Category Archives: Headlines

Oregon Man Cited For Bringing CWD-infected Deer Carcass Back From Montana

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Last week, Montana reported its first case of a free-ranging deer testing positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). The deer was harvested by a Montana hunter and its carcass was brought to Oregon by the hunter’s relative, who lives in Madras.

(USGS NATIONAL WILDLIFE HEALTH CENTER)

The parties involved failed to follow regulations that prohibit certain parts of deer, elk and moose that contain central nervous system tissue (where the prion that causes CWD is most concentrated) from being brought into Oregon. People hunting in states with CWD who harvest a deer, elk or moose may only bring back parts without spinal cord or brain tissue (e.g. antlers on a clean skullcap). See page 29 of the Oregon Big Game Regulations under “Parts Ban” for more information.

ODFW and OSP contacted the relative late last week after learning from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks that the deer had tested positive for CWD. They discovered that prohibited parts containing neurological tissue had been brought into Oregon and had been disposed of in the local area following butchering. ODFW and OSP immediately retrieved these deer parts for safe disposal.

Some parts of the deer also went to a landfill. ODFW was unable to locate and retrieve these parts, as too much time had passed since their disposal. However, the parts are deeply buried and will not come into contact with deer or elk, so are considered a low risk to free-ranging wildlife.

Following investigation, OSP Fish & Wildlife Division Troopers criminally cited the relative for Unlawful Import of Cervid Parts from a CWD State. Troopers also recovered packaged deer meat as well as additional parts of the infected deer which will be safely disposed of by ODFW Staff.

“Enforcing the regulations established to protect Oregon’s fish, wildlife and other natural resources is the Division’s top priority. The cooperation with the individual who imported the unlawful parts, as well as the close coordination with ODFW, was paramount and really aided us in completing a thorough investigation” said Tim Schwartz, OSP Fish & Wildlife Division Lieutenant. “Without this cooperation and coordination, this could’ve turned out much worse.”

Chronic Wasting Disease is caused by a protein prion that damages the brain of infected animals, causing progressive neurological disease and loss of body condition. It’s untreatable and always fatal. It spreads through nose-to-nose contact between infected animals and through the animal’s bodily fluids. The prions that cause CWD can also last a long time in the environment, infecting new animals for decades, which is why Oregon has had a parts ban in place for 15 years.

“CWD is considered one of the most devastating wildlife diseases on the American landscape today,” said Colin Gillin, ODFW State Wildlife Veterinarian. “Once CWD enters a State and infects free-ranging deer and elk, it has been nearly impossible to eradicate with present day tools. So we want to do all we can to keep Oregon CWD-free.”

Oregon is still a CWD-free state. The disease has never been detected in a captive or free-ranging deer, elk or moose in Oregon. ODFW has been monitoring the state’s wildlife for the disease for years and is increasing its surveillance this year.

For example, ODFW is asking hunters interested in having their deer or elk tested for CWD to contact their local office to set up an appointment. ODFW is most interested in deer and elk that are at least two-years-old (e.g. not spikes). To get an animal CWD tested, hunters will need to bring in the animal’s head, which should be kept cool prior to sampling if possible. ODFW will also take a tooth for aging and hunters should receive a postcard several months later with information about the animal’s age.

Anyone who sees or harvests a sick deer or elk should also report it to the ODFW Wildlife Health Lab number at 866-968-2600 or by email to Wildlife.Health@state.or.us.

CWD spreads most quickly through movement of live animals, although it can also spread by transport of carcasses by hunters or through infected migrating deer and elk. In addition to Montana, documented cases of CWD have occurred in Alberta, Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,  Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and Saskatchewan.

Long-term $$$ Plan Subject Of New WDFW Advisory Group’s First Meeting

Representatives from Washington fishing and hunting organizations are part of a newly launching advisory group that will assist WDFW in coming up with a long-term revenue plan and other tasks.

An edict from the state legislature coming out of this year’s marathon session, it’s billed as the agency’s “first comprehensive management, operations, and financial review in more than 10 years.”

