Tag Archives: spring chinook

‘Next Steps’ In Columbia Salmon Reforms Subject Of ODFW-WDFW Commissioners Meeting; Open To Public

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRESS RELEASES FROM THE WASHINGTON AND OREGON DEPARTMENTS OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

WDFW

The public is invited to attend a meeting scheduled this month by members of the Washington and Oregon fish and wildlife commissions to discuss next steps in reforming salmon management on the Columbia River.

GUIDE BOB REES NETS A FALL CHINOOK AT THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA. THE “NEXT STEPS” IN SALMON REFORMS ON THE BIG RIVER WILL BE DISCUSSED BY FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMISSIONERS FROM BOTH STATES IN SALEM. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The meeting is set for Jan. 17 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission Room, 4034 Fairview Industrial Dr. S.E. in Salem, Ore. The public is welcome to observe the discussion, but will not have an opportunity to comment during the meeting.

The Joint-State Columbia River Salmon Fishery Policy Review Committee, which includes three members of each state’s commission, was formed to renew efforts to achieve management goals for Columbia River fisheries endorsed by both states in 2013.

The three delegates to the workgroup from the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission are commissioners David Graybill from Chelan County, Bob Kehoe from King County, and Don McIsaac from Clark County. The commission is a citizen panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

WDFW recently finalized its five-year performance review of the 2013 fishery reform policy, which called for reforms ranging from requirements that anglers use barbless hooks to a phase-out of commercial gillnets in the main channel of the Columbia River. While the performance review noted progress on some issues, expectations have not been met in a variety of other key areas, said Ryan Lothrop, WDFW Columbia River policy coordinator.

“This new effort is designed to find common ground on strategies for improving fishery management in the Columbia River,” Lothrop said. “Having different policies in joint waters of the Columbia River makes it very difficult to manage and implement fisheries.”

Washington’s Comprehensive Evaluation of the Columbia River Basin Salmon Management Policy is available on WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/02029/.

Lothrop, who will staff Washington’s commissioners, said the workgroup’s first task will be to establish a schedule for future meetings. The panel will then discuss issues addressed in the policy review, focusing initially on strategies that could to be incorporated into fishing regulations for the 2019 season.

To take effect, any new proposals endorsed by the workgroup would require approval by the full fish and wildlife commissions in each state, Lothrop said.

“The group doesn’t have a lot of time to discuss changes for 2019,” Lothrop said. “The season-setting process for this year’s salmon fisheries gets underway in mid-March, so that’s the focus for the near term.”

………………………..

ODFW

A joint workgroup of commissioners from the Oregon and Washington fish and wildlife commissions will meet to discuss policies affecting Columbia River salmon fisheries. The workgroup includes three members from each state’s commission.

The meeting is scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 17 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Commission room at the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Headquarters, 4034 Fairview Industrial Dr. SE, Salem. The meeting is open to attendance by the public, but no public testimony will be taken.

The workgroup meeting follows a November 2018 joint meeting of the two full Commissions to discuss differences between the current policies of each state. The workgroup’s first task will be to establish a schedule and process for future meetings. The workgroup will then begin discussion of issues, initially focusing on finding common ground for 2019 fishing seasons.

The workgroup meetings are not decision-making meetings. The workgroups will report back to their full Commissions, who will ultimately consider any changes to their respective policies.

2019 Columbia Spring And Summer Chinook, Sockeye Forecasts Out

One of 2019’s first Northwest salmon forecasts was quietly posted late last week, a not-so-stellar prediction for Columbia spring and summer Chinook as well as sockeye.

According to ODFW and WDFW, the big river will see an overall run of 157,500 springers, 35,900 summer kings, and 99,300 of the red salmon.

A COLUMBIA RIVER ANGLER SIZES UP HIS SPRING CHINOOK DURING 2016’S RUN. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

All of those figures are well below 10-year averages but should come as no surprise given recent ocean conditions.

