Tag Archives: yellow perch

Boat Ramp, Access Improved At Baker County’s Phillips Reservoir

THE FOLLOWING IS A JOINT PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE AND OREGON STATE MARINE BOARD

Boaters and anglers now have improved access to Phillips Reservoir, with the recent completion of the Mason Dam boat ramp. Mason Dam is a popular and heavily used boat launch facility. Phillips Reservoir receives approximately 5,000 boating use days annually.

IT WILL BE A LITTLE WHILE BEFORE THE ICE COMES OFF OF PHILLIPS RESERVOIR AND BOATS CAN LAUNCH, BUT WHEN IT DOES ANGLERS WILL FIND AN UPGRADED RAMP AT THE DAM ACCESS. (USFS VIA ODFW)

This project was identified in the Oregon State Marine Board’s “Six-Year Plan” as a priority to replace the deteriorating boat ramp. The half-century old boat ramp was part asphalt, part concrete and part gravel/dirt. The ramp was unsafe and difficult to use at nearly all water levels.

The recent project replaced the old potholed boat ramp with 430 linear feet of cast in place concrete ramp that improved access and will make the site more usable during low water conditions.

Phillips Reservoir provides good fishing for rainbow trout and yellow perch from mid-April through July and again in the fall as the water cools, according to Tim Bailey, district fish biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The reservoir also provides good ice fishing for the same species from mid-December through March, according to Bailey.  Since 2016, ODFW has stocked the reservoir with trophy-sized rainbows, providing additional opportunity to catch bigger fish. It is scheduled to receive 4,500 trophies this spring from May through June.


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Mason Dam boat ramp is the first access site that visitors encounter at the reservoir. In addition to the boat ramp, amenities include an accessible vault toilet and parking for vehicles with boat trailers. The Mason Dam boat ramp is the only year-round boat ramp at Phillips Reservoir. The reservoir is typically ice-covered from mid-December through the end of March but the site also offers access for ice fishers during that time.

Cost of the project was approximately $275,000, which was paid by several partners, including the Oregon State Marine Board, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife through a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fish Restoration grant, and the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest.

For more information about boating access and boating regulations, visit http://www.boatoregon.com/map.

Catch Perch, Help Save Imperiled Sammamish Kokanee At Derby

A yellow perch derby will be held on Lake Sammamish tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 15, part of an effort to help out the lake’s landlocked salmon.

“They are abundant and are predators of the endangered kokanee salmon at certain life stages,” say organizers of the event being put on by Trout Unlimited. “The derby will not only help to reduce the number of perch in the lake but will educate anglers about kokanee salmon and the ongoing work to improve the watersheds and health of Lake Sammamish.”

THE FIRST ANNUAL LAKE SAMMAMISH PERCH DERBY WILL BE HELD SATURDAY, SEPT. 15, WITH CASH AND PRIZES TO BE AWARDED FOR ANGLERS BRINGING IN YELLOWBELLIES LIKE THIS ONE. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Headquartered at Lake Sammamish State Park in Issaquah, the derby begins at 7 a.m. and runs till 2 p.m.

Prizes include $200 each for longest and heaviest perch, and heftiest overall catch (maximum: 25 fish).

There’s also a youth division with $50 gift certificate to a sporting goods retailer for the same three categories.

More prizes from the Snoqualmie Tribe and local businesses will be given away as well.

And according to TU, all proceeds will go towards recovering kokanee.

Those in the King County lake have been struggling for decades as the surrounding area has urbanized, and despite efforts to prop up the population in recent years, there has been an alarming decline in spawning numbers.

Less than 20 were counted in tributaries last fall, prompting an emergency response from county officials.

ADULT KOKANEE SPAWN IN LAKE SAMMAMISH TRIBUTARY EBRIGHT CREEK. (ROGER TABOR, USFWS)

TU was among the groups that in 2007 petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list Sammamish kokanee under the Endangered Species Act, but in 2011 the feds declined to do so, saying it wasn’t an independent population.

Yellow perch are a popular sportfish. According to state biologist Aaron Bosworth, the species was introduced into Lake Sammamish in 1915, and though it’s unclear who put them there, it came near the end of the era when the U.S. Fish Commission was moving Eastern gamefish into Western waters.

These days, efforts are being made to get them out of the lakes, or at least limit their numbers and impacts to young salmonids.

After perch were illegally stocked into Eastern Oregon’s Phillips Reservoir, state officials launched a gillnetting campaign and released piscivorous tiger muskies into the lake to try and recover the once-vaunted rainbow trout fishery.

