Category Archives: Headlines

IDFG Director Blasts Groups’ Steelhead Lawsuit Threat, Agency Details What Closure Means

Idaho steelhead managers are providing more details on today’s decision by the Fish and Game Commission to suspend fishing for the species as of midnight, Dec. 9.

DARKNESS IS FALLING ON STEELHEADING IN IDAHO — THESE TWO ANGLERS WERE FISHING THE CLEARWATER AT LEWISTON — DUE TO THREAT OF A LAWSUIT. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

The citizen panel made the move this morning under threat of a federal lawsuit from six organizations, three from out of state, who told IDFG in October they would sue over the agency’s lack of a federal authorization to hold fisheries over ESA-listed stocks unless the agency closed the season.

Officials say that an attempt to settle the dispute was unsuccessful after the groups asked for bait and boat bans, barbless hook restrictions, a prohibition on removing wild steelhead completely out of the water and closing steelhead fishing after Jan. 1.

IDFG claimed that deal would have made for “a disproportionate loss of angling opportunity for a particular user group, while preserving fishing opportunity for another.”

In a nearly 700-word letter to Idaho steelheaders, outgoing Director Virgil Moore explained that the commission didn’t want to go to U.S. District Court, lose because NMFS “dropped the ball on permit renewal” and waste sportsmen’s dollars to “pay bills for advocacy-group lawyers instead of conservation”

“Having been involved in steelhead management as a professional biologist, and being a steelhead fisherman for over 40 years, I’m well aware how important steelhead fishing is to Idaho anglers and local economies,” he wrote. “The loss of that opportunity, even temporarily, due to a lawsuit and unprocessed permit is truly regrettable.”

RETIRING IDFG DIRECTOR VIRGIL MOORE DURING A 2015 UPLAND BIRD HUNTING TRIP. (IDFG)

The permit in question ran out in 2010 but IDFG has been able to hold seasons in subsequent falls and winters “in coordination with federal managers,” according to an FAQ staffers put together.

For fans of Idaho steelheading, this means two things:

Per IDFG, fishing for steelhead will be closed in the Snake, Salmon and Clearwater, and it will be “illegal” to target them while seasons remain open on those rivers for whitefish, trout, sturgeon, etc.

As for the shared Snake, IDFG says “If Oregon and Washington continue their steelhead fisheries, anglers with a valid fishing license issued by Oregon or Washington may fish for steelhead consistent with the rules of those states.”

A WDFW official confirmed that.

“Short answer is we will keep fishing. Idaho anglers will be required to have a Washington or Oregon license if they are fishing for steelhead” on the shared Snake, said Chris Donley.

The six groups are using a page out of the same playbook some used in Washington in 2014, identifying an expired federal permit that provides cover for state fisheries over ESA-listed runs, then threatening a lawsuit.

In this case, they claim wild steelhead have been harmed during hatchery steelhead and Chinook fisheries.

Without the NMFS permit, the state is vulnerable to the suit from The Wild Fish Conservancy and Wild Salmon Rivers of Washington, The Conservation Angler of Portland, and Idaho Rivers United, Friends of the Clearwater and Snake River Waterkeeper, all based in Idaho.

But in its FAQs, IDFG states, “Angling has minimal impacts to wild steelhead and the majority (~85%) of the 5,000 miles of wild steelhead spawning and rearing habitat is closed to fishing.”

The agency says that most impacts on the fish occur downriver and that catch-and-release of wild fish has a 3 percent mortality rate.

Even so, a C&R fishery on even clipped steelhead can’t be kept open because it would accrue impacts on wild fish without a permit to do so.

As for when that permit will arrive, IDFG says it will take “a few months” for the feds to take public comment and finalize biops and other documentation, but it “may be completed in time to reopen the spring steelhead fishery,” which runs into April.

Idaho To Close Steelhead Season In Early Dec. Due To Lawsuit Threat

Editor’s update 11:45 a.m., Nov. 14, 2018: Due to the threat of a lawsuit, Idaho’s Fish and Game Commission this morning has voted to suspend the state’s fall steelhead season after Dec. 7 and won’t open the spring season, which begins Jan. 1, 2019, until a fisheries plan is OKed by NMFS, per a report from Eric Barker at The Lewiston Tribune. He says the commission feared IDFG “would be on the hook for legal fees should the season continue and the groups follow through with their intent to sue.” Below is our earlier story on the issue.

