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SW WA, Columbia Fishing Report (7-18-19)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River mainstem

During Saturday’s flight, 79 salmonid boats and 213 Washington bank anglers were counted from Cathlamet upstream to Bonneville Dam.

Shad:

Monday’s (7/15) count was just over 5,910 fish, which pushes the season total to 7.4 million shad passing Bonneville Dam.

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – 8 bank rods had no catch.

Above the I-5 Br – 30 bank rods kept 14 steelhead.  32 boats/93 rods kept 71 steelhead.

ANNA RUNYARD SHOWS OFF A COWLITZ SUMMER-RUN STEELHEAD CAUGHT IN 2014 DRIFT FISHING A CORKY AND YARN. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 20 spring Chinook adults, five spring Chinook jacks, 155 spring Chinook mini jacks, and 172 summer-run steelhead adults during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released three spring Chinook adults and one spring Chinook jack into the Cispus River located near Randle and they released one spring Chinook adult, and one spring Chinook jack at the Franklin Bridge release site in Packwood.

To date, Tacoma Power employees have recycled 220 summer-run steelhead to the lower Cowlitz River.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 2,430 cubic feet per second on Monday, July 15. Water visibility is 15 feet and the water temperature is 52.5 F.

Kalama River – 8 bank anglers had no catch.

Lewis River – 9 bank anglers kept 2 steelhead and released 1 steelhead.  3 boats/7 rods kept 4 steelhead.

Drano Lake – 3 boats/5 rods kept 1 steelhead and released 1 steelhead.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – No anglers sampled.

Klickitat above #5 Fishway- No anglers sampled.

  •       Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

Pikeminnow Sport – Reward Fishery Program:

The program operates from May 1 to September 30 in the lower Columbia River (mouth to Priest Rapids Dam) and the Snake River (mouth to Hells Canyon Dam).  http://www.pikeminnow.org/

Lower Columbia Mainstem Sport July 8-14

Salmon and steelhead:

Bonneville bank: 40 anglers with 9 steelhead, 1 adult Chinook, 1 jack Chinook and 3 “other”
Camas/Washougal bank: No report
I-5 area bank: 2 anglers with nothing
Vancouver bank: 20 anglers with 4 steelhead and 2 sockeye released
Woodland bank: 46 anglers with 1 steelhead released
Kalama bank: 42 anglers with 1 kept steelhead and 4 steelhead, 2 adult Chinook and 1 sockeye released
Longview bank: 166 anglers with 11 steelhead kept and 12 steelhead and 1 jack Chinook released
Cathlamet bank:  16 anglers with nothing
Private boats/bank: 5 anglers with nothing

Bonneville boat: No report
Camas/Washougal boat: 3 anglers with nothing
I-5 area boat: No report
Vancouver boat: 9 anglers with 1 steelhead released
Woodland boat: 4 anglers with nothing
Kalama boat: 4 anglers with nothing
Cowlitz boat: 7 anglers with 1 jack Chinook and 1 steelhead released
Longview boat: 38 anglers with 13 steelhead kept and 1 adult Chinook and 6 steelhead released
Cathlamet boat: 47 anglers with 16 steelhead kept and 6 steelhead and 1 sockeye released
Private boats/bank: 4 anglers with nothing

Shad:

Bonneville bank: 2 anglers with nothing

Sturgeon:

Kalama boat: 9 anglers with 14 sublegals released
Longview bank: 2 anglers with 2 sublegals and 1 legal released
Longview boat: 2 anglers with nothing

Walleye:

Vancouver boat: 4 anglers with 8 kept and 7 released

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Egregious Sekiu Salmon Poacher Fined, Forfeited Boat

An angler who egregiously violated Washington’s salmon regulations last summer was sentenced to pay more than $3,200 in fines, and he also forfeited his boat.

