Tag Archives: walleye

SW WA, Columbia Gorge Pools Fishing Report (1-14-20)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Washington Columbia River and Tributary Fishing Report Jan 6-12, 2019

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River

John Day Pool – 12 bank anglers kept one steelhead and released four steelhead.

Sturgeon:

Bonneville Pool – Seven bank anglers had no catch.  13 boats/39 rods kept 10 legal sturgeon, released 64 sublegal and two oversize sturgeon.

KATIE CRAIG CAUGHT THIS DALLES POOL STURGEON IN FEBRUARY 2016. SHE WAS FISHING THE COLUMBIA RESERVOIR WITH HUBSTER NATHAN. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

The Dalles Pool – Six bank anglers released one sublegal sturgeon.

John Day Pool – 15 bank anglers had no catch.  17 boats/36 rods kept one legal sturgeon and released one oversize sturgeon.

Reservoir Estimated
Total Harvest
% of Guideline Guideline
Bonneville 146 29 500
The Dalles 74 55 135
John Day 18 17 105

Walleye:

John Day Pool – 1 boat/3 rods had no catch.

Bass:

John Day Pool – Two bank anglers had no catch.

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries 

Elochoman River – 11 bank anglers kept 12 steelhead.

(Cowlitz) Above the I-5 Br – One bank angler had no catch.

  • Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

SW WA Tribs, Columbia Gorge Pools Fishing Report (1-8-20)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Fishery Reports:

Salmon/Steelhead:

John Day Pool – 15 bank anglers released 15 steelhead.  1 boat/1 rod had no catch.

Sturgeon:

Walleye:

Bonneville Pool- 1 boat/2 rods had no catch.

The Dalles Pool- 2 boats/3 rods released two walleye.

John Day Pool- 1 bank angler had no catch.  6 boats/12 rods kept 13 walleye.

COLUMBIA WALLEYE ANGLERS LIKE JIM DEATHERAGE ARE BEGINNING TO TARGET TROPHIES AND EATERS IN THE POOLS AND TAILRACES OF THE BIG RIVER. DEATHERAGE CAUGHT THIS ONE LAST JANUARY WHILE FISHING WITH JERRY HAN IN THE TRI-CITIES AREA. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Bass:

John Day Pool- 1 boat/3 rods kept six bass.

 Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Grays River – 2 bank anglers had no catch.

Elochoman River – 22 bank anglers kept 12 steelhead.  3 boats/4 rods kept one steelhead and released one steelhead and one coho.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 9 bank rods had no catch.

Above the I-5 Br:  11 bank rods had no catch.  1 boat/3 rods had no catch.

WDFW Commission Liberalizes Bass, Etc., Daily Limits On 77 Lakes

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission made decisions on several fishing rule proposals and a land transaction at their Dec. 13-14 meeting in Bellingham. The commission also heard updates on Southern Resident Killer Whales, Baker Lake and Skagit River sockeye fishery management, hatchery reform, non-toxic ammunition, and Columbia River salmon policy.

WASHINGTON FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMISSIONERS INCREASED THE BAG LIMIT ON LARGEMOUTH BASS THIS SIZE ON 77 LAKES FROM FIVE TO TEN A DAY IN RESPONSE TO THE STATE LEGISLATURE’S DIRECTIVE TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT SALMON SMOLT PREDATION AND INCREASING CHINOOK, COHO, STEELHEAD AND OTHER FISH AVAILABILITY FOR ORCAS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

On Friday, the commission approved a 1.8-acre land acquisition for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) in Asotin County. The property will be donated by Larry and Marilou Cassidy, as an addition to the Snyder Bar Water Access Area, located in the Chief Joseph Wildlife Area. The new addition will improve public access for fishing and boating.

WDFW fishery managers briefed the commission on the department’s proposals to simplify forage fish, marine fish, and shellfish sport fishing rules. The commission adopted the department’s recommendations to modify rule language to be more concise and consistent with other regulations. More details on these changes are available on WDFW’s fishing rule simplification webpage.

The commission also approved regulation updates to simplify sturgeon fishing rules and improve conservation efforts. Rule changes include expanding spawning sanctuary areas in the Columbia River, shifting retention fisheries upstream of McNary Dam to catch-and-release only, closing night fishing for sturgeon in the Chehalis River, and defining oversize sturgeon as fish larger than 55 inches fork length. More details are available on WDFW’s sturgeon fishing rules webpage.

