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Chance To Join Columbia River Fishery Advisory Panels; Nominations Due By Nov. 30

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Fishery managers in Oregon and Washington are seeking candidates to fill positions on advisory committees that provide guidance on sport and commercial fishing issues on the Columbia and Snake rivers. The term is for three years from 2018-2020.

OREGON AND WASHINGTON FISHERY MANAGERS ARE LOOKING TO FILL POSITIONS ON  ADVISORY PANELS FOR SPORT AND COMMERCIAL FISHERIES HELD ON THE COLUMBIA AND SNAKE RIVERS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The two states’ fish and wildlife departments will accept nominations to their joint advisory groups on Columbia River sport and commercial fisheries through Thursday, Nov. 30. The two groups meet two to four times per year to assist with developing recommendations for salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and smelt fisheries.

Members are also expected to provide comments on issues addressed by the North of Falcon season-setting process for salmon fisheries, Columbia River Compact commercial fishing hearings and joint state hearings on sport fishing regulations.

“Advisory group members provide an important voice for the fishing public,” said Tucker Jones, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Program Manager for Ocean Salmon and Columbia River Fisheries. “We’re looking for candidates who are interested in filling that role.”

Up to 20 candidates (combined) from Oregon and Washington will be chosen for each advisory group, which together represent most aspects of the fishing industry in Columbia River, Jones said.

Any group or individual may submit a nomination. Nominations for new advisors should include the following information: A resume with contact information and a statement that describes the nominee’s fishing experience, interest in serving on the committee and ability to communicate with regional constituents. Current members may re-apply by contacting staff and expressing interest in serving an additional term.

Nominations can be submitted by mail to John North, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, 17330 SE Clackamas, OR 97015, by FAX at (971) 673-6072, or by email to john.a.north@state.or.us.

For more information, please contact John North at 971-673-6029, Tucker Jones at 971-673-6067, or visit ODFW’s Columbia River Fisheries Management page on-line.

Pikeminnow Catches Perk Back Up

Pikeminnow catches improved last week as fishing rebounded from the usual midsummer lull.

After falling as low as 5,400 during August’s first week, anglers brought in 6,329 fish last week to sport reward fishery stations on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

THE PIKEMINNOW SPORT REWARD PROGRAM OFFERS INCENTIVES TO CATCH THE SPECIES FROM THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA UP TO TRI-CITIES, AND IN THE SNAKE FROM TRI-CITIES UP TO CLARKSTON. (PIKEMINNOW.ORG)

And catch per unit effort rose as well from recent weeks’ high 5s and low 6s to nearly 7.5 each.

Top landings came from both ends of the fishery. Cathlamet, near the mouth of the Columbia, saw the most pikeminnow turned in, 940, while Boyer Park on the Snake had 922.

Coming in third and fourth were two more from the Lower Columbia: Willow Grove and Rainier with 647 and 613, according to the latest figures from program manager Eric Winther.

Beacon Rock had the highest catch per angler, with 22.2 for the six participants, followed by 15.7 at Rainier and 13.2 at Ridgefield.

The overall average per angler was 7.4 pikeminnows for 858 participants, up about more than a fish a fisherman over the previous week.

Seven specially tagged pikeminnow were turned in last week, with two at Cathlamet, and one each at Rainier, Kalama, Chinook Landing and Columbia Point.

All totaled, 150,840 qualifying pikeminnow have been removed from the Columbia and Snake since the start of season May 1.

The Dalles has been most productive, with 44,340, followed by Boyer Park at 19,040 and Columbia Point at 15,713.

Average catch on the season is 6.8, with a range from 10.3 at The Dalles to 1.4 at Umatilla.

Just under 232 tagged fish have been turned in.

Effort is 22,218 on the season.

The sport reward program pays anglers from $5 to $8 per pikeminnow, with tagged ones worth $500. The idea is to remove the native species that preys on young salmon and steelhead in the Columbia hydropower system. It runs through Sept. 30.

For more details, including fishing maps, check out pikeminnow.org.

Relief On Way From High Columbia Flows?

Editor’s note: This was our annual April Fools day story.

Columbia hydropower operators will begin holding back runoff starting today, 4-1, in an effort to improve spring Chinook fishing in time for the season extension.

With flows as high as they’ve been in 70 years for this time of year, the big river’s been an even bigger roiling, murky mess loaded with debris, making for difficult angling and low catches below Bonneville Dam through late March, traditionally when action begins to pick up as the year’s first salmon make their way upstream.

