Tag Archives: wickiup reservoir

ODFW Hosting Dec. 6 Meeting In Bend On 2018 Wickiup Koke Regs

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW invites the public to participate in a discussion regarding fish management for Wickiup Reservoir, a favorite destination for anglers seeking large brown trout and kokanee. The meeting will be held on Dec. 6 from 6-8 p.m. at Central Oregon Community College, Room 190 in the Health Career Center building.

WICKIUP RESERVOIR KOKANEE ANGLERS ARE INVITED TO AN EARLY DECEMBER MEETING IN BEND FOCUSING ON CHANGING REGULATIONS AT THE UPPER DESCHUTES IMPOUNDMENT, WHERE STEPHANIE PEMBLE CAUGHT THIS ONE WHILE TROLLING A PLUG WITH GUIDE JON WILEY. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Fishing regulations are changing at Wickiup Reservoir beginning in 2018. The “bonus” bag limit for kokanee will change from 25 to 5 and the Deschutes River Arm will close Aug. 31 (one month earlier than in 2017).

The new approach is intended to protect naturally reproducing fish populations and sustain quality recreational fishing opportunities into the future. During the meeting, ODFW will also provide insight on how current water management in the upper Deschutes River impacts the reservoir fishery.

Meeting attendees will find free parking on College Way and at the Library. The link below provides a detailed map of Central Oregon Community College campus.
https://culinary.cocc.edu/uploadedfiles/departments_/community_learning/cocc-bend-campus-map.pdf

ODFW Reverses Course On Wickiup Kokanee Bag, Season Rules

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM AN OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has rescinded two emergency rules that would have removed the kokanee “bonus bag” on Wickiup Reservoir, and closed the Deschutes River arm of the reservoir a month earlier in late summer.

STEPHANIE PEMBLE CAUGHT THIS KOKANEE AT WICKIUP RESERVOIR WITH GUIDE JON WILEY. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

The rules were intended to protect natural reproduction in the reservoir under new water management rules that could affect key spawning grounds.

“We’re going to take a step back to do some additional monitoring and to engage the angling community in a discussion of what the fish management options are for Wickiup under the new water regime,” said Brett Hodgson, ODFW fish manager.

Wickiup Reservoir will open to fishing on April 22 under the regulations printed in the 2017 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations.

ODFW Sharply Drops Wickiup Kokanee Limit, Trims Season

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Fishery managers have announced two new rule changes that will affect the kokanee bag limit, and fall fishing in the Deschutes River arm of Wickiup Reservoir.

The first rule change eliminates the kokanee “bonus bag” that allowed anglers to keep up to 25 kokanee in addition to the regular 5 fish trout limit. Effective opening day, April 22, 2017, anglers must include kokanee within the 5 fish trout limit.

WICKIUP RESERVOIR KOKANEE ANGLERS MAY NOT BE SMILING AS MUCH AS STEPHANIE PEMBLE WAS AFTER CATCHING THIS ONE SEVERAL SEASONS AGO, BUT TO PROTECT NATURAL SPAWNING STOCKS OF THE LANDLOCKED SALMON SPECIES, ODFW IS DROPPING THE LIMIT SHARPLY AND CHOPPING A MONTH OFF THE BACK END OF THE SEASON. PEMBLE WAS FISHING WITH GUIDE JON WILEY. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

The second rule change will close fishing in the Deschutes River arm of the reservoir one month earlier from Sept. 30 to Aug. 31 and move the boundary from the West South Twin boat ramp to Gull Point. The remainder of the reservoir will continue to be open for fishing until Oct. 31.

According to Brett Hodgson, ODFW fish biologist in Bend, the Deschutes River arm is an important spawning area for kokanee and trout.

“We don’t stock Wickiup Reservoir – the entire fishery depends on the natural production of kokanee, brown trout and redband trout,” Hodgson said. “We need to take management action to ensure this natural production sustains a fishery.”

Under a new water management regime, water in the reservoir is drawn down earlier in the summer.  This will concentrate fish in a smaller area near the unscreened outlet and make them more vulnerable to both fishing pressure on the spawning grounds and escaping from the reservoir downstream into the Deschutes River. This will limit the annual production of kokanee and trout. Kokanee begin their spawning migration in late August.

“These fish are vulnerable to anglers who target the spawning kokanee and the trout that follow the kokanee upstream to feed on their eggs,” Hodgson states.

The storage and release of water from the Reservoir has been altered to help protect listed spotted frogs downstream, and to improve the ecological function of the Deschutes River, he said.

“It may be a while before we know what impact the change in water management will have on the spotted frog,” Hodgson said. “But in the meantime we need to be proactive in protecting spawning fish to conserve redband trout populations and to maintain the robust and diverse recreational fishery.”