In addition, WDFW staff provided an update on the Joint State Columbia River Salmon Fishery Policy Review Committee’s work to recommend possible revisions to the Columbia River Salmon Management Policy. The commission asked the director to present information in January 2020 about the delegation of authority and to contact the director of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to discuss possible options for fisheries in 2020.

The committee expects to hold additional public meetings in early 2020, with a possible recommendation to both Oregon and Washington commissions in spring 2020. Information and materials from previous meetings are available on the joint policy review committee webpage.

On Saturday, fishery managers briefed the commission on Baker Lake sockeye salmon management following poor returns in the last several years. WDFW staff provided updates on the harvest shares from the 2019 season and reviewed the department’s efforts to address management challenges, which focused on prioritizing Baker Lake sockeye harvest equity in the 2020 North of Falcon salmon season-setting process.

“We couldn’t have had better public testimony to illuminate the different perspectives on the Baker Lake sockeye salmon fishery,” said Ron Warren, fish policy director for WDFW. “Baker Lake is a beautiful and popular fishery that we want Washingtonians to continue to enjoy.”

Finally, fishery managers presented six options to liberalize limits on bass, walleye, and channel catfish in select waters throughout the state, a requirement passed by the state Legislature this spring as part of House Bill 1579. The bill’s intent was to implement task force recommendations to benefit the endangered Southern Resident Killer Whale population by increasing salmon availability.

WDFW conducted six months of public engagement on the proposal to change rules for bass, walleye, and channel catfish fishing, which included five public meetings around the state. After reviewing public feedback, 72% of comments supported a warmwater species rule change to reduce the risk of predation on salmon smolts.

All six options presented to the commission include removing size and daily limits on rivers. The options varied in the number of affected lakes, size limits, and daily limits. WDFW staff recommended “Option B” which would affect 77 lakes around the state containing bass, walleye, or channel catfish, and have public access.

The commission supported WDFW’s recommendation and adopted “Option B2”, which includes changes to size and daily limits of largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, channel catfish, and walleye in 77 lakes around the state:

  • Largemouth bass: Change from 5 to a 10-fish daily limit; only one fish may be over 17 inches.
  • Smallmouth bass: Change from 10 to a 15-fish daily limit; only one fish may be over 14 inches.
  • Channel catfish: Change from a 5 to a 10-fish daily limit.
  • Walleye: Change from 8 to a 16-fish daily limit; only one fish may be over 22 inches.

A recording of the Dec. 13 meeting is available at https://player.invintus.com/?clientID=2836755451&eventID=2019121001 and the Dec. 14 meeting is available at https://player.invintus.com/?clientID=2836755451&eventID=2019121002.

6 Options For Liberalizing Washington Bass, Spinyray Limits Identified

Will it be the bag limit behind Door No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6?

WDFW staffers will present the Fish and Wildlife Commission a half dozen options for liberalizing bass, walleye and channel catfish retention in select waters across Washington later this month.

A STRINGER OF SMALLMOUTH DRAPE THE PROW OF A DRIFT BOAT ON OREGON’S UMPQUA RIVER. (VIA TROY RODAKOWSKI)

They range from the complete elimination of size and daily limits on 146 lakes to expanded bags but with standard slot size protections for spawners on a set of just 14 lakes which have Chinook runs in their headwaters.

The citizen panel is scheduled to make a final call the morning of Saturday, Dec. 14, at its meeting in Bellingham. Public comment will be taken.

They’re acting on a bill passed by the state legislature earlier this year.

While primarily strengthening habitat protections for Chinook, Substitute House Bill 1579 also requires the commission to liberalize limits on the three nonnative but popular warmwater species “in all anadromous waters of the state in order to reduce the predation risk to salmon smolts.”

It was among a set of measures aimed at helping out endangered southern resident killer whales, which mostly feed on Chinook though also coho, chums and steelhead at select times of the year.

But bass anglers rebelled against WDFW’s initial proposal that would have eliminated rather than liberalized limits on 106 waters in Puget Sound, 18 in coastal watersheds, 12 in Southwest Washington and another dozen on the Eastside.

