Category Archives: Headlines

STEELHEADING ON THE CLEARWATER HAS REBOUNDED THIS SEASON, PUTTING OUT GOOD NUMBERS OF FISH, INCLUDING THIS FIRST B-RUN FOR KAYCEE SKELTON OF CDA. THE 10-YEAR-OLD WAS FISHING THIS PAST FAL WITH HER DAD, TIM. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

What A Difference A Year Makes For Clearwater Steelheading

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH & GAME

Anglers fishing the Clearwater River are enjoying a healthy increase in the number of steelhead returning. After a lackluster season in 2013-2014, the number of “B-run” steelhead is up in 2015, and anglers are taking advantage.

STEELHEADING ON THE CLEARWATER HAS REBOUNDED THIS SEASON, PUTTING OUT GOOD NUMBERS OF FISH, INCLUDING THIS FIRST B-RUN FOR KAYCEE SKELTON OF CDA. THE 10-YEAR-OLD WAS FISHING THIS PAST FAL WITH HER DAD, TIM. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

STEELHEADING ON THE CLEARWATER HAS REBOUNDED THIS SEASON, PUTTING OUT GOOD NUMBERS OF FISH, INCLUDING THIS FIRST B-RUN FOR KAYCEE SKELTON OF CDA. THE 10-YEAR-OLD WAS FISHING THIS PAST FALL WITH HER DAD, TIM. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

Creel surveys and angler reports for the week ending on January 25 indicate good success among anglers fishing the Clearwater. 265 anglers reported catching 277 steelhead. Numerous anglers have reported catching their daily limit of three hatchery steelhead this month; in some cases harvesting their limit within a few hours. Overall, anglers averaged one fish every five hours during the seven day period, with much of the action taking place on the weekend.

Anglers fishing the North Fork Clearwater averaged ten hours per fish during the week of ending January 25. Anglers are not only catching fish in large numbers, they are also catching some large steelhead; as long as 37 inches.

Fishery managers expect angler success to remain high throughout the Clearwater drainage over the next three months. Anglers are also finding steelhead in the Salmon and Snake Rivers, and catch rates are likely to improve as water temperatures rise during the approach of spring. For more information on steelhead fishing in Idaho, go to http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/fish/?getPage=38

SW WA, Lower Columbia, Gorge Fishing Report (1-26-15)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT IS COURTESY JOE HYMER, P.S.M.F.C.

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – 35 bank anglers kept 3 steelhead.

During four days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered:
270 coho adults and 1 jack
68 winter-run steelhead
one cutthroat trout

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released:
33 coho adults, 20 winter-run steelhead and one cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton
28 coho adults and four winter-run steelhead into Lake Scanewa above Cowlitz Falls Dam

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 11,100 cubic feet per second on Monday, January 26. Water visibility is nine feet.

Bonneville, The Dalles, and John Day pools – Boat anglers are catching some steelhead though the majority of the fish were wild and had to be released.

Sturgeon

Bonneville Pool – Boat anglers are catching some legals; fishing from the bank remains slow.

Only a handful of legals were estimated caught during the week of Jan. 12-18.

The Dalles Pool – Boat anglers are catching some legals; fishing from the bank is slow.

John Day Pool – Slow for legal size fish.

Walleye and Bass

Bonneville Pool – Effort and catches for walleye are light.  No effort was observed for bass.

The Dalles and John Day pools – Boat anglers are catching some walleye.  No effort was observed for bass.

Trout

Klineline Pond – 21 bank anglers kept 14 rainbows.

Recent releases of catchable and broodstock rainbows into SW WA waters:
Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish per Pound

KLINELINE PD
Jan 20, 2015
Rainbow
1,500
2.2
Jan 16, 2015
Rainbow
1,500
2.6

BATTLE GROUND LK
Jan 20, 2015
Rainbow
1,500
2.2

ICE HOUSE LK
Jan 14, 2015
Rainbow
8
0.1
Jan 14, 2015
Rainbow
34
0.2

KIDNEY LK
Jan 14, 2015
Rainbow
8
0.1
Jan 14, 2015
Rainbow
47
0.2

LTL ASH LK
Jan 14, 2015
Rainbow
34
0.2
Jan 14, 2015
Rainbow
8
0.1

TUNNEL LK
Jan 14, 2015
Rainbow
62
0.2
Jan 14, 2015
Rainbow
9
0.1

EVEN IF YOU DIDN'T NOTCH YOUR TAG THIS PAST SEASON, WDFW AND ODFW REQUIRE ALL HUNTERS TO REPORT THEIR RESULTS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Deadline To Report Washington, Oregon Hunting Results Looms

You know, sometimes Facebook and Twitter posts really do get action.

