Tag Archives: WATERFOWL

Tips Needed In ‘Major’ Whatcom Co. Waterfowl Wastage Case

Washington game wardens are looking for whomever strew more than 60 dead ducks and geese across a rural part of Whatcom County recently, a “major wastage.”

(WDFW)

The mallards, Canadas and other waterfowl were found on and along stretches of Weidkamp and West Badger Roads, which are just west of Lynden and a couple miles south of the US-Canada border.

It’s believed the birds had been shot several days before but were not processed at all.

“None of them were breasted and they appeared to have been dead for several days. The birds were spread out singly. It appears they were thrown from a vehicle traveling up the road,” WDFW Police reported on Facebook this afternoon.

The Northwest Washington Waterfowl Association reported that on  Friday, Nov. 30, one of its members came across a warden collecting the birds.

They were initially spotted by a school bus driver earlier in the day, according to a Bellingham Herald article out this morning.

Anyone with information is being asked to call WDFW’s poaching tip line at (877) 933-9847.

Anonymous texts can also be sent to 847411, entering WDFWTIP and then providing details.

Trying To Foul Hook Downed Fowl, Something Bassy Bites Instead For Basin Duck Hunter

Everybody knows that Washington’s Columbia Basin is a great spot for duck hunting and it’s widely regarded as tops for bass fishing, but it isn’t often that Northwest sportsmen get to enjoy both pursuits at once.

KYLE VANDERWAAL AND THE FRUITS OF A COLUMBIA BASIN BLAST-AND-CAST LAST WEEKEND. (KYLE VANDERWAAL VIA GARY LUNDQUIST)

Waterfowling heats up in midfall as northern flights begin to arrive but largies and smallies become much more lethargic as lakes cool down with the onset of winter.

That’s the theory, anyway, and you just know that for every theory there’s that one guy gunning to poke a hole in it.

Enter Mr. Kyle Vanderwaal.

He’s a hardcore duck and goose hunter, if reports from family friend Gary Lundquist are any indication, and last weekend he found himself in the basin chasing mallards.

Despite blue skies hunting was pretty good that day, but apparently Vanderwaal downed one bird over water that was a bit deeper than his chest waders allowed him to wade.

Sans Bowser, it was time to implement plan C — casting.

Out came a fishing rod strung up with a No. 9 Shad Rap, a 31/2-inch plug sporting a pair of trebles, on the business end.

Perfect for hooking far-fallen fowl.

Also fish.

As Vanderwaal attempted to snag his greenhead, a green bass bit instead.

In the hook-and-bullet world, a cast and blast is an outing where you might fish for steelhead in the morning and head into the breaks for chukar in the afternoon, so this was more of a blast and cast or blast then cast.

Anyway, a photo snapped shortly afterwards shows the young hunter smiling with the day’s, er, catch — five drakes and a roughly 2-pound largemouth.

“The bass was released :)” reports Lundquist.

The same can not be said, however, of Vanderwaal’s ducks.

Water Flowing Again Into A Top Public Basin Duck Hunting Area

A popular and productive public-land Columbia Basin duck hunting area is filling up with water for the first time in several years, good news as the best part of the waterfowl season arrives.

WATER FLOWS INTO PONDS AT THE WINCHESTER REGULATED ACCESS AREA EARLIER THIS WEEK. (BRIAN HECK, DUCKS UNLIMITED)

The recently completed project at WDFW’s Winchester Regulated Access Area unclogged an inlet from the nearby wasteway west of Potholes Reservoir and water is now flowing into the ponds there.

(CHAD EIDSON, WDFW)

“This will be the first time in three or four years that we’ll have a good amount of water,” says the agency’s Sean Dougherty in Ephrata.

The area opened in the early 2000s and provided good hunting but gradually the channel that fed water into the ponds silted up, and during 2016’s opener it was completely dry.

(BRIAN HECK, DUCKS UNLIMITED)

Dougherty says that funds were secured last year, including from state duck stamp moneys, to fix the problem.

After coordinating with the Bureau of Reclamation and the local irrigation district and with help from Ducks Unlimited, which provided “technical support and project management,” he says, water has begun flowing in again.

The area primarily attracts mallards as well as other puddlers as the migration and season goes on, but some geese fly in as well, and access is first come, first served.

“It’s really competitive to get a spot,” says Dougherty. “I would encourage you to be there at 4 a.m.”

That’s when vehicles can begin parking here, and the first five parties of up to four hunters each head out to set up their decoy spreads.

FLOODING IN CELL, OR POND, A. (CHAD EIDSON, WDFW)

The area is only open Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays, with the other days off limits to rest the birds.

It’s also next to a game reserve, which helps keep ducks in the area too.

A WDFW MAP SHOWS CURRENT PARKING AND BLIND LOCATIONS FOR THE WINCHESTER REGULATED ACCESS AREA. (WDFW)

Dougherty doesn’t want to make any promises about how many greenheads you might down if you set up here, but says it’s one of the best public hunts, with an average of three ducks a gun in the past.

And with more water here this fall, the ponds might also remain as open water longer, though with their shallow depths, ambitious hunters can still bust through the ice later on.

DUCKS SIT ON A POND AT THE WINCHESTER REGULATED ACCESS AREA. (CHAD EIDSON, WDFW)

Editor’s note: This blog initially contained an outdated WDFW map of access to the Winchester Regulated Access Area. It has subsequently been updated with a new one from regional lands manager Rich Finger. Also, blinds are not assigned and the area is free roam.

Just 7 Days Left To Comment On WDFW 2018-20 Hunting Reg Proposals

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is seeking public input on proposed recommendations for the 2018-20 hunting seasons.

HUNTERS DISCUSS THE DAY AROUND A CAMPFIRE IN THE OKANOGAN-WENATCHEE NATIONAL FOREST. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Through Feb. 14, WDFW will accept comments from the public to help finalize proposed regulations for hunting seasons that begin this year. To review and comment on the proposals, visit the department’s website starting Jan. 24 at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulations/seasonsetting/.

Developed after extensive public involvement, the proposed hunting season rules are based on the objectives and strategies contained in the new 2015-21 Game Management Plan, said Anis Aoude, WDFW game manager. The plan is available on the department’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/01676/.

“We appreciate the input we’ve received over the past months and encourage everyone interested in the 2018-20 hunting seasons to review and comment on the proposed rules before final action is taken,” Aoude said.

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission, which sets policy for WDFW, will also take public comment on the proposed recommendations at its March 16-17 meeting at the Red Lion Hotel in Wenatchee. Final commission action is scheduled to take place at the April 12-16 meeting.