Category Archives: Headlines

BRENDA SKINNER AND HER HEN. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

With Rains, Fall Kings Head Up Tillamook Tribs

Editor’s note: The following fishing report comes from Northwest Sportsman contributor Andy Schneider, who has a big feature in our fresh-off-the-presses November issue on fishing Tillamook County’s Nestucca River for fall Chinook.

By Andy Schneider

With the third rise of the rivers, I gathered a crew and headed to a Tillamook tributary for a day of back-bouncing.

While the rivers were on a small rise throughout the day, fishing remained good. We ended up landing four fish, releasing a wild coho and a monstrous bronzy buck, and kept a pair of identical sisters.

BRENDA SKINNER AND HER HEN. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

BRENDA SKINNER AND HER HEN. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

It was obvious that the fish were on the move all day. When we would get a bite, half the time the fish would be swimming at the boat faster than we could reel to catch up with it, so we missed a lot of fish.

FALL CHINOOK BAITS. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

FALL CHINOOK BAITS. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

Though it may be a little early to abandon the estuaries and head to the tributaries, it’s evident that fishing should remain good in the rivers for the remainder of our season.

Got to love the slight ache of your arm after a day of back-bouncing!

ANDY SCHNEIDER WITH A TILLAMOOK TRIB FALL KING. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

ANDY SCHNEIDER WITH A TILLAMOOK TRIB FALL KING. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

 

(THE NATURE CONSERVANCY)

TNC Buys 75 Square Miles Of Kittitas Co.

UPDATED 12:05 A.M. OCT, 29, 2014 In the latest major reshuffling of land ownership in Kittitas County, The Nature Conservancy yesterday announced the purchase of 48,000 acres south of Easton, north and south of Cle Elum and scattered sections near Snoqualmie Pass from Plum Creek Timber.

Billed as a “historic land deal” benefiting local waters and wildlife habitat, TNC’s Washington director told a news reporter it will also help “to ensure that people can continue to enjoy fishing, hunting, hiking and cross country skiing.”

Some of the lands abut the 50,000-acre Teanaway Community Forest which was part of a blockbuster $97 million deal last year between American Forest Holdings and the state DNR.

(THE NATURE CONSERVANCY)

(THE NATURE CONSERVANCY)

Further down the upper Yakima Valley, 71,000 acres of the Naneum Ridge State Forest north of Ellensburg was acquired from Western Pacific Timber in a 2007 trade with DNR.

And both TNC and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation have been purchasing blocks of private timberlands along the Yakima-Kittitas County border region and transferring them to the state, including the 10,000 acres in the Rock Creek/Bald Mountain area, part of the Heart of the Cascades project.

A timeline put together by TNC shows how much land has changed hands in the area in just the past seven years:

(THE NATURE CONSERVANCY)

(THE NATURE CONSERVANCY)

(THE NATURE CONSERVANCY)

(THE NATURE CONSERVANCY)

Here’s TNC’s FAQs on their plans:

Where is the land? How do I get to it?
The property sits on both sides of I-90 between Snoqualmie Pass and Ellensburg. It touches three lakes: Keechelus, Kachess and Cle Elum. It is adjacent to the Teanaway Community Forest. There is also land in the Little Naches headwaters, accessible by highway 410.

What does The Nature Conservancy plan to do with this land?
Our primary goal in acquiring this land is conservation. We will embark on restoration including commercial and non-commercial forest harvest for long-term forest health. We anticipate robust community dialog about the best ways to manage this land for conservation and recreation, to benefit people and to benefit nature. As we develop the shared vision through our conversation with stakeholders, we will look for opportunities to move some of this land into public ownership where feasible, for long-term conservation.

Will these areas remain open to the public?
Our intention is to keep the land as open to the public as possible consistent with the conservation purposes for which we purchased this land. We will work to balance recreation and public safety with our primary goal of conservation. As we work to refine recreational access, we’ll continue to provide the same access that is currently allowed.

Will individuals be able to have a say in what happens to the land?
We look forward to engaging with everyone who has an interest in this land, to develop a shared vision for conserving these lands for people and for nature.

Can people help or support this project in any way?
Absolutely! We will be reaching out to the local community to engage in a dialog about the future of these lands, and we will identify specific opportunities to support the project. We will also have volunteer stewardship projects on the land after we take ownership. Please check our website for more information. Restoration is expensive so we will definitely need support to restore these forests to health.

