Category Archives: Headlines

TIGER MUSKY DON'T OFTEN MAKE JOE HYMER'S FISHING ROUNDUP, BUT THIS 40-INCHER WAS CAUGHT LAST WEEK ON THE COWLITZ RIVER'S LAKE MAYFIELD BY KAYAK ANGLER BRAD HOLE. "iHOOKED INTO A COUPLE NICE TIGER MUSKIES AND THEN THIS WHOPPER TOOK THE BAIT!  I WAS DRAGGING A 7" CRANK BAIT NEAR THE WEED LINE.  SHE JUMPED THREE TIMES BEFORE I COULD BRING THE KAYAK INTO SHORE TO LAND HER." (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

SW WA, Lower Columbia Fishing Report (6-29-15)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT WAS GENERATED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

A Joint State Hearing scheduled for Tuesday June 30, 2015 via teleconference will start at 1:00 p.m. (one hour earlier than previously scheduled).  The agenda has been updated to include the following fisheries: Lower Columbia River mainstem recreational summer Chinook and Bonneville Pool recreational sturgeon.

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – 5 bank anglers had no catch.  Effort has been light.

During five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered:

* 407 spring Chinook salmon, 82 jacks, 43 maxi-jacks, 168 summer steelhead.

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released:

* 137 recycled summer steelhead at the Interstate-5 boat launch.
* 300 spring Chinook and 73 jacks into the Cispus River above the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek and 53 spring Chinook mini-jacks were released into Riffe Lake at Mossyrock Park.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,980 cubic feet per second on Monday, June 29. Water visibility is ten feet.
Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Last week we sampled  1,478 salmonid anglers (including 264 boats) with 122 adult and 3 jack summer Chinook, 143 steelhead and 78 sockeye.  76 (62%) of the adult Chinook, 95 (66%) of the steelhead , and 73 (94%) of the sockeye were kept (though it was legal to retain all sockeye, adipose fin clipped or not).

Bonneville Pool – Light effort and catch.

The Dalles Pool – Bank anglers are catching some summer Chinook.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Marker 82 line downstream – Boat anglers from Vancouver to Longview continue to catch-and-release some legals, at the rate of almost a fish per rod.

Bonneville Pool – A little slower for boat anglers with a legal kept per every 6.3 rods compared to the one for every 4.6 rods during June 19-21.  Bank anglers were also catching a few legals.

Sturgeon retention is scheduled to be allowed July 3-July 5.  A Joint State Hearing to review and update catches from this fishery is scheduled for tomorrow.

Walleye and Bass

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Boat anglers in the Camas/Washougal area are catching some walleye.

Bonneville Pool – Boat anglers released an average of 6 bass per rod.  Effort and catch for walleye was light.

The Dalles Pool – Boat anglers averaged just over a walleye per rod when including fish released.

TIGER MUSKY DON'T OFTEN MAKE JOE HYMER'S FISHING ROUNDUP, BUT THIS 40-INCHER WAS CAUGHT LAST WEEK ON THE COWLITZ RIVER'S LAKE MAYFIELD BY KAYAK ANGLER BRAD HOLE. "iHOOKED INTO A COUPLE NICE TIGER MUSKIES AND THEN THIS WHOPPER TOOK THE BAIT!  I WAS DRAGGING A 7" CRANK BAIT NEAR THE WEED LINE.  SHE JUMPED THREE TIMES BEFORE I COULD BRING THE KAYAK INTO SHORE TO LAND HER." (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

TIGER MUSKY DON’T OFTEN MAKE JOE HYMER’S FISHING ROUNDUP, BUT THIS 40-INCHER WAS CAUGHT LAST WEEK ON THE COWLITZ RIVER’S LAKE MAYFIELD BY BRAD HOLE. “I HOOKED INTO A COUPLE NICE TIGER MUSKIES AND THEN THIS WHOPPER TOOK THE BAIT!” REPORTS THE BALLARD-BASED KAYAK ANGLER. “I WAS DRAGGING A 7-INCH CRANKBAIT NEAR THE WEEDLINE. SHE JUMPED THREE TIMES BEFORE I COULD BRING THE KAYAK INTO SHORE TO LAND HER.” (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

ROCK CREEK HATCHERY IS ON THE NORTH UMPQUA, NORTH OF IDLEYLD PARK. (ODFW)

400,000 Young Spring Chinook Die At North Umpqua Hatchery After Water Flow Problem

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

A fish carcass clogged an intake pipe at Rock Creek Hatchery, shutting off the flow of water to a raceway, killing 400,000 spring Chinook pre-smolts. These fish were to be released directly from the hatchery into the North Umpqua River next spring.