“We’re hoping today we can kinda come to some kind of consensus, maybe not to just destroy but can we surgically do something?” Phil Martin, president of the Mt. St. Helens Bassmasters, asked the commission in mid-October. “We’re conservative fishermen, we don’t want to destroy the fishery for anything, whether it be salmon, carp, bass, panfish. That’s what we do, but there’s got to be a better alternative than just genocide on the bass, walleye and catfish populations.”

And with commissioners pushing back as well, state fishery managers developed a matrix of six options, which differ based on how many waters they would affect and the extent of the liberalization.

Option A1 would be the full elimination of limits on all 146 lakes, while A2 would expand the daily bag on them for largemouth from five to 10 (none between 12 and 17 inches and only one over 17 inches); on smallmouth from 10 to 15 (only one over 14 inches); on channel catfish from five to 10; and on walleye from eight to 16 (only one over 22 inches).

A WDFW MAP SHOWS 146 LAKES THAT WOULD BE AFFECTED UNDER OPTION A. (WDFW)

For Option B, the list of lakes was whittled to 77 after subtracting out those that didn’t have bass, walleye and/or channel catfish, or public access, but still said to have salmon spawning in their headwaters.

Option B1 would eliminate limits on all 77, while B2 would expand the limits as described in A2.

And for Option C, the list was narrowed down to 14 lakes which adult Chinook and their fry swim through, have bass, walleye and/or channel catfish, and have public access.

Those waters include popular bass lakes such as Washington, Union, Sammamish, Osoyoos, Vancouver, Ohop and Kapowsin, smaller ones such as Cottage, and overlooked lakes such as Scanewa, Cushman, Mayfield and Wynoochee.

Under C1, they would see limits eliminated, while C2 would follow A2 and B2.

In their briefing packets, WDFW staffers only recommend Option B, leaving it up to commissioners whether to choose the wholesale elimination of all limits on the 77 lakes or expanded bags instead.

That alternative would mesh with the legislature’s intent to protect “salmon smolts.” The lakes and their feeder streams largely represent habitat for coho, which are important to orca diets in the inland sea in late summer.

But it’s also questionable how productive some of those waters are compared to larger river systems and hatcheries, as well as how recently salmon have actually used them.

Some like Lakes Sammamish, Union and Washington are a critical conduit between the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery, which annually raises millions of Chinook and coho fry, and the saltwater.

While that King County watershed’s Chinook were not federally identified as important for southern residents, Scanewa and the Cowlitz River, where springers are being reintroduced in the upper end, has been.

At any rate, the rule change would primarily affect bass, as channel cats are limited to few lakes and on the Westside they are typically too cold for reproduction, and fortunately few walleye have been illegally brought over the Cascade crest.

Even as largemouth and smallmouth aren’t as coveted on the table in Northwest and also have consumption advisories out for women and children due to mercury, the episode has served as a warning for bass anglers that they “need to have a voice in Olympia,” in the words of Joel Nania of the Inland Northwest Bass Club.

He joined Martin and several others at the state capital in mid-October to talk to the commission about limits.

BASS CLUB PRESIDENT PHIL MARTIN SPEAKS TO THE WASHINGTON FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMISSION IN OCTOBER. (TVW)

During written public comment, there were 500 comments in favor of liberalized limits, 190 against.

SHB 1579 follows on previous prodding by federal fishery overseers to do more in the Columbia system to protect outmigrating smolts preyed on by the three spinyrayed species. WDFW several years ago waived daily and size limits on the big river and its tribs.

The primary factors impacting reduced Chinook and salmon abundance are massive, long-term, all-encompassing habitat destruction from the tops of our mountains to the depths of Puget Sound, and declining ocean productivity.

Whether the commission chooses to liberalize limits on 14, 77 or 146 lakes, it has a tough needle to thread between lawmakers, pro-orca public sentiment and a portion of its constituents.

Limits At Popular Washington Bass Fisheries Could Be Scrubbed For Orcas

One hundred and forty-six lakes across Washington have been identified for elimination of bass, walleye and channel catfish limits after state lawmakers earlier this year passed a bill aiming to increase salmon numbers for starving orcas.