Mark Heinemann, 75, of Bainbridge Island was caught fishing alone off Sekiu with six lines out — all baited with lures with barbed hooks — off two downriggers, claimed he had only caught one fish but was eventually found to be way over his limit with 10 (half of which were also illegal to retain wild salmon) and hadn’t recorded anything on his punch card.

WDFW OFFICER BRYAN DAVIDSON POSES WITH THE BOAT, TRAILER, DOWNRIGGERS, FISHING ROD AND COMMERCIAL FLASHER-LURE COMBOS SEIZED FOLLOWING AN AT-SEA INSPECTION OF MARK HEINEMANN’S BOAT LAST AUGUST THAT TURNED UP EGREGIOUS FISHING RULES VIOLATIONS. (WDFW)

WDFW Region 6 Capt. Dan Chadwick said his fishing setups looked like what you might find on a commercial boat, though added there wasn’t any evidence he was selling his catch.

In late February, Heineman was convicted of 10 counts in Clallam County District Court, including criminal charges for possessing four wild coho and a king during a closed season, exceeding the bag limit on hatchery coho by three fish, and failing to record his catch.

Another 10 charges were dropped, according to Chadwick.

Heinemann’s 23-foot Maxum Cabin Cruiser, worth approximately $5,000, was initially seized at the dock. Later he did not contest its forfeiture to the state, according to WDFW.

While there are some Washington waters that an angler can run two lines for salmon with the second rod endorsement, Sekiu is not one of them.

Barbless hooks are also required on all of the state’s marine waters for salmon.

Wild Chinook or wild coho open weren’t open at the time either, and civil penalties for keeping unclipped salmon run up to $500 apiece.

CLALLAM COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPUTIES AND A WDFW OFFICER POSE WITH HEINEMANN’S BOAT. (WDFW)

Heinemann was spotted on Tuesday, Aug. 28, during a joint Clallam County Sheriff’s Office-WDFW patrol of the western Strait of Juan de Fuca.

Officers noticed that his second downrigger was deployed but there was not an accompanying rod with it, nor another angler on board.

When they asked Heinemann to reel up his gear for an inspection, he brought in the line of the rod attached to his other downrigger, but left the ‘rigger’s cable and ball down.

So they asked him to bring them up, and he began to but stopped part way, so they had to ask again, after which he complied “reluctantly,” according to WDFW.

As it came up, Heinemann unclipped a leader from the cable and officers saw it had a bungee attached to a flasher and lure, as did a second that came up with the cable and ball.

When they asked him to bring up the other downrigger, it had three more bungee-flasher-lure rigs.

“I’ve done thousands of boardings in that time. I’ve never seen somebody run that kind of gear off of a recreational boat,” Clallam County Sheriff’s Office Sergeant Eric Munger told the Peninsula Daily News last August.

Heinemann volunteered that he had kept one hatchery coho, which he showed to the officers, though he hadn’t put it on his catch card.

Between the good bite in the Straits at the time, all the gear he had down and his claim to have only one fish, the officers were a bit suspicious.

WDFW Officer Bryan Davidson asked him again if he had any more salmon to show, and after Heinemann denied it, Davidson advised him that he thought there were in fact more on the boat.

From the cabin Heinemann brought out two garbage bags containing nine more salmon, most of which had been cleaned.

HEINEMANN WAS IN POSSESSION OF 10 SALMON, INCLUDING A WILD CHINOOK AND FOUR WILD COHO THAT WERE ILLEGAL TO RETAIN, AND FIVE HATCHERY COHO, THREE MORE THAN WERE ALLOWED. (WDFW)

Game wardens have suggested it probably wasn’t Heinemann’s first try running some much gear, but what led him to decide to break the rules so spectacularly that day last summer isn’t clear.

He hadn’t responded to efforts to contact him through Facebook, nor had he returned a message left with a man who answered his home phone this past Friday.