WATER SURGES THROUGH BONNEVILLE DAM IN THIS CROPPED JUNE 2014 CORPS OF ENGINEERS PHOTO. (ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS)

State managers say only 53 springers had been retained through last Sunday, compared with 2,211 for the same period in 2016.

“We recognize that the way we’ve been flushing this year’s increased snowpack through the system has harmed the fishery in the Lower Columbia, and we want to make amends for that by sharply curtailing outflows from our seven largest upriver reservoirs,” a joint press release from the Bonneville Power Association and Army Engineers Corps says.

Federal managers believe the move should reduce flows in time to take advantage of this week’s DFW push-back of the season closure from April 6 to April 10.

For anglers, gear manufacturers and fishing tackle shack owners, it will come as a relief. Though a middling forecasted return, just under 7,000 upriver-bound fish are available for harvest, but angst has been running as high as the river, because springers are a highly sought after fish, provide a great kickoff to the fishing season for Portland, Vancouver and environs, and taste great on the plate.

“Should’ve known a sunny-day Chinook and barbecue reference on my cover would’ve jinxed this year’s fishery,” joked a regional hook-and-bullet magazine editor, who also gnashed his teeth knowing that in fact he had jinxed it.

Hydropower system operators will try their best to fix that.

“Our goal is to drop the Columbia into the 200kfs range at The Dalles Project, which is still above the longterm mean for this time of year, but far below flows in recent days of 450kfs,” they stated in their release.

That should provide better water conditions for trolling herring, sitting on anchor and running plugs, or plunking from the beach instead of the parking lot.

You’ll want to watch this USGS gauge to verify when flow levels actually drop.

“We hope anglers get out and take advantage of this window of opportunity, because we’re not quite sure how long we can hold this wall of water back without damaging our dams and flooding communities all the way back into Northwest Montana,” said a high-ranking yet very nervous federal administrator, Al Floorips.

Mocrocks, Copalis Beaches To Open For Razor Clams

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

State shellfish managers have approved a morning razor clam dig starting March 30 with openings alternating between Mocrocks and Copalis beaches through April 2.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the four-day dig – the first dig of the season on morning tides – after marine toxin tests showed that clams on those two beaches are safe to eat.

DIGGERS HUNT FOR RAZOR CLAM SHOWS ON A COASTAL BEACH DURING A PREVIOUS SEASON. (DAN AYRES, WDFW)

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said diggers should be aware that only one beach – either Mocrocks or Copalis – will be open each day of the upcoming dig.

Ayres also reminds diggers that all state fishing licenses expire March 31, so they will need to purchase a 2017-18 fishing license if they plan to participate in the digs approved for Saturday, April 1, and Sunday, April 2.

Licenses applicable to digging razor clams include an annual razor clam license, a shellfish license or a combination fishing license. A three-day razor clam license is also available, although it is restricted to digging days in a single licensing year.

All licenses are available online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/ and from sporting goods stores and other licensing outlets throughout the state.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and morning low tides:

  • March 30, Thursday, 8:58 a.m.; -0.6 feet, Mocrocks
  • March 31, Friday, 9:47 a.m.; -0.6 feet, Copalis
  • April 1, Saturday, 10:40 a.m.; -0.5 feet, Mocrocks
  • April 2, Sunday; 11:39 a.m., -0.1 feet, Copalis

Long Beach and Twin Harbors remain closed to digging, because they have not yet met state testing requirements for marine toxins, Ayres said.

Copalis Beach extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Maps of those beaches and information about razor clam digs proposed in the future are available on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html

Snake In Washington Opening Sept. 1 For Hatchery Fall Chinook

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Action: The Snake River will open for the harvest of fall chinook salmon.

Locations:

On the Columbia River from the railroad bridge between Burbank and Kennewick upstream approximately 2.1 miles to the first power line crossing upstream of the navigation light on the point of Sacajawea State Park (Snake River Confluence Protection Area).

On the Snake River from the mouth to the Oregon State line (approximately seven miles upstream of the mouth of the Grande Ronde River).