WDFW is taking public comment on the proposal which would affect 108 waters in Puget Sound, 14 in coastal watersheds, 12 in Southwest Washington and another dozen on the Eastside.

LAKE WASHINGTON SYSTEM POND LARGEMOUTH BASS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Most if not all don’t actually have walleye or channel catfish in them, let alone any preying on young Chinook, coho and steelhead, but some popular largemouth and smallmouth fisheries are on the list.

Those include Ballinger, Big, Bosworth — home to the state record bucketmouth — Clear (Skagit), McMurray, Osoyoos — which features the heftiest tournament bags — Riffe, Sawyer, Sammamish, Silver, Stevens, Tanwax, and Washington, among others.

Dozens upon dozens of other “secret” bass lakes are also on the list.

Because they’re classified as anadromous waters, they are targeted by Second Substitute House Bill 1579.

It passed 26-20 in the state Senate and 57-37 in the state House before being signed into law by Gov. Jay Inslee.

TOURNAMENT BASS ANGLERS FISH A LAKE WASHINGTON SHIP CANAL BAY TWO SPRINGS AGO. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

At the pushing of federal fishery overseers to do more to protect outmigrating smolts preyed on by the three nonnative spinyrayed species, as well as to align with Oregon regs, WDFW several years ago waived daily and size limits on the Columbia system.

Biologically, it’s questionable if applying the same rule on these new lakes, ponds and reservoirs would have any effect whatsoever, either on reducing highly fecund warmwater populations or increasing salmon availability for killer whales.

Bass aren’t as coveted on the table as other species in our region; channel catfish have only been stocked in select landlocked lakes and can’t breed in our cooler waters; and walleye are also only found in the Columbia-Snake system, though some jackass(es) put a few in Lakes Washington and Sammamish.

Chinook, the primary feedstock for orcas, as well as steelhead mostly originate in our large river systems, though coho make use of smaller streams often connected to all the lakes left behind by the Great Glacier.

But now with this new state law, which came out of the governor’s Southern Resident Orca Task Force last year, WDFW will hold five public meetings in the coming weeks in Mill Creek, Olympia, Ridgefield, Ephrata and Spokane on the proposal, as well as take comment online through Oct. 17.

The Fish and Wildlife Commission will also take testimony at its mid-October meeting, with a final decision expected in December.

SW WA, Columbia, Hanford Reach Fishing Report (9-9-19)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN AND PAUL HOFFARTH, WDFW

Fishing Report Sept. 2-8, 2019

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Elochoman River – 1 bank angler released 1 steelhead.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – 5 bank rods had no catch. 8 boats/19 rods kept 3 coho, 1 coho jack and released 1 coho, 1 coho jack, 7 Chinook and 2 Chinook jacks.

Above the I-5 Br – 13 bank rods had no catch. 3 boats/6 rods kept 1 steelhead and released 1 steelhead and 1 Chinook.

JERRY HAN SHOWS OFF A NICE EASTERN COLUMBIA GORGE FALL CHINOOK CAUGHT EARLIER TODAY. HE WAS FISHING WITH TYLER MILLER OF MILLER TIME FISHING. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Lewis River – 35 bank anglers kept 1 Chinook jack, 2 coho, 5 coho jacks and released 1 Chinook. 5 boats/6 rods kept 1 coho.

Wind River – 1 bank angler had no catch. 6 boats/9 rods released 11 Chinook.

Drano Lake – 6 bank anglers released 5 steelhead. 15 boats/33 rods kept 19 Chinook, 2 coho and released 16 steelhead.

Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

Pikeminnow Sport – Reward Fishery Program:

The program operates from May 1 to September 30 in the lower Columbia River (mouth to Priest Rapids Dam) and the Snake River (mouth to Hells Canyon Dam). http://www.pikeminnow.org/

Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Fishery Update (Sept 2-8)

Adult counts of fall chinook over Bonneville are running ~9% above last year’s numbers but McNary counts are 1/3 lower than last year at this time. The first in-season update for the Hanford Reach will be included in next week’s update.

 

SW WA, Columbia, Hanford Reach Fishing Report (9-4-19)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN AND PAUL HOFFARTH, WDFW

Fishing Report Aug. 26-Sept. 1, 2019

Salmon/Steelhead:

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Mouth of the Cowlitz River to Bonneville Dam – 606 salmonid boats and 124 Washington bank rods were tallied during the flight on Tuesday.