After WDFW put up one recently about reporting on 2014 hunting seasons, I immediately went online and filled mine out.

As reporting deadlines for both states loom, ODFW is taking the same tack, putting out notice that 30 percent of its tagholders had yet to file.

“… There are still 57,025 deer tags and 36,494 elk tags that haven’t been reported. Most of these reports are due by Jan. 31, 2015,” the agency’s Michelle Dennehy reported.

EVEN IF YOU DIDN'T NOTCH YOUR TAG THIS PAST SEASON, WDFW AND ODFW REQUIRE ALL HUNTERS TO REPORT THEIR RESULTS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

EVEN IF YOU DIDN’T NOTCH YOUR TAG THIS PAST SEASON, WDFW AND ODFW REQUIRE ALL HUNTERS TO REPORT THEIR RESULTS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

She points to odfw.com, reportmyhunt.com and(866) 947-6339 as where to go to report.

In Washington, you can submit a report here, or by calling (877) 945-3492.

Both states have small fines that must be paid when buying a future license.

JAMES UNSWORTH. (IDFG)

Washington’s ‘Got It All In Terms Of Interesting Issues,’ Says Incoming WDFW Chief

Outside of where fish and wildlife ain’t — say, the moon — there probably ain’t too many places that managing all those critters (not to mention their fans) is going to be an easy job, and it appears that WDFW’s incoming chief head honcho realizes that Washington certainly has its challenges.

James Unsworth, a deputy director at the Idaho Department of Fish & Game, was recently chosen to be the Evergreen State agency’s new director. His first day is Feb. 2, when he takes over from Phil Anderson, who is leaving after six years on the job.

JAMES UNSWORTH. (IDFG)

JAMES UNSWORTH. (IDFG)

We’re working on a story with and about Unsworth for our March issue of the magazine, but in the meanwhile, Eric Barker at the Lewiston Morning-Tribune got ahold of the 57-year-old, who gave him these quotes:

“Washington is a state that kind of has it all, plus some of the most interesting and some really exciting resource issues, with their fish allocation issues and their emerging wolf issues — something I have experience with.”

“It’s amazingly complex,” he said of Washington’s task of managing salmon and steelhead and allocating harvest among commercial and recreational anglers, while also balancing harvest shares with the state’s 27 American Indian tribes, Canada, Alaska and neighbors Oregon and Idaho.

“For a wildlife professional it’s got it all, I guess, in terms of interesting issues, not to mention 7 million people also,” Unsworth said. “That complicates things a whole bunch.”

Unsworth also complimented WDFW staffers, said he was planning on visiting the agency’s six regions, and hopes to get to know the state’s sportsmen.

For more from Barker’s article, including comments from Asotin County Fish & Wildlife Commissioner Jay Holzmiller, check out his article here.

(COURTESY KEVIN KLEIN)

San Juan Islands Fishing Report (1-19-15)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT COMES FROM KEVIN KLEIN, PUGET SOUND ANGLERS, SAN JUAN ISLANDS CHAPTER

Salmon fishing has been steady in the San juans. Hootchies have been good producers. The fish seem to be biting a bit more suspended than most winters.

The bait that’s around right now seems to be a mixed bag. Probably why the old school hootchies are working. They look like all sorts of bait to a following fish.

Joining clubs like Puget Sound Anglers and Coastal Conservation Association is a great way to get involved in sport fishing, meet new fisher folk, and let your voice be heard on issues that involve angling and resource issues.

CCA North Sound and PSA Bellingham have a combined meeting Wednesday June 21st at 6:30 p.m., at Nicki’s Bella Harbor Marina in Bellingham. IFGA hall of famer Gary Loomis will be the guest speaker. This would be a great event to attend, for newbies or old salts alike.

We’ve got the 36th annual Orcas Legion Derby coming up this weekend. It will be interesting to see what wins.

As the Seahawks showed on Sunday,  as long as you keep trying (fishing), there’s always a chance. Go Hawks!

Pictures:

(KEVIN KLEIN)

(COURTESY KEVIN KLEIN)

1. The sun rises silently on a new day, while the twin sparking hammers drive us forward, slicing through the stillness with their bright thunder. Forward into a new beginning, and an everlasting covenant that this day could be a day… The Day…of good fishing. That’s why we come back. That’s why it’s always on our minds. Those who are drawn to the river, and those who are drawn to the Sea.