 

BILL STANLEY'S SEPTEMBER BRIGHT WAS AMONG THE RECORD HAUL FROM THE COLUMBIA'S HANFORD REACH FISHERY. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

Hanford Reach Salmon Fishery Tops Last Year’s Record By 4,000

Word from WDFW that 2014′s fall salmon fishery on the Hanford Reach stretch of the Columbia River has now trumped last year’s record by 4,000.

Reports district fisheries biologist Paul Hoffarth in the Tri-Cities:

“For the fall salmon season that started August 1, there have been 44,000 angler trips harvesting 26,880 adult Chinook, 3,474 jacks, and 171 coho.  This is a new record for the number of salmon harvested in the Hanford Reach eclipsing last year’s numbers by over 4,000 fish (17%).”

That figure will be padded slightly, but salmon fishing is ebbing on the free-flowing stretch of the big river as it moves towards the Oct. 31 end of the season.

BILL STANLEY'S SEPTEMBER BRIGHT WAS AMONG THE RECORD HAUL FROM THE COLUMBIA'S HANFORD REACH FISHERY. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

BILL STANLEY’S SEPTEMBER BRIGHT WAS AMONG THE RECORD HAUL FROM THE COLUMBIA’S HANFORD REACH FISHERY. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

Last week around 560 boats were out on the water, and anglers on 222 were interviewed by creel samplers. They had 1,284 adult fall kings and 185 jacks.

While the Ringold bank fishery was slow, Hoffarth reported that they’re catching some summer steelhead.

KURT SARKELA SHOWS OFF A 14 1/2-POUND COHO WHICH BIT A BACK-TROLLED MAGLIP 3.5 LAST WEEK ON A SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON RIVER. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

SW WA, Columbia Fishing Reports (10-27-14)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORTS ARE FROM JOE HYMER, PSMFC, AND TANNA TAKATA, ODFW

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – Bank and boat anglers continue to well on coho with both averaging 2 fish or better when including fish released.  Some fall Chinook are being caught at the barrier dam and sea run cutthroats at the trout hatchery.  Fishing has slowed in the lower river with the turbid conditions  following the rain.

During five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered:
*   154 summer-run steelhead
*   798 fall Chinook adults and 33 jacks
*   14,734 coho adults
*   794 coho jacks
*   107 sea-run cutthroat trout

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released:
*   2,386 coho adults and 145 jacks into Lake Scanewa
*   379 coho adults and 12 jacks into the Cispus River above the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek
*   175 fall Chinook adults, 22 jacks; 974 coho adults, 35 jacks and six cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton
*   504 fall Chinook adults and seven jacks; 1,744 coho adults and 103 jacks at Franklin Bridge in Packwood
*   One sockeye salmon was released at the Barrier Dam boat launch

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 4,150 cubic feet per second on Monday, October 20.

Kalama River – Including fish released, bank and boat anglers averaged 1.5 adult coho per rod.

Mainstem Lewis – Anglers are some fall Chinook and coho.

KURT SARKELA SHOWS OFF A 14 1/2-POUND COHO WHICH BIT A BACK-TROLLED MAGLIP 3.5 LAST WEEK ON A SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON RIVER. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

KURT SARKELA SHOWS OFF A 14 1/2-POUND COHO WHICH BIT A BACK-TROLLED MAGLIP 3.5 LAST WEEK ON A SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON RIVER. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

East Fork Lewis and Washougal rivers – Bank anglers are catching some summer run steelhead though most were released.

North Fork Lewis River – Bank anglers averaged better 2/3 adult coho per rod while boat anglers over a Chinook per rod when including fish released.

Drano Lake – Boat anglers continue to catch some coho though effort has waned.

Klickitat River – Bank anglers on the lower river are catching coho though the river has been turbid at times.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Last week anglers made 1,120 trips and caught 43 Chinook (38 kept and five released) and 144 coho (123 kept and 21 released).  Only 27 boats counted on the flight this past Sunday.

Bonneville Pool – Boat anglers are catching coho and some Chinook at the mouth of the Klickitat.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Light effort and catch during the current catch-and-release fishery.

Walleye

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – No walleye anglers were sampled last week.

……………………..

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On the lower Columbia this past weekend there were 27 salmonid boats and nine Oregon bank anglers counted from Bonneville Dam downstream to Tongue Point on Sunday’s (10/26) flight.  Anglers had the best success in the gorge where boat anglers averaged 0.33 Chinook and 0.17 coho caught per boat.  In Troutdale, boat anglers averaged 0.29 coho caught per boat.