In Northeast Washington, after a “startling increase” in perch numbers at previously clean Curlew Lake, locals organized a “Perch Purge.”

Tickets for the Lake Sammamish derby are $20 for adults and $5 for kids, $30 and $10 if you register on site at the state park tomorrow.

A GOOD TACTIC FOR PERCH IS TO FISH WORMS — OR SMALL WHITE CURL-TAILED GRUBS — ON BOTTOM, LIKE THESE ANGLERS ON LAKE WASHINGTON WERE DOING A COUPLE FRIDAYS AGO. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Yuasa: Plenty Of Places To Catch Chinook, Coho This Month, And Lake WA Perch Peaking

Editor’s note: The following is Mark Yuasa’s monthly fishing newsletter, Get Hooked on Reel Times With Mark, and is run with permission.

By Mark Yuasa, Director of Grow Boating Programs, Northwest Marine Trade Association

Wow! We’ve hit August in a flash and by now anglers have gotten their chances to hook salmon in what’s clearly turning out to be a memorable summer.

KINGS ARE THE TARGET FOR ANGLERS EVERYWHERE FROM BUOY 10 TO DEEP SOUTH SOUND THIS MONTH. (MARK YUASA, NMTA)

And while we’ve just eclipsed the midway point of summer, one shouldn’t let a lack of sleep or the ever growing “must do” list of house chores hold them back from getting out on the water.

In early June, my fishing journey began when the early summer chinook run ramped up in south-central Puget Sound (Area 11) around the Tacoma area off the Clay Banks, Flats and even as far south as Fox Island!

Fast forward to mid-July when the hatchery king fishery in northern and central Puget Sound (Areas 9 and 10) started off on a high note with anglers averaging more than half-a-fish-per rod during the Area 9 opener. Fishing was so good that WDFW had to shut-down the chinook season – it’s still open for hatchery coho – earlier than anticipated.

Here is a historical snapshot of Area 9 angler trips with total fish caught and days open – 2018: 1,640 anglers caught 629 fish in seven days (doesn’t include July 26-29 data); 2017: 1,312 caught 383 in 14; 2016: 785 caught 157 in 19; 2015: 1,283 caught 212 in 11; 2014: 759 caught 96 in 30; 2013: 1,079 caught 251 in 19; 2012: 737 caught 206 in 34; 2011: 812 caught 50 in 46; 2010: 662 caught 107 in 46; 2009: 930 caught 135 in 17; 2008: 739 caught 153 in 25; and 2007: 1,211 caught 329 in 15.

This kind of success and pure fishing fun reminded me why I enjoy being on my boat during this short window of opportunity in the summer chasing migratory kings from Puget Sound into the Strait of Juan de Fuca and down to the Columbia River mouth.

We’re all limited to how much time we get on the water especially when we’ve got jobs to hold down, family vacations to take and spending time with the kiddos. But, being smart and choosing where to fish locally will often lead to “fish-on” time-and-time again.

Looking at the month of August and September, anglers will still have plenty of choices to hook into kings and silvers.

Some of my favorite spots are Buoy 10 located near the Columbia River mouth; Westport on the south-central coast; Willapa Bay; Puget Sound in the Vashon Island/Tacoma area; and Long Beach just outside of Ilwaco off the southern coast.

While the Columbia chinook and coho returns aren’t as glamorous compared to recent year averages – the total fall chinook forecast is 365,000, which is about half of the 10-year average and falls below the 582,600 forecast and actual return of 475,900 last year – it will still provide ample hook-ups to make for a worthwhile trip to Ilwaco.

I first got hooked on the shallow water fishery off Long Beach by Tony Floor (a long-time sport-fishing advocate and dear fishing partner for many years) where we’d troll in 20 to 50 feet of water with just a banana weight and whole herring. Trolling through the huge schools of anchovies would constantly make your rod tip vibrate.

Keeping up the speed on your boat by going at a fast clip of 3 to 3.5 miles per hour is vital and you only need 13 to 15 pulls of line off the reel. Then kick back and watch those kings smash your bait and head out into the horizon like a fast-moving locomotive.

Just inside the Columbia River mouth is the famous Buoy 10 salmon fishery where on busy weekends will have an armada of boats stretching in all directions as far as the eyes can see.

Look for hungry salmon at places like the “Wing Walls” on the Washington side of the river, Desdemona Flats, above and below the Astoria-Megler Bridge and the Blind Channels just above the bridge.
If you want to stay close to home it’d be wise to hit central (10) and south-central Puget Sound (11) since the South Sound-bound hatchery chinook forecast of 227,420 is up 21 percent from 10-year average and a 35 percent increase from 2017. Be sure to check the WDFW website or hotline just in case the fisheries close sooner than expected.