Another state, another low-hanging-fruit lawsuit in the works by wild steelhead zealots against fishery agencies.

In 2014 it was WDFW and its Chambers Creek early winter program in Puget Sound; in 2018 it’s IDFG and its A- and B-runs.

ANGLERS WHO LIKE TO FISH FOR IDAHO STEELHEAD LIKE KELLY COLLITON WON’T BE HAPPY WITH TODAY’S NEWS THAT THE THREAT OF A LAWSUIT MORE THAN LOW RUNS ARE FORCING THE STATE TO CLOSE FISHING FOR THE STOCKS. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

The two agencies’ lack of federally approved management plans for hatchery operations and to hold fisheries more so than low runs leave them vulnerable to suits.

Washington’s was eventually settled out of court and a new plan is in place after several disrupted fishing seasons, but now Idaho is under threat.

In October, the Wild Fish Conservancy and Conservation Angler, along with Rivers United, Friends of the Clearwater and Snake River Water Keeper notified IDFG that they were going to take it to court in December if they didn’t close steelhead season by early in the month.

This year has seen a low run to the Snake River Basin and all three states dropped the limit to one already, but this lawsuit is very similar to the one WFC and others pursued against WDFW several years ago when it didn’t have a NMFS-OKed hatchery genetic management plan for the Skykomish and other winter rivers.

HGMPs provide the states with Endangered Species Act coverage, and at the time draft plans for multiple rivers and stocks were piling up on the federal fishery overseers’ collective desk following a raft of listings throughout the region.

In IDFG’s case, its expired all the way back in 2009, per Lewiston Morning Tribune outdoor reporter Eric Barker.

“The state submitted a new monitoring and evaluation plan the same year but officials at Fisheries Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration let it sit idle while working on other pressing issues,” he writes in a story out overnight.

Also at risk are Idaho’s spring, summer and fall Chinook fisheries.

What to do about it is on the agenda of Idaho’s Fish and Game Commission meeting today.

“Department and federal agency review processes to date have found Idaho’s management frameworks for hatchery steelhead and chinook fisheries do not jeopardize wild steelhead populations,” reads a staff briefing out ahead of the confab. “The Department has monitoring and evaluation frameworks in place for hatchery steelhead and chinook fisheries, with annual reporting to NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service.”

Barker reports NMFS is working on a new draft plan and it’s out for public comment now.

Still, IDFG may have to close steelheading as of Dec. 7 to head off the risk of a lawsuit being filed on the 9th, Barker reports.

Stay tuned.

Chinook Return To Spawn In Restored Seattle Urban Stream Stretch

For the first time this decade, Chinook are spawning in a Seattle stream, and what’s more they’re doing so in a stretch restored for just that purpose.

A SEATTLE PUBLIC UTILITY IMAGE SHOWS A PAIR OF CHINOOK SALMON ON THE GRAVEL OF LOWER THORNTON CREEK, EAST OF NORTHGATE MALL. (SPU)

Seattle Public Utilities reports that in late October it spotted the pair in Thornton Creek’s Meadowbrook reach, between Matthews Beach on Lake Washington and Nathan Hale High School.

ANOTHER SEATTLE PUBLIC UTILITIES IMAGE SHOWS ONE OF THE CHINOOK, A HEN. (SPU)

That section was part of an $8 million 2014 SPU project that combined improved spawning habitat with better flood control.

THORNTON CREEK FLOWS THROUGH THE MEADOWBROOK REACH IN MARCH 2015. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“We engineered the streambed vertically and horizontally. Four years after construction, it is maintaining very high-quality gravel,” said utility biologist Katherine Lynch in a press release. “The Chinook salmon pair travelled almost one and a half miles to select this site for spawning. That’s a vote of confidence!”

HIGH WATER BRAIDS AROUND AN ISLAND IN LOWER THORNTON CREEK FOLLOWING A MARCH 2017 RAIN. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Ironically, Thornton isn’t even among the sites the public are directed to go to for Salmon Seeson in King County, but the duo appear to be fin-clipped, and in its release SPU noted the importance of the salmon stock to starving southern resident killer whales.

Thornton here formerly was a 1,000-foot-long ditch, essentially a “hallway” for fish instead of a home, and above there it still runs nearly as straight as an arrow.