AMANDA WILES CAUGHT THIS FALL CHINOOK AT BUOY 10 BEFORE RETENTION CLOSED IN MID-AUGUST. SHE WAS FISHING IN THE LIPSTICK SALMON SLAYERS TOURNAMENT. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Columbia River Tributaries

Elochoman River – 4 bank rods had no catch.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – 16 bank rods had no catch. 5 boats/13 rods kept 1 coho, released 2 Chinook jacks and 2 steelhead.

Above the I-5 Br – 14 bank rods released 2 Chinook, 6 Chinook jacks and 1 steelhead. 8 boats/19 rods kept 21 steelhead.

Wind River – 1 bank angler had no catch. 1 boat/2 rods had no catch.

Drano Lake – 2 bank anglers had no catch. 8 boats/16 rods kept 5 Chinook, released 3 Chinook and 17 steelhead.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Pikeminnow Sport – Reward Fishery Program:

The program operates from May 1 to September 30 in the lower Columbia River (mouth to Priest Rapids Dam) and the Snake River (mouth to Hells Canyon Dam). http://www.pikeminnow.org/

Lower Columbia Mainstem Sport Aug. 26-Sept. 1

Salmon and steelhead:

Bonneville bank: 42 anglers with 1 adult Chinook kept
Camas/Washougal bank:  No report
I-5 area bank:  2 anglers with nothing
Vancouver bank:  278 anglers with 44 adult Chinook kept and 1 released
Woodland bank: 4 anglers with nothing
Kalama bank:  164 anglers with 31 adult Chinook kept and 8 released
Longview bank:  13 anglers with nothing
Cathlamet bank:  1 angler with nothing
Private boats/bank:  No report

Bonneville boat:  55 anglers with 22 adult Chinook and 2 jacks kept
Camas/Washougal boat: 214 anglers with 55 adult Chinook and 3 jacks and 2 coho kept and 4 adult Chinook, 1 jack and 1 coho released
I-5 area boat:  24 anglers with 3 adult Chinook and 1 jack kept
Vancouver boat:  259 anglers with 69 adult Chinook and 3 jacks and 1 coho kept and 1 steelhead released
Woodland boat:  105 anglers with 11 adult Chinook kept and 1 released
Kalama boat:  46 anglers with 8 adult Chinook and 1 jack kept and 2 steelhead and 2 coho released
Cowlitz boat:  75 anglers with 7 adult Chinook and 1 jack kept
Longview boat:  34 anglers with 5 adult Chinook and 1 coho kept
Cathlamet boat:  No report
Private boats/bank:  No report

Sturgeon:

Vancouver boat: 3 anglers with 1 legal released
Longview boat: 2 anglers with nothing

Walleye:

Camas/Washougal boat: 4 anglers with 4 kept

Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Fishery Update (Aug. 26-Sept. 1)

Fishing for fall chinook continues to be slow this month with very light effort. From August 26 through September 1, WDFW staff interviewed anglers from 67 boats (180 anglers) with 8 adult chinook and 3 jacks. An estimated 35 adult chinook and 13 chinook jacks were harvested. Boats averaged 64 hours per fish. For the season there have been 1,614 angler trips with 100 adult chinook, 53 chinook jacks, and 5 coho harvested.

Harvest began to pick up the first week of September in 2018 (see table below).

SW WA, Columbia, Hanford Reach Fishing Report (8-27-19)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN AND PAUL HOFFARTH, WDFW

Fishing Report Aug 19-25, 2019

Salmon/Steelhead:

Lower Columbia mainstem from Cathlamet to Bonneville Dam – 757 salmonid boats and 185 Washington bank rods were tallied during last Saturdays flight count.

A PINK BIG AL’S FISH FLASH AND A HERRING YIELDED COLTON ADAMS HIS FIRST EVER CHINOOK AT BUOY 10 BEFORE IT CLOSED FOR FALL KING RETENTION IN MID-AUGUST. (MIKE KELLY’S GUIDE SERVICE VIA BUZZ RAMSEY)

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Elochoman River – 6 bank anglers kept 1 steelhead.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – 1 boat/2 rods had no catch.