Expectations for next year’s first salmon runs of the year were essentially set all the way back in 2017 when federal fishery overseers warned that that spring’s offshore survey of juvenile Columbia salmon foresoothed poor 2018 returns continuing into 2019.

Still, some individual stocks are expected to hold steady or even improve slightly this coming season.

And things may improve down the road as 2018’s spring ocean sampling did find above-average numbers of coho and average to just slightly below average numbers of Chinook. That might translate into better silver fishing this summer and for springers and summer kings in 2020.

“Stay hopeful” was Liz Hamilton’s reaction last Friday when asked about this year’s adult numbers.

The executive director of the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association pointed to a linkage between spring spill down the Columbia hydropower system to benefit outmigrating smolts and subsequent increased adult spring returns in past years.

“The ocean isn’t as quite as good as it was then, and the high waters of the last two springs weren’t quite as high, but we do have a court order for spill that we didn’t have then combined with more fish to start with. And if we win our battle for more spring spill, you’ll see even better smolt to adult returns, as much as two to three times improved!” she said.

Hamilton is among the state fishery managers and industry officials who are meeting today at 1 p.m. in Clackamas to go over 2019’s figures, the first steps as we move towards setting the seasons in midwinter.

As for the forecasts, those are:

Columbia springers (all runs, SAFE to Central Idaho): 157,500, down 91,000 from the overall 2018 forecast and 20,000 fewer than the actual return; just over half of the 10-year average and would be the lowest since 2007 if it returns as predicted

Willamette: 40,200, one of the lowest forecasts in 10 years but above 2018’s actual return; 10-year average is 64,900

Sandy: 5,500, slightly more than 2018’s forecast and more than actually came back last year

Cowlitz, Kalama, Lewis: 4,300 (1,300, 1,400, 1,600), the lowest forecast this millennium; 10-year average is 15,300

Mid-Columbia (Wind, Drano, Hood, Klickitat, Yakima, Umatilla): 40,000, slightly up from 2018 and 5,000-plus fish more than actually returned

Upriver (Upper Columbia, Snake springs and summers): 99,300, 60 percent of last year’s preseason forecast and 16,000 fewer than actually returned; would be the fewest since 2007; 10-year average is 204,500

Upper Columbia summer Chinook: 35,900, down from the 2018 forecast of 67,300 and actual return of 42,120; would be lowest since 2000

Columbia, Snake sockeye: 94,400, down somewhat from 2018’s forecast; includes 74,500 to the Okanogan/Okanagan and 18,300 to Lake Wenatchee; overall, less than a third of the 10-year average

The caveat to that last one is that sockeye have proven somewhat tough to reliably forecast. Last year’s prediction didn’t allow for Columbia fisheries, but when the run came in twice as large, managers were able to open a season.

Columbia spring Chinook seasons are typically set by late February, usually with a 30 percent upriver runsize buffer to guard against an unexpectedly low return. Managers can add additional fishing time if angling is slower than expected or the midseason update is better than expected.

Groundbreaking Set For $16.4 Million Puyallup Hatchery Renovation Project

Washington fish and wildlife officials, local tribal representatives and state lawmakers will break ground tomorrow to mark the start of a $16.4 million renovation of the historic Puyallup Hatchery.

THE FACADE OF THE PUYALLUP HATCHERY REFLECTS THE ERA IT WAS BUILT IN, THE YEARS RIGHT AFTER WORLD WAR II. THE FACILITY WILL UNDERGO A $16.4 MILLION RENOVATION THAT WILL INCREASE TROUT, SALMON AND STEELHEAD CAPACITY TO SUPPORT SPORTFISHING AND CONSERVATION PROGRAMS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The remodel will increase salmon and trout production at the facility built in the 1940s, resulting in more sport opportunity, as well as support conservation programs in the watershed.

WDFW says the project will allow them to rear an extra 50,000 rainbow trout, along with 800,000 spring Chinook, 300,000 coho and 200,000 steelhead at the facility.

The coho represent new capacity and will be adipose-fin clipped, according to agency hatchery manager Eric Kinne.