(COURTESY KEVIN KLEIN)

(COURTESY KEVIN KLEIN)

2. Karen Rhinehart with a chromega 3.

Head’s Up, Blue Mtn. Steelheaders, Changes On The Tucannon

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH & WILDLIFE

Changes to Tucannon River fishing regulations

Action:  Rule changes for steelhead and whitefish fisheries.

Rule change for definition of the mouth of the Tucannon River.

Closes fishing effective March 1, 2015.

Effective date: Jan. 19 through Feb. 28, 2015; closed March 1, 2015.

Species affected: Hatchery steelhead (with missing adipose fin) and whitefish                        

  1. All (hatchery origin) steelhead with a missing adipose fin landed in the Tucannon River) must be retained. Catch and release of hatchery steelhead is not allowed.
  2. Anglers may retain up to 15 whitefish and 2 hatchery steelhead, but must release all other fish.
  3. Barbless hooks are required.
  4. Release all wild steelhead.
  5. The area from Marengo (at Turner Road Bridge) upstream is closed to fishing.

Location:  For this emergency regulation, the Tucannon River is defined as the water lying south of a line of sight from an orange diamond-shaped sign attached to the Hwy 261 guard rail (northwest of the Tucannon River and adjacent to/downstream from the rest area turn off), running southeast across to the eastern, unsubmerged shoreline of the Tucannon River (point of land spit). The large embayment between the eastern shoreline of the Tucannon River and the rock bluff to the east along the south shore of the Snake River is considered part of the Snake River.

Reason for actionWild steelhead returns to the Tucannon River are below management objectives for conservation and for maintaining fisheries under previous rules. Therefore, the fishery for hatchery steelhead must be constrained to provide more protection of naturally produced steelhead in the Tucannon River. The emergency regulations are designed to focus the fishery on removing stray hatchery steelhead that primarily enter the Tucannon River in late summer and fall to prevent them from spawning. The emergency rules also provide a refuge area above Marengo to protect early returning wild steelhead, and close the fishery before March when most of the wild steelhead return to the Tucannon River.

Other Information: Anglers must cease fishing for steelhead for the day once they have retained 2 hatchery steelhead. Adipose fin-clipped fish must have a healed scar at the location of the missing fin. All steelhead with unclipped adipose fins must be immediately released unharmed.

In addition, anglers may not remove any steelhead from the water unless it is retained as part of the daily bag limit. Anglers should be sure to identify their catch because chinook and coho salmon, as well as bull trout are also present in the Tucannon River during this steelhead fishery. Gamefish fisheries re-open in the Tucannon River on the first Saturday in June as described in the May 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet.

WDFW Reports Massive Coho Fry Loss; Efforts Under Way To Replace Them

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH & WILDLIFE

State managers of the Grays River Hatchery are well on their way to replacing 600,000 coho salmon fry lost after a water supply line failed during a heavy rainstorm last week.

On Monday (Jan. 12), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) received 90,000 excess coho eggs from the Cascade Hatchery, operated by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife near Bonneville Dam.

Yesterday, the WDFW hatchery took delivery of 351,000 eyed coho eggs from the Eagle Creek Hatchery, owned by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in Estacada, Ore.

Jim Scott, assistant director for the WDFW fish program, said he is optimistic that USFWS can supply enough additional coho eggs or fry to replace all the fry lost after the water-line failure at the Grays River Hatchery.

“We really appreciate the support we’ve received from our fellow fish managers,” Scott said. “These salmon support sport, commercial and tribal fisheries in the Deep River, the Columbia River and ocean waters.”

All state and federal permits required to transfer fish eggs to the Grays River facility have been approved, Scott said.

Cindy LeFleur, regional WDFW fish manager, said the fry lost last week suffocated Jan. 9 due to lack of water. The supply line that runs water to the hatchery from a nearby creek was damaged in the storm, and the alarm system designed to alert staff to the problem failed, she said.

Scott noted that the Grays River Hatchery, built in 1960, often has problems during high-water events.

“Unfortunately, neither maintenance nor capital funding has kept pace with the need for renovation, repair and replacement of many of our state’s aging hatcheries,” he said.

LeFleur said the coho salmon eggs now being moved to the hatchery will eventually be transferred to net pens in Deep River and released as smolts in 2016.