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for three bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook and one adipose fin-clipped adult coho kept, plus one adult Chinook released for six boats (12 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed one jack Chinook and nine adipose fin-clipped adult coho kept, plus one unclipped adult coho released for 35 boats (64 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed one adipose fin-clipped adult coho kept, plus two unclipped adult coho released for 15 bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for two boats (three anglers).

John Day Pool (Columbia River above John Day Dam and John Day Arm): Weekly checking showed five adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus seven unclipped steelhead released for 30 boats.

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River:

Catch and release only. No report.

Sturgeon creel sampling summaries and catch estimates for Bonneville, The Dalles, and John Day pools: WDFW Mid-Columbia River mainstem sport sampling summary<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/creel/region5/>

(CHRIS COCOLES)

Steelheading Class Coming Up In Troutdale

With the first of the season’s winter-runs due back in just a few weeks, a steelheading workshop will be held on the banks of the Sandy River early next month.

ODFW and the Sandy Chapter of the Association of Northwest Steelheaders are teaming up for the 9 a.m.-4 p.m. class Nov. 8 at Glenn Otto Park in Troutdale.

Instruction will focus on bank-fishing tactics, including plunking, drift fishing, and float fishing, but will also touch on where-to-find-’em aspects, identification and release tips.

(CHRIS COCOLES)

(CHRIS COCOLES)

Cost is $52, and that comes with a one-year membership with the Steelheaders.

You’ll need an Oregon fishing license, combined angling tag and Columbia River Basin endorsement, but the gear will be supplied.

To register, go to ODFW.com, and click on the Event Calendar.

Afterwards, grab yourself a copy of the November issue of Northwest Sportsman to find out three streams where you can put your new skills to the test!

(WDFW)

WDFW Map Spotlights Where To Head For Deer Just East Of Vail

State wildlife biologists literally went the extra mile to find hunters access into Western Washington’s best deer unit this fall.

District bio Michelle Tirhi has always gotten calls about where to go chase bucks in the Skookumchuck GMU, and up until two seasons ago, it was a pretty simple answer: head for Weyerhaeuser’s heavily logged Vail Tree Farm, open for drive-in hunting on general-season weekends, and walk-in hunting at other times.

But starting in 2013, the timber giant began selling a limited number of permits to the 159,000-acre property. If you didn’t snap up one of the fast-selling passes, which went for $150 last year and $200 this year, you didn’t get on.

And it appears that a lot of guys didn’t get on, or refused to pay the fee and ended up going elsewhere.

WDFW’s 2013 game harvest report shows a clear dropoff for the GMU as a whole: Just under 1,500 riflemen hit it last season, harvesting 540 bucks, down from 2,600 who took 615 the year before.

It’s a good bet that a big chunk of those blacktails got whacked on the tree farm, but as it turns out, there’s more to the Skookumchuck than just the Vail.

“Instead of saying, ‘Go to the east side,’ this year I sent biologists out to get a better feel for the access,” Tirhi said.

They surveyed roads on a big block of Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest lands southwest of Mineral Lake and west of Highway 7. A map they produced was included in the most recent WDFW Wildlife Program report.

(WDFW)

(WDFW)

Tirhi says it has an eye towards senior and disabled hunters, but also identifies how far roads go till washouts.

Now, looking at aerial shots on Bing and Google Maps, there is less logging going on in this federal block than on Weyco’s landslide-ready hills to the west, but Tirhi says it may be just as productive.

“You shouldn’t have any less chance of seeing deer there as on Vail,” she says.

Whether they’re roaming private, state or national forestlands, blacktail love 5- to 15-year-old regenerating clearcuts.

There are also several sections of the tree farm in the upper North Fork Tilton River that are open to public hunting for free.

WDFW and many others have identified loss of access to land as one of the biggest problems in hunting today, and a recent document put out by the agency estimates that “over 1.3 million acres of private industrial timberlands in western Washington (have) implemented fee access permit or lease programs that also capped hunter numbers. This represents over one quarter of the state’s private industrial timberland.”

Tirhi points out that that still leaves huge areas open for business, and in the meanwhile, she insists wildlife managers and biologists aren’t sitting on their butts.

“I don’t think hunters realize how much time we spend talking to landowners to get access,” she says.

The general rifle season in the Skookumchuck GMU continues through Halloween, and picks up again Nov. 13-16

For a better copy of the map Tirhi’s team produced as well as a write-up that accompanies it, hit her cell at (206) 406-9966.