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DU, WDFW Teaming Up To Buy 1,700 acres Near Westport For Hunting, More

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

In close partnership with Ducks Unlimited, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) recently finalized the purchase of 1,100 acres of land near Westport in Grays Harbor County. WDFW will manage the new property as an addition to the Elk River Unit of the Johns River Wildlife Area for the benefit of wildlife and people. A second phase to purchase an additional 600 acres is expected to be finalized by the end of the year.

A WDFW MAP FROM A FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMISSION PRESENTATION EARLIER THIS YEAR SHOWS THE 1,100 ACRES RECENTLY PURCHASED (“PROPOSED ACQUISITION”) AND THE 600 ACRES (“ADDITIONAL GRAYLAND PARCELS”) THAT ARE EXPECTED TO BE CLOSED ON BY THE END OF THE YEAR. (WDFW)

The new property features diverse natural resources, including large freshwater and saltwater wetland areas and old-growth Sitka spruce trees. A variety of wildlife use the area for year-round habitat, including several species of waterfowl, Roosevelt elk, black-tailed deer, and black bears.

The site will also provide additional recreation opportunities, including hiking, birding, and big-game and waterfowl hunting. Public access will initially be on a walk-in basis from the perimeter of the property, as plans to improve access are ongoing.

“This purchase wouldn’t have been possible without the strong support of Ducks Unlimited,” said Larry Phillips, WDFW’s coastal regional director. “We are excited to explore potential opportunities for habitat restoration on this property that would further benefit waterfowl and other wildlife.”

DIGNITARIES AT A RIBBON CUTTING INCLUDED STATE REP. BRIAN BLAKE (FAR LEFT), WDFW DIRECTOR KELLY SUSEWIND (IN BLUE SHIRT WITH SCISSORS), AND STATE RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE DIRECTOR KALEEN CUNNINGHAM (TO SUSEWIND’S RIGHT). (WDFW)

The process to purchase the property began three years ago with the intention to buy a total of 1,750 acres. Ducks Unlimited and WDFW secured funding for the first phase to purchase 1,100 acres last year. Partners have secured additional funding for the remaining 600 acres through a grant application to the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. The finalized transaction for the second phase of the purchase is expected to be completed by the end of 2019.

“The new addition to the Elk River Unit is one of those truly special properties,” said Greg Green, Ducks Unlimited manager of conservation programs. “The opportunity to purchase and protect a large property near the coast with such ecological and recreational diversity is unique. Ducks Unlimited is pleased to have provided a major supporting role for WDFW on this effort, and we look forward to future restoration and public use planning.”

WDFW purchased the property with about $1.5 million from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Coastal Wetland Conservation Grant Program and $500,000 from the Washington Coastal Restoration Initiative, which the Washington State Department of Ecology administers. Ducks Unlimited also provided in-kind matching funds to coordinate negotiations and closing.

WDFW manages approximately 1 million acres of land and over 600 water access sites across the state that provide fish and wildlife habitat, as well as fishing, hunting, wildlife-viewing, and other outdoor activities for thousands of Washingtonians and visitors every year.

Ducks Unlimited conserves, restores, and manages wetlands and associated habitats for North America’s waterfowl with the intent to fill the skies with waterfowl today, tomorrow and forever. These habitats also benefit other wildlife and people. Ducks Unlimited has worked for over 30 years in the state of Washington, completing more than 300 on-the-ground projects and spending more than $73 million.

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Washington Lawmakers Tour Wolf, Wildfire Country In Search Of Solutions

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON STATE HOUSE REPUBLICANS

In the past decade, perhaps no two issues have affected local communities, ranchers and families in Northeast Washington more than wolves and wildfires.

Last week, a bipartisan group of lawmakers joined with legislative staffers, agency officials, local ranchers and federal foresters to discuss the problems, frustrations and potential solutions to these two critical issues.