A WDFW WORKER CLEANS A RACEWAY AT THE PUYALLUP HATCHERY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The springers are for release at the White River acclimation ponds and are part of a restoration program, he says. They’re marked with a ventral clip.

Details on the steelhead are “still being worked out,” Kinne says.

Salmon production will begin in fall 2019, when work at the site is expected to wrap up.

NETS AND A SIPHON HANG ON THE WALL OF THE PUYALLUP HATCHERY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Funding comes from the state Capital Budget and sale of general obligation bonds, according to WDFW. Puyallup’s Prospect Construction won the construction bid.

The groundbreaking is scheduled for 5 p.m. at the hatchery, 1416 14th Street SW, Puyallup, just southwest of the state fairgrounds and along lower Clarks Creek. The public is welcome.

A HATCHERY WORKER SETS A METAL FENCE IN PLACE TO CORRAL RAINBOW TROUT IN A REARING POND AT THE PUYALLUP HATCHERY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

SW WA, Columbia Fishing Report (6-25-18)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT ORIGINATED WITH WDFW AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

BONUS FACTOIDS – The 4.9 million shad counted at Bonneville Dam through June 24th are the second highest on record.  The record are the 5.06 million fish counted through June 24, 2004.  However, this year’s run still remains strong with 262,000-380,000 shad counted daily at the dam this past week.  The record total of nearly 5.4 million fish counted in 2004 could fall in the next couple days!

A BIG RUN OF SHAD YIELDED WHAT’S BELIEVED TO BE THE SECOND HIGHEST SPORT CATCH SINCE 1969. (ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS)

The nearly 91,000 sockeye counted at Bonneville Dam through June 24 have almost met the pre-season forecast of 99,000 fish for 2018.  In fact, they are the 7th highest on record thru June 24th!

Salmon/Steelhead

Elochoman River – 15 bank anglers kept 6 steelhead.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream:  6 bank rods had no catch.  Above the I-5 Br:  5 bank rods had no catch.   51 boat rods kept 26 steelhead.

Kalama River – 8 bank anglers had no catch.Lewis River (mainstem) – 3 boat anglers kept 1 steelhead.

Wind River – 3 boat rods had no catch.

Drano Lake – 9 boat rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook and 1 steelhead.

Wind River and Drano Lake – At Wind River, June 30 is the last day to fish for spring Chinook above Shipherd Falls. It is also the last day for the two-poles, boat limits, and barbed hooks for both Wind River and Drano Lake. Drano Lake will be open 7 days per week beginning July 1 and the bank only area near the mouth will be open for boats.

Klickitat River – 2 bank anglers had no catch.

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Megler-Astoria Bridge upstream to Bonneville Dam – Since the hatchery adult summer Chinook opener on June 22, bank anglers from Kalama upstream are catching some fish; boat anglers are catching fish more spread throughout the lower river.  Almost equal numbers of summer steelhead are also being handled.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Light 85 line downstream – Light effort and catch during the current catch-and-release only fishery.

Trout

4,500 catchable size rainbow trout were planted in Mayfield Lake on June 20.  No report on angling success.

Shad

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Based on mainly incomplete trips, bank anglers just below the dam averaged 4 shad per rod while boat anglers averaged nearly 14 fish per rod based on completed trips the past few days.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (6-12-18)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT ORIGINATED WITH ODFW AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Current & Upcoming Fishing Opportunities:

*         Spring Chinook angling is open through Friday June 15 to both boat and bank anglers from Tongue Point upstream to Bonneville Dam; and from Tower Island Power Lines upstream to the Oregon/Washington border above McNary Dam, plus the banks only between Bonneville Dam and Tower Island Power Lines.  The bag limit is two adult salmonids.

*         Angling for shad is open from Buoy 10 upstream to Bonneville Dam.

CONNOR THUN SHOWS OFF A LOWER COLUMBIA STURGEON HE CAUGHT ON — GET THIS — PEANUT BUTTER AND SAND SHRIMP. (VIA BUZZ RAMSEY)

*         White sturgeon retention is closed from Buoy 10 upstream to McNary Dam but remains an option for catch and released fishing.  Anglers are reminded that spawning sanctuaries are in effect (see special regulations for details).