Last ODFW Fam Fishing Event Of 2014 Tomorrow

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will host its last family fishing event of the year Saturday, Oct. 18 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mt. Hood Pond.

The event is open to anglers of all ages. ODFW will loan out rods, reels, tackle and bait, while it lasts, free of charge to participants on a first-come, first-served basis. Anglers are welcome to bring their own equipment and bait if they prefer.

To ensure that everybody has the opportunity to catch fish, ODFW will release more than 1,800 rainbow trout into the pond just prior to the event, including a couple hundred “lunkers” weighing in at more than a pound apiece.

“We’ve got a lot of high-quality fighting fish lined up for this event,” said Jeff Fulop, ODFW family fishing coordinator. “As far as outdoor activities go, it’s hard to beat a day of fall fishing in Oregon.”

Kids 13 years old and younger fish for free while persons 14 and older will need a fishing license that can be purchased at any ODFW license agent, ODFW office or on-line at ODFW’s website (www.odfw.com). Licenses will not be issued at the event so those who are required should obtain one ahead of time.

Mt. Hood Pond is a five-acre pond located on the Mt. Hood Community College campus in Gresham, at 2600 SE Stark Street.

Mt. Hood Pond is one of 350 water bodies in Oregon that ODFW regularly stocks with trout that the department raises at its hatcheries across the state. To explore the many other trout fishing opportunities that are available around Oregon, please visit ODFW’s website at www.odfw.com and click on the “Fishing” tab.

(WDFW)

3 Anglers Busted On Tahuya For Snagging, Wasting Wild Coho

Three men are in trouble — apparently yet again — after being caught with dozens of skeins of eggs allegedly stripped from bright wild coho they snagged out of a closed stretch of a Hood Canal river.

And then left the fish to waste.

Washington game wardens say they cited the trio on the Tahuya River, which at the time was running very low but full of nice fish, creating ideal conditions for snaggers to take advantage of holed-up salmon.

If WDFW’s allegations are true, it appears they thought they could collect a stash of eggs for winter-run steelhead fishing later this year, but with poor angler behavior on the Tahuya in recent falls — not to mention a slowly recovering salmon run — officers have been monitoring the river more closely.

(WDFW)

(WDFW)

Last week trail cam images told Officer Jeff Summit that three men had headed into a section of the southwest Kitsap Peninsula river open for fishing but closed to retention, according to a WDFW post on Facebook, so he waited for them to return.

Half an hour later they came out with rods rigged for salmon, and when asked what they had been up to, said they’d been catching and releasing fish, according to the agency’s writeup.

The Tahuya from the North Shore Road Bridge upstream 1 mile to what’s known as the Steel Bridge is open in October for up two coho a day in October, but the waters above the Steel Bridge aren’t.

Summit wasn’t quite convinced it had been a C&R outing. The officer asked one to open his backpack for an inspection.

“The subject became very nervous and attempted to conceal the contents multiple times, unzipping the same compartment repeatedly,” WDFW reported.

When the angler was finally able to figure out how to operate his pack correctly, Summit allegedly discovered three gallon-sized ziplock bags full of salmon eggs.

He marched the men back to the Tahuya and had them retrieve 16 of 20 coho carcasses allegedly tossed into the forest and log jams in the river.

“In my 20 years as a game warden, I don’t recall anyone taking eggs and discarding the carcasses like that,” said Summit’s sergeant, Ted Jackson.

The thing is, if they snagged 20 coho hens, how many bucks did they also hook in the back, tail, side?

As if somehow it could explain away the sickening wastage, the three claimed to be “avid” steelheaders who were just going to use the eggs for bait, according to WDFW.

As an editorial aside, an “avid” angler is one who actually cares about the resource, who doesn’t waste fish, who only takes what they’re going to eat, who gives back to the fish and habitat, who packs out litter, who pays attention to a water’s issues, who educates others.

And who doesn’t break fishing laws.

That doesn’t appear to be the case here. The trio are frequent customers of local game wardens’ citation books, having been written up “multiple times for numerous fish and wildlife violations,” according to WDFW.

This episode added several more to their rap sheet — second-degree trespassing, failure to submit to a field inspection, possessing salmon eggs without the carcass of the fish, first-degree overlimits, retention in a closed area, snagging and wastage.

I’d add the word wanton in front of wastage.