STUART ROSENBERGER OF BOISE LANDED THIS FALL CHINOOK NEAR LEWISTON IN SEPTEMBER, WHICH IS THE THE PEAK OF THE RUN. FALL CHINOOK COMMONLY RUN IN THE 15 TO 20-POUND RANGE AND ON AVERAGE ARE LARGER THAN SPRING OR SUMMER CHINOOK. (ROGER PHILLIPS, IDFG)

STUART ROSENBERGER OF BOISE LANDED THIS FALL CHINOOK ON THE SNAKE RIVER NEAR LEWISTON AND CLARKSTON LAST SEPTEMBER, WHICH IS THE THE PEAK OF THE RUN. FALL CHINOOK COMMONLY RUN IN THE 15 TO 20-POUND RANGE AND ON AVERAGE ARE LARGER THAN SPRING OR SUMMER CHINOOK. (ROGER PHILLIPS, IDFG)

Dates: Sept.1 through Oct. 31, 2016

Species affected: Chinook salmon

Reason for action: The 2016 Columbia River forecasted return of upriver bright adults is 593,800, with a significant portion of these fish expected to return to the Snake River. Popular steelhead fisheries also occur in the area and some hatchery fall chinook are expected to be caught during steelhead fishing. Retention of hatchery fall chinook is not expected to increase impacts to ESA-listed wild fall chinook. Therefore, adipose-fin-clipped hatchery fall chinook that are caught can be retained in the Snake River.

Other Information: The salmon daily limit in the Washington portion of the Snake River is six (6) adipose fin-clipped fall chinook adults (24 inches in length and larger), and six (6) adipose fin-clipped jack fall chinook (less than 24 inches). The minimum size for chinook that can be retained in the Snake River is 12 inches.

Harvest of hatchery chinook (adults and jacks) is allowed seven days per week.  Anglers must cease fishing for salmon and steelhead for the day once they have retained 3 hatchery steelhead – regardless of whether the salmon daily limit has been retained. Adipose fin-clipped fish must have a healed scar at the location of the missing fin. All chinook and steelhead with unclipped adipose fins must be immediately released unharmed. In addition, anglers must use barbless hooks when fishing for chinook or steelhead in the Snake River and the Snake River Confluence Protection Area. Anglers cannot remove any chinook or steelhead from the water unless it is retained as part of the daily bag limit. Anglers should be sure to identify their catch because returning unmarked chinook salmon, coho salmon and steelhead are also in the Snake River during this fishery.

2 Miles Of Access On Famed Idaho Trout Stream Secured

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM IDAHO FISH & GAME

Idaho Fish and Game recently secured a permanent public easement along 2 miles of Silver Creek that provides access to some of the best fishing opportunities on the entire creek.

SILVER CREEK NEAR IDAHO FISH AND GAME’S ROCKY POINT SPORTSMAN’S ACCESS. (GREGG SERVHEEN, IDFG)

SILVER CREEK NEAR IDAHO FISH AND GAME’S ROCKY POINT SPORTSMAN’S ACCESS. (GREGG SERVHEEN, IDFG)

The easement is through private property owned by the Nick Purdy family that includes three sections of Silver Creek located downstream of the U.S. 20 highway bridge and north of Picabo.  Within these segments, the easement provides for public access along both sides of Silver Creek within 30 feet of the high water line along the edge of the creek.

Silver Creek is renowned for its rainbow and brown trout fishery that attracts anglers from throughout Idaho, the U.S. and abroad. The easement ensures that generations of Idahoans and others will have opportunities to experience the thrill of a trout tugging on their line from some of the famed spring creek’s finest fishing waters.

Idaho Fish and Game exchanged a parcel of its property with the Purdys for the easement.  The Purdys had previously farmed the parcel through an agreement with Fish and Game in exchange for public access on their Silver Creek property, the easement now ensures public access in the future.

ODFW Holding Ice Fishing Workshop Jan. 30 Near K-Falls

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will host a workshop showing anglers how to make the best of snowy, icy conditions at a Jan. 30, 2016 Family Ice Fishing Workshop on Lake of the Woods near Klamath Falls.

The family-friendly workshop is open to adults and youth. Youth must be at least 9 years old and accompanied by a paying adult.

PARTICIPANTS IN AN ICE FISHING WORKSHOP GET SOME POINTERS ON DIFFERENT LURES AND HOW TO RIG THEM UP. (ODFW)

PARTICIPANTS IN AN ICE FISHING WORKSHOP GET SOME POINTERS ON DIFFERENT LURES AND HOW TO RIG THEM UP. (ODFW)

“If you’ve never been ice fishing, this is the perfect opportunity to learn how,” said Darlene Sprecher, ODFW outdoor skills program coordinator. “The whole family can safely participate and enjoy a great day out on the ice.”

The workshop is from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Participants will learn all the ice fishing basics – safety on the ice, how to drill a hole, what gear to use and how to use it, and how to clean and take care of their catch. The cost of the workshop is $52 per adult and $12 per child under age 18. This includes the use of equipment, instruction and lunch. The registration deadline is Jan. 16, 2016.

Children under 12 years old do not need a fishing license to participate, but adults must have a valid Oregon fishing license and youth ages 12-17 will need an Oregon youth license. Youth must be accompanied by a paying adult.