*         On Friday June 15, Bonneville and The Dalles pools will be open to the retention of white sturgeon (see special regulations for details).

*         The McNary Pool is open to the retention of legal white sturgeon through July 31.  Anglers are reminded that spawning sanctuaries are in effect (see special regulations details).

*         Walleye angling is good in The Dalles and John Day pools.

Columbia River regulation updates for salmon, steelhead, shad and sturgeon can be found above.

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

Salmonid angling effort was low this past weekend, most likely due to the poor weather conditions.   Boat anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.33 Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing the Westport to Buoy 10 area averaged 0.09 steelhead caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.06 Chinook and 0.10 steelhead caught per angler.

Gorge Bank: Weekly checking showed five adult Chinook kept for 22 bank anglers; and weekend checking of shad anglers showed 2,564 shad kept, plus 51 shad released for 191 shad anglers.

Gorge Boats (below Beacon Rock): Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook kept for three salmonid boats (11 anglers); and 685 shad kept for 11 shad boats (33 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for one salmonid boat (three anglers); and no catch for one shad boat (two anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed three adult Chinook and five steelhead kept for 52 bank anglers.

Portland to St. Helens Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for four salmonid boats (nine anglers).

Goble to Beaver (Clatskanie) Boats: No report.

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank: No report.

Westport to Buoy 10 Boats: Weekend checking showed one steelhead released for four boats (11 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for five bank anglers.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed one adult Chinook kept for 11 bank anglers.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed one adult Chinook released for six bank anglers; and four adult Chinook kept for eight boats (21 anglers).

STURGEON

Gorge Boats:  Closed for retention. No report.

Troutdale Boats:  Closed for retention. No report.

Portland to Wauna Powerlines:  Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed eight sublegal sturgeon released for one boat (four anglers).

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank:  Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed one legal white sturgeon kept for 17 bank anglers.

Buoy 10 to Wauna Powerlines Boats:  Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed 139 legal white sturgeon kept, plus 244 sublegal, 253 oversize and two green sturgeon released for 121 boats (401 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Closed for retention.  No report.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Closed for retention.  No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Closed for retention.  No report.

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool: No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 53 walleye kept for 11 boats (23 anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one bank angler; and 152 walleye kept, plus seven walleye released for 16 boats (43 anglers).

States Add Columbia Springer, Sturgeon Days

THE FOLLOWING IS ODFW PR

Fishery managers from Oregon and Washington extended the ongoing recreational spring Chinook fishing season on the lower Columbia River, set a one-day white sturgeon season  in the estuary, and approved a two-fish bag limit on Chinook above Bonneville Dam today during a joint state hearing.

Andy Schneider holds a Columbia Estuary Sturgeon caught on a recent retention day. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

 Downstream of Bonneville Dam, the states approved a nine-day extension to the ongoing spring Chinook season starting June 7 and continuing through June 15. The effective area is from the Tongue Point/Rocky Point line up to the boat and bank deadlines near Bonneville Dam. The bag limit is up to two adult salmonids (Chinook, coho, or steelhead) per day, and only hatchery fish may be kept.

From Bonneville Dam upstream to the OR/WA border, the ongoing spring Chinook season was modified to allow fishermen to keep two adult hatchery Chinook per day instead of one beginning June 7.

The spring Chinook seasons were approved in light of catch and fish passage information that affirmed a previous forecast of 116,500 upriver spring Chinook returning to the river mouth, leaving additional fish for harvest.

Fishery managers from the two states also set a one-day white sturgeon retention season for Saturday, June 9, ending at 2 p.m. on that day. The open area is the mainstem Columbia River from Wauna powerlines downstream to the river mouth at Buoy 10, including Youngs Bay and all adjacent Washington tributaries.