“I was surprised — discarding such good meat,” said Jackson of the still-fresh-from-the-salt coho.

Sadly, there was no food bank in the area to take the fish, he said, so they had to be disposed of.

No doubt the trio have more rods, but at least those used in this alleged crime were seized.

Besides issues of littering and trespassing, which led to a landowner on the river shutting down access to their property, WDFW is also focusing law enforcement on the Tahuya because it is home to federally listed summer chum salmon. Once extinct in the stream, the run is slowly recovering thanks to a unique hatchery program using eggs from fish collected on the nearby Union River.

Summit’s work drew widespread praise on WDFW’s Facebook page, and the case was noted on several local fishing forums.

Jackson hopes the Mason County Prosecutors Office follows through on charges.

We do too, and will update the case as names officially become available.

THE HAN FAMILY OF TRI-CITIES GOT IN ON THE GREAT FISHING IN THE HANFORD REACH LAST WEEKEND, NAILING THESE TWO BRIGHT CHINOOK. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

Hanford Reach, Yakima River Salmon Fishing Report (10-21-14)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORTS ORIGINATED WITH PAUL HOFFARTH, WDFW, AND WERE TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

The number of anglers fishing for salmon in the Hanford Reach continues to slowly decline but the fishing remains excellent with 2.7 chinook landed per boat.  An estimated 1,576 boats fished for salmon in the Hanford Reach this past week.  WDFW staff interviewed anglers from 481boats (1,251 anglers:8,066 pole hours) and 93 bank anglers (333 hours).  An estimated 4,311 salmon (3,767 adult chinook, 534 jacks & 10 coho) were harvested.   Bank anglers didn’t fare as well only averaging one chinook for each 31 anglers but the good news is that the bank anglers are starting to pick up a few steelhead.   There were an estimated 4,297 angler trips for fall Chinook in the Tri-cities this past week.

THE HAN FAMILY OF TRI-CITIES GOT IN ON THE GREAT FISHING IN THE HANFORD REACH LAST WEEKEND, NAILING THESE TWO BRIGHT CHINOOK. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

THE HAN FAMILY OF TRI-CITIES GOT IN ON THE GREAT FISHING IN THE HANFORD REACH, NAILING THESE TWO BRIGHT CHINOOK LAST WEEKEND. (WRIGHT & McGILL/EAGLE CLAW PHOTO CONTEST)

For the fall salmon season that started August 1, there have been over 42,000 angler trips harvesting 25,596 adult Chinook, 2,290 jacks, and 171 coho.

The lower Hanford Reach (Hwy 395 to the wooden powerline towers at the old Hanford townsite) will remain open to fishing for salmon through October 31. The last day of fishing in the area upstream of the old Hanford townsite wooden powerline towers is October 22

This past week WDFW staff interviewed 211 anglers fishing for salmon in the lower Yakima River with 49 adult chinook, 1 Chinook jacks, and 4 coho harvested. Anglers averaged a salmon for every 11 hours of fishing.  This is the last few days of fishing with the fishery closes after October 22.

An estimated 275 salmon were caught this past week (247 adult fall Chinook, 5 jacks, and 23 coho) bringing the season total to 1,152 salmon.

SW WA, Lower Columbia Fishing Report (10-20-14)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORTS ARE FROM JOE HYMER, PSMFC, AND TANNA TAKATA, ODFW

Salmon/Steelhead

Lower portions of Abernathy, Cedar (North Fork Lewis tributary), Coal, Germany, Mill (Cowlitz Co.) creeks and the Coweeman River – Re-open to fishing for hatchery steelhead and other game fish November 1.

Elochoman River – No report on angling success. Oct. 31 is the last day of night closure, anti-snagging rule, and stationary gear restrictions.

Cowlitz River – Fishing for coho is still excellent with bank anglers averaging over ½ fish per rod and boat anglers nearly 1.5 per rod when including fish released.  Fish are being caught throughout the system though fishing slowed near the mouth of the river after last week’s rain.  Some fall Chinook and sea run cutthroats are also being caught.

During five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered:
*   106 summer-run steelhead
*   1,051 fall Chinook adults and 52 jacks
*   14,936 coho adults
*   596 coho jacks
*   68 sea-run cutthroat trout
*   one sockeye

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released:
*   1,842 coho adults and 65 jacks into Lake Scanewa
*   370 coho adults and 11 jacks into the Cispus River above the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek
*   375 fall Chinook adults, 26 jacks; 1,111 coho adults, 24 jacks and seven cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton
*   490 fall Chinook adults and 17 jacks; 1,793 coho adults and 62 jacks at Franklin Bridge in Packwood
*   One sockeye salmon was released at the Barrier Dam boat launch

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 4,150 cubic feet per second on Monday, October 20.