As of press time Area 10 was under a hatchery king quota of 4,743, which is twice as large as last year’s quota, and scheduled to remain open until Aug. 30. Look for good fishing from Kingston south to Jefferson Head, and other locales like Point Monroe, West Point, Yeomalt Point and Skiff Point.

Back in early July, the WDFW decided to keep Area 11 open on a Friday to Monday only schedule for boat angling to slow down the fast-paced chinook catch that is under a quota of 5,587 fish. However, catches eventually slowed down and WDFW made a decision to revert back to the area being open daily starting Aug. 1. The Area 11 scheduled closure date is Sept. 30.

Look for hatchery kings around Dolphin Point, Redondo Beach, Brace Point, Three Tree Point and Point Robinson.

Further south of the Narrows Bridge is where “13” could be your lucky number! This deep-south sound region is known as Area 13 and will be the final staging area of the strong hatchery chinook returns. Anglers were already hooking up on good numbers of hatchery king around Fox Island in July, and seek them out at Anderson Island, the Nisqually Flats, Dover Point near Zangle Cove, Itsami Ledge, Dickenson Point, Little Fish Trap Bay, Big Fish Trap Bay and Johnson Point.

Another sleeper spot in late-summer is the San Juan Islands and is open to wild and hatchery kings through Sept. 3.

Great summer warm-water fish action

Fish species like yellow perch and rock bass just don’t get the attention as much as our beloved salmon, but I will often sneak away to my favorite lakes for these fine tasting fish.

WDFW BIOLOGIST AND HARDCORE ANGLER DANNY GARRETT SHOWS OFF A NICE STRINGER OF LAKE WASHINGTON YELLOW PERCH. (MARK YUASA, NMTA)

The cool thing about this fishery is that you can easily catch them from the shore or boat, and Lake Washington – which is 20 miles long and covers more than 22,000 acres – is excellent for yellow perch, rock bass as well as many other fish species.

The yellow perch population is one of the most prolific and are extremely easy to find and catch. It’s peak time right now as the water temperature heats up making them very active all-day long.

Look for schools of yellow perch in shallow water, 15 to 35 feet, and close to the shoreline. They will school up in shaded locations just outside the cover of weed beds, milfoil, aquatic weeds and lily pads or under docks, piers and overhanging trees and brush.

Target Seward Park; Montlake Cut; Newport Canal; Newport Shores; Kenmore log boom and pier; Juanita Bay; Magnuson Park shoreline; Andrews Bay; Newport area and slough; Webster Point in Union Bay; Yarrow Bay in Kirkland; Gene Coulon Park in Renton; Mercer Island near Luther Burbank Park; and in South Seattle off Leschi Park, Madison Park, Stan Sayres Pits and Mount Baker Park. Lake Union around Gasworks Park and other areas are good spots too!

A simple light-to-medium-action trout fishing rod and spinning reel loaded with 4- to 6-pound line on a drop-shot (egg-style) weight attached to a three-way swivel is the “go to” tackle. Baits of choice are worms, maggots or a skirted crappie jig. Once you catch your first perch cut a small chunk of the meat or even a perch eyeball, which works great as bait.

Other lakes to target perch are Sammamish; Kapowsin; Sawyer; Goodwin; Steven; American; Angle; Desire; Meridian; Samish; Whatcom; and Bosworth. The WDFW website offers a wealth of information at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/washington/Species/1849/.

Word on NW Salmon Derby Series

The derby series got off to a good start with 362 adult and 45 youth anglers turning out for the PSA Bellingham Salmon Derby on July 13-15. Participants weighed-in 155 fish and the winner of the $7,500 first-place prize was Darren Anderson with a 24.28-pound hatchery king. Second was Kevin Klein with a 21.60; and third was Ryan Johnson with a 20.44. By comparison in 2017, there was 329 anglers with 167 fish caught.

DARREN ANDERSON HOLDS AN OVERSIZED CHECK FOR $7,500 AFTER WEIGHING IN THE BIGGEST CHINOOK DURING THE BELLINGHAM PSA SALMON DERBY. (MARK YUASA, NMTA)

That was followed by the Big One Salmon Derby on July 25-29 at Lake Coeur d’Alene in Idaho.

The Brewster Salmon Derby on Aug. 3-5 was cancelled then reinstated after WDFW verified the summer chinook return to the Upper Columbia River was stronger than expected. The fishery reopened July 25 from Rocky Reach Dam to Wells Dam, including the Wenatchee and Chelan rivers; and Aug. 1 from Wells Dam to Chief Joseph Dam, including the Okanogan and Similkameen rivers. The change came after fishery managers were confident they’d achieve escapement goals.