Dan Meyer, Rock Creek Hatchery manager said the water flow didn’t drop low enough to trigger an alarm. An alert employee discovered the problem within an hour but with the water temperature in the raceway at about 68 degrees and no fresh water coming in, it was too late to salvage any live fish.

ROCK CREEK HATCHERY IS ON THE NORTH UMPQUA, NORTH OF IDLEYLD PARK. (ODFW)

ROCK CREEK HATCHERY IS ON THE NORTH UMPQUA, NORTH OF IDLEYLD PARK. (ODFW)

“We have a new intake and a new emergency valve we can open. If power to the screens is out, water to the hatchery is severed, and the emergency valve will get water to fish. It was opened for short time during a power outage a few months ago when the emergency generator failed, and we think the carcass may have gotten into the water line then,” Meyer explained.

The hatchery spring Chinook provide a popular fishery in the Umpqua and North Umpqua rivers with 4,000 to 6,000 returning each year. These fish return as three to five-year old adults, with the majority returning as four-year-olds. Anglers will see the impact predominately in the 2018 returns and to some degree 2017 and 2019 as well.

ODFW fish staff are looking at possible options for this fishery and will keep the public informed. Hatchery staff are refining the new alarm system testing and protocol.

BRAD SMITH. (WDFW)

WA Fish And Wildlife Commission Chair Smith Confirmed By Senate

Brad Smith‘s appointment to the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission was confirmed on Saturday.

The full Senate’s vote for the current chairman of the citizen panel was 43-0, with six members excused.

BRAD SMITH. (WDFW)

BRAD SMITH. (WDFW)

Video of the upper chamber’s decision wasn’t immediately available, but in late May, Smith, who lives in Bellingham and is a retired dean at Western Washington University, received a do-confirm recommendation from the Natural Resources and Parks Committee, which is chaired by Sen. Kirk Pearson.

Smith was originally appointed to the commission in 2009, and had previously been confirmed in 2011. Governor Jay Inslee reappointed him last year, and his current term runs through December of 2020.

Other commissioners who have received the full Senate’s stamp of approval include vice chair Larry Carpenter as well as members Jay Holzmiller, Bob Kehoe, Conrad Mahnken, and Jay Kehne.

The only members who have not had their positions confirmed are longtime former chairman Miranda Wecker and new members Kim Thorburn and Dave Graybill.

NEHALEM SYSTEM SALMON ANGLERS LIKE JEFF ANDERSON WILL NEED TO LOOK ELSEWHERE FOR WILD COHO THIS YEAR. WHILE HATCHERY SILVERS REMAIN OPEN, THERE AREN'T ENOUGH UNCLIPPED ONES TO OPEN A RETENTION SEASON. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

ODFW Reminding Anglers Of Different Nehalem Salmon Regs This Season

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

With the summer chinook salmon season in the Nehalem Bay and River set take off in July, fish biologists with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are reminding anglers of changes in daily and seasonal bag limits for 2015.

As listed in the 2015 Sport Fishing Regulation pamphlet, the bag limit for non fin-clipped Chinook salmon in the Nehalem Basin is one fish per day and five for the season through Sept. 15. Beginning Sept. 16, the bag limit will increase to two non fin-clipped Chinook per day. No more than 10 non fin-clipped Chinook may be taken for the Nehalem per year, in aggregate with other North Coast bays and streams.

According to Chris Knutsen, ODFW fish biologist in Tillamook, the one-fish daily bag limit was adopted to reduce harvest impacts on this unique, early-returning summer run.

