Tag Archives: twin harbors

Washington Razor Clam Bosses Pencil In New Year’s, Midwinter Digs

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

State shellfish managers have proposed the first round of razor clam digs in 2018, starting with the addition of New Year’s Day on two beaches followed by a weeklong dig extending from late January into early February.

A FULL MOON RISES BEHIND A RAZOR CLAM DIGGER AT COPALIS BEACH IN DECEMBER 2017. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will confirm that schedule prior to each dig, provided that upcoming marine toxin tests show the clams are safe to eat.

Under WDFW’s plan, Twin Harbors and Mocrocks beaches will open for digging at noon Jan. 1, extending a dig previously scheduled for New Year’s Eve dig at four ocean beaches. Starting Jan. 28, WDFW then plans to open various beaches for razor-clam digging through Feb. 3.

No digging will be allowed at any beach before noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said the Jan. 1 opening is designed to give families a chance to ring in the new year digging clams on the beach.

“We know that digging razor clams is a New Year’s tradition for many families and we want to help them keep tradition alive,” Ayres said.

That and other digs are proposed on the following beaches, dates and evening low tides:

  • Dec. 31Sunday5:12 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks (previously announced and pending final toxin results)
  • Jan. 1Monday6:02 p.m.; -1.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Jan. 28Sunday4:06 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Mocrocks
  • Jan. 29Monday4:59 p.m.; -1.0 feet; Copalis
  • Jan. 30Tuesday5:47 p.m.; -1.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Jan. 31Wednesday6:33 p.m.; -1.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Feb. 1Thursday7:17 p.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Feb. 2Friday8:00 p.m.; -1.0 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Feb. 3Saturday8:42 p.m.; -0.4; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

Razor Clam Digs Set For Dec. 1-4 At Varying Washington Beaches

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Razor clam diggers will have the opportunity to fill their limits during a four-day dig beginning Dec. 1 on various ocean beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the Dec. 1-4 dig on evening tides after marine toxin tests show the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed before noon.

RAZOR CLAMMERS WORK THE BEACH DURING AN EARLY 2010 SEASON. (JASON BAUER)

Some areas have a mix of both large and small razor clams. Diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig, regardless of size or conditions, to avoid wasting clams, said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for WDFW.

Diggers should also remember to bring a lantern for the digs with later low tides, Ayres said. The best digging typically occurs one to two hours before low tide.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and evening low tides:

Dec. 1, Friday, 4:42 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Copalis

Dec. 2, Saturday, 5:29 p.m.; -1.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Dec. 3, Sunday, 6:15 p.m.; -1.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

Dec. 4, Monday, 7:02 p.m.; -1.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Dec. 31. In the coming weeks, the department also will announce planned digs for January and February, Ayres said.

For more information about recreational razor clamming, visit WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

Get Out Your Calendars! Tentative WA Coast Razor Clam Season Announced

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has announced a tentative schedule for the fall razor clam season set to begin in early October.

Final approval of all scheduled openings will depend on results of marine toxin tests, which are usually conducted about a week before a dig is scheduled to begin.

RAZOR CLAMMERS WORK THE BEACH DURING AN EARLY 2010 SEASON OPENER. (JASON BAUER)

“We’re releasing a tentative schedule to give people plenty of time to make plans to go digging this fall,” said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for WDFW.

State shellfish managers are also seeking public input on management options, including scheduling for spring digs. Comments on the spring digs can be sent via email to razorclams@dfw.wa.gov.

A summary of last season and an overview of the recently completed razor clam stock assessment are available in WDFW’s 2017-18 Razor Clam Management Plan at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fi…/shellfish/razorclams/seasons_set.html.

Based on beach surveys conducted this summer, WDFW estimates the total razor clam population on Washington’s beaches has decreased significantly from last season, which means fewer days of digging this season.

Ayres said the decline in clam populations was likely caused, at least in part, by an extended period of low salinity in surf zone ocean waters, particularly those near Long Beach and Twin Harbors.

“The total number of clams may be down this year, but we still expect good digging on most beaches,” Ayres said.

Proposed razor clam digs through December are listed below, along with evening low tides and beaches:

· Oct. 6, Friday, 7:49 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

· Oct. 7, Saturday, 8:33 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

· Nov. 2, Thursday, 6:03 p.m.; 0.1 feet; Copalis

· Nov. 3, Friday, 6:47 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

· Nov. 4, Saturday, 7:31 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

· Nov. 5, Sunday, 7:16 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

· Dec. 1, Friday, 4:42 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Copalis

· Dec. 2, Saturday, 6:49 p.m.; -1.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

· Dec. 3, Sunday, 6:15 p.m.; -1.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

· Dec. 4, Monday, 7:02 p.m.; -1.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

· Dec. 31, Sunday, 5:12 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

Twin Harbors Opening Tomorrow For Start Of 5-day Razor Clam dig

THE FOLLOWING IS A WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

State shellfish managers have given the OK for a five-day razor clam dig at Twin Harbors starting April 5, and have tentatively scheduled the beach to open again later this month.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the opening after marine toxin tests showed clams at Twin Harbors are safe to eat.

RAZOR CLAMMING WAS THE SUBJECT OF AN ARTICLE BY BRIAN ROBERTSON IN THE APRIL 2016 ISSUE OF NORTHWEST SPORTSMAN MAGAZINE. (BRIAN ROBERTSON)

Razor clam diggers should be aware that the first four days of the dig are on evening tides, whereas the last day’s dig is on a morning tide, said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for WDFW.

“We know diggers are looking forward to returning to Twin Harbors and we are happy to announce these new opportunities,” Ayres said.

The first four days of digging are approved on the following dates and evening low tides:

  • April 5, Wednesday, 3:06 p.m.; 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 6, Thursday, 4:08 p.m.; 0.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 7, Friday, 5:01 p.m.; 0.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 8, Saturday, 5:46 p.m.; 0.4 feet; Twin Harbors

The fifth day of digging will be conducted on morning tides, as will other digs through the end of the season:

  • April 9, Sunday, 6:25 a.m.; 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

State shellfish managers also added Twin Harbors to a tentatively scheduled dig in mid-April that includes openings at Copalis and Mocrocks. The planned opening depends on the results of marine toxin tests, which generally take place about a week before the dig is scheduled.

The proposed razor clam digs, along with morning low tides and beaches, are listed below

  • April 12, Wednesday, 8:08 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 13, Thursday, 8:43 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 14, Friday, 9:18 a.m.; 0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 15, Saturday, 9:55 a.m.; 0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 16, Sunday, 10:36 a.m., 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Long Beach remains closed to digging, Ayres noted. However, the beach could open soon if the next round of toxin testing shows the clams there are safe to eat.

During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand on the southern section of Twin Harbors beach and at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula. The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and “horns.”

To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line.

More details on how to avoid disturbing nesting birds can be found on the WDFW’s webs