO AND McKENNA SHOW OFF A PAIR OF COLUMBIA RIVER SHAD CAUGHT SEVERAL SEASONS AGO NEAR KALAMA. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Yaquina Chinook Tourney Cancelled To Help Low Run; Boat Raffle Still On

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE U DA MAN FISHING TOURNAMENT

The Executive Board of the U Da Man Fishing Tournament (UDM) has made the difficult decision to cancel this year’s fishing tournament that was scheduled for Saturday, October 12th.

CHINOOK CAUGHT DURING 2014’S U DA MAN FISHING TOURNAMENT ON THE YAQUINA RIVER LAY ON A BED OF ICE. LAST YEAR ONLY ONE FISH WAS WEIGHED IN AND THIS YEAR, ORGANZERS ARE SCRUBBING THE EVENT BUT STILL PLAN TO RAFFLE OFF A DRIFT BOAT. (U DA MAN FISHING TOURNAMENT)

Based on information presented by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff at a public meeting held on 05-29-2019, returning wild (non clipped) Chinook populations are forecast to be near historic lows on all Central Coast streams in Oregon, including the Yaquina River.

The Yaquina River has no hatchery or salmon enhancement programs. Nearly all Chinook harvested by sport anglers are non clipped.

ODFW is proposing regulations this year that would limit anglers to just one non clipped Chinook a day, with a total aggregate catch of five non clipped Chinook total for the central river zone rivers. The executive board members are confident that ODFW will implement these regulations and agree with ODFW’s decision to do so.

For the past 20 years, the UDM group has worked to protect and enhance the Salmon populations and habitat on the Yaquina River, supported by many community members and local businesses. Last year’s event saw 111 participants with only one Chinook salmon weighed for the winning prize.

While we are disappointed in having to cancel the October event, we feel it would be hypocritical of our group to hold the tournament and put even more pressure on the forecasted low returns of non clipped Chinook salmon.

UDM has purchased a new Willie Drift boat to raffle this year.  The boat will be on display and all tickets will be sold at Englund Marine and Industrial Supply in Newport beginning June 8th. The 17 foot drift boat package includes oars, anchor, 2 inflatable PFD’s and a galvanized Saxon trailer valued at $9950. Tickets cost $50 each and only 200 will be sold.  In lieu of the tournament, the winner will be announced at Englund Marine and Industrial Supply at 12 noon on October 12th.

Funds usually generated by the tournament and the raffle support our projects on the Yaquina River, which include the Port to Port River Clean Up, Coho Ho habitat enhancement, contributions to local schools for wildlife and outdoor projects as well as our scholarship awards to local graduating high school seniors who plan on continuing their education in fields such as marine biology, fisheries and related fields.

Without the monies generated by the tournament, our available funds will be severely depleted. UDM is a small group and a registered nonprofit 501c3. We hope that you will continue to support UDM in these efforts by purchasing raffle tickets.

Where Barbed Hooks Are, Aren’t Now Allowed For Salmon, Steelhead On Washington’s Columbia System

Updated 3:10 p.m., May 31, 2019 with ODFW press release announcing Columbia hook rule change at bottom

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Anglers on a large portion of the Columbia River and many of its tributaries will no longer be required to use barbless hooks when fishing for salmon and steelhead beginning June 1.

In March, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission directed the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to make the use of barbless hooks voluntary for salmon and steelhead fisheries in the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Due to Endangered Species Act permitting with NOAA, WDFW is unable to fully lift restrictions on barbed hooks in some areas at this time, including tributaries upstream of McNary Dam, including the Snake River.

Still, barbless hook requirements on salmon and steelhead fishing are being lifted across a broad swath of Washington waters, including the mainstem Columbia River from Buoy 10 to Chief Joseph Dam, and Columbia River tributaries from Buoy 10 to McNary Dam. Anglers fishing for sturgeon are still required to use barbless hooks.

The restriction on barbed hooks for salmon and steelhead will lift June 1 on the following waters:

A) Barbed hooks allowed for salmon and steelhead:

  1. Blue Creek (Lewis County), from the mouth to Spencer Road
  2. Cispus River (Lewis County)
  3. Columbia River, from a true north/south line through Buoy 10 to Chief Joseph Dam
  4. Coweeman River and tributaries (Cowlitz County)
  5. Cowlitz Falls Reservoir (Lake Scanewa) (Lewis County)
  6. Cowlitz River (Cowlitz County); Barbed hooks are also allowed for cutthroat trout in the Cowlitz River
  7. Drano Lake (Skamania County)
  8. Elochoman River (Wahkiakum County)
  9. Grays River (Wahkiakum County)
  10. Grays River, West Fork (Wahkiakum County)
  11. Kalama River (Cowlitz County)
  12. Klickitat River (Klickitat County)
  13. Lewis River (Clark County)
  14. Rock Creek (Skamania County)
  15. Tilton River (Lewis County)
  16. Toutle River (Cowlitz County)
  17. Toutle River, North Fork (Cowlitz County)
  18. Washougal River (Clark County)
  19. Washougal River, West (North) Fork (Clark/Skamania counties)
  20. White Salmon River (Klickitat/Skamania counties)

B) Selective gear rules still in effect; barbed hooks now allowed:

  1. Abernathy Creek and tributaries (Cowlitz County)
  2. Cedar Creek and tributaries (tributary of N.F. Lewis) (Clark County)
  3. Coal Creek (Cowlitz County)
  4. Delameter Creek (Cowlitz County)
  5. Germany Creek (Cowlitz County) and all tributaries.
  6. Grays River (Wahkiakum County)
  7. Grays River, East Fork (Wahkiakum County)
  8. Grays River, South Fork (Wahkiakum County)
  9. Grays River, West Fork tributaries (Wahkiakum County)
  10. Green River (Cowlitz County)
  11. Hamilton Creek (Skamania County)
  12. Kalama River (Cowlitz County): From 1,000 feet above fishway at upper salmon hatchery to Summers Creek and from the intersection of 6000 and 6420 roads to 6600 Road bridge immediately downstream of Jacks Creek.
  13. Lacamas Creek (Clark County): From mouth to footbridge at lower falls.
  14. Lacamas Creek, tributary of Cowlitz River (Lewis County)
  15. Lewis River, East Fork (Clark/Skamania counties): From mouth to 400 feet below Horseshoe Falls.
  16. Little Washougal River (Clark County)
  17. Mill Creek (Cowlitz County)
  18. Mill Creek (Lewis County): From the mouth to the hatchery road crossing culvert.
  19. Olequa Creek (Lewis/Cowlitz counties)
  20. Outlet Creek (Silver Lake) (Cowlitz County)
  21. Salmon Creek (Clark County): From the mouth to 182nd Avenue Bridge.
  22. Salmon Creek (Lewis County)
  23. Skamokawa Creek (Wahkiakum County)
  24. Stillwater Creek (Lewis County)
  25. Swift Reservoir (Skamania County): From the posted markers approximately 3/8 mile below Eagle Cliff Bridge to the bridge; from the Saturday before Memorial Day through July 15.
  26. Toutle River, North Fork (Cowlitz County):  From the mouth to the posted deadline below the fish collection facility.
  27. Wind River (Skamania County): from 100 feet above Shipherd Falls to Moore Bridge.
  28. White Salmon River (Klickitat/Skamania counties): From the county road bridge below the former location of the powerhouse upstream to Big Brother Falls (river mile 16).

C) Fly fishing only rules still in effect; barbed hooks now allowed:

  1. Kalama River (Cowlitz County): From Summers Creek to the intersection of 6000 and 6420 roads.

This rule will be reflected in the new Washington Sport Fishing Rules Pamphlet on July 1, 2019. Anglers are reminded to check the pamphlet for additional regulations and to learn more about selective gear and fly fishing rules. Anglers can also download the Fish Washington mobile app to see up-to-date regulations around the state. Visit https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/app to learn more.

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW today adopted temporary rules to allow anglers to use barbed hooks when fishing for salmon, steelhead and trout in the Columbia River beginning Saturday, June 1.

ODFW adopted the rule so Oregon’s fishing regulations will remain concurrent with Washington in the jointly-managed Columbia River. The temporary rule will remain in effect until further notice or until it expires in late November. For it to become a permanent rule, the Fish and Wildlife Commission will need to approve a rule change, which Commissioners are expected to consider at a future meeting.

Anglers have been required to use barbless hooks when fishing for salmon, steelhead, and trout in the Columbia River since 2013. In March, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission adopted a recommendation to make the use of barbless hooks voluntary, and Washington Fish and Wildlife implemented the rule to begin June 1.

Rules requiring the use of single-point barbless hooks when fishing for sturgeon in the Columbia River remain in effect for anglers in both states. 

For the latest on Columbia River fishing regulations visit https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/columbia-zone

ODFW Details Hunt Change Proposals; Legalizing Blacktail Spikes Could Up Harvest

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Last year, ODFW began a multi-year effort to review and improve hunting regulations.