As my two young sons can tell you, if last Sunday’s visit to Seattle’s Pipers Creek and a chat with a fish steward there is any indication, in addition to clear, clean and cold water, salmon need connected and complex streams– the 5Cs.

The Meadowbrook work also includes a pond that fills with runoff during high water events, filtering out some of the debris.

SCHMUTZ GATHERS NEAR A WATER CONTROL GATE LEADING TO A HOLDING AND CLEANSING POND ON THORNTON CREEK AT MEADOWBROOK. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Well upstream, my family and I had a rain garden installed outside our house to slow and treat street runoff that feeds into a stormwater drain that dumps into Thornton. It’s suspected that particles from tires flushed off the roads into urban waterways are particularly deadly to returning adult coho and their young.

In a year of mixed news for Northwest salmon, that a pair of Chinook found themselves in a city stream outfitted with spawning gravel is a bit of good.

Study Finds Side Channel Restoration One Key For Puget Sound Chinook Recovery

THE FOLLOWING IS A NEWS STORY FROM THE NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

Teasing apart the elements of Puget Sound rivers that matter most to fish, researchers have found that one of the best ways to recover threatened Chinook salmon may be to restore the winding side channels that once gave young fish essential rearing habitat and refuge from high winter flows.

Models were based on fine-scale river mapping and tracking salmon populations across Puget Sound. They showed that habitat restoration projects in the Cedar River southeast of Seattle could boost the number of young Chinook salmon produced by each spawning adult by adding side channel habitat.

BRAIDS OF THE SAUK RIVER BETWEEN DARRINGTON AND ROCKPORT. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Additional side channels and other habitat improvements also appear to help stabilize salmon numbers, making them less vulnerable to flooding or other extreme conditions that may come more often with climate change.

“The risk of those extreme catastrophes is lessened because the water can spread out and slow down, with less impact to the fish,” said Correigh Greene, a research biologist at NOAA Fisheries’ Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle and coauthor of the The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site new research published last week in PLOS ONE. The team of scientists from NOAA Fisheries, Cramer Fish Sciences, and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife used aerial photographs to chart and measure each twist and turn of 10 of Puget Sound’s largest rivers, from the Skagit to the Dungeness, and relate them to Chinook salmon populations.

Restoring Habitat Key To Salmon Recovery

The findings also provide important confirmation that restoring Chinook salmon habitat, a key recovery strategy for Puget Sound populations, can deliver real improvements in their survival and productivity.

“We now know that there is a detectable response to habitat restoration that can inform our decisions about how to pursue recovery and dedicate funding where it will do the most good for fish,” said Elizabeth Babcock, Northern Puget Sound Branch Chief in NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region, who helps carry out recovery plans for threatened Puget Sound Chinook salmon.

River Complexity Leads to Better Salmon Habitat

Biologists view the braided networks of side channels that are common in natural rivers in the Northwest as evidence of a river’s “complexity,” which also includes deep pools, outcrops, and log jams, all of which provide important habitat for juvenile and adult fish. Generally, the more complexity a river displays, the better habitat it will provide for fish, because they can more easily find refuge and rearing habitat when they need it.

Many Puget Sound rivers have suffered reduced complexity through years of development as dikes, roads, and riprap have hemmed them into straight, narrow channels with far less room. That leaves less refuge for juvenile fish to grow before migrating into the Salish Sea.

A SCREENGRAB FROM GOOGLE MAPS SHOWS A STRAIGHT, DREDGED STRETCH OF THE SAMMAMISH RIVER BETWEEN WOODINVILLE AND REDMOND. (GOOGLE MAPS)

Of all the factors that contribute to a river’s complexity, the researchers found that side channels and the number of junctions among them, and to a lesser extent woody material such as log jams, are most important to Chinook salmon. More complex rivers are generally slower than narrow rivers with impervious banks, so the juvenile salmon aren’t swept downstream faster than they’re ready to go. The more habitat complexity, the researchers found, the higher the productivity of Chinook salmon populations.

Models Can Help Plan and Track Habitat Restoration

“Once we link habitat metrics to meaningful productivity metrics, we can start to answer some of the big questions, such as, “How much restoration achieves recovery, and what qualities do you most want to focus on,” said Jason Hall, a senior scientist at Cramer Fish Sciences and lead author of the new study. He noted that the answers may differ from species to species and river to river. Habitat complexity also appeared to reduce fluctuations in salmon numbers from year to year, “supporting the idea that habitat complexity buffers populations from annual variation in environmental conditions,” the scientists wrote.