Some names on the 20-member Budget and Policy Advisory Group you may recognize include:

Ron Garner, Puget Sound Anglers
Andy Marks, Coastal Conservation Association
David Cloe, Inland Northwest Wildlife Council
Wayne Marian, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation
Rachel Voss, Mule Deer Foundation
Mark Pidgeon, Hunters Heritage Council
Butch Smith, Ilwaco Charter Association

According to a press release, they and others from the timber and farming industries, as well as a number of conservation groups and others are being tasked to:

* Develop a long-term plan to balance projected expenses and revenues by providing prioritized options for spending reductions and revenue increases.

· Identify and implement management improvements and operating efficiencies.

· Conduct a “zero-based budget review” to accompany the department’s proposed 2019-21 operating budget.

“Rapid population growth and recent state and federal budget trends pose major challenges for fish and wildlife management,” WDFW Policy Director Nate Pamplin said in the release. “The advisory committee will provide valuable perspectives and recommendations about the role the department plays in conservation and the outdoor economy.”

It’s fallout from this past legislative session in which WDFW requested the first major fee increase in six years, but lawmakers led by Senate Republicans gave the agency a one-time $10.1 million budget bump instead.

The advisory group’s first meeting working on the long-term revenue plan is Dec. 4 at South Puget Sound Community College in Lacey. It is open to the public.

For more, go here.

Multiple Fishing Regs Pamphlets? WDFW Looks For Opinions On Idea

As the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife embarks on a project to simplify its angling regs, the agency is also asking fishermen whether they would be interested in multiple smaller pamphlets for different species and waters.

So, instead of one book covering everything from albacore to Yocum Lake, say, one covering just salmon, another focusing on shellfish, lingcod and other saltwater species, and a third an evergreen one for freshwater fishing.

This afternoon, the marketing department sent out an email with a link to an 11-question survey asking:

In your opinion, would splitting the pamphlet into multiple pamphlets (e.g., freshwater gamefish, marine fish/shellfish/seaweed, and salmon) be helpful?

A freshwater-only pamphlet would contain fishing rules for certain species in freshwater only. It would not include salmon seasons in freshwater systems. Do you prefer a pamphlet that contains only information about non-salmon freshwater species?

and:

Would you prefer a freshwater pamphlet that could remain in effect for more than one year?

That last one would likely only be possible with a freshwater book for trout, walleye and bass, the regs for which generally are static.

Meanwhile, the salmon pamphlet could come out after that annual joyfest known as North of Falcon wraps up in mid-April or whenever.

The survey also asks anglers which species they fish for most often, their age, county of residence and whether they own a boat.

To take it, go here.

Reward Grows For Info On Killing, Waste Of 3 Butte Falls Bucks

The reward for information that leads to whomever killed three blacktail bucks but took just some of the meat and left the rest of the carcasses minus the heads behind is growing.

(OSP)

The Rogue Valley Chapter of the Oregon Hunters Association is now offering $500, while Crime Stoppers of Southern Oregon is ponying up $1,000, Oregon State Police report today.

That’s on top of the standing reward of $500 from the Turn-In-Poachers Program, funded by OHA.

According to wildlife troopers, the three bucks were found discarded outside Butte Falls, northeast of Medford.

“Only the heads and some meat were taken. The deer appeared to be dead only a couple of days,” they reported.

The carcasses were investigated last Saturday, Nov. 11, so that would put time of death around Thursday or Friday of last week.

Anyone with information is being asked to call the TIP Hotline,  1-800-452-7888, or the state police dispatch number, 541-776-6111.

What A Deal! Free Fishing In Oregon On Black Friday, Small Biz Saturday

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW is waiving all fishing licensing requirements on the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving to encourage people to #optoutside with friends and family during the long holiday weekend.

(ANDY WALGAMOTT)

On Nov. 24 and 25, 2017, all fishing, crabbing and clamming in Oregon will be free for both Oregon residents and non-residents. That means no licenses, tags or endorsements are needed on those days. All other fishing regulations apply.

Below are some good bets for fishing, crabbing or clamming on Thanksgiving weekend. For more, check ODFW’s Recreation Report, which is updated on Wednesday each week. Be sure to check water conditions and the weather forecast before heading out and dress appropriately. If you’re heading to the coast, be wary of high surf.