“The Chinook in the Nehalem Basin arrive earlier than in other coastal basins because they have a long way to go to reach their spawning grounds,” he said. Most of the early fish are bound for the upper Nehalem River or Rock Creek near Vernonia — almost 90 miles upstream, Knutsen added.

Reducing harvest pressure on this population may be even more important this summer.

“Even during an average summer, the water temperatures in the Nehalem can reach levels that are close to lethal to salmon,” Knutsen said. “With the current drought, this summer could be much worse.”

Also, in anticipation of the upcoming fall salmon season, Knutsen is reminding anglers there will not be a wild coho fishery in Nehalem Bay this year due to low projected returns. Hatchery coho will remain available for harvest.

NEHALEM SYSTEM SALMON ANGLERS LIKE JEFF ANDERSON WILL NEED TO LOOK ELSEWHERE FOR WILD COHO THIS YEAR. WHILE HATCHERY SILVERS REMAIN OPEN, THERE AREN'T ENOUGH UNCLIPPED ONES TO OPEN A RETENTION SEASON. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

NEHALEM SYSTEM SALMON ANGLERS LIKE JEFF ANDERSON WILL NEED TO LOOK ELSEWHERE FOR WILD COHO THIS YEAR. WHILE HATCHERY SILVERS REMAIN OPEN, THERE AREN’T ENOUGH UNCLIPPED ONES TO OPEN A RETENTION SEASON. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

The change in Chinook harvest management in the Nehalem Bay and River is an action called for under the recently adopted Coastal Multi-Species Conservation and Management Plan, which was developed to address conservation and management of salmon, steelhead and sea-run cutthroat trout on the Oregon coast from Cape Blanco to Seaside. Learn more about the Coastal Multi-Species Plan, on the ODFW website.

COWLITZ RIVER SUMMER STEELHEADERS SHOULD BE ALL SMILES OVER THE REGULATION CHANGE THAT ALLOWS THE USE OF BARBLESS HOOKS IN JULY, BUT THE LOWER BOUNDARY STATED IN WFDW'S PRINTED REGULATIONS IS INCORRECT. THE AGENCY SAYS THEY'RE OK BETWEEN LEXINGTON BRIDGE AND 400 FEET BELOW THE BARRIER DAM, NOT DOWN NEAR THE MOUTH, WHERE SUMMERS FROM OTHER STOCKS WILL DIP IN TO COOL OFF. HERE, TRISTEN BROWN OF IDAHO SHOWS OFF HIS FIRST STEELIE, CAUGHT WITH GUIDE RON HOLT A COUPLE JULYS AGO. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

Barbed-hooks-OK Area On Cowlitz Actually Slightly Smaller Than New Regs Say

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Boundary for using barbed hooks modified on lower Cowlitz River

Action:  Anglers may use barbed hooks for hatchery salmon and hatchery trout.

Effective dates: July 1 through July 31, 2015

Species affected:  Hatchery salmon, hatchery steelhead, and hatchery sea run cutthroats

Location:  From Lexington Drive Bridge (Sparks Road Bridge) upstream to 400 feet or posted markers below the barrier dam.

COWLITZ RIVER SUMMER STEELHEADERS SHOULD BE ALL SMILES OVER THE REGULATION CHANGE THAT ALLOWS THE USE OF BARBLESS HOOKS IN JULY, BUT THE LOWER BOUNDARY STATED IN WFDW'S PRINTED REGULATIONS IS INCORRECT. THE AGENCY SAYS THEY'RE OK BETWEEN LEXINGTON BRIDGE AND 400 FEET BELOW THE BARRIER DAM, NOT DOWN NEAR THE MOUTH, WHERE SUMMERS FROM OTHER STOCKS WILL DIP IN TO COOL OFF. HERE, TRISTEN BROWN OF IDAHO SHOWS OFF HIS FIRST STEELIE, CAUGHT WITH GUIDE RON HOLT A COUPLE JULYS AGO. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