In addition to coho, the facility rears chinook salmon, chum salmon and winter steelhead. None of those fish were affected by the faulty water line, LeFleur said.

A SCREEN SHOT FROM ANIMAL PLANET'S TRAILER FOR "RUGGED JUSTICE," A SHOW FEATURING WDFW FISH AND WILDLIFE OFFICERS. (ANIMAL PLANET)

‘Rugged Justice’ Shows ‘Window Into Vital, Varied, Harrowing Work’ Of WDFW Officers

WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH & WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

Animal Planet’s new documentary series ‘Rugged Justice’ follows Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) police as they patrol mountains, coasts and city streets, protecting natural resources and serving the people of Washington.

The six-episode series premieres Sunday, Jan. 18, at 8 p.m. on Animal Planet.

A SCREEN SHOT FROM ANIMAL PLANET'S TRAILER FOR "RUGGED JUSTICE," A SHOW FEATURING WDFW FISH AND WILDLIFE OFFICERS. (ANIMAL PLANET)

A SCREEN SHOT FROM ANIMAL PLANET’S TRAILER FOR “RUGGED JUSTICE,” A SHOW FEATURING WDFW FISH AND WILDLIFE OFFICERS. (ANIMAL PLANET)

“Our participation in the series provides an opportunity for WDFW’s Law Enforcement Program to promote the department and the dedicated professionals that carry out our mission of protecting our natural resources and the public we serve,” said WDFW deputy chief Mike Hobbs. “Policing the outdoors presents unique challenges, and this show helps to inform the public about our critical role in preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish, wildlife and ecosystems in Washington.”

WDFW officers enforce all state laws, including those related to fishing and hunting, licensing and protecting natural habitat. Officers also provide first response to incidents involving potentially dangerous wildlife, including bear and cougar, and other public safety issues.

“‘Rugged Justice’ provides a window into the vital, varied and sometimes harrowing work of officers as they protect nature and people in Washington,” said Steve Crown, WDFW enforcement chief.

The WDFW enforcement program has 144 officers deployed statewide.

Officers appearing in ‘Rugged Justice’ were not paid by the show’s producers or Animal Planet for their participation.

For broadcast schedules, interested viewers should visit http://www.animalplanet.com/schedule/ .

THE BURBOT IN QUESTION. (VIA JOE HYMER)

Sturgeon Angler Catches A Burbot Just Below John Day Dam

You can find burbot squirming on the bottoms of Eastern Washington’s biggest lakes and reservoirs this time of year as they go into the spawn, but one that was caught off on an eastern Columbia Gorge fishing platform is surprising fishery observers.

“Wendy Martin from ODFW reported: Some sturgeon anglers last week caught this burbot from the sturgeon platform just below John Day Dam,” emailed that watcher for all things weird on the Columbia, Joe Hymer, this morning.

THE BURBOT IN QUESTION. (VIA JOE HYMER)

THE BURBOT IN QUESTION. (VIA JOE HYMER)

 

That particular spot is better known for walleye fishing this time of year, but it makes sense that a burbot could be there. Perhaps it was washed downstream during previous years’ high runoff events.

Burbot are most commonly found at places like Sullivan and Bead Lakes in the Pend Oreille River drainage — Bead, above Newport, holds the state record, a 17,37-pounder — the reservoirs of the upper Yakima River, along with Banks and Palmer Lakes and Lake Chelan.

 

A SALMON CREEK STEELHEAD SLUMBERS IN THE FROSTY EMBRACE OF AN ANGLER'S COOLER AFTER BEING CAUGHT OUT OF THE VANCOUVER-AREA STREAM IN EARLY JANUARY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

SW WA, Columbia Fishing Report (1-13-15)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORTS ARE COURTESY JOE HYMER, P.S.M.F.C, AND TANNA TAKATA, O.D.F.W.

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – The coho just keep on coming!  Over 108,400 adults had returned to the salmon hatchery through Jan. 7.

36 bank anglers kept 4 steelhead and 3 coho and released 2 steelhead. 6 boat anglers kept 1 and released 1 steelhead.  The steelhead were sampled from the trout hatchery area; coho at the barrier dam.

During four days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered:
1,357 coho adults and 8 jacks
263 winter-run steelhead
one fall Chinook
two cutthroat trout

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released:

227 coho adults, three jacks, nine winter-run steelhead and two cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton.

76 coho adults and one jack into Lake Scanewa above Cowlitz Falls Dam.