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: REP. TOM DENT, R-MOSES LAKE; REP. MIKE CHAPMAN, D-PORT ANGELES; REP. LARRY SPRINGER, D-KIRKLAND; REP. BRIAN BLAKE, D-ABERDEEN; REP. DEBRA LEKANOFF, D-BOW; SEN. SHELLY SHORT, R-ADDY; REP. JOEL KRETZ, R-WAUCONDA; REP. ED ORCUTT, R-KALAMA; REP. JOE SCHMICK, R-COLFAX. (WASHINGTON LEGISLATURE)

Members of the House Rural Development, Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee began their day at the Sherman Creek Wildlife Area Headquarters.  They were welcomed by local legislators, Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda and Sen. Shelly Short, R-Addy, as well as Kelly Susewind, director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).  They then listened to WDFW officials describe their animal capture plans, techniques, and equipment.

Afterwards, the legislators drove through scarred and burnt federal forestland on their way to the Deer Creek Summit Campground at the top of Boulder.  There, the lawmakers heard from Republic District Ranger Travis Fletcher.  The group saw the damage done to the forest and then discussed the forest management techniques now being utilized on state land to help prevent massive wildfires.

The tour ended with a stop at a local ranch near Danville to hear from fifth-generation cattle producers about the struggles they are having with wolves.

The ranchers described how the threat of wolves continues to force cattle off the higher elevation grazing areas, leading to an overabundance of dry grasses, which serves as potential fuel for wildfires.  This also places more stress on lowland grazing areas needed for later in the year as well as using up water at lower elevations.

The cattlemen also described their encounters with wolves, their interactions with WDFW officials when going through the “confirmed wolf kill” process, as well as the effects the wolves have on the pregnancy rates and weights of their cows.

“As a state, we’ve got to do better by these communities,” said Rep. Brian Blake, D-Aberdeen and chair of the committee.  “We need to be thinking out-of-the box in order to keep our producers whole and ensure these multigenerational ranchers have a chance at staying in business.”

Blake’s committee was invited to tour the region and interact with local community members by Kretz, an outspoken critic of recent forest and wolf management practices.

“It seems we are making some headway with our forest management so that we might have a fighting chance when the next major wildfire strikes our region,” said Kretz.  “But we’re not seeing a lot of progress on the wolf side of things.  My four northern counties have enough wolves to delist in the entire state, but because of political boundaries, it’s not been possible.  My district continues to be held hostage by statewide wolf repopulation expectations.  There are folks here that are barely hanging on.  They can’t wait another three or four years for a solution.  They needed one yesterday.  I’m glad some of our Westside lawmakers traveled across the state to see firsthand the problems we face.”

Rep. Debra Lekanoff, D-Bow, said that some of her fondest childhood memories include time spent in Northeast Washington and that committee members acknowledge the urgency of the situation.

“Is there another way, by using increased management methods in the wolf management plan, to address the problems ranchers and cattlemen are facing?” asked Lekanoff.  “What can the Legislature do to better manage the resources or provide the policy, laws, regulations, science, data and funding to help this rural community sustain its way of life with the predators, prey and livestock that all call this place home?  Let us start by changing our terminology and stop calling this the wolf conflict, but rather the Washington State Wolf Management Plan.  We take our commitment of continued economic viability to this rural community seriously and commit to address these issues with urgency.  We are not turning our backs on rural Washington.”

The visit to Northeast Washington by members of the House Rural Development, Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee was the first to the region in nearly a decade.

“This is a committee that deals with rural issues.  It’s vitally important that committee members get out of Olympia whenever possible in order to see the real-world problems our folks in rural Washington are up against,” said Kretz.  “I’m very grateful for the legislators who made the trip up here.  I’m hopeful that come next legislative session, we can work in a bipartisan fashion to provide relief to my communities.”

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Neah Chinook Retention To Close; La Push King Limit Dropping To 1

THE FOLLOWING ARE  WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICES

Anglers must release Chinook in Neah Bay beginning Sunday, July 14

MARK BACKMAN SHOWS OFF A NEAH BAY CHINOOK FROM LAST SEASON. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONT

Action: Closes Chinook retention.

