Category Archives: Headlines

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Oregon Wildlife Troopers Arrest, Jail Man In Shooting Of Trophy Metolius Buck

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH & WILDLIFE DIVISION

On November 24, 2014, Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish & Wildlife troopers in Central Oregon received information about a trophy class, 205″ mule deer, killed the day prior under suspicious circumstances in the Metolius Wildlife Management Unit.

 

006Members of the team began an investigation and as the investigation unfolded the hunter who shot the animal was contacted and ultimately provided a full confession to the illegal harvest of the buck deer.

The suspect was identified as DANNY DAVIDSON, 54. Mr. Davidson was lodged in the Deschutes County Jail for the illegal take of the buck deer and hunting on the enclosed lands of another.

 

 

New Leader In Steelhead Derby — By 1/100ths Of An Ounce

It is literally the tiniest of margins, but Darrel Atkinson hopes to milk it for all its worth.

The steelhead he weighed in yesterday at the Snake-Clearwater Derby was all of one-one hundreths of an ounce bigger than the previous day’s leader, putting him into the poll position for the $2,000 top prize.

Atkinson’s fish runs 17.82 pounds. He is followed by Leo Wolf, and his 17.81.

Meanwhile, there’s a new third-place steelie, a 16.5-pounder caught by Deedee Pearson yesterday.

Ty Rasmussen leads the youth division with an 11.88.

The event, which features daily prizes, stretches until noon this Saturday.

For more, check out this link.

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OSP Troopers Looking For Loud, Dark Toyota Pickup At Scene Of Late-night Deer Shooting

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH & WILDLIFE DIVISION

Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish & Wildlife troopers in Roseburg are asking for the public’s help locating the person(s) responsible for the unlawful shooting of a 3X4 Blacktail deer on Elkhead Road near milepost 11 (one mile north of the intersection of Scott’s Valley Road), in northern Douglas County.

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On November 23, 2014, at approximately 11:00 PM, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office responded to a call of shots being fired near the location. A vehicle was observed in the area and Troopers would like to speak the occupant(s) regarding the incident. The vehicle is described as a late 80′s or early 90′s Toyota standard cab pickup truck, dark blue or black in color with a loud muffler.

On November 24, 2014, Trooper Aaron Baimbridge received a call from a landowner in the area who located a wounded 3X4 buck deer lying in a creek near Elkhead Road. The deer had been shot and was dispatched at the scene.

A reward is being offered through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) program, administered through the Oregon Hunters Association, for any information that leads to an arrest in this case. Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to contact Trooper Baimbridge at (541) 817-4473 or the Turn in Poachers hot lineotline at 1-800-452-7888. Information may be kept anonymous.

SAM ELLINGER AND HIS WASHINGTON STATE RECORD BLUEFIN TUNA, A 39.2-POUNDER CAUGHT IN LATE SEPTEMBER. (VIA WDFW)

New Washington Record Bluefin Tuna Tops Old High Mark By 2.71 Pounds

A 39.2-pound bluefin tuna caught off Westport in early fall has been announced as the new Washington state record for the species.

It was caught by Central Washington University student Sam Ellinger on Sept. 28, and topped Patrick Fagan’s 2012 record by 2.71 pounds.

SAM ELLINGER AND HIS WASHINGTON STATE RECORD BLUEFIN TUNA, A 39.2-POUNDER CAUGHT IN LATE SEPTEMBER. (VIA WDFW)

SAM ELLINGER AND HIS WASHINGTON STATE RECORD BLUEFIN TUNA, A 39.2-POUNDER CAUGHT IN LATE SEPTEMBER. (WESTPORT WEIGHMASTER FACEBOOK)

His fish bit an anchovy 28 miles southwest of Westport; it taped out at 41 inches.

Elllinger was out that day “from the crack of dawn until it got dark,” according to a WDFW press release.

“Catching a fish this size was pretty exhausting,” he said.  “We didn’t know what we hooked until we got it on the boat.”

He was reportedly fishing about Deep Sea Charter’s boat Fury.