COWLITZ RIVER SUMMER STEELHEADERS SHOULD BE ALL SMILES OVER THE REGULATION CHANGE THAT ALLOWS THE USE OF BARBLESS HOOKS IN JULY, BUT THE LOWER BOUNDARY STATED IN WFDW’S PRINTED REGULATIONS IS INCORRECT. THE AGENCY SAYS THEY’RE OK BETWEEN LEXINGTON BRIDGE AND 400 FEET BELOW THE BARRIER DAM, NOT DOWN NEAR THE MOUTH, WHERE SUMMERS FROM OTHER STOCKS WILL DIP IN TO COOL OFF. HERE, TRISTEN BROWN OF IDAHO SHOWS OFF HIS FIRST STEELIE, CAUGHT WITH GUIDE RON HOLT A COUPLE JULYS AGO. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

Reason for action: The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Commission adopted this proposal during the recent 2015-2016 permanent fishing rule process. It was modified from the original proposal that used the mouth of the river as the lower boundary. The modified boundary was inadvertently left out of the new sportfishing pamphlet.

Other information: This regulation focuses on the harvest of surplus Cowlitz River hatchery summer run steelhead. However, steelhead from outside the basin can be found taking advantage of the cooler water temperatures of the lower Cowlitz. Barbless hooks are still required downstream from the Lexington Drive Bridge for easier release of wild fish destined to areas outside the Cowlitz.

Beginning in 2016, per permanent regulations, barbed hooks may be used from the Lexington Drive Bridge upstream to the barrier dam during the months of June and July. However, barbless hooks are still required upstream of the Lexington Drive Bridge August through May. Barbless hooks are also required for sturgeon at all times.

Washington Coast Salmon Fishing Report (Thru June 21, 2015)

THE FOLLOWING NEWS ORIGINATED FROM WENDY BEEGHLEY, WDFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Columbia Ocean Area (including Oregon)

A total of 1,337 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery during the week of June 15, landing 599 Chinook, 1,407 coho, and no pink. Through Sunday, June 21, a total of 674 Chinook (5% of the area guideline) and 1,527 coho (2% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

Westport

A total of 1,570 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery the week of June 15, landing 694 Chinook, 485 coho, and 56 pink. Through Sunday, June 21, a total of 800 Chinook (3% of the area guideline) and 490 coho (1% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

La Push

A total of 98 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery the week of June 15, landing 52 Chinook, 19 coho, and 5 pink. Through Sunday, June 21, a total of 69 Chinook (3% of the area guideline) and 19 coho (1% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

Neah Bay

A total of 616 anglers participated in the all-species salmon fishery the week of June 15, landing 429 Chinook, 63 coho, and 198 pink. Through Sunday, June 21, a total of 523 Chinook (6% of the area guideline) and 70 coho (1% of the area sub-quota) have been landed.

Reichert, Kilmer, Cantwell Call On Congress To Reauthorize LWCF

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON WILDLIFE AND RECREATION COALITION

The week of June 24th marks the last 100 days of the Land and Water Conservation fund which will expire unless Congress moves quickly to reauthorize the program. Created in 1964, LWCF has invested over $600 million dollars in Washington alone, providing grants to hundreds of national, state and local parks, trails, fishing access sites, and recreational facilities, and supporting working forests and family farms.

“In Washington state, the LWCF has helped preserve places like the Columbia River Gorge, Lake Chelan, Mount Rainier and Olympic National Parks, and it has improved management of our public lands,” Senator Maria Cantwell, ranking member of the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, said. “The LWCF is the country’s most successful conservation law, supporting an outdoor economy of more than $600 billion annually and 6 million American jobs. We must reauthorize and fully fund this critical, effective program.”

Congressmen Derek Kilmer and Dave Reichert participated in a conference call organized by the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition, which brings together 280 businesses and non-profits, to highlight the importance of LWCF. A recording of the call is available HERE.

“The outdoor spaces that the Land and Water Conservation makes possible, help Washington be a number one destination for tourists and businesses alike, bringing people from all over the world,” said Congressman Dave Reichert of Washington’s 8th district. “Whether it’s local parks that families enjoy, or the incredible hiking trails Washingtonians flock to every weekend, LWCF is a crucial part of making our state a beautiful place to live. We can’t afford to let it expire this fall.”