Effective date:  July 14, 2019.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location:  Marine Area 4 (Neah Bay).

Reason for action: Marine Area 4 is expected to reach its Chinook guideline at current catch rates, which would require closure of the fishery in the area; this rule should extend the fishing season to provide opportunity to access harvestable coho in the area.

Additional information: Waters of Marine Area 4 east of a true north-south line through Sail Rock are closed. The daily limit for salmon in Neah Bay remains at two salmon.

Anglers are reminded to always check for emergency rule changes prior to fishing. Rule changes can be found on the website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ or by calling the fishing hotline at 360-902-2500.

Change to daily limit for Chinook in La Push

Action:  Anglers may retain only one Chinook as part of their two-salmon daily limit

Effective date:  July 15, 2019.

Species affected:  Chinook salmon.

Location:  Marine Area 3 (La Push).

Reason for action:  Chinook retention in adjacent Marine Area 4 (Neah Bay) will end July 14.  Adjustment of the Chinook daily limit in Area 3 will help ensure that Area 3 stays within its subarea guideline even if fishing effort shifts from Area 4 to Area 3.

Additional information:  Anglers are reminded to always check for emergency rule changes prior to fishing. Rule changes can be found on the website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ or by calling the fishing hotline at 360-902-2500.

 

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Shrimp Season, Limit Boosted In Area 6 (But Not Disco Bay)

THE FOLLOWING IS A WDFW EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE

Majority of Marine Area 6 opening to recreational shrimp fishing 7 days per week with an increased limit

Action: This opens Marine Area 6 (excluding the Discovery Bay Shrimp District) seven days a week for shrimp harvest. Harvest days are currently restricted to Thursday through Sunday each week. Additionally, the daily limit in this area only is being increased to 120 shrimp per person.

Effective date: July 15, 2019.

Species affected: All shrimp species including spot shrimp.

Location: Marine Area 6 (excluding the Discovery Bay Shrimp District).

Reason for action: Additional opportunity for harvest is being added to take the target share of spot shrimp in this area.

Additional information: Some marine areas including 4 (east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line), 5, and 6 (outside the Discovery Bay Shrimp District) remain open for spot shrimp fishing 7 days per week. Marine Area 7 West remains open for spot shrimp fishing 4 days per week. Several other marine areas are open for coonstripe and pink shrimp fishing. Check WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/shrimp/ for more information.

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Section Of The Upper Columbia, Entiat, Chelan Rivers To Open For Kings

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Areas of the upper Columbia River and select tributaries to open for Chinook salmon retention

Action: Opens salmon seasons.

Effective date: July 16, 2019

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Salmon rules by dates and location:

THE COLUMBIA BETWEEN WELLS DAM, WHERE SCOTT FLETCHER CAUGHT THIS SUMMER KING, AND ROCKY REACH DAM WILL OPEN FOR CHINOOK RETENTION. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)


1. Columbia River: From the upstream line of Rocky Reach Dam to the boundary markers 400 feet below the spawning channel discharges (on Chelan County side) and the fish ladder (on Douglas County side) at Wells Dam:

· Effective July 16 through Oct. 15, 2019.

· Daily limit 6 Chinook. Minimum size 12 inches. No more than 2 hatchery adult Chinook may be retained in daily limit. Release wild adult Chinook, sockeye, and coho.

· Use of barbless hooks is voluntary. Anglers may fish with two poles with a valid Two-Pole Endorsement.

2. Entiat River: From the mouth (railroad bridge) to the boundary markers located approximately 1,500 feet upstream of the upper Roaring Creek Road Bridge (immediately downstream of the Entiat National Fish Hatchery):

· Effective one hour before official sunrise on July 16 to one hour after official sunset on Sept. 30, 2019.