Above the I-5 Br – 5 bank rods had no catch. 13 boats/33 rods kept 20 steelhead, released 5 steelhead and 2 Chinook.

Lewis River – 4 bank anglers had no catch.

Wind River – 1 boat/1 rod had no catch.

Drano Lake –11 boats/25 rods kept 9 Chinook.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Klickitat above #5 Fishway – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Pikeminnow Sport – Reward Fishery Program:

The program operates from May 1 to September 30 in the lower Columbia River (mouth to Priest Rapids Dam) and the Snake River (mouth to Hells Canyon Dam). http://www.pikeminnow.org/

Lower Columbia Mainstem Sport Aug. 19-25

Salmon and steelhead:

Bonneville bank: 45 anglesr with 1 adult Chinook and three jacks kept
Camas/Washougal bank: 4 anglers with nothing
I-5 area bank: No report
Vancouver bank: 110 anglers with 4 adult Chinook kept
Woodland bank: 171 anglers with 12 adult Chinook kept
Kalama bank: 392 anglers with 40 adult Chinook and 2 jacks kept and 1 jack released
Longview bank: 111 anglers with 2 adult Chinook kept
Cathlamet bank: 3 anglers with nothing
Private boats/bank: No report

Bonneville boat: No report
Camas/Washougal boat: 61 anglers with 7 adult Chinook and 1 jack kept and 1 adult Chinook and 1 jack released
I-5 area boat: 3 anglers with nothing
Vancouver boat: 201 anglers with 18 adult Chinook and 1 jack and 1 coho kept and 1 jack and 2 coho released
Woodland boat: 57 anglers with 2 adult Chinook kept
Kalama boat: 240 anglers with 33 adult Chinook and 1 jack and 1 coho kept, and 2 adult Chinook and 2 coho released
Cowlitz boat: 153 anglers with 43 adult Chinook and 4 jacks kept and 2 coho released
Longview boat: 136 anglers with 8 adult Chinook kept
Cathlamet boat: 139 anglers with 13 adult Chinook kept and 1 jack released
Private boats/bank: 4 anglers with nothing

Sturgeon:

Vancouver boat: 2 anglers with nothing
Kalama boat: 5 anglers with 15 oversize released
Cathlamet boat: 3 anglers with nothing

Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Fishery Update (Aug 19-25)

Fishing for fall chinook continues to be slow this month with very light effort. From August 19 through August 25, WDFW staff interviewed anglers from 40 boats (109 anglers) with 6 adult chinook, 3 jacks, and 1 coho. An estimated 32 adult chinook, 16 chinook jacks, and 5 coho were harvested. In addition, 11 jack chinook and 25 sockeye were caught and released. Boats averaged 1/4 salmon per boat, 47 hours per fish.

For the season there have been 900 angler trips with 66 adult chinook, 40 chinook jacks, and 5 coho harvested.

Fall chinook counts at Bonneville and McNary picked up this past week and are running slightly above last year’s numbers. Roughly 2,000 adult chinook per day are passing through Bonneville. McNary counts are still slow with 300-400 per day passing by the end of this past week.  As of Aug 25, 3,187 adult fall chinook have passed McNary compared to 2,817 in 2018.

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SW WA, Lower Columbia Fishing Report (8-14-19)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Elochoman River– 1 bank angler had no catch.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – 1 boat/4 rods had no catch.

Above the I-5 Br – 31 bank rods kept 25 steelhead. 27 boats/73 rods kept 37 steelhead and released 3 steelhead.

NATE SCANLON BEAMS WITH PRIDE AT HIS MOM LARA AND HER ESTIMATED 30-POUND UPRIVER BRIGHT, CAUGHT IN THE BUOY 10 FISHERY ON AUG. 7 JUST ABOVE THE ASTORIA-MEGLER BRIDGE. THEY WERE FISHING WITH GUIDE JOEL HENLEY AND TROLLING A GREEN-LABEL CUTPLUG BEHIND A CUSTOMIZED FISH FLASH AND 14 OUNCES OF WEIGHT TO KEEP THE SETUP “HUGGING THE BOTTOM.” (ANVILOUTDOORS.COM)

Tacoma Power employees recovered 121 summer-run steelhead adults, 68 spring Chinook adults, one spring Chinook jack, 62 spring Chinook mini-jacks, and two Cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released nine spring Chinook adults into the Cispus River located near Randle and they released six spring Chinook adults and two Cutthroat trout at the Franklin Bridge release site in Packwood.