“The Land and Water Conservation Fund helps us protect and enhance outdoor spaces that draw visitors and boost local businesses,” said Representative Derek Kilmer of Washington’s 6th congressional district. “With its expiration fast approaching we need Congress to take up our bipartisan legislation to reauthorize the fund. It’s important to the future of our outdoor economy.”

“Washington is fortunate to have such strong leadership dedicated to reauthorizing the Land and Water Conservation Fund,” said Joanna Grist, Executive Director of the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition. “Representatives Kilmer and Reichert, along with Senator Murray and Cantwell, understand that reauthorizing LWCF is a critical part of promoting an outdoor recreation industry that supports nearly 200,000 jobs in Washington. We’re grateful for their commitment to our great outdoors and the public access and jobs that depend on it.”

(ODFW)

Get Tips For Training Your Oregon Hunting Dog At July Workshop

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Get the most out of the dog you have or learn what to look for in a new hunting dog. Join ODFW and several dog hunting clubs at the Queener Ridge Pheasant Company for a weekend workshop near Scio on July 25-26.

The workshop will cover topics including obedience, tracking, water, field and bird work, and more. On Sunday, instructors will take participants’ dogs through some training activities. Participants without dogs can observe.

(ODFW)

(ODFW)

This family-friendly workshop is open to adults, couples, and families with children who are at least 9-years-old. The cost is $62 for adults and $22 for children age 9-17. The workshop begins at 7:30 a.m. each day.

“Training begins with obedience and ends with a dog that is eager to work with you,” said Mark Newell, ODFW outdoor skills coordinator. “We’ll show you how to get started and what these amazing dogs are capable of with the right positive training.”

This event is co-hosted by the Owen Denny chapter of Pheasants Forever, Queener Ridge Pheasant Company, the Green Valley Hunting and Retrieving Club and ODFW. Primitive camping (no water or electricity hookups) is available.

Pre-registration is required. Learn more about the event and register at: http://www.odfwcalendar.com/?tribe_events=family-introduction-to-hunting-dog-training-workshop-2

SW WA, Lower Columbia Fishing Report (6-23-15)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC, AND INCLUDES REPORTS FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW

Salmon/Steelhead

The new Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet and numerous regulations for the Washington lower Columbia tributaries go into effect beginning July 1.  Some highlights include:

*         All streams not listed are closed to all fishing;
*         All streams open to fishing are listed geographically, not alphabetically in the Columbia River Basin section;
*         Selective gear rules are in effect on several smaller streams that remain open to fishing;
*         Mandatory hatchery steelhead retention rules are in effect on several larger streams but anglers may keep up to 3 fish;
*         On a few streams, only hatchery trout may be retained to harvest residual steelhead smolts or mature sea run cutthroats;
*         On some streams, only hatchery trout may be retained – no other gamefish;
*         During the month of July, barbed hooks allowed on the Elochoman, lower Cowlitz, South Fork Toutle and Green rivers;
*         Only adipose clipped trout may be retained at Swift Reservoir;
*         North Fork Lewis is now listed as just the Lewis River.

Cowlitz River – 7 boat anglers sampled at the trout hatchery ramp kept 3 summer run steelhead.

During five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered: 732 spring Chinook salmon, 98 jacks, 39 maxi-jacks, 120 summer steelhead and two cutthroat trout.

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released: 510 spring Chinook and 92 jacks into the Cispus River above the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek and one cutthroat trout in the Tilton River.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,100 cubic feet per second on Monday, June 22.

Wind River and Drano Lake – June 30 is the last day to fish for spring chinook above Shipherd Falls.  It is also the last day for the 3 adult Chinook daily limit on the Wind and at Drano Lake as well as the last day for two-poles and boat limits.  Drano Lake will be open 7 days per week beginning July 1 and the bank only area near the mouth will be open for boats.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – During the first six days of the summer Chinook and sockeye season, we sampled  1,210 salmonid anglers (including 225 boats) with 137 adult and 5 jack summer Chinook, 51 steelhead and 15 sockeye.  82 (60%) of the adult Chinook, 40 (78%) of the steelhead, and 13 (87%) of the sockeye were kept (though it was legal to keep marked or unmarked sockeye).