· Daily limit 6 Chinook. Minimum size 12 inches. Release sockeye and coho.

· Night closure in effect. Use of barbless hooks is voluntary.

AN EXAMPLE OF THE CALIBER OF SUMMER KING RETURNING TO THE ENTIAT NATIONAL FISH HATCHERY. (USFWS)

3. Chelan River: From the mouth (railroad bridge) to the Chelan PUD safety barrier below the powerhouse:

· Effective one hour before official sunrise on July 16 to one hour after official sunset on Oct. 15.

· Daily limit 6 Chinook. Minimum size 12 inches. No more than 2 hatchery adult Chinook may be retained in daily limit. Release wild adult Chinook, sockeye, and coho.

· Night closure in effect. Anti-snagging rule in effect. Use of barbless hooks is voluntary.

Reason for action: Forecasts of hatchery summer Chinook to Entiat and Chelan Falls hatchery programs indicate broodstock needs will be met and surplus hatchery Chinook are available for harvest. Removal of summer Chinook in the Entiat River will also help achieve conservation objectives for spring Chinook on the spawning grounds.

Additional information: WDFW will be monitoring harvest closely and may close one or more areas in-season by emergency rule if necessary. For emergency rule updates, please visit https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/.

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2,000 Upper North Fork Lewis Smolts Die In Mishap

“Human error” was unfortunately to blame when a steady stream of dead and dying smolts began drifting past Dan Moir and his wife early last month.

A JUNE 1 VIDEO TAKEN BY DAN MOIR SHOWS DOZENS OF DEAD OR DYING SALMON AND STEELHEAD SMOLTS FLOATING DOWN THE NORTH FORK LEWIS RIVER. (DAN MOIR)

They were fishing the North Fork Lewis just below Merwin Dam on June 1 when they noticed dozens upon dozens of the young fish float by their boat.

“They are kinda trying to wiggle, but I think they’re not going to make it,” Moir narrates in the 80-second video he took and shared with Northwest Sportsman magazine. “Some of them made it, but most of them, it looks like they’re dead.”

A tanker truck can be seen just upstream, and according to a report submitted by PacifiCorp to federal fishery overseers 11 days later, some 2,000 smolts died as a result of low oxygen levels in the vehicle’s holding tanks.

The rig was transporting 5,725 coho, spring Chinook and winter-run steelhead — part of an ongoing effort to reseed the upper North Fork — from the utility’s Floating Surface Collector at Swift Dam to a release site on the mainstem Lewis near Woodland.

According to a June 12 letter from PacifiCorp’s Mark Sturtevant, vice president of renewable resources, to National Marine Fisheries Service biologist Josh Ashline, the loss was attributed to oxygen volumes that weren’t adjusted by the driver as the tanker was being loaded with more fish.

Catching his mistake before leaving Swift, he checked on the fish twice en route. The first time they “looked fine,” according to the letter, but down the road at a weigh station pulloff, he “noticed that some of the fish had died and others were distressed.”

Once in cell phone service, he called a manager who advised him to drive to the Merwin Boat Ramp just below the dam, and there they “observed numerous fish mortalities and stressed fish” in the tank.

“(The manager) then directed the truck driver to release the fish into the river,” the report states.

Those were the smolts that the Moirs saw floating downstream.

A check of the rig’s oxygen and water aeration mechanism’s found it to be “functioning as designed.”

“It is something we feel terrible about and don’t want it to happen again,” said PacifiCorp spokesman Spencer Hall yesterday afternoon.

The report details proactive steps taken with drivers and loading protocols to prevent another mishap.

Hall describes it as the “only incident of this nature” since the utility began operating its $63 million surface collector on the uppermost of the three North Fork Lewis impoundments.

It’s part of a federal dam relicensing agreement to open up more than 100 miles of stream habitat in the watershed above Swift Reservoir.

