Tag Archives: spring bear

Oregon Spring Bear Hunt Permits Coming Out Of Hibernation A Bit Later Than Usual

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Results for the spring bear hunt draw will be available by March 1.

RON GARDNER SHOWS OFF A SPRING BLACK BEAR FROM THE OREGON COAST RANGE. AFTER FRIEND CARL LEWALLEN SPOTTED IT ONE AFTERNOON. A SHORT STALK PUT THEM WITHIN 100 YARDS. (ONTARIO KNIFE CO. PHOTO CONTEST)

Results are usually available by Feb. 20, but delayed this year to allow additional time for review and validation of the draw. ODFW always validates controlled hunt draw results (for example by confirming that parties drew correctly and preference points and non-resident quotas on tags were applied correctly) but staff are taking additional time to validate 2019 spring bear results as this is the first draw under ODFW’s new licensing system.

Once spring bear draw results are available, hunters who have already set up their online account can login at the MyODFW.com licensing page and click “Controlled Hunts” under Recreational Portfolio to find their results. Hunters who drew a spring bear tag will see the term “Selected” next to their hunt choice, and those who did not draw will see “Not Selected.”

Draw results cannot be viewed in the MyODFW app, but click “Access full ODFW Account Online” in the app to get to the licensing page and login. Note your spring bear tag will only show up in your MyODFW app after purchase. SportsPac holders who drew their spring bear tag can redeem their voucher by “purchasing” the tag (at no additional cost) through the licensing webpage or at a license sales agent.

Spring bear applicants without an online account can call ODFW Licensing at (503) 947-6101 during regular business hours to get their draw results, or visit a license sales agent.


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All hunters with internet access who are applying for controlled hunts this year are encouraged to visit the MyODFW.com licensing page and access their account online. Use the “Verify/Look Up your account” button to find your profile and set up an online account, where you can easily view draw results and apply for hunts.

2018 Oregon Spring Bear Hunting Forecast Out

Oregon spring bear hunters will find generally good prospects when seasons open in April, with many parts of the state seeing a lower snowpack than usual and bruins likely active earlier than last year.

Those are among the highlights from ODFW’s annual forecast for the year’s first major big game hunts.

HUNTING MIGHT BE BETTER LATER IN THE SPRING SEASON, BUT BARRETT PROCK DIDN’T WASTE ANY TIME LAST YEAR, BAGGING THIS BRUIN IN THE COAST RANGE WITH A 350-YARD SHOT ON 2017’S OPENING WEEKEND. FRIEND AND PACK MULE CARL LEWALLEN TOOK THE PIC, THEN LOADED UP FOR THE PACK OUT. (BROWNING PHOTO CONTEST)

The agency posted the document this week ahead of the April 1 and April 15 openers for controlled and sold-out first-come tags, though hunting tends to improve as the May 31 end of the season nears.

In Southwest Oregon, where the 4,400 available tags sold out back in January, ODFW reports “stable and relatively high” bear numbers, with the thickest densities “closer to the coast in the Coast Range.”

“This winter has been significantly different that last year,” the agency reports. “While last year was quite wet and winter-like weather persisted well into the spring. This year has been much milder and relatively dry. If this pattern persists bears may become active earlier than in previous years. Typically bear activity increases as the season progresses due to the fact that the bear rut is in late May and June. This should still be the case even if the spring continues to be milder than some other years.

THE NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE’S LATEST SNOWPACK MAP SHOWS SNOW WATER EQUIVALENTS BELOW AVERAGE ACROSS ALL OF OREGON, AND RECENT WARMING TRENDS COULD HELP GREEN UP HILLSIDES AS BEARS EMERGE FROM HIBERNATION. (NRCS)

In the northern Cascades, black bear densities are “good” with best hunting from mid- to late May.

“With snow pack in the northern Cascades at 50 – 69 percent of normal this year, hunters should expect to have access to mid-elevation habitats earlier than normal. However, many of the higher elevation and north facing road systems are expected to remain snow covered and may limit access until late May. Hunters should check road conditions and access before heading out, especially early in the season,” ODFW advises.

In the South Blue Mountains, things are starting to green up in the valleys and hillsides facing south.

” Bear populations are stable or increasing but this hunt is still challenging due to the heavily forested terrain which makes it difficult to spot bears,” the state says. “Hunters can find bears widely distributed through all units but harvest in the spring has been highest in the Desolation unit.”

On the west side of the Blues, in Umatilla County, ODFW reports best bear densities north of I-84, but that’s also where winter arrived late, so it may not be entirely accessible till May. Still, bears will be lower down where there’s fresh greens.

In Wallowa County, home to “high” numbers of bears, glass the canyons, which is where boars will be foraging.

For more information, including hunting tips, good locations and what to watch out for, check out ODFW’s spring bear forecast here.