During June 16-21, anglers on the lower Columbia made 9,221 trips and caught 1,249 adult summer Chinook (716 kept and 533 released), 317 summer steelhead (255 kept and 62 released), and 85 sockeye (76 kept and nine released).  See attached file for additional details.

Bonneville and The Dalles pools -Light effort and no catch was observed.

Hatchery summer run steelhead returns to Washington lower Columbia hatcheries are off to a similar start as last year.  Through early June:

River                      2014                       2015
Cowlitz                 210                         264
Kalama                 53                           103
Lewis                     324                         200
Washougal          398                         354

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Marker 82 line downstream – We sampled 14 sturgeon boat anglers (5 boats) from Vancouver to Longview with 20 legals released.

Bonneville Pool – Boat anglers averaged a legal kept per every 4.6 rods during last week’s Friday-Sunday retention fishery.  Bank anglers were also catching some legals.

Overall, 145 legal sturgeon were sampled; however, this is not the actual total catch estimate which is unavailable at this time. Before last week, a balance of 945 sturgeon remained for the summer retention season.  Sturgeon retention is scheduled to be allowed again from June 26-28 and July 3-5.

Walleye and Bass

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Effort and catches were light for walleye.

Bonneville Pool – Including fish released, boat anglers averaged just over 2.5 bass per rod while bank anglers averaged almost 1.5 fish per rod.  No walleye anglers were sampled.

The Dalles Pool – The few boat anglers sampled averaged over 7 walleye kept or released per rod.

…………………………….

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On the lower Columbia this past weekend, salmonid angling was fair and shad angling success declined.  In the gorge, boat anglers averaged 0.35 summer Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.16 summer Chinook and 0.02 steelhead caught per boat.  In the Portland to Westport area, boat anglers averaged 0.15 summer Chinook, 0.05 steelhead and 0.03 sockeye caught per boat.  In the estuary, boat anglers averaged 0.10 summer Chinook and 0.30 steelhead caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge this past week averaged 0.12 summer Chinook, while anglers fishing in the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.03 summer Chinook and 0.02 steelhead caught per angler.  On Saturday’s (6/20) flight, 539 salmonid boats and 174 Oregon bank anglers were counted from the Columbia River Estuary to Bonneville Dam.

Gorge Bank: Weekly checking showed five adipose fin-clipped adult summer Chinook kept, plus two unclipped adult summer Chinook released for 58 salmonid anglers; and 577 shad kept for 132 shad anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed seven adipose fin-clipped adult summer Chinook, and two adipose fin-clipped jack summer Chinook kept, plus two unclipped adult summer Chinook released for 26 boats (76 anglers); and 32 shad kept for five boats (17 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed six adipose fin-clipped adult summer Chinook kept, plus two unclipped adult summer Chinook and one unclipped steelhead released for 49 boats (114 anglers); and no catch for one shad boat (two anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekly checking showed four adipose fin-clipped adult summer Chinook and three adipose fin-clipped jack summer Chinook kept, plus one unclipped adult summer Chinook and three unclipped steelhead released for 155 bank anglers.

Portland to Westport Boats: Weekend checking showed five adipose fin-clipped adult summer Chinook, two adipose fin-clipped steelhead and one sockeye kept for 39 boats (97 anglers); and no shad for one boat (two anglers).

Estuary Bank (Clatsop Spit to Wauna Powerlines): Weekly checking showed one adipose fin-clipped adult summer Chinook and two adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus one unclipped steelhead released for 10 bank anglers.

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Wauna Powerlines): Weekly checking showed no catch for three boats (three anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Columbia River between Bonneville Dam and The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for 20 bank anglers; and no catch for two boats (two anglers).

The Dalles Pool (Columbia River between The Dalles Dam and John Day Dam): No report.

John Day Pool (Columbia River between John Day Dam and McNary Dam): No report.

STURGEON

Lower Columbia (below Bonneville Dam): Closed to retention, catch-and-release only.

Gorge Boats (below Marker 82): Closed for retention.  Weekend checking showed four legal white sturgeon and 15 sublegal sturgeon released for two boats (seven anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Closed for retention.  Weekend checking showed one legal white sturgeon and one sublegal sturgeon released for one boat (two anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed two legal white sturgeon and two sublegal sturgeon released for one bank angler.