Habitat protection and restoration along the Cedar River, which provides much of Seattle’s municipal water, is an example of the kind of restoration that can help recover Puget Sound Chinook salmon in the long run, Greene said. Understanding the habitat qualities most important to fish helps estimate “how much we have to do to move the needle over the whole life cycle.” The same mapping and modeling approach that was demonstrated by the research can help plan and track the benefits of other restoration occurring in estuaries and along Puget Sound’s shorelines, the authors said.

IN A RELATED STORY OUT TODAY, SEATTLE PUBLIC UTILITIES SAYS THAT A  PAIR OF CHINOOK WERE SPOTTED IN A SECTION OF THORNTON CREEK THAT WAS RESTORED IN 2014 TO BE BETTER SPAWNING HABITAT AND THAT THE TWO WERE THE FIRST OF THEIR SPECIES SEEN IN THE URBAN STREAM IN EIGHT YEARS. (SPU)

“If you have funding for restoration, where can you spend it to deliver the best benefit for fish?” Babcock asked. “We’re finally starting to have better answers to that question.”

SW Washington Fishing Report (11-13-18)

THE FOLLOWING WDFW FISHING REPORT WAS TRANSMITTED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Grays River – 6 bank anglers had no catch.

Skamokawa Creek – No anglers sampled.

Elochoman River – 7 bank anglers kept 1 steelhead and released 15 coho.

JASON RESSER HOLDS A HATCHERY COHO CAUGHT ON THE KALAMA SEVERAL SEASONS BACK. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Abernathy Creek – No anglers sampled.

Mill Creek – No anglers sampled.

Germany Creek – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 12 bank rods had no catch.  1 boat/1 rod released 2 coho jacks.

Above the I-5 Br:  87 bank rods kept 2 coho jacks, 1 steelhead, 5 cutthroat and released 28 chinook, 2 coho, 1 coho jack and  1 steelhead. 11 boats/24 rods kept 4 coho, 11 coho jacks, 2 steelhead and released 5 chinook jacks, 1 coho jack and 3 cutthroat.

Kalama River – 31 bank anglers kept 4 coho, 2 steelhead and released 2 coho.  3 boats/6 rods released 1 chinook.

Lewis River – 12 bank rods kept 2 chinook and released 1 coho.  17 boats/33 rods kept 1 chinook, 3 coho and 1 coho jack.

East Fork Lewis River – 4 bank anglers released 1 coho and 2 steelhead.

Salmon Creek – No anglers sampled.

Wind River – No anglers sampled.

Klickitat River – 73 bank anglers kept 8 chinook, 1 chinook jack, 10 coho , 3 coho jacks and released 1 chinook and 1 coho jack.

Trying To Foul Hook Downed Fowl, Something Bassy Bites Instead For Basin Duck Hunter

Everybody knows that Washington’s Columbia Basin is a great spot for duck hunting and it’s widely regarded as tops for bass fishing, but it isn’t often that Northwest sportsmen get to enjoy both pursuits at once.

KYLE VANDERWAAL AND THE FRUITS OF A COLUMBIA BASIN BLAST-AND-CAST LAST WEEKEND. (KYLE VANDERWAAL VIA GARY LUNDQUIST)

Waterfowling heats up in midfall as northern flights begin to arrive but largies and smallies become much more lethargic as lakes cool down with the onset of winter.

That’s the theory, anyway, and you just know that for every theory there’s that one guy gunning to poke a hole in it.

Enter Mr. Kyle Vanderwaal.

He’s a hardcore duck and goose hunter, if reports from family friend Gary Lundquist are any indication, and last weekend he found himself in the basin chasing mallards.

Despite blue skies hunting was pretty good that day, but apparently Vanderwaal downed one bird over water that was a bit deeper than his chest waders allowed him to wade.

Sans Bowser, it was time to implement plan C — casting.

Out came a fishing rod strung up with a No. 9 Shad Rap, a 31/2-inch plug sporting a pair of trebles, on the business end.

Perfect for hooking far-fallen fowl.

Also fish.

As Vanderwaal attempted to snag his greenhead, a green bass bit instead.

In the hook-and-bullet world, a cast and blast is an outing where you might fish for steelhead in the morning and head into the breaks for chukar in the afternoon, so this was more of a blast and cast or blast then cast.