October 31 is the last day 3 hatchery steelhead may be retained from the Hwy. 4 Bridge at Kelso upstream to Mayfield Dam. Cowlitz River from posted sign on Peters Road to the mouth of Ohanepecosh and Muddy Forks, Tilton River from mouth to West Fork, and the Green River – Oct. 31 is the last day of the night closure and anti-snagging rule.

Kalama River – Both bank and boat anglers are catching hatchery coho.

Oct. 31 is the last day of the night closures, anti-snagging, and fly fishing only rules on the lower river.

Lewis River – When including fish released, bank and boat anglers averaged over ½ adult coho per rod on the North Fork Lewis.  However, fishing at the mouth was slower.  Some fall Chinook are also being caught.

Colvin Creek to the overhead powerlines below Merwin Dam remains open to fishing through Friday October 31.  It will re-open for salmon and hatchery steelhead Dec. 16.

Washougal River – No report on angling success.  Oct. 31 is the last day of the anti-snagging rule.  In addition, night fishing will be allowed from the Mt. Norway Bridge upstream to the Salmon Falls Bridge.

Wind River – Light effort and catch.  October 31 is the last day to fish for salmon.

Drano Lake – Boat anglers averaged an adult coho kept per rod.   Some Chinook are also being caught.

White Salmon River – No report on angling success. Oct. 31 is the last day to fish from the county road below the powerhouse upstream to Big Brothers Falls at River Mile 16.

Klickitat River – Bank anglers below Fisher Hill Bridge averaged about a coho per rod.  Some fall Chinook are also being caught.

Buoy 10 – At least 35 private boats and 2 charters were counted during last Saturday’s lower Columbia mainstem flight.  Some reports indicate fishing for hatchery coho is still very good.  However, the creel census program has concluded for the year.

Lower Columbia below Bonneville Dam – Last week we sampled 302 salmonid anglers (including 87 boats) with 19 adult and 2 jack fall Chinook, 53 adult and 1 jack coho, and no steelhead.

All the Chinook caught were kept and as were 45 (85%) of the adult coho.

Last week on the lower Columbia, anglers made 2,800 trips and caught 204 adult Chinook (197 kept and seven released) and 424 adult coho (369 kept and 55 released).

Effort is waning with just over 100 boats and 58 bank anglers counted during last Saturday’s (Oct. 17) effort flight count.  Over half the boat effort was observed in the Camas/Washougal area.

Under permanent rules, closed to fishing for salmon from Beacon Rock to Bonneville Dam effective November 1.

Oct. 31 is the last day of the 2014 lower Columbia mainstem creel census program. The program will resume February 2015.

Bonneville Pool – Boat anglers averaged about ½ coho per rod.  Some fall Chinook are also being caught but are becoming more mature.

Trout

Blue, Horsethief, Packwood, Walupt, and Willame lakes and Lewis River Power Canal – October 31 is the last day to fish for the year.

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On the lower Columbia this past weekend there were 112 salmonid boats and 15 Oregon bank anglers counted from Bonneville Dam downstream to Tongue Point on Saturday’s (10/18) flight.  Anglers had the best success in the gorge, where boat anglers averaged 2.0 Chinook and 0.50 coho caught per boat.  In Troutdale, boat anglers averaged 0.02 Chinook and 0.40 coho caught per boat, while anglers fishing the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.08 Chinook and 0.50 coho caught per boat.

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for eight bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed four adult Chinook and one adipose fin-clipped adult coho kept for two boats (seven anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook and 18 adipose fin-clipped coho kept, plus one unclipped adult coho released for 47 boats (86 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for one bank angler.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook and six adipose fin-clipped adult coho kept for 12 boats (26 anglers).

John Day Pool (Columbia River above John Day Dam and John Day Arm): Weekly checking showed two jack Chinook and two adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus 11 unclipped steelhead released for 41 boats.

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River: Catch and release only. No report.

Sturgeon creel sampling summaries and catch estimates for Bonneville, The Dalles, and John Day pools: WDFW Mid-Columbia River mainstem sport sampling summary<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/creel/region5/>

WALLEYE

Gorge: No report.

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (two anglers).