Said Fagan that day on Facebook, “I would say congrats, but I was the current record holder. :(“> Ah well, congrats on the great catch, and the great eating.”

Recent years have seen several inaugural or new high marks for offshore species, including dolphinfish and opa last year.

Researchers Studying Grizzly-Hunter Interactions

These days we put tracking devices on all sorts of critters — fish, wolves, mountain goats — so it’s not surprising to hear that federal wildlife biologists recently slung GPS collars around the necks of eight grizzly bears near Grand Teton National Park.

What is interesting, however, is that they also gave elk hunters GPSs, turned them loose into silverback country and found that sometimes the paths of collared bears and sportsmen were very close together.

Reports Brett French at the Billings Gazette:

In one encounter already tracked,  [Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team researcher Mike] Ebinger showed slides demonstrating how the data could be combined. As one group of hunters left a parking area at around 6 a.m. they turned on their GPS. As they moved around a lake in search of elk a nearby GPS-collared grizzly starts moving in the same direction behind and to the side of the hunters — probably downwind of them. At one point, the bear is within about 100 yards of the hunters who never knew it was there.

After bedding down around noon, the bear picks up the hunters’ now-cold trail and follows them again, possibly hoping they would shoot an elk …

While the idea is to study bear-hunter interactions and how powerful the attraction of a gut pile is, the researchers also recorded some very interesting movements by another grizz. For more, see French’s article here.

And for more on the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team , go here.

17.81-pounder Leaps To Top Spot At Steelhead Derby

Another day, another new leader at the Snake-Clearwater Steelhead Derby.

Leo Wolf’s fish leapt over the day 2 leader by nearly 1.75 pounds. His 17.81-pounder is now the fish to beat for the $2,000 top prize for biggest steelhead.

Monday also saw Jeff McClure match Don Hubbell’s 16.18, but sneaking by both gents was Pat Grimm who brought in a 16.33.

The first day’s leader was Denise Dinublio, who weighed in a 16.06-pounder.

The event, which features daily prizes, stretches until noon this Saturday.

For more, check out this link.

CHRIS PRATT HATES COYOTES. (BEN WATT/GQ)

Northwest Coyotes Better Hope This Actor Has A Good Agent

Everything is awesome these days if you’re Chris Pratt.

Everything, that is, except coyotes.

Because this is a family magazine we can’t quote his exact words, but suffice it to say, the voice behind Emmett Brickowski from The Lego Movie, and the avid angler and hunter formerly from Lake Stevens, Wash., probably wouldn’t mind squirting a little Kragl on a pack of ‘em.

CHRIS PRATT HATES COYOTES. (BEN WATT/GQ)

CHRIS PRATT HATES COYOTES. (BEN WATT/GQ)

(If you can’t tell, yes, said movie has run at the Walgamott Boys’ house a time or 13.)

Actually, Pratt, who is GQ’s “Man of the Year” for 2014, has put worse on them – he claims to have used his own urine for tanning hides.

Anti-hunters will latch onto the unvarnished talk in the print interview, but Pratt sympathizes with farmers dealing with the predators, and dog owners who’ve lost pets to them.

In an online behind-the-scenes interview, he talks to magazine reporter Drew Magary about calling them in:

“They’re smart as ****, dude. To call a coyote in that doesn’t hang up at, like, 700 yards—to get him to come in is so hard. You’ve gotta lure him in. You’ve gotta post up in the morning and evening and do a predator call that sounds like a dying rabbit. And they come running out, and they’re like, “Where the *** is it?” It’s been a while since I shot one, but I just like to shoot anything with the .22-250 [Remington].”

Yes, he’s rough around the edges, like any sportsman, but the cover story does feature his grilled dove-jalapeno-bacon roll, and he has a valuable take on procuring your own meat:

Anytime you go to the farmers’ market or you go hunt something, you earn it a little bit,” he tells Magary. “Getting all the food is a process. It makes you feel good. It’s like getting in shape by working out rather than by getting lipo. You know what I mean?”