Anyway, a photo snapped shortly afterwards shows the young hunter smiling with the day’s, er, catch — five drakes and a roughly 2-pound largemouth.

“The bass was released :)” reports Lundquist.

The same can not be said, however, of Vanderwaal’s ducks.

Female Pike Caught 10 Miles Of Grand Coulee Dam

A 6.2-pound female northern pike that could have spawned next spring was instead fortuitously netted about 10 miles of Grand Coulee Dam in what’s believed to be the furthest downreservoir capture of the invasive nonnative predator fish so far on Lake Roosevelt.

THE COLVILLE TRIBES CAUGHT THIS 6.2-POUND, 30-INCH FEMALE NORTHERN PIKE NEAR GRAND COULEE DAM EARLIER THIS MONTH. (COLVILLE TRIBES)

It and a 27.5-pounder caught near the head of Roosevelt’s Spokane Arm mark temporary victories in the fight to keep the species out of the Columbia River’s anadromous zone.

The two pike were captured by the Colville and Spokane Tribes, respectively, during recent surveys throughout the reservoir and were first reported by KING 5 in a segment that aired last night.

The worry is that the fish will eventually get below Lake Rufus Woods and Chief Joseph Dam, which marks as far upstream as salmon and steelhead can travel on the Columbia, and wreak havoc on ESA-listed Chinook and steelhead at the mouth of the Okanogan River and below.

Tens of millions of dollars have been invested in recovering those stocks and others in the Inland Northwest.

Unfortunately, pike are moving that way as inexorably as water flows downhill.

They were likely moved illicitly by bucket biologists from Idaho’s Lake Couer d’Alene drainage into Washington’s Pend Oreille River, and from there were flushed downstream into the Columbia during high spring runoff.

The species established itself near the mouths of the Kettle and Colville Rivers on Roosevelt, but has been dropping further and further downlake,

They may even already be in Rufus Woods, if anecdotal angler reports are any indication. State fishery biologists are worried about that possibility.

WDFW and the tribes have been working hard for several years to reduce pike numbers, eradicating as many as possible through gillnetting.

The Colvilles are also in the second year of a program that offers anglers $10 a head for any northerns they turn in.

While meant to help protect Lake Roosevelt’s rainbow trout, kokanee and other fish populations, a poster says that any pike caught downstream in Rufus Woods and even the Wells Pool can also be submitted for cash.

The program was the inspiration behind Northwest Sportsman‘s offer of $50 for any caught in Lake Washington, where two have shown up since January 2017.

Chums Begin To Arrive In Central, South Sound After Slow Start, Dispute

State commercial fishing managers say they scrubbed a Puget Sound chum salmon fishery last week after the Squaxin Island Tribe expressed “deep doubts about the run.”

“We understand tribal concerns with their fisheries occurring in extreme terminal areas and closed the seine fishery to help address those concerns,” reads a WDFW statement sent out late Friday afternoon.

THE SQUAXIN ISLAND TRIBE CALLED “FOUL” ON STATE SALMON MANAGERS LAST WEEK IN PROTEST OF CONTINUED FISHING ON AT THE TIME WHAT LOOKED LIKE A LOW RETURN OF CHUM SALMON. A CHUM LEAPS OUT OF ALASKA’S COLD BAY. (K. MUELLER, USFWS)

Squaxin Chairman Arnold Cooper had blasted the agency earlier in the week for planning to continue to fish despite low initial returns and the tribe deciding not to go out for chums.

“When the co-manager alerts you to a problem in real fish, they need to stop telling us that the computer model says there is plenty of paper fish and there is no problem,” Cooper said in a press release. “The state ignores the warning, on the hope that the rains will come, the rivers will rise, and the fish will show up. The tribe hopes that is so, but is not willing to risk the run.”

Cooper said that at the time returns to Kennedy Creek at the head of Totten Inlet was just 20 percent of usual.

WDFW acknowledged that fewer chums were showing up in streams that see early runs, but said there have been good signs to the north.

“Purse seine catch per landing in Areas 10 and 11 on Monday was the highest we have seen for this week since 2007,” the statement said. “Two weeks ago it was one of the lowest we have seen in recent years.”

WDFW reports that 165,000 chums have been caught in the nontribal commercial fishery off Seattle and Tacoma. It said that while there are still salmon available for state netters (~36,000), per a preseason agreement the fishery closed as of last Friday morning to protect Nisqually River winter chums.