Trout: Lakes and reservoirs across Oregon have been stocked with trout in recent weeks, and several western Oregon lakes will be stocked the week of Nov. 20 including: Waverly Lake (Albany), Emigrant Lake (Ashland), Hyatt Reservoir (SE of Ashland), Applegate Reservoir (SW of Ashland), Expo Pond (Central Point), Faraday Lake (Estacada), Blue Lake (Fairview), St Louis Ponds (Gervais), Reinhard Park Pond (Grants Pass),  Mt Hood Pond (MHCC-Gresham), Junction City Pond, Medco Pond (east of Lost Creek Lake), Willow Lake (east of Medford), Agate Reservoir (White City/Medford), Garrison Lake (Port Orford), Walter Wirth Lake and Walling Pond (Salem), Alton Baker Canal (Springfield) and Progress Lake (Tigard).

Winter steelhead: Thanksgiving usually marks the beginning of winter steelhead season on the coast, and some early returning hatchery fish have already been caught. Check the Recreation Report for the latest on conditions.

Crabbing and clamming: While some crabbing closures are in effect due to domoic acid and ocean crabbing is closed, recreational crabbing is open in bays and estuaries and on beaches, docs, and piers from the north jetty of Coos Bay to Tahkenitch Creek and from north of Cape Foulweather to the Columbia River. Always check ODA’s shellfish page before crabbing or clamming for the latest information on any closures due to domoic acid http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/programs/FoodSafety/Shellfish/Pages/ShellfishClosures.aspx  Bay clam and mussel harvesting are currently open along the entire Oregon coast and razor clamming is open on Clatsop County beaches.

For tips on how and where to fish, crab and clam, visit ODFW’s new webpage www.myodfw.com

 

Hatchery Steelhead Retention Opening For A-runs In Lower Snake

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE FROMT HE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF IFSH AND WILDLIFE

Hatchery steelhead retention to open in lower Snake River

Action: Opens lower Snake River to retention of hatchery steelhead measuring under 28 inches in length.

SNAKE RIVER ANGLERS BELOW CLARKSTON WILL BE ABLE TO RETAIN HATCHERY STEELHEAD AS OF SATURDAY, NOV. 18, BUT ONLY THOSE LESS THAN 28 INCHES. SOPHIA WITHROW CAUGHT THIS ONE IN 2012 OFF WAWAWAI. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Location:

  • Snake River from the mouth of the river (Burbank to Pasco railroad bridge at Snake River mile 1.25) to the Washington/Idaho state line, at Clarkston Wash.: Daily limit of 2 hatchery steelhead; release all steelhead 28 inches or greater in length.

Areas already open to steelhead retention:

  • Snake River from the Idaho/Washington state line (at Clarkston, Wash.) upstream to the Couse Creek Boat Ramp: Daily limit of 2 hatchery steelhead; release all steelhead 28 inches or greater in length.
  • Snake River from Couse Creek Boat Ramp upstream to the Idaho/Oregon state line: Daily limit of 2 hatchery steelhead; no size restrictions.

Dates:   Nov. 18, 2017, until further notice.

Species affected:  Steelhead.

Reason for action: Lagging steelhead returns during the summer of 2017 led fisheries managers to initially close or reduce daily limits for steelhead fisheries to protect both A-run steelhead (fish smaller than 28 inches) and B-run steelhead (those 28 inches and larger) destined for the Columbia and Snake river basins. However, A-run steelhead, both wild and hatchery-origin adults, have returned in adequate numbers to allow opening portions of the Snake River to steelhead retention, including the lower portion of the river.

Allowing retention of fish measuring less than 28 inches in length will give anglers the opportunity to harvest excess hatchery A-run steelhead, while still providing protection to the remaining B-run steelhead within this reach. WDFW will continue to monitor the steelhead run over the coming months, and either curtail the harvest of steelhead if needed, or provide more harvest opportunity if possible. Anglers fishing in this area should continue to check emergency rules for any updates.

Other Information: Anglers must use barbless hooks when fishing for chinook or steelhead in the Snake River.  Anglers cannot remove any chinook or steelhead from the water unless it is retained as part of their daily bag limit. Anglers should be sure to identify their catch because unmarked chinook salmon, coho salmon and steelhead are also in the Snake River during this fishery.

Anglers are reminded to check the 2017/2018 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for other regulations, including possession limits, safety closures, and a definition of a hatchery steelhead.  Anglers should continue to check emergency regulations for new and changing seasons.