For more information about the workshop, and to register, go to www.odfwcalendar.com

WA Wildlife Commission Set To Decide On Cougar Harvest Petition

Washington’s Fish and Wildlife Commission will tomorrow make a decision on a petition calling on the citizen panel to reverse the slightly liberalized cougar hunting regs it approved earlier this year.

The Humane Society of the United States, Conservation Northwest, Wolf Haven, Center for Biological Diversity and a former WDFW carnivore researcher objected to the commission’s adding of one to three lions in the harvest guidelines for numerous units in Northeast, Southeast and North-central Washington.

Those areas also happen to host another furry fanger — wolves — and the colonization thereof was cited as part of the reason for the move.

“The logic is that we have tremendous social conflict under way,” explained Commissioner Miranda Wecker in audio from the April 9-10 meeting. “I don’t believe that in any of these GMUs the small changes that I’ve proposed will make a difference in the health of cougar populations. I’ve been assured by staff that is the case … It will have a beneficial effect, I believe, of giving some consideration to that communities that live in these GMUs in which wolf packs are now operating.”

Cougar harvest has been set to remove up to 12 to 16 percent of the big cats in each unit to maximize hunting ops while also helping maintain the stability of the populations and avoid conflicts with people and livestock.

The effect of the commission’s 7-1 decision to go ahead with the chance raised the potential harvest guideline to 17 to 21 percent.

In their petition, the groups called it a “procedural and scientific misstep and the Commission is legally required to take action to bring cougar hunting quotas back to a sustainable level.”

But Jack Field of the Washington Cattlemen’s Association was paraphrased in a Seattle Times article as explaining it was part of “a step toward a more holistic approach to predator management.”

“We can’t just let predators grow exponentially, unchecked,” he told reporter Sandi Doughton.

Rest Of Washington’s Snake Springer Waters To Close

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Snake River spring chinook fisheries to close

Action: Chinook salmon fishing to close on the Snake River.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Effective date: May 12, 2015, one hour after official sunset.

Locations:

C)  Below Lower Granite Dam:  Snake River from the south shore boat launch (Ilia Boat Launch) across to the mouth of Almota Creek upstream about four miles to the restricted fishing area below Lower Granite Dam.

D) Clarkston:  Snake River from the downstream edge of the large power lines crossing the Snake River (just upstream from West Evans Road on the south shore) upstream about 3.5 miles to the Washington state line (from the east levee of the Greenbelt boat launch in Clarkston northwest across the Snake River to the WA/ID boundary waters marker on the Whitman County shore).

Reason for action:  Based on the most current harvest estimates and anticipated harvest through Tuesday of this week, for the Lower Granite Dam area, the Snake harvest allocation will have been met.

SW WA, Lower Columbia Fishing Report (3-24-15)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM JOE HYMER, P.S.M.F.C. SUPERVISING BIOLOGIST IN VANCOUVER, AND TANNA TAKATA, ODFW

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – 42 boat anglers kept 36 steelhead and released 1.  32 bank anglers kept 6 adult spring Chinook and 9 steelhead plus released 1 steelhead.  The steelhead were mainly caught around the trout hatchery; spring Chinook at the salmon hatchery.

During five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered:

494 winter-run steelhead and two spring Chinook salmon

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released:

75 winter-run steelhead to the Tilton River at Gus Backstrom Park in Morton
15 steelhead adults and one spring Chinook into the Cispus River above Yellow Jacket Creek
15 steelhead adults and one spring Chinook into Lake Scanewa above Cowlitz Falls Dam.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 4,080 cubic feet per second on Monday, March 16. Water visibility is ten feet.
Wind River – A couple boats there daily with but no catch was observed.

Anglers are reminded Wind River from the Hwy. 14 Bridge upstream is closed to all fishing through March.

Drano Lake – No effort was observed.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Effort is increasing but not so much on the catch.  We sampled nearly twice as many anglers but about the same number of fish as the previous week.

Last week we sampled 1,709 salmonid anglers (including 563 boats) with 68 adult spring Chinook and 15 steelhead.  54 (79%) of the adult Chinook were kept.  73% of the adult Chinook were upriver origin based on Visual Stock Identification (VSI).

8 (53%) of the steelhead caught were kept.

Salmonid effort doubled from Thursday to Saturday.  On Saturday, 889 boats and 676 bank anglers were tallied.  Effort was spread throughout the river.

Reminder – The mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam will be closed to fishing for salmon, steelhead, and shad March 24, March 31, and April 7, 2015.