Moir worried in the video that the dead and dying smolts had come from a hatchery release gone very wrong. While it’s likely that most of the fish’s parents did come from a production facility, these young fish were spawned in the wild.

All but 95 of the salmon and steelhead in the tanker truck that day were coho.

The truck driver and manager initially collected around 300 dead fish at the boat ramp, with PacifiCorp biologists recovering another 1,700 in the following days.

It’s primarily a potential setback for the utility’s bid to get a steady stream of 9,000 silvers back to the headwaters, according to a 2012 article in The Daily News that also noted the goal includes 2,000 springers and 1,500 winters.

In its 2018 annual report, PacifiCorp stated that last year it transported 7,060 adult late and early coho, 1,225 winter steelhead and 700 spring Chinook into Swift.

The utility also reported moving 55,336 smolts — 73 percent coho, 14 percent steelhead, 12 percent spring Chinook and 2 percent cutthroat trout — from the FSC to the lower Lewis last year.

Lewis springers have been identified as being among the most important feedstocks for struggling southern resident killer whales.

“While this event is extremely unfortunate, PacifiCorp is proud of the Lewis River Fish Passage Program and its continued success in operations and its contribution to establishing salmon and steelhead populations upstream of Swift Dam,” said Hall.

Editor’s note: The last name of Dan Moir was misspelled in the original version of this blog. Our apologies.

Columbia River Salmon Policies Subject Of Aug. 1 Public Meeting

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The public is invited to attend a meeting of members of the Washington and Oregon fish and wildlife commissions to discuss next steps in the review of salmon management on the Columbia River.

A GUIDE BOAT HEADS IN TO THE WEST MOORING BASIN AT ASTORIA. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The meeting is scheduled for Aug. 1 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., in the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission Room located at 4034 Fairview Industrial Dr. S.E. in Salem.

The public is welcome to attend, but public comment will not be taken at the meeting. This meeting will include providing a significant amount of background material. The meeting will also be streamed online.

The Joint-State Columbia River Fishery Policy Review Committee (PRC), made up of members from each state’s commission, is working to find common ground for jointly managed fisheries, and emphasizes having concurrent regulations in these jointly managed waters.

The PRC group began meeting in January, and three additional meetings have been held. Materials from previous meetings can be found at https://wdfw.wa.gov/about/commission/joint-policy-review-committee.

“Since the first meeting of this group, department staff from both Oregon and Washington have provided informational material and analysis for review,” said Ryan Lothrop, Columbia River policy coordinator with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

The Aug. 1 meeting will include an overview of Columbia River fishery management, progress to date from the past PRC meetings, and discussions on ways to improve policy and regulatory concurrence between the two states in 2020 and beyond.

The committee is also expected to discuss a schedule for future meetings.

In 2018, WDFW finalized its five-year performance review of the Columbia River Basin Salmon Management Policy of 2013. That review can be found at https://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/02029/.

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Hood Canal Shrimpers Get 2 More Days In Late July

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Hood Canal to get two additional days for recreational shrimp fishing

Action: Opens Marine Area 12 for two more days of recreational spot shrimp harvest.

A DAY OF SHRIMPING WITH GREAT GRANDFATHER GENE BIRDYSHAW REALLY PAID OFF FOR BELLA AND ROWAN ANDERSON. THEY WERE WORKING HOOD CANAL DURING A PAST SEASON. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)


Effective date: July 23, 2019 and July 24, 2019 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. each day.

Species affected: All shrimp species including spot shrimp.

Location: Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal).

Reason for action: The target share for recreational spot shrimp has not been taken in this area. Additional days of fishing are being added to take the target share of spot shrimp.

Additional information: Some marine areas, including 4 (east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line), 5, 6 (outside the Discovery Bay Shrimp District) and 7 West remain open for spot shrimp fishing. Several other marine areas are open for coonstripe and pink shrimp fishing. Check WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/shrimp/ for more information.

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