 

Idaho Water Chemistry Affecting Hatchery Sockeye Survival?

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME

Idaho Fish and Game’s sockeye recovery program has overcome many challenges in preserving the species, and scientists are continuing to learn and improve as they transition from staving off extinction to growing Idaho’s sockeye population.

Fish and Game’s Assistant Fisheries Chief Paul Kline said F&G biologists think they’ve answered a nagging question about its relatively new sockeye hatchery in Springfield. The hatchery succeeded in raising lots of young sockeye, but the fish have survived poorly after being released to migrate to the Pacific.

IDAHO HATCHERY SOCKEYE PRODUCTION MAY BE HAMPERED BY WATER HARDNESS DIFFERENCES BETWEEN WHERE ADULTS LIKE THIS 2017 RETURNER ARE HATCHED AND REARED AND WHERE THEY’RE RELEASED. (ROGER PHILLIPS, IDFG)

A hard journey made harder

Biologists found differences in water hardness between Springfield Hatchery in Southeast Idaho where the fish are raised from eggs and Redfish Lake Creek near Stanley where they’re released.  Differences in water chemistry between the two waters may be adding stress to fish that are already stressed from “smoltification” – a period when they migrate downstream and their bodies transition from freshwater to saltwater.

Biologists are investigating higher-than-expected mortality that started in 2015, the first year Springfield Hatchery’s sockeye were released for migration. That year, about 37 percent of the young sockeye survived the trip between Lower Granite Dam about 30 miles downstream from Lewiston and Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, which is the last dam the fish cross enroute to the Pacific.

But the spring of 2015 was a low water year for migrating young salmon, which need high flows to flush them to the ocean. Upper Columbia River sockeye, Idaho’s closest geographic cousins, also had poor survival.

However, river conditions and survival of Upper Columbia River sockeye improved in 2016, but survival of Idaho’s sockeye dropped, signaling Idaho’s fish were facing other challenges.

Solving the mystery through science

Biologists explored potential causes and improved or eliminated some possibilities, such as additional stress associated with high levels of dissolved gas, and stress from loading fish on trucks and transporting smolts from the hatchery to the release site.

Unlike other salmon species that Fish and Game has decades of experience raising in hatcheries, sockeye production is relatively new. Sockeye hatcheries are common in Alaska and Canada, and over 20 years ago, Idaho biologists followed guidance from these programs to establish rearing and fish-health protocols for the Eagle Hatchery Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program. That program likely saved Idaho’s sockeye from extinction.

The same protocols are also being followed at the Springfield Hatchery.  Kline pointed out most of Alaskan and British Columbia hatcheries are in the same river systems where the fish are released, not raised off site with a different water source like at the Springfield Hatchery.

The water at Springfield comes from wells with a hardness of about 200 milligrams per liter of calcium carbonate, compared with Redfish Lake Creek at less than 20 milligrams per liter. Kline described Redfish Lake Creek as “almost like distilled water” Whereas, Springfield’s water is typical for Southeastern Idaho.

Kline pointed out water hardness is not an issue for raising sockeye from eggs, and the young fish do well in the Springfield Hatchery. There is little to nothing in the scientific literature regarding water hardness in relation to rearing sockeye in hatcheries, however big changes in water chemistry can spell trouble for any species of fish.

“We’re treading on fresh ground here,” he said.

Biologists theorized that when young salmon enter the smolt phase of their life and transition from freshwater to saltwater, the additional stress of going from hard water to soft water may contribute to higher-than-expected mortality.

Biologists at Idaho Fish and Game’s Eagle Fish Health Laboratory experimented with a few young sockeye, testing their response after being trucked and transferred to tanks filled with hard water from Springfield, soft water from Redfish Lake Creek or Salmon River water with hardness roughly between those two.

A smoking gun?

They found young sockeye transferred from Springfield well water to Redfish Lake Creek water had elevated cortisol levels, which is an indicator of stress, and those levels increased over time. Whereas fish that were transferred to water taken from Springfield’s well, or the Salmon River, quickly began to recover from the stress of the road trip.