Bonneville Pool – Light effort and no catch was observed.

The Dalles Pool – Bank anglers are catching some spring Chinook and steelhead.

John Day Pool – Light effort and no catch was observed.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Light effort during the current catch-and-release fishery.

The Dalles Pool – Slow for legal size fish.

John Day Pool – Boat anglers are catching a few legals.

Walleye and Bass

The Dalles Pool – Boat anglers averaged just over 3 walleye and just under 6 bass per rod when including fish released.  The majority of the walleye were kept.

John Day Pool – Including fish released, boat anglers averaged nearly 1.5 walleye per rod.  Boat anglers were also catching some bass.

Trout

Recent plants of rainbows into SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

LEROY BURNS PD (WAHK)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LEROY%20BURNS%20PD%20(WAHK)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Mar 16, 2015
Rainbow
2,000
2.05
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Mar 16, 2015
Rainbow
250
2.2
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

THEY CALL HIM HUNTER, BUT FISHER WORKS TOO! THAT'S HUNTER WALL WITH A TROUT HE RECENTLY CAUGHT OUT OF SILVER LAKE, NEAR CASTLE ROCK. IT HIT A RED AND WHITE SPOON, SAYS HIS DAD, GARY. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

THEY CALL HIM HUNTER, BUT FISHER WORKS TOO! THAT’S HUNTER WALL WITH A TROUT HE RECENTLY CAUGHT OUT OF SILVER LAKE, NEAR CASTLE ROCK. IT HIT A RED AND WHITE SPOON HUNTER WAS FISHING AFTER SCHOOL, SAYS HIS GRANDAD, GARY. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

LK SACAJAWEA (COWL)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LK%20SACAJAWEA%20(COWL)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Mar 17, 2015
Rainbow
1,849
2.05
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

KLINELINE PD (CLAR)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=KLINELINE%20PD%20(CLAR)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Mar 16, 2015
Rainbow
1,500
2
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

This past week 20 fish went to Kress Lake: 17 adult Kalama integrated stock and 3 adult Early Winter stock.

……………………………..

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

Effort is increasing, but salmonid catch rates are still low in most areas.  Boat anglers fishing in the gorge below Beacon Rock averaged 1.0 spring Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.07 spring Chinook caught per boat.  In the Portland to Westport area, boat anglers averaged 0.13 spring Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in the estuary averaged 0.08 spring Chinook caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.2 spring Chinook caught per bank angler, while anglers fishing the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.03 spring Chinook and 0.01 steelhead caught per bank rod.  On Saturday’s (3/21) flight, 889 salmonid boats and 423 Oregon bank anglers were counted from the Columbia River Estuary to Bonneville Dam.

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed one adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook kept for five bank anglers.

Gorge Boats (below Beacon Rock): Weekend checking showed three adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook kept for three boats (10 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed one adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook kept for 14 boats (34 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed six adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook and one adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus one unclipped spring Chinook and three unclipped steelhead released for 269 bank anglers.

Portland to Westport Boats: Weekend checking showed 32 adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook kept, plus five unclipped spring Chinook released for 283 boats (749 anglers).

Estuary Bank (Clatsop Spit to Wauna Powerlines): Weekend checking showed no catch for 12 bank anglers.

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Wauna Powerlines): Weekend checking showed two adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook kept for 24 boats (46 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Columbia River between Bonneville Dam and The Dalles Dam): No report.

The Dalles Pool (Columbia River between The Dalles Dam and John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed one adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook and one adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept for 18 bank anglers.

John Day Pool (Columbia River above John Day Dam and John Day Arm): Weekly checking showed no catch for 17 bank anglers; and no catch for one boat (two anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia (below Bonneville Dam): Closed to retention, catch-and-release only. No report.

Gorge Bank: No report.

Bonneville Pool (Columbia River between Bonneville Dam and The Dalles Dam): Closed to retention, catch-and-release only.  No report.

The Dalles Pool (Columbia River between The Dalles Dam and John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for 10 bank anglers; and one oversize and 17 sublegal sturgeon released for seven boats (17 anglers).

John Day Pool (Columbia River between John Day Dam and McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for 11 bank anglers; and one legal white sturgeon kept, plus three sublegal sturgeon released for nine boats (23 anglers).

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool: No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for three bank anglers; and 188 walleye kept, plus two walleye released for 27 boats (63 anglers).

John Day Pool (Columbia River between John Day Dam and McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for two bank anglers; and 77 walleye kept, plus 12 walleye released for 35 boats (62 anglers).