Even if his talk about predator control could be better messaged, it’s notable to have such a big Hollywood star talking about hunting in a national magazine. Pratt is known for appearing on TV’s Parks And Recreation, and his Guardians of the Galaxy is the year’s top-grossing movie, Lego the fifth highest, and he’ll appear in a sequel to Jurassic Park next year.

For more on the outtakes, go here; for more from the magazine, it will be on newsstands tomorrow or you can read the cover story here.

16.18-pounder In Lead At Weeklong Snake-Clearwater Derby

Coming out of the weekend, a 16.18-pound steelhead is in first place at the Snake-Clearwater Steelhead Derby.

Don Hubbell’s big B-run took over the top spot from Denise Dinublio, who caught hers on the opening day of the weeklong event, a 16.06-pounder.

A 16.10, hooked by Mike Poirier, is in second.

The event stretches through Thanksgiving to this Saturday with a top prize of $2,000 for heaviest steelhead.

For more, check out this link.

(OSP)

Oregon Coast Wildlife Troopers Busy With Cases, Looking For Info

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRESS RELEASES FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH & WILDLIFE DIVISION

NEWPORT TROOPERS INVESTIGATE WASTED TROPHY BUCK DEER

On November 7, 2014, Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish and Wildlife troopers responded to a home off NE Port Lane in Lincoln City to investigate a report of a dead buck deer. Upon arrival, troopers discovered a deceased 4-point buck deer that appeared to have been shot with an arrow. The buck was unable to be salvaged. The deer was seen alive earlier in the afternoon and appeared to have been killed around 6:30 PM, inside city limits. This was the last day of the Western Oregon Deer season.

(OSP)

(OSP)

A $5,250 reward is offered, comprised of $250 by the State Chapter of the Oregon Hunters Association, $2500 from the Humane Society of the United States and $2500 from the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust, that leads to an arrest and conviction related to the investigation.

Anyone with information regarding this investigation is asked to please call Sr. Tpr. Ryan Kehr with the Oregon State Police, Newport Area Command at 541-270-0097

REWARD INCREASED TO HELP OSP FISH & DIVISION INVESTIGATION OF MULTIPLE DEER & ELK KILLINGS IN TILLAMOOK COUNTY

A reward of up to $1,000 is offered for information to assist the Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish & Wildlife Division’s investigation into multiple illegally killed deer and elk cases in Tillamook County.

(OSP)

(OSP)

OSP Fish & Wildlife Division troopers from the Tillamook office have responded to multiple reports of illegally killed deer and elk in the East Beaver and Sand Lake areas. Some of the illegally killed wildlife includes an elk in the Wildcat area of East Beaver, the shooting and waste of a bull elk along Highway 101 in Beaver where the head was removed, and the killing of multiple deer along East Beaver Creek.

The ongoing investigations led OSP troopers on Monday, November 3, 2014, to two suspects. BRADLEY JORDAN, age 20, from Beaver, was arrested by OSP troopers and lodged in the Tillamook County Jail for Unlawful Taking Buck Deer, Unlawful Possession of Buck Deer (2 counts), Waste of a Game Animal, and Criminal Trespass in the Second Degree. When arrested, JORDAN was in possession of an illegally killed black-tail deer. A second person identified as JOSHUA SINCLAIR, age 22, from Cloverdale, was cited and released to appear in Tillamook County Circuit Court for Aiding in a Game Violation.

(OSP)

(OSP)

OSP believes there may be others involved in these incidents and are asking for the public’s help. A $1,000 reward is offered, comprised of $500 by the State Chapter of the Oregon Hunters Association and $500 from the Tillamook Chapter of the Oregon Hunters Association, that leads to an arrest and conviction related to the investigations.