Spreading the risk and learning

Biologists are developing several strategies to test their theory and ease young sockeye’s transition from hard water to soft water. This fall, some fish were released directly into Redfish Lake as pre-smolts, and they will spend the winter in the lake before naturally migrating downstream through Redfish Lake Creek and into the Salmon River.

Others will be raised at the Sawtooth Hatchery in raceways that would normally be used for young Chinook salmon, but a low 2017 Chinook return means there’s temporary space available.

The remaining fish will continue to be raised at the Springfield hatchery, and biologists are continuing to refine protocols to help 2018 releases go more smoothly, including gradual water softening during trucking, mixing water in trucks before fish are released, and acclimating fish for a few days in Sawtooth Hatchery’s moderately hard water before release.

Fish will be released in Redfish Lake Creek and the Salmon River near the Sawtooth Hatchery. Kline said if water hardness is the problem, the test groups should provide some answers without further endangering the entire group of young fish.

“We’re getting closer to long-term solutions, but in the mean time, we are spreading our risk,” he said.

Biologists want to solve the problem, but it’s a constant challenge considering there are many other variables in play beyond their control, including weather, river and ocean conditions. Young sockeye only migrate downstream once per year, and it takes another year to see how many return as adults.

“We want to be sure we’re checking off probable causes accurately,” Kline said. “Between 2018 and 2019, we’re going to learn a lot.”

Another bump in a long road

It can be a frustrating setback for Fish and Game biologists who’ve devoted their careers to saving sockeye from the brink of extinction, and then boosting annual adult returns from single digits, to dozens, and now to hundreds. Kline said the goal is to increase that to thousands of adult sockeye in the future.

He also tries to keep the current smolt survival in perspective. He remembers when Idaho sockeye were listed in 1991 under the federal Endangered Species Act, only four adults returned to the Sawtooth Basin. The total annual returns to Idaho between 1991 and 1999 were 23 sockeye, which included two years when none returned.

By comparison, 157 adult sockeye returned to the Sawtooth Basin in 2017, which was a down year. The 10-year average from 2008 through 2017 is 690 sockeye annually, which you can read about in this September sockeye article explaining the 2017 return.

Biologists expect more sockeye will return to Idaho each year if they can raise and release more young fish and improve their survival through the Salmon, Snake and Columbia rivers to the Pacific. If Springfield’s water hardness situation proves to be the culprit, Kline sees solving it as a hurdle, not a wall.

“It’s not a disaster, it’s part of what you experience when you open a new hatchery,” he said. “It’s disappointing, but we’re not going to let it get us down.”

OlyPen Senator Named Natural Resources Committee Chair

A state senator representing a fish- and wildlife-rich part of Washington — and who’s known to dangle a hook there — will head up the committee where WDFW-related issues come before lawmakers.

Sen. Kevin Van De Wege of Sequim was named the chair of Agriculture, Water, Natural Resources & Parks by fellow Democrats after last week’s special election in which they picked up a seat and became the majority party in the legislature’s upper chamber.

SENATOR KEVIN VAN DE WEGE REPRESENTS THE 24TH DISTRICT, WHICH ENCOMPASSES ALL OF THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA EXCEPT MASON COUNTY. (WASHINGTON LEGISLATURE)

Van De Wege, a firefighter, had been the ranking minority member in former Sen. Kirk Pearson‘s Natural Resources and Parks Committee, and was believed by observers to be interested in the chairmanship.

The senator, who was also a five-term state representative for the sprawling 24th District, enjoys fishing. A quick scan of his personal Facebook feed shows he and family members on the saltwater with bottomfish and salmon. And in March he was among those calling for a seven-day halibut season this year.

Through bills he’s sponsored, Van De Wege has shown an interest in regulating the fishing guide industry, particularly out-of-state entrants, and one he introduced earlier this year addressing Olympic Peninsula rivers led to WDFW’s ongoing meetings around the state on managing salmon and steelhead guiding.

Also this session, he twice voted against Senate Joint Memorial 8009, which called on Washington DC to expedite Puget Sound hatchery reviews.

The committee Van De Wege now heads is where many WDFW-related bills originate in the Senate, and the chair has the power to hold public hearings on them and determine if they advance. This past session, the agency’s fee increase package got zero traction with Pearson in charge. When Sen. Kevin Ranker (D-Orcas Island) was chair, he questioned WDFW’s 2012 lethal removal of the Wedge Pack and planned to hold hearings before election results changed the equation and Pearson came in.