To date, Tacoma Power employees have recycled 606 summer-run steelhead to the lower Cowlitz River.

Kalama River – 23 bank anglers had no catch.

Lewis River – 26 bank anglers kept 3 steelhead and released 1 Chinook jack. 3 boats/8 rods released 4 Chinook.

Drano Lake – 5 boats/7 rods kept 1 Chinook jack and released 1 steelhead.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – No anglers sampled.

Klickitat above #5 Fishway – No anglers sampled.

Trout:

Merrill Lake – Fishing has been good for rainbow and cutthroat, some browns are being caught.

Catchable Trout Plants:

Lake/Pond Date Species Number Fish/lb Hatchery

MAYFIELD RES (LEWIS) August 6, 2019 Rainbow 2,680 1.34 EELLS SPRINGS

MAYFIELD RES (LEWIS) July 28, 2019 Rainbow 2,648 1.32 EELLS SPRINGS

MAYFIELD RES (LEWIS) July 24, 2019 Rainbow 2,786 1.39 EELLS SPRINGS

GOOSE LK (SKAM) July 18, 2019 Rainbow 1,644 2.30 GOLDENDALE

Warmwater:

Lacamas Lake – Bass and yellow perch fishing has been excellent.

Rowland Lake – Anglers have been catching some bluegill and pumpkinseed.

Swofford Pond – Bass and channel catfish fishing has been excellent.

Pikeminnow Sport – Reward Fishery Program:

The program operates from May 1 to September 30 in the lower Columbia River (mouth to Priest Rapids Dam) and the Snake River (mouth to Hells Canyon Dam). http://www.pikeminnow.org/

Buoy 10 

Date Number
of Boats
Number
of Anglers
Chinook
Kept
Coho
Kept
Comments
1-Aug 35 85 3 3 Opener
2-Aug 40 100 7 7  
3-Aug 192 505 45 34  
4-Aug 128 338 35 22  
5-Aug 73 180 47 30  
6-Aug 86 212 85 45  
7-Aug 0 0 0 0 Not Sampled
8-Aug 114 287 129 82  
9-Aug 35 97 31 27  
10-Aug 264 756 217 143  
11-Aug 334 997 82 66  

 

Lower Columbia Mainstem Sport Aug. 5-11

Salmon and steelhead:

Bonneville bank: 14 anglers with nothing
Camas/Washougal bank: 4 anglers with 1 Chinook jack kept
I-5 area bank: No report
Vancouver bank: 23 anglers with nothing
Woodland bank: 50 anglers with 1 Chinook kept
Kalama bank: 42 anglers with nothing
Cowlitz bank: No report
Longview bank: 52 anglers with nothing
Cathlamet bank: 5 anglers with nothing
Private boats/bank: 3 anglers with nothing

Bonneville boat: No report
Camas/Washougal boat: 14 anglers with nothing
I-5 area boat: 7 anglers with nothing
Vancouver boat: 23 anglers with 1 Chinook kept
Woodland boat: 24 anglers with 4 Chinook kept and 1 Chinook released
Kalama boat: 25 anglers with 2 Chinook kept
Cowlitz boat: 24 anglers with 5 Chinook kept and 10 steelhead released
Longview boat: 41 with 1 Chinook kept
Cathlamet boat: No report
Private boats/bank: 11 anglers with 1 Chinook kept and 1 jack released

Sturgeon:

Kalama boat: 2 anglers with 7 sublegals and 1 oversize released
Longview bank: 1 angler with nothing
Longview boat: 3 anglers with 1 sublegal, 2 legals and 1 oversize released

Walleye:

Camas/Washougal boat: 8 anglers with 2 kept and 2 released

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SW WA, Lower Columbia Fishing Report (8-7-19)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Columbia River and Tributary Fishery Reports July 29-Aug. 4, 2019

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Elochoman River:

July 29-31– No anglers sampled.

Aug 1-4 – 8 bank anglers had no catch.