The legal size slot for this fishery is 44-inch minimum and 50-inch maximum fork length, with a daily bag limit of one fish and an annual limit of two fish.  Anglers are reminded that green sturgeon may not be retained.  Identification signs have been posted at local launching ramps.

For more information about upcoming Columbia River seasons, including regulation updates, visit ODFW’s online fishing reports atwww.myodfw.com.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (6-5-18)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED WITH ODFW AND WDFW AND WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Estuary [white sturgeon] update

On June 2 and 4, estuary sturgeon anglers made 2,964 trips and kept 660 white sturgeon.

DAVE ANDERSON CAUGHT THIS STURGEON IN THE COLUMBIA ESTUARY OVER THE RECENT HOLIDAY WEEKEND. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

SALMON, STEELHEAD AND SHAD

Salmonid angling was fair this past weekend in the lower Columbia River.  On Saturday’s (6/2) flight, 199 salmonid boats and 237 Oregon bank anglers were counted from Tongue Point to Bonneville Dam.  Boat anglers fishing in the Portland to St. Helens area, averaged 0.09 Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing from Goble to Beaver averaged 0.11 Chinook caught per boat.  Boat anglers fishing in the estuary averaged 0.15 Chinook and 0.22 steelhead caught per boat. Bank anglers fishing in both the gorge averaged 0.07 Chinook caught per bank angler, while anglers fishing the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.07 Chinook and 0.02 steelhead caught per angler.

Gorge Bank:

Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook kept for 15 salmonid anglers; and 693 shad kept for 93 shad anglers.

Gorge Boats (below Beacon Rock):

Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (five anglers).

Troutdale Boats:

Weekend checking showed no catch for 11 salmonid boats (29 anglers); and one shad kept, plus 75 shad released for two boats (four anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank:

Weekend checking showed nine adult Chinook, one jack Chinook and four steelhead kept, plus five adult Chinook released for 208 salmonid anglers; and no catch for one shad angler.

Portland to St. Helens Boats:

Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook kept for 11 salmonid boats (22 anglers); and 14 shad kept for five shad boats (17 anglers).

Goble to Beaver (Clatskanie) Boats:

Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook kept for nine salmonid boats (22 anglers); and 72 shad kept for two shad boats (eight anglers).

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank:

No report.

Westport to Buoy 10 Boats:

Weekend checking showed two adult Chinook, one jack Chinook and eight steelhead kept for 13 boats (36 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam):

No report.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam):

Weekly checking showed four adult Chinook kept for 19 bank anglers.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam):

Weekly checking showed 11 adult Chinook and two jack Chinook kept, plus six adult Chinook released for 56 boats (151 anglers).

STURGEON

Gorge Boats:  Closed for retention.     

No report.

Troutdale Boats:  Closed for retention.

Weekend checking showed five sublegal and two oversize sturgeon released for two boats (five anglers).

Portland to Wauna Powerlines:  Closed for retention.

Weekend checking showed nine sublegal, six legal and 13 oversize sturgeon released for seven boats (24 anglers).

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank:  Closed for retention.

Weekend checking showed one sublegal and three oversize sturgeon released for 19 bank anglers.

Buoy 10 to Wauna Powerlines Boats:  Closed for retention.

Weekend checking showed 195 legal white sturgeon kept, plus 321 sublegal, 294 oversize and two green sturgeon released for 196 boats (675 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam):

Closed for retention.  No report.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam):

Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed two sublegal sturgeon released for three bank anglers.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam):

Closed for retention.  No report.

 

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool:

No report.

The Dalles Pool:

Weekly checking showed 87 walleye kept for 18 boats (36 anglers).

John Day Pool:

Weekly checking showed 146 walleye kept, plus 35 walleye released for 40 boats (97 anglers).

SW WA Fishing Report (6-5-18)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS CONTRIBUTED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Lower Cowlitz River (I-5 Br downstream) – 30 bank rods had no catch.

Upper Cowlitz River (above the I-5 Br.) – 55 bank rods kept 8 adult spring Chinook and 2 steelhead.  31 boat rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook and 14 steelhead.

