Tag Archives: togo pack

WDFW Investigates Stevens Co. Depredations; Wolves Reported Back In Profanity Peak Area

Things are getting busy again in Northeast Washington, home to the most wolves in the state and increasing efforts to keep them from tangling with livestock.

On the heels of May 20’s confirmed wolf depredation in northern Ferry County, state wildlife managers investigated a dead calf in neighboring Stevens County last Friday.

They found that wolves had scavenged on the carcass, but there were “no indicators” the predators had killed the calf, so the loss went down as an “unconfirmed cause of death.”

WOLVES HAVE TURNED UP AGAIN IN THE PROFANITY PEAK AREA OF NORTHERN FERRY COUNTY, WHERE THIS ONE WAS PHOTOGRAPHED IN SEPTEMBER 2014. (WDFW)

WDFW reported that the producer has been using deterrents such as human presence, flagged fencing and trail cameras to keep watch on livestock. They were also provided with fox lights, horns, fireworks and a state-contracted range rider to “help reduce wolf activity.”

The agency also said this month it had investigated at least three other dead or injured Stevens County calves and sheep, classifying them as bear and cougar attacks and a nondepredation event.

Attempts to catch the bruin and lion were unsuccessful, WDFW reported.

Staffers also checked on a report of missing cattle in Stevens County but found none.

Also in the county in May, biologists spent time trying to catch Huckleberry Pack wolves to get telemetry on them, but were unsuccessful.

In June they hope to put collars on members of the Lookout, Grouse Flats, Beaver Creek and Togo Packs. The Togos were involved with the aforementioned confirmed calf depredation in Ferry County a week and a half ago.

State and county wolf works also discovered new wolf activity in the Profanity Peak region, to the south of the Togos’ initial range dot and where seven members of a pack that preyed on more than a dozen cattle were lethally removed in 2016.

They’ll be working with local producers to get ahead of potential conflicts as turnout on federal grazing allotments in the Kettle Range begins, WDFW reports.

And biologists will be following up on recent reports from the Central and South Cascades. The latter area is where dung detection dogs will be used as well to try and find wolves.

Northern Ferry Co. Wolf Pack Kills Calf

A northern Ferry County wolf or wolves killed a young calf early this week as a new pack appears to have resumed its livestock-chasing ways.

Washington wildlife managers believes the Togo Pack is responsible for this depredation as well as two early last November that resulted in an injured and a dead calf.

Another wolf was shot in the area late last October after being caught by a producer in the act of pursuing cattle.

A WDFW MAP SHOWS WHERE THE TOGO PACK IS BELIEVED TO BE CENTERED IN NORTHERN FERRY COUNTY. (WDFW)

The latest incident occurred north of Orient, a small community along the lower Kettle River, and was discovered by a woodcutter who heard a cow bawling and observed a black-coated wolf running from the scene.

The producer was alerted and told WDFW that the calf had been seen alive earlier that day.

It was described as a week-and-a-half old black Angus owned by Ron Eslick and was found dead on federal ground about a third of a mile from the rancher’s brother’s residence, according to a Capital Press story.

The carcass was necropsied by a state official as well as a local county wildlife specialist.

“The investigators found that the calf had bite lacerations and puncture wounds to both rear quarters, upper rear legs, neck and sternum, consistent with predation by a wolf. Hemorrhaging was visible near the bite wounds and was also found in the left front armpit, where no lacerations or punctures were visible. Evidence indicated the calf was alive during the depredation event,” WDFW reported.

“A lot of the quarters were eaten off,” Eslick told the Press. “If we had come two hours later, it would have been eaten and nobody would have known anything about it.”

According to WDFW, the producer had been using at least one proactive deterrence measure, checking on their animals daily.

The agency’s depredation protocols require at least two to be used and to have failed before lethal removal is considered.

Later on Sunday, a range rider was put on the job of keeping the Togos and cattle apart.

Last November’s two qualifying depredations occurred despite multiple deterrents being employed.

WDFW can go after problem wolves if there are four attacks in a rolling 10-month period or three in 30 days, with various criteria.

The Togo Pack is a new one and local reports last year helped WDFW confirm it.

It had two members at the end of 2017 and is named for a nearby mountain in the northern Kettle Range.