Tag Archives: teanaway pack

Eastside Reps’ Wolf Bill OKed By US House Committee

A bill federally delisting gray wolves in the western two-thirds of Washington and Oregon as well as elsewhere in the Lower 48 has been approved by a Congressional committee.

A WOLF NEAR WENATCHEE TAKES A LOOK AT A SHERIFF’S DEPUTY. (CHELAN COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE)

The Manage Our Wolves Act received a 19-15 vote before the House Natural Resources Committee during markup yesterday.

The legislation is cosponsored by two Eastern Washington Republicans, Dan Newhouse of the Yakima Valley and Cathy McMorris Rodgers of the Spokane area, and Wisconsin Rep. Sean Duffy.

“The best-available science used by the U.S. Department of Interior and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows that the gray wolf has recovered and is no longer endangered,” said Newhouse in a statement.

He’s previously introduced wolf bills as WDFW has been encouraging him to push the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to complete its delisting of the species.

In a midspring letter to the lawmaker, the state agency’s Acting Director Joe Stohr wrote that “(to) ensure ongoing success in wolf recovery, the federal listing needs to keep pace with the on-the ground (sic) recovery status and allow the state to fully implement its management plan.”

Most Washington wolves are in the state’s northeast corner, but at least three packs run west of the delisting line, Highways 97, 17 and 395.

The bifurcated status of wolves in the state means that “the only means available for the USFWS to address wolf-livestock conflicts in the geographic area under the federal endangered designation is for the USFWS to attempt to relocated livestock-killing wolves,” Stohr wrote.

In midsummer, the Teanaway Pack, which runs in the still federally listed portion of Central Washington, injured a calf and an adult sheep, killed an ewe and was probably responsible for a missing lamb.

Gray wolves were proposed for delisting by the Obama Administration in 2013, but progress stalled, and then came a Humane Society of the United States court case addressing Canis lupus in the western Great Lakes that blocked USFWS from moving ahead on its full proposal.

There was little movement on that front until in June USFWS said it was again assessing wolf populations and, “(if) appropriate, the Service will publish a proposal to revise the wolf’s status in the Federal Register by the end of the calendar year.”

It would then undergo public review.

Newhouse’s and McMorris Rodgers’ bill would preclude a delisting from judicial review. It needs to pass the full House and Senate and be signed into law.

Both representatives are up for reelection this fall, with Newhouse likely to retain his seat but McMorris Rodgers in a tighter race, if Fivethirtyeight’s forecast is any indication.

New Report Details Teanaway Wolf Depredations

Wolves in Central Washington killed one sheep, injured another as well as a calf, and probably killed a lamb earlier this summer.

The separate incidents involving the Teanaway Pack and two different livestock producers’ animals occurred a month ago or more but details didn’t emerge until this afternoon with WDFW’s August monthly gray wolf update.

A WDFW MAP SHOWS THE RANGE OF THE TEANAWAY PACK OF NORTHERN KITTITAS, SOUTHWEST CHELAN AND NORTHEAST KING COUNTIES. (WDFW)

According to the agency, the injured calf was reported July 31 and recovered the next day by the producer.

An exam determined its injuries had come from one or more wolves, and it led the rancher to move his cattle to another part of his grazing allotment on the Teanaway Community Forest.

Then, a week and a half later, a WDFW range rider alerted wolf managers to a possible depredation on Forest Service land.

Lacerations and puncture wounds on an injured and a dead sheep, along with telemetry data that put the Teanaway wolves nearby, led to the attack being classified as a confirmed wolf depredation.

A lamb from the flock was also determined to be missing.

WDFW reports that the shepherd moved the sheep to another part of the allotment and that many different conflict prevention tactics had been taken to minimize conflicts.

“(The producer) delayed entry onto the allotment until July, after wild ungulates are born. A sheepherder stays with the sheep at all times, accompanied by five herding dogs and three guarding dogs. The sheep are gathered tightly together each night and guarded by the dogs, the sheepherder, two Foxlights, and a Radio Activated Guard (RAG) programmed to trigger when a collared wolf approaches the sheep. Additionally, sick and injured sheep are removed from the allotment. The sheepherder, range rider, and WDFW actively haze wolves with human presence, air horns, and gunfire when they are detected near the sheep,” the agency stated.

A cursory search suggests the depredations are the first for the Teanaway Pack since two in 2015.

Wolves in this portion of Washington are still federally listed and WDFW only considers lethal removals in the delisted eastern third of the state.

The news follows recent confirmed and probable depredations by two different packs in northern Ferry County — the Togos and “the Unnamed pack using the old Profanity territory” — and the removal of the Togo’s breeding male.

WDFW’s monthly update also details August nonlethal work around Northeast Washington packs including Carpenter Ridge, Dirty Shirt, Goodman, Huckleberry, Leadpoint and Smackout.

Also, WDFW appears to have posted a new map for the Teanaway wolves as well. It shows an expanded territory that stretches from the Teanaway Valley north to nearly Stevens Pass.

WDFW Reports On June Wolf Work

June was relatively quiet on Washington’s wolf scene, according to state managers’ monthly report.

WDFW reports capturing two wolves last month, adult males in the Togo and Profanity Peak ranges, and say there were no confirmed livestock depredations as producers moved more than 1,000 cow-calf pairs as well as sheep herds onto Eastside grazing allotments.

DEPREDATION INVESTIGATORS WERE UNABLE TO DETERMINE A CAUSE OF DEATH FOR A PEND OREILLE COUNTY CALF, THE BONES OF WHICH WERE DISCOVERED LAST MONTH. THE CARCASS OF ANOTHER CALF IN NEIGHBORING STEVENS COUNTY WAS ALSO TOO FAR GONE TO FIGURE OUT WHY IT HAD DIED. (WDFW)

They did investigate nine calf, sheep and goat kills in Northeast Washington and King County, finding them to be victims of cougar or, in the latter case, coyote or domestic dog attacks, or that the scenes lacked enough evidence to make any determination of cause of death.

Managers outlined a range of proactive deterrent measures being used on 10 packs, mostly in the state’s wolfy northeastern corner, and said direct hazing was used on the Dirty Shirt and Smackout Packs.

The latter pack has one depredation in the last 10 months; four within a rolling 10-month period (or three within 30 days) could lead to consideration of lethal removals under agreed-to protocols.

The pack closest to that mark is the Togos, which have three since last November 2, which means Sept. 2 is the key date to remember with those two animals.

The Smackouts key date is Aug. 9.

Yesterday saw the expiration of a 10-month window in the Blue Mountains following a Sept. 2 attack on a cow-calf pair by an unknown wolf or wolves.

In Central Washington’s Kittitas County, interactions between the Teanaway Pack and grazing cattle were closely monitored by WDFW and a producer.

The agency also reported it attempted to trap and collar wolves in the Lookout, Huckleberry and Grouse Flats ranges but without success, and planned to try in the Beaver Creek, Five Sisters and Leadpoint Pack boundaries as well.

Following up on public reports, biologists poked around south of I-90 but couldn’t find any tracks or sign.

Still, WDFW “encourages” people to post sightings to its database, saying they “can be very helpful in locating new packs on the landscape.” Confirming wolves in the South Cascades is key to moving toward state delisting goals.