Many of Oregon’s controlled hunts and season structures were put in place decades ago and mostly untouched through the years. “We have undertaken a complete review of our big game hunting regulations with the goal of making them more consistent, in tune with current populations and issues, and simpler,” said Nick Myatt, ODFW Grand Ronde Watershed Manager who is leading the effort.

AN OREGON HUNTING PROPOSAL WOULD REMOVE THE FORKED-ANTLER REQUIREMENT DURING WESTERN OREGON’S GENERAL BLACKTAIL SEASON. (ODFW)

A number of changes took effect in 2019, and now ODFW has new proposals for 2020. One of the major ideas proposed will be a change in the bag limit for the hunt in Oregon with more participation than any other—the Western Oregon general rifle deer season, which more than 61,000 people hunted in 2017. ODFW is proposing to simplify the bag limit from “one buck deer having not less than a forked antler” to “one buck with visible antler.” All 600 series antlerless deer hunts in western Oregon currently with a “one antlerless or spike deer” bag limit would also change to “one antlerless deer.”

The current bag limit is different from the eastern Oregon deer bag limit, creates enforcement issues, and is not biologically relevant. It is a relic of when western Oregon offered a large number of antlerless deer tags in some wildlife management units. The proposed bag limit change is expected to increase harvest opportunities and success for general season rifle deer hunters by allowing the harvest of spike bucks. While it may result in an increase in buck harvest, there are sufficient bucks in the population to support increased harvest. All but one Western Oregon unit has met or exceeded the benchmark for observed post-hunting season buck ratio in at least two of the last three years.

The change may also help the buck deer population by allowing hunters to remove the bucks genetically inclined to remain spikes. Data shows that some yearling bucks have forked antlers while some 2-year-old or older bucks have spike antlers.

Other eastern Oregon hunts in the 600 series that allow for buck harvest will be moved to the 100 series buck hunts for consistency and to more equitably distribute hunting opportunity by giving each hunter one buck hunting opportunity every year.

General season antlerless elk damage tag pilot program

Over the last few decades, elk populations in many areas have increased on private land adjacent to row crop or irrigated agricultural lands, leading to conflict, economic damage, and reduced hunting opportunity in some units.

ODFW and landowners use a variety of tools to address this damage, including hunting through controlled antlerless elk hunting and damage tags. However, controlled hunts can be inconvenient for hunters who must know far in advance (by May 15) that they will have private land access and want this as their elk hunting opportunity. Damage tags can be cumbersome for landowners and staff to implement. In many areas, overall harvest is still inadequate and private land elk populations continue to increase.

OREGON HUNTING MANAGERS HAVE A NEW PLAN FOR ACCESSING ELK CAUSING DAMAGE ON PRIVATE LAND. (RICK SWART, ODFW)

To address these issues, ODFW is proposing a new general season elk damage tag with an antlerless bag limit for the 2020 hunting season. This tag would replace 19 controlled hunts and the need for landowner damage tags during those timeframes (Aug. 1-March 31 for elk de-emphasis areas and western Oregon, and Aug. 1-Nov. 30 in other areas). The tags would be valid in specific chronic elk damage areas mapped annually by ODFW. Hunters considering this new opportunity would still need to think ahead about permission to hunt on private land for this tag and the tag would be their only elk hunting opportunity.

ODFW also proposes changing a few general bull elk rifle seasons in eastern Oregon (in Hood, White River, and central and SE Cascades) to controlled hunts, both for consistency and because some units are not meeting bull ratio objectives under the general season structure.

Other proposed changes include:

  • Longer, later seasons for pronghorn, bighorn sheep, and Rocky Mountain goat hunts to give hunters who draw one of these prized tags a later opening and more time to hunt.
  • 127 existing hunts being consolidated into 49 hunts.
  • 91 hunt dates expanded, made simpler or made consistent with other hunts.
  • 85 hunt areas expanded to the entire unit or hunt boundaries were made simpler.
  • 57 bag limits made simpler or made consistent with other hunts.
  • Nine new controlled hunt opportunities, including three late season mule deer hunts, two mountain goat hunts, and a pronghorn hunt.

A more complete list of proposed changes is available on MyODFW.com (under Big Game Hunting). ODFW is also hosting public meetings around the state in July to present these ideas and get feedback (meeting schedule will be posted on MyODFW.com in June).

The Fish and Wildlife Commission will be briefed on these concepts at their June 6 meeting in Salem, and make a final decision at their Sept. 13 meeting in Gold Beach when they adopt 2020 Big Game Regulations. Comments on the proposals can also be emailed to odfw.commission@state.or.us