Southern resident killer whales from J Pod have been feasting on chums off Vashon Island and elsewhere in the Central Sound since last week. Transient, or marine mammal-eating Bigg’s orcas, have also been in the area.

Chums were definitely in evidence in Seattle’s Pipers Creek over the weekend, where 40 had been counted by early afternoon on Saturday, ballooning the season total to 54.

THE BROTHERS WALGAMOTT LOOK FOR CHUMS AND COHO SATURDAY IN SEATTLE’S PIPERS CREEK WHERE IT RUNS THROUGH CARKEEK PARK. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

WDFW says that surveyors spotted far more chums in Kennedy Creek, 3,524, on Nov. 7, though that figure is on the low side.

“While we may be below the 10-year average for this date of 9,033 chum, we are within the range expected during this time, especially given the lack of rain which typically serves as an environmental cue for fish to move onto the spawning grounds,” the agency statement said.

According to precipitation totals posted on KOMO’s website, November rainfall is one-third of average and running 1.25 inches behind since the start of the water year, Oct. 1.

The escapement goal for Kennedy Creek is 14,400 in even years, 11,500 in odds. According to WDFW, those figures have been met 27 years in a row.

The overall preseason forecast for Central and South Sound was 543,637. The state and tribes agreed to lower that to 478,000 two weeks ago, but WDFW test fishery and purse seine models last week spit out 643,566 and 538,330, figures the tribes didn’t agree to.

A POD OF CHUMS HEAD UP PIPERS CREEK. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

ODFW Biologists Spotlighting Deer For Douglas County Survey

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists are conducting nighttime spotlight surveys of deer populations around Douglas County. All state trucks in the survey are clearly marked with large ODFW placards and flashing amber strobe lights.

(ODFW)

District spotlight surveys include county roads along the Umpqua Valley floor and remote locations throughout Douglas County foothills. Both black-tailed and Columbian white-tailed deer are counted along established roots. This data helps biologists monitor deer population trends and herd health through time.

Nighttime spotlighting in fall gives biologists an estimate of buck to doe and fawn to doe ratios. Spring spotlight surveys that begin in early March provide an indication of winter survival for fawns and yearlings.

Citizens witnessing spotlighting activity from unmarked vehicles are asked to call Oregon State Police’s TIP line at *OSP (677) or 1-800-452-7888

Lower Siletz To Reopen For Chinook Retention

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Emergency regulations restricting Chinook fishing have helped put Siletz River fall Chinook on a path toward achieving spawning escapement objectives for the basin.

THE SILETZ RIVER TO JUST ABOVE THE OJALLA BRIDGE BELOW THE TOWN OF SILETZ WILL REOPEN FOR FALL CHINOOK STARTING THIS SATURDAY, NOV. 10, GIVING ANGLERS LIKE MATT LITTLE SOMETHING TO SMILE ABOUT IN AN OTHERWISE DOWN YEAR FOR NORTH COAST KINGS. HE CAUGHT THIS PAIR OUT OF ONE HOLE A COUPLE SEASONS BACK. NOTE THAT THE DAILY LIMIT IS JUST ONE KING BETWEEN NOV. 1 AND DEC. 31. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Effective Saturday, Nov. 10, the section of the Siletz River from the mouth upstream to the ODFW marker located 1,200 feet above the Ojalla Bridge is open to Chinook angling through Dec. 31. The river upstream of the ODFW marker will remain closed to Chinook angling per emergency regulations.

The Chinook bag limit for all waterbodies in the NW Zone, including the Siletz River,  remains 1 chinook per day and 3 for the season between Nov. 1 and Dec. 31.

“Numbers of spawning fall Chinook have increased over the last week in the Siletz Basin to a point where we are comfortable with reducing the Chinook salmon closure area to provide additional fishing opportunity,” said John Spangler, ODFW Fish Biologist in Newport. “The remaining closure area will continue to provide protection for fish in key spawning areas.”

Counts of adult Chinook in spawning areas continue to lag behind in other coastal basins, so the emergency regulations remain in effect for other NW Zone basins.

“ODFW will continue to monitor fish numbers and look for opportunities to ease restrictions in other basins if sufficient numbers of Chinook enter key spawning areas,” said Spangler.

See the Northwest Zone Fishing Report in the Recreation Report for the latest information on regulations and opportunities https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/northwest-zone