Sen. John McCoy, the Tulalip Democrat who was also a member of Natural Resources & Parks, will sit alongside Van De Wege as the committee’s vice chair.

Van De Wege will also serve on Ways & Means and Health & Long Term Care Committees.

“These committees focus on major issues critical to all Washingtonians but particularly critical to 24th District residents,” he said of all his committee assignments in a press release. “I look forward to solving problems confronting residents of our district as well as prioritizing legislation that will lead to stronger households and communities across our state.”

More Details Emerge On Tractor Man, Alleged Elk Poacher, L.E. Response

The story of a man, his tractor and an alleged elk poacher and his truck has attracted a lot of attention since it was first reported on Facebook Monday morning.

Many cheered the actions of the Pierce County resident who used heavy equipment to push the Chevy parked on his land into some trees, disabling it.

TractorMan for Sheriff!!??” posted one person.

A neighbor who jumped on the thread filled in details about how long after hearing shots in the dark and calling 911 it was before help arrived, as well as the actions local residents took in the meanwhile.

(WDFW)

Today, it led Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife officers to post a “further clarification” to their initial report on the incident.

It provides information on how quickly state wardens were on the way to the scene once they learned about the incident, how the 16-year-old boy who allegedly shot a cow elk came to think he could do so, as well as apologies from WDFW for the overall slow response from law enforcement.

And it serves as a reminder about the overwhelming amount of country in Washington that the state’s 135 wildlife officers have to cover at all hours of the day.

To wit:

First and foremost, we apologize for the poor response from law enforcement – no one should fear being on their own property, and we take the threat of endangerment of the public’s safety very seriously.

Fish and Wildlife Police did not receive a 911 dispatch nor a formal request for help from County Officers. An online post on a local neighborhood group reported poaching occurring on their property. The reporting party read the post several hours later and called the officer on his personal cell phone. Officer Flowers was en-route within ten minutes of receiving the phone call and on scene within 30 minutes. Officer Prater being in the local area and in-service until midnight assisted officer Flowers. Both officers were in-service until 1am the following morning.

It is simply not true that we don’t work at night. What is true is that we have 135 people to serve 7 million people when they go into the outdoors…(i.e. our activity to protect resources and the public’s safety doesn’t just involve those that hold hunting and fishing licenses). There is no second shift when our folks sign out of service after a long day and we rely on dispatch centers to get the info to us.

The 16 year old who shot the cow elk and his grandfather are new to Washington State. The minor did have a North Carolina hunter Education card. The minor took bad advice from classmates that he could kill a cow elk. The case will be forwarded to the County Prosecutor. Charges could include, closed season poaching with fines and mandatory hunter education training. The landowner who used a tractor to total the 16 year old’s truck may face charges of malicious mischievous. The case is ongoing and has not been forwarded to the County Prosecutor. Keep in mind that there are a number of extenuating circumstances that will be considered in the final outcome.

Follow up will be taken to address this miscommunication from 911 dispatch, as we cannot respond if it is not dispatched to us.

Bottom line, it may pay to not only have 911 on your speed dial but also the number for your local, hardworking game warden.

Also, don’t be Tractor Man.

And never ever take something your classmates tell you at face value without checking it out yourself in this thing we call the hunting pamphlet.

OSP Looks For Tips On 3 Headless Blacktail Bucks Found Near Butte Falls

OSP PRESS RELEASE

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division in Central Point is asking for the public’s assistance in locating the persons responsible for the unlawful killing and waste of three black tail deer that were discovered just outside of Butte Falls. 

(OSP)

On Saturday, November 11, 2017, the Oregon State Police investigated three black tail deer that were dumped just outside of Butte Falls. Only the heads and some meat were taken. The deer appeared to be dead only a couple of days. Currently, there is an archery deer season in this unit. 

A reward is being offered by the Oregon Hunters Association through the Turn-in-Poachers (TIP) program for any information leading to an arrest in this or any other wildlife case. Callers can remain anonymous. The TIP program number is 1-800-452-7888

Anyone with any information is encouraged to contact either the TIP hotline or by calling Oregon State Police Dispatch at 541-776-6111