Kalama River – 12 bank and 3 boat anglers released 1 steelhead.

Lewis River (mainstem) – 4 bank rods had no catch.

Lewis River (North Fork) – 15 bank rods had no catch. 5 boat rods kept 5 spring Chinook.

Wind River (mouth) – 8 boat rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook.

Drano Lake – 40 boat rods kept 16 adult spring Chinook and released 2 adult spring Chinook.

SW WA Fishing Report (5-29-18)

THE FOLLOWING ARE ODFW AND WDFW REPORTS FORWARDED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Estuary WSG Update

From: Jimmy Watts <Jimmy.W.Watts@state.or.us>
Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 2:49 PM
Subject: Estuary WSG Update

Over the Memorial Day Weekend, sturgeon anglers in the estuary made 3,609 trips and kept 466 white sturgeon

DAVE ANDERSON CAUGHT THIS STURGEON IN THE COLUMBIA ESTUARY OVER THE HOLIDAY WEEKEND. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Columbia River Estuary White Sturgeon Sport Update

https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html

TAC meeting – 29 May 2018

The Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) met this morning and after reviewing available information it was agreed that there was insufficient reason to change the run update from last week. So the spring Chinook forecast of upriver Spring Chinook at the Columbia River mouth remains 116,500. TAC expects that LCR harvest estimates from the sport fishery and SAFE fisheries later today, as well as additional information from fish passage at Bonneville will provide a clearer picture at next weeks TAC meeting for consideration of run size.

River flows continue to be very high and preliminary reports indicate river conditions have been suboptimal.

Washington Columbia River mainstem and its tributaries sport sampling summaries for May 21-28

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – (I-5 Br downstream) – 7 bank rods and 1 boat rod had no catch.  Above the I-5 Br. – 64 bank rods kept 12 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook.  12 boat rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook and 1 steelhead.

Last week Tacoma Power employees recovered 34 winter-run steelhead, 134 spring Chinook adults, six spring Chinook jacks, and nine summer-run steelhead during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released one winter-run steelhead into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton and they released three winter-run steelhead into the Cispus River near Yellow Jacket Creek.

Tacoma Power also released five spring Chinook adults and one spring Chinook jack into Lake Scanewa near Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 6,320 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Tuesday, May 29. Water visibility is 14 feet and the water temperature is 48.7 degrees F.

From the Lexington (Sparks) Road Bridge upstream to 400 feet or boundary markers below the barrier dam – From June 1 through July 31, barbed hooks will be allowed for salmon, steelhead, and cutthroats.

Starting June 1, the area that is closed to fishing below the Cowlitz River barrier dam will expand from 100 feet to 400 feet to help increase the number of spring Chinook arriving at the salmon hatchery. We had projected that 5,000 spring Chinook would return to the river this year, but they’re tracking well below that now. Expanding the area that’s closed to fishing will help ensure we can meet hatchery broodstock goals and continue to move fish to the upper Cowlitz watershed for fishing opportunities and reintroduction efforts. The no-fishing zone will be posted with signs until further notice.

East Fork Lewis River from the mouth to 400 feet below Horseshoe Falls (except closures around various falls) and the Washougal River from the mouth to Salmon Falls Bridge – Under permanent rules these areas will be open to fishing with bait for hatchery steelhead beginning the first Saturday in June.

Kalama River – 9 bank and 3 boat anglers had no catch.

Lewis River (mainstem) – 5 bank rods had no catch.  11 boat rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook.

Lewis River (North Fork) – 33 bank rods kept 7 adult spring Chinook and 1 steelhead.  8 boat rods had no catch.

Wind River (mouth) – 3 bank rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook.  96 boat rods kept 32 adult and 2 jack spring Chinook and released 1 adult spring Chinook.

Drano Lake – 145 boat rods kept 53 adult and 2 jack spring Chinook and released 7 adult spring Chinook.