Portland to Westport Boats: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed five legal white sturgeon, one oversize and 34 sublegal sturgeon released for two boats (eight anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Columbia River between Bonneville Dam and The Dalles Dam): Weekend checking showed six legal white sturgeon kept, plus 130 sublegal sturgeon released for 175 bank anglers; and 139 legal white sturgeon kept, plus 10 legal, 51 oversize and 1,665 sublegal sturgeon released for 220 boats (645 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (Columbia River between The Dalles Dam and John Day Dam): Closed to retention, catch-and-release only.  No report.

John Day Pool (Columbia River between John Day Dam and McNary Dam): Closed to retention, catch-and-release only.  No report.

WALLEYE

Troutdale: Weekly checking showed 26 walleye kept, plus two walleye released for five boats (10 anglers).

THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL GAUGE FOR THE UMPQUA RIVER AT ELKTON SHOWS IT FLOWING AT HALF OF THE LONG-TERM MEDIAN, THOUGH STILL ABOVE RECORD LOWS. THE AREA IS EXPECTED TO SEE SCORCHING TEMPERATURES LATER THIS WEEK AND WEEKEND, ACCORDING TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE. (USGS)

ODFW Closes Angling Around Umpqua Tribs, Issues Hot-weather Fish-handling Tips

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Effective immediately, an emergency regulation protects wild summer steelhead and a temporary rule better defines fall and spring Chinook angling in the Umpqua River.

Temporary rule – Umpqua River from tips of jetties to confluence of the North and South Umpqua rivers

This temporary rule change was made to allow anglers to begin harvesting fall Chinook earlier to benefit those who may already have reached their limit of spring Chinook. ODFW recognizes that biologically, the fish are classified as fall Chinook beginning July 1, not August 1.

  • Spring Chinook angling is February 1 – June 30, 2015. Harvest limit is two adult wild Chinook per day, five per year.
  • Fall Chinook angling is July 1 – December 31, 2015. Harvest limit is two adult wild Chinook per day, 20 per year in combination with all other salmon or steelhead marked on anglers’ tags.

Emergency regulation – Scottsburg Bridge (Hwy. 38) to River Forks Boat Ramp

Today through Oct. 1, 2015, angling is prohibited within 200 feet of all tributaries including no angling in the tributaries themselves from the mouth to 200 feet upstream.

This emergency regulation will protect wild summer steelhead and fall Chinook salmon that hold in and around tributaries looking for colder water. Currently, the Umpqua River has abnormally low flows and higher than normal water temperatures due to drought conditions.

THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL GAUGE FOR THE UMPQUA RIVER AT ELKTON SHOWS IT FLOWING AT HALF OF THE LONG-TERM MEDIAN, THOUGH STILL ABOVE RECORD LOWS. THE AREA IS EXPECTED TO SEE SCORCHING TEMPERATURES LATER THIS WEEK AND WEEKEND, ACCORDING TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE. (USGS)

THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL GAUGE FOR THE UMPQUA RIVER AT ELKTON SHOWS IT FLOWING AT HALF OF THE LONG-TERM MEDIAN, THOUGH STILL ABOVE RECORD LOWS. THE AREA IS EXPECTED TO SEE SCORCHING TEMPERATURES LATER THIS WEEK AND WEEKEND, ACCORDING TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE. (USGS)

Greg Huchko, Umpqua District fish biologist, says projected low flows and water temperatures often over 75 F will likely continue through the summer.

“The wild steelhead that haven’t made it up to the North Umpqua will stay around those mainstem tributaries until the fall rains come. They’re often easy to spot in shallow water and are more susceptible to illegal snagging. Even fish caught legally and released are stressed and mortality rates are higher in these conditions.” Huchko said.

Tips for hot weather angling

  • Fish during the cooler early mornings or evenings.
  • Land your fish quickly to help increase survival rates.
  • Keep your fish in at least six inches of water while releasing it.
  • Revive the fish before release. Keep the fish upright facing into the current, and the current is slow, move fish back and forth slowly to help oxygenate the gills.