FISHING HAS BEGUN AT BUOY 10, AT THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA, AND THAT’S WHERE BUZZ RAMSEY AND BILL MONROE JR. PICKED UP THIS NICE UPRIVER BRIGHT TROLLING AN ANCHOVY BEHIND A FISH FLASH. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream:

July 29-31– No anglers sampled.

Aug 1-4 – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Above the I-5 Br:

July 29-31– 7 bank rods kept 1 Chinook jack and 1 steelhead. 11 boats/25 rods kept 15 steelhead.

Aug 1-4 – 32 bank rods kept 2 steelhead and released 8 jack Chinook. 27 boats/79 rods kept 35 steelhead.

Tacoma Power employees recovered 228 summer-run steelhead adults, 67 spring Chinook adults, six spring Chinook jacks, 84 spring Chinook mini-jacks, one fall chinook adult, and one cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released nine spring Chinook adults into the Cispus River located near Randle and they released one spring Chinook adult and one spring Chinook jack at the Franklin Bridge release site in Packwood. They also released one fall Chinook adult at Gus Backstrom Park in Morton.

To date, Tacoma Power employees have recycled 579 summer-run steelhead to the lower Cowlitz River.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,110 cubic feet per second on Monday, Aug. 5. Water visibility is 15 feet and the water temperature is 45.9 F.

Kalama River:

July 29-31– No anglers sampled.

Aug 1-4 – 2 bank angler had no catch. 2 boats/3 rods had no catch.

Lewis River:

July 29-31– 5 bank rods had no catch. 1 boat/1 rod had no catch.

Aug 1-4 – 7 bank rods kept 2 steelhead and released 1 Chinook. 1 boat/2 rods released 1 steelhead.

Drano Lake: July 29-31– 10 bank rods had no catch. 30 boats/62 rods kept 11 steelhead and released 55 steelhead.
Aug 1-4 – 6 boats/14 rods kept 2 Chinook, 2 Chinook jacks, released 3 Chinook jacks and 4 steelhead.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – No anglers sampled.

Klickitat above #5 Fishway – No anglers sampled.

Catchable Trout Plants:

Lake/Pond Date Species Number Fish/lb Hatchery

LK MERWIN (COWL) July 14, 2019 Rainbow 1,142 0.80 MERWIN

MAYFIELD RES (LEWIS) July 28, 2019 Rainbow 2,648 1.32 EELLS SPRINGS

MAYFIELD RES (LEWIS) July 24, 2019 Rainbow 2,786 1.39 EELLS SPRINGS

GOOSE LK (SKAM) July 18, 2019 Rainbow 1,644 2.30 GOLDENDALE

Pikeminnow Sport – Reward Fishery Program:

The program operates from May 1 to September 30 in the lower Columbia River (mouth to Priest Rapids Dam) and the Snake River (mouth to Hells Canyon Dam). http://www.pikeminnow.org/

Lower Columbia Mainstem Sport

Salmon and steelhead:

Bonneville bank: 12 anglers with 5 steelhead released
Camas/Washougal bank: No report
I-5 area bank: 4 angler with nothing
Vancouver bank: 59 anglers with 1 steelhead kept and 8 steelhead released
Woodland bank: 30anglers with 2 steelhead released
Kalama bank: 58 anglers with 3 steelhead and 1 adult Chinook kept and 8 steelhead and 1 Chinook jack released
Cowlitz bank: No report
Longview bank: 87anglers with 4 steelhead kept and 8 steelhead released
Cathlamet bank: 17anglers with nothing
Private boats/bank: No report

Bonneville boat: No report
Camas/Washougal boat: No report
I-5 area boat: 4 anglers with nothing
Vancouver boat: 19 anglers with 1 steelhead released
Woodland boat: 6 anglers with 1 steelhead released
Kalama boat: 15 anglers with nothing
Cowlitz boat: 10 anglers with 2 steelhead and 1 Chinook jack released
Longview boat: 27 anglers with 2 steelhead kept and 2 steelhead releasd
Cathlamet boat: No report
Private boats/bank: 10 anglers with 2 steelhead kept and 7 steelhead released

Sturgeon:

Kalama boat: 2 anglers with 36 sublegals (really?) and 4 oversize released
Longview bank: 3 anglers with 1 legal released

Walleye:

Camas/Washougal: 7 anglers with nothing

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