A FEDERAL FISHERIES BIOLOGIST RELEASES SOCKEYE SMOLTS BELOW A WEIR AT IDAHO'S REDFISH LAKE. (JESSE LAMB, NOAA)

Hatchery Program To Save Snake Sockeye From ‘Extinction Vortex’ Has Succeeded

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

Endangered Snake River sockeye salmon are regaining the fitness of their wild ancestors, with naturally spawned juvenile sockeye migrating to the ocean and returning as adults at a much higher rate than others released from hatcheries, according to a newly published analysis. The analysis indicates that the program to save the species has succeeded and is now shifting to rebuilding populations in the wild.

A FEDERAL FISHERIES BIOLOGIST RELEASES SOCKEYE SMOLTS BELOW A WEIR AT IDAHO'S REDFISH LAKE. (JESSE LAMB, NOAA)

A FEDERAL FISHERIES BIOLOGIST RELEASES SOCKEYE SMOLTS BELOW A WEIR AT IDAHO’S REDFISH LAKE. (JESSE LAMB, NOAA)

Biologists believe the increased return rate of sockeye spawned naturally by hatchery-produced parents is high enough for the species to eventually sustain itself in the wild again.

“This is a real American endangered species success story,” said Will Stelle, Administrator of NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region. “With only a handful of remaining fish, biologists brought the best genetic science to bear and the region lent its lasting support. Now there is real potential that this species will be self-sustaining again. The sockeye didn’t give up hope and neither did we.”

Biologists Paul Kline of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Thomas Flagg of NOAA Fisheries’ Northwest Fisheries Science Center report the results in the November issue of Fisheries, the magazine of the American Fisheries Society.

These findings demonstrate that the program to save Snake River sockeye can indeed reverse the so-called “extinction vortex,” where too few individuals remain for the species to sustain itself. Some thought that Snake River sockeye had entered that vortex in the 1990s, highlighted in 1992 when the sole returning male Redfish Lake sockeye, known as “Lonesome Larry” captured national attention.

NOAA Fisheries earlier this year released a proposed recovery plan for Snake River sockeye, which calls for an average of 1,000 naturally spawned sockeye returning to Redfish Lake each year, with similar targets for other lakes in Idaho’s Sawtooth Valley. About 460 naturally spawned sockeye returned to Redfish Lake this year – the most since the program began – out of an overall record return of about 1,600.

The article in Fisheries recounts the 20-year history of the scientific program to save the Snake River sockeye. The program began with 16 remaining adult sockeye – 11 males and five females – taken into captivity from 1991 to 1998. Through advanced aquaculture techniques, the program has retained about 95 percent of the species’ remaining genetic variability, while boosting surviving offspring about 2,000 percent beyond what could be expected in the wild.

Without such advances, the scientists write, “extinction would have been all but certain.”

The program funded by the Bonneville Power Administration has released more than 3.8 million sockeye eggs and fish into lakes and streams in the Sawtooth Valley, and tracks the fish that return from the ocean. Hatchery fish returning as adults have also begun spawning again in Redfish Lake, increasingly producing naturally spawned offspring that are now also returning.

A new analysis of those returns shows that the naturally spawned sockeye are returning at rates up to three times higher than those released from hatcheries as smolts, and more than 10 times greater than those released as even younger pre-smolts.

The higher returns indicate the naturally spawned fish are regaining the fitness the species needs to better survive their 900-mile migration to the ocean, their years at sea, and the return trip to Redfish Lake. A salmon population must produce at least one returning offspring per adult to sustain itself. Naturally spawned sockeye have returned at more than twice that rate in some years, indicating that under the right conditions they can not only sustain the species but add to it.

The results also suggest that hatchery-produced sockeye may regain the fitness advantages they need to sustain their species in the wild much faster than had been previously estimated, the scientists reported. Biologists caution that the current results span only three years so far, but indicate that fitness – and, in turn, survival – can improve in as little as only one generation in the wild.

“We hoped we could get returns equivalent to what you’d expect to see from a hatchery,” said Flagg, manager of the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries’ Science Center’s Manchester Research Station. “We’ve seen the population respond even better than that, which bodes well for the idea that the lakes can produce the juveniles you’d want to see to get to recovery.”