72 coho adults, one jack and one winter-run steelhead into the Cispus River above the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 11,200 cubic feet per second on Monday, January 12.

Salmon Creek in Vancouver – 8 bank anglers with 3 steelhead kept and 2 released.

A SALMON CREEK STEELHEAD SLUMBERS IN THE FROSTY EMBRACE OF AN ANGLER'S COOLER AFTER BEING CAUGHT OUT OF THE VANCOUVER-AREA STREAM IN EARLY JANUARY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

A SALMON CREEK STEELHEAD CHILLS OUT IN THE FROSTY EMBRACE OF AN ANGLER’S COOLER AFTER BEING CAUGHT OUT OF THE VANCOUVER-AREA STREAM IN EARLY JANUARY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Bonneville Pool – No effort for salmonids was observed.

The Dalles and John Day pools – Summer run steelhead are being caught in both pools.  Unfortunately, all of the fish sampled were wild fish that had to be released.

Sturgeon

Bonneville Pool – Boat anglers are averaging over 3.5 sublegals per rod and a legal per every 8.7 rods.   Fishing is slower from the bank.

Through Jan. 4, an estimated 23 legals were kept.  The winter season is being managed for a harvest of approximately 400-550 fish or a March 2 end date, whichever comes first.

The Dalles Pool – Boat anglers are catching some legals.  Fishing is slow from the bank.

John Day Pool – Boat and bank anglers are catching some legals.

Walleye and Bass

Bonneville Pool to John Day Pool – Boat anglers are catching some walleye in John Day Pool.  No effort for bass and walleye were observed in Bonneville and The Dalles pools.

Trout

The hatchery planting trucks were busy last week.  Below are recent catchable size rainbow plants into SW WA waters.  No reports on angling success (except for Klineline Pond where 29 bank anglers kept 3 rainbows).

BATTLE GROUND LK (CLAR)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=BATTLE%20GROUND%20LK%20(CLAR)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Jan 05, 2015
Rainbow
1,500
2.5
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

FORT BORST PRK LK (LEWI)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=FORT%20BORST%20PRK%20LK%20(LEWI)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Jan 07, 2015
Rainbow
1,500
2.2
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

KIDNEY LK (SKAM)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=KIDNEY%20LK%20(SKAM)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Jan 05, 2015
Rainbow
1,000
2.5
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

KLINELINE PD (CLAR)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=KLINELINE%20PD%20(CLAR)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Jan 05, 2015
Rainbow
1,360
2.5
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

MARYHILL PD (KLIC)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=MARYHILL%20PD%20(KLIC)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Jan 06, 2015
Rainbow
500
2.2
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

ROWLAND LK (KLIC)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=ROWLAND%20LK%20(KLIC)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Jan 06, 2015
Rainbow
734
2.1
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Jan 06, 2015
Rainbow
2,266
2.2
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

SPEARFISH LK (KLIC)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SPEARFISH%20LK%20(KLIC)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Jan 06, 2015
Rainbow
2,0002.2
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

 

SALMON, STEELHEAD, SHAD

The salmonid creel program on the lower Columbia will resume in February 2015.

Bonneville Pool (Columbia River between Bonneville Dam and The Dalles Dam): No report.

The Dalles Pool (Columbia River between The Dalles Dam and John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed one unclipped steelhead released for 16 bank anglers; and 21 unclipped steelhead released for five boats (16 anglers).

John Day Pool (Columbia River above John Day Dam and John Day Arm): Weekly checking showed no catch for seven bank anglers; and four unclipped steelhead released for four boats (eight anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia (below Bonneville Dam): Closed to retention, catch-and-release only. No report.

Bonneville Pool (Columbia River between Bonneville Dam and The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed 18 sublegal sturgeon released for 57 anglers; and nine legal white sturgeon kept, plus one legal, three oversize and 306 sublegal sturgeon released for 34 boats (87 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (Columbia River between The Dalles Dam and John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for 34 bank anglers; and three legal white sturgeon kept, plus five oversize and 11 sublegal sturgeon released for six boats (19 anglers).

John Day Pool (Columbia River between John Day Dam and McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed one legal white sturgeon kept, plus two oversize and five sublegal sturgeon released for 40 boats; and two legal white sturgeon kept, plus one oversize and one sublegal sturgeon released for 11 boats (26 anglers).

WALLEYE

John Day Pool (Columbia River between John Day Dam and McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed six walleye released for one boat (one angler).