Klickitat River from the mouth (Burlington Northern Railroad Bridge) upstream to the Fisher Hill Bridge and from 400 feet upstream from #5 fishway upstream to the boundary markers below the salmon hatchery – Effective June 1, the salmon daily limit is 6 hatchery Chinook of which no more than two may be adults. In addition, up to 3 hatchery steelhead may be retained. Wild chinook must be released. Open 7 days per week.

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam –  Last week we sampled 495 anglers, including 74 boats, with 32 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook and 16 steelhead.  23 (72%) of the adult Chinook and 14 (88%) of the steelhead were kept.

Fish were caught throughout the river.

Trout

Recent plants of rainbows and cutthroats into SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish per Pound
Hatchery
Notes

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 21, 2018
Cutthroat
3,259
1.88
SKAMANIA HATCHERY

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 21, 2018
Rainbow
1,500
1.3
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Cutthroat
3,237
2.26
SKAMANIA HATCHERY

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
1,700
1.3
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

HORSETHIEF LK (KLIC)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=HORSETHIEF+LK+%28KLIC%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
4,000
2.5
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

LITTL WHITE SALMON R<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LITTL+WHITE+SALMON+R&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
3,022
2.25
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

SPRING CR 30.0106<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SPRING+CR++++30.0106&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
3,030
2.27
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

BATTLE GROUND LK (CLAR)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=BATTLE+GROUND+LK+%28CLAR%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Clark County – Region 5
May 23, 2018
Rainbow
1,835
2.26
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

LEWIS CO PRK PD-S (LEWI)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LEWIS+CO+PRK+PD-S+%28LEWI%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Lewis County – Region 5
May 24, 2018
Rainbow
720
1.8
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

SWIFT POWER CANAL (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SWIFT+POWER+CANAL+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 24, 2018
Rainbow
2,670
2.67
SPEELYAI HATCHERY

SWOFFORD PD (LEWI)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SWOFFORD+PD+%28LEWI%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Lewis County – Region 5
May 24, 2018
Rainbow
3,600
1.8
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

Swift Reservoir – Expected to be planted with 45,000 catchable size rainbows before the June 2nd opener.

Shad

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – 60 shad anglers (including 10 boats) kept 289 and released 191 fish, an average of 6 fish per person.  A check of bank anglers just below Bonneville Dam today averaged 11.6 fish kept/released per person based on mainly incomplete trips.  Some anglers had up to 50 fish!

With ‘Much Larger’ Springer Run Back, Lookingglass Creek Opening June 2-23

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Lookingglass Creek, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River at Palmer Junction, will open to fishing for hatchery spring chinook Saturday, June 2 through Saturday, June 23. The open area is from the Moses Creek Lane Bridge (County Road 42) upstream to the confluence of Jarboe Creek.

LOOKINGGLASS CREEK FLOWS INTO THE GRANDE RONDE RIVER NORTH OF ELGIN, OREGON. (ODFW)

“The Lookingglass Creek Chinook run has surprised us this year with a return much larger than initially expected,” said Tim Bailey, ODFW district fish biologist in La Grande. “This year’s run is expected to be around 1,400 adult Chinook, the majority being hatchery fish.”

Anglers may retain two adipose fin-clipped chinook adults and five adipose fin-clipped jacks per day, with two daily limits in possession. Jack salmon are less than 24-inches long. Anglers do not need to record jack catch on their combined angling tags, but it is illegal to continue fishing for jack chinook once the adult bag limit is met. Unmarked (wild) fish must be released carefully and unharmed.

As with the trout fishery that opened on Lookingglass Creek on May 22, anglers are restricted to artificial flies and lures while fishing for salmon — no bait. “There are bull trout in Lookingglass Creek, and bait fishing could pose a threat to them, so all fishing in the creek is restricted to artificial flies and lures,” Bailey said.

The area open to fishing is bordered by private timberlands owned by Forest Capital and open to public access. Anglers are reminded to respect private property by picking up trash when leaving.

Anglers will need a Columbia Basin Endorsement for this fishery.

For more information, contact the ODFW East Region Office in La Grande at (541) 963-2138.