Brewster Salmon Derby anglers in early July were refunded so they needed to re-register online at http://brewstersalmonderby.com/ by Wednesday, Aug. 1 at 5 p.m.

Other derbies are the South King County PSA Derby on Aug. 4; Gig Harbor PSA Derby on Aug. 11; and the Vancouver, B.C. Canada Chinook Classic on Aug. 18-19.

It’s also not too soon to start getting excited about coho in September and be sure to enter the PSA Edmonds Coho Derby on Sept. 8, and the biggest derby on West Coast – the Everett Coho Derby on Sept. 22-23.

That is where we’ll draw the lucky name to win a grand-prize $65,000 KingFisher 2025 Falcon Series boat powered with Honda 150hp and 9.9hp motors on an EZ-loader galvanized trailer. It is fully rigged with Scotty downriggers, Raymarine electronics, a WhoDat Tower and a Dual Electronic Stereo. Details: www.NorthwestSalmonDerbySeries.com.

Now it’s for me to start tying up bunch of leaders and bolt out the door to see if I can entice a late-summer king to take my bait. See you on the water!

 

Plenty Of Porky Perch At Idaho’s Cascade, Though Fewer Smaller Ones

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME REGIONAL FISHERIES BIOLOGIST PAUL JANSSEN

Lots of large perch remain, but fewer smaller sizes could affect the fishery in the future

Since 2012, Fish and Game fisheries staff in McCall has annually conducted fall fishery surveys on Lake Cascade. We sample all fish populations in the lake, which helps manage all game fish in the reservoir.

So what did we find in our 2017 survey?

Lots of big perch

The perch population looks healthy. All ages of fish are present in the lake, and there’s still a large number of perch over 12 inches. Of all the perch we caught in nets 59 percent were over 12 inches.

(IDFG)

We have seen a decline in perch less than 11 inches in both 2016 and 2017 surveys. This is a result of predation on small perch by the large numbers of big perch and also pikeminnow, smallmouth bass, rainbow trout and birds. If this trend continues, it will mean fewer jumbo perch in the future.

One of the primary food items for perch are juvenile perch and large numbers of big perch can have a huge effect on juvenile perch numbers as most get eaten. The good news is that as the large group of big perch decline, it allows for large numbers of small perch to survive and become the next generation of jumbos. Perch grow 1.5 to 2 inches a year, thus 12-inch fish are six to seven years old and 14 inch and larger perch are eight to 12 years old.

As a result of Fish and Game’s continued pikeminnow removal efforts their numbers have remained steady since 2012. However, in this years’ survey, the percentage of adult pikeminnow increased.  This is expected as young pikeminnow that are not killed in traps or by chemical treatment  grow in size. This illustrates the need for continued adult pikeminnow removal to protect the perch fishery.

Rainbows and smallmouths

We saw good numbers of rainbow trout in the fall 2017 survey ranging from 12 to 21 inches with most in the 12 to 17 inch range. However, we didn’t see as many rainbows over 17 inches than we have in the past.

(PAUL JANSSEN, IDFG)

We collected a number of 10 to 20-inch smallmouth bass with half of those larger than 16 inches. Trends in juvenile bass are unknown because our nets are not designed to collect those small fish.

Annual fish surveys are vital to managing Lake Cascade, which is the fourth-largest body of water in Idaho, contains many fish species and is a popular spot for anglers.

Managing for the future

The lake’s rainbow trout and kokanee fisheries are a direct result of annual stockings, and smallmouth bass are a self-sustaining population that we watch, but only manage with rule changes.

Yellow perch management is much more hands on and depends on the control of northern pikeminnow numbers. Therefore, of particular interest to managers is the status of the perch and pikeminnow populations.

We closely monitor perch population and fish sizes to ensure there are abundant perch over 9 inches, which cannot be eaten by pikeminnow, so they’re important for spawning and angler harvest.

Biologists also want to see good numbers of younger perch to replace the large fish as those older fish die of natural causes or angler harvest.

We closely monitor pikeminnow numbers and sizes and pikeminnow predation because it’s the biggest threat to the perch fishery.

Pikeminnow predation on perch was the primary cause of the fishery collapse in the 1990s when large numbers of adult pikeminnows ate virtually every perch under 9 inches in the lake.

Today, pikeminnow numbers are much lower than in the 1990s because since 2004, Fish and Game has removed large numbers of them using large traps and rotenone (a chemical pesticide which specifically targets fish) in the North Fork of the Payette River to remove pre-spawning adults.