Tag Archives: salmon

Columbia, SW WA Fishing Report (4-23-18)

THE FOLLOWING ORIGINATED WITH ODFW AND WDFW AND WERE TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Columbia River Angling Report

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

Gorge Bank: CLOSED.  No report.

BRENDA SKINNER SHOWS OFF A SPRING CHINOOK CAUGHT DURING THE APRIL 14 REOPENER. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Gorge Boats (below Beacon Rock): CLOSED.  No report.

Troutdale Boats: CLOSED.  No report.

Portland to Westport Bank: CLOSED.  No report.

Portland to St. Helens Boats: CLOSED.  No report.

Goble to Beaver (Clatskanie) Boats: CLOSED.  No report.

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank: CLOSED. No report.

Westport to Buoy 10 Boats: CLOSED.  No report.

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for eight bank anglers.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed one adult spring Chinook kept for 13 bank anglers.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (two anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam):  Closed for retention. No report.

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed four sublegal and two oversize sturgeon released for one boat (four anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Closed for retention.  No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (two anglers).

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (one angler).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed one walleye kept for one bank angler; and 20 walleye kept for four boats (10 anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 111 walleye kept, plus 34 walleye released for 57 boats (128 anglers).

Washington Columbia River mainstem and its tributaries sport sampling summaries for April 16-22 + a BONUS FACTOID

BONUS FACTOID – The 551 adult spring Chinook counted at Bonneville Dam through April 22nd are the 2nd lowest on record.  The record low are the 427 adults counted through April 22, 2006.  However, over 126,000 spring Chinook were tallied crossing the dam by the end of that season (June 15, 2006).

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – From the I-5 Bridge downstream:  143 bank rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook and 6 steelhead and released 1 steelhead.  18 boat rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook.  Above the I-5 Bridge:  195 bank rods kept 7 adult spring Chinook and 22 steelhead and released 2 steelhead.  91 boat rods kept 3 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook and 20 steelhead and released 1 steelhead.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 629 winter-run steelhead and 90 spring Chinook adults and two jacks during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released eight winter-run steelhead into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton and they released 66 winter-run steelhead and 23 spring Chinook adults into the Cispus River, near Yellow Jacket Creek.

Tacoma Power also released 14 winter-run steelhead and 20 spring Chinook adults into Lake Scanewa near Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 6,280 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, April 23. Water visibility is five feet and the water temperature is 42.8 degrees F.

Bank anglers should note the south side of the river from Mill Creek to the Barrier Dam is closed to all fishing from May 1 through June 15 per permanent regulations.

Kalama River – 29 bank anglers kept 1 adult spring Chinook and released 5 steelhead.  10 boat anglers kept 1 adult spring Chinook and released 3 steelhead.

Lewis River mainstem – 39 bank rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook. 16 boat rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook and released 1 adult spring Chinook.

North Fork Lewis River – 56 bank rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook  43 boat rods kept 7 adult spring Chinook and released 1 steelhead

Under current permanent rules, the Lewis (including North Fork) closes for spring Chinook effective May 1.  Also, the area from Johnson Creek upstream to the dam is closed to all fishing during the month of May.

Wind River – 12 boat anglers had no catch.

Effective May 1 through June 30, from the mouth to the Hwy. 14 Bridge each angler aboard a vessel may deploy SALMON/STEELHEAD angling gear until the daily SALMON/STEELHEAD limit for all anglers aboard has been achieved. In addition, anglers with a Two-Pole Endorsement may fish for salmon and steelhead with two poles during the same period.

Beginning May 1, anti-snagging rule will be in effect from the Hwy. 14 Bridge upstream. When the anti-snagging rule is in effect, only fish hooked inside the mouth may be retained.

Wind River from 100 feet above Shipherd Falls upstream to boundary markers approximately 800 yards downstream from Carson National Fish Hatchery (except closed 400 feet below to 100 feet above the Coffer Dam) -From May 1 through June 30, the salmon and steelhead daily limit will be a total of 2 chinook or hatchery steelhead or one of each. Unmarked chinook may be retained in this section of the Wind. Night closure and anti-snagging rule will be in effect. Only fish hooked inside the mouth may be retained.

Drano Lake -2 bank anglers had no catch. 57 boat anglers kept 8 adult spring Chinook

Effective May 1 through June 30, each angler aboard a vessel may deploy SALMON/STEELHEAD angling gear until the daily SALMON/STEELHEAD limit for all anglers aboard has been achieved. In addition, anglers with a Two-Pole Endorsement may fish for salmon and steelhead with two poles during the same period.

Klickitat River – 5 bank anglers had no catch.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – All fishing for sturgeon will be closed from May 1 through Aug. 31 in the sturgeon sanctuary from Bonneville Dam downstream 9 miles to a line crossing the Columbia River from navigation Marker 82 on the Oregon shore westerly to the boundary marker on the Washington shore upstream of Fir Point.

Bonneville Pool – Angling for sturgeon will be prohibited from May 1 through July 31 between The Dalles Dam downstream 1.8 miles to a line from the east (upstream) dock at the Port of The Dalles boat ramp straight across to a marker on the Washington shore.

The Dalles Pool -Under permanent rules to protect spawning fish, closed to fishing for sturgeon from John Day Dam downstream 2.4 miles to the west end of the grain silo at Rufus Oregon May 1 through July 31.

John Day Pool – Under permanent rules to protect spawning fish, closed to fishing for sturgeon from McNary Dam downstream 1.5 miles to Hwy. 82 (Hwy. 395) Bridge May 1 through July 31.

Trout

Recent plants of catchable size rainbows into SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish perPound
Hatchery
Notes

KRESS LK (COWL)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=KRESS+LK+%28COWL%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Cowlitz County – Region 5
Apr 16, 2018
Rainbow
3,361
2.31
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

BATTLE GROUND LK (CLAR)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=BATTLE+GROUND+LK+%28CLAR%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Clark County – Region 5
Apr 17, 2018
Rainbow
3,000
1.45
VANCOUVER HATCHERY
Tacoma Power released 3,600 rainbow trout into South Lewis County Park Pond.

 

 

ODFW Calls On Congress To Allow Managers To Stop Male Sea Lions From Taking Over Fish Bottlenecks

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Over 25 California sea lions and an unknown number of Steller sea lions continue to prey on salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey in the Willamette River this month. Concerns for the wild Willamette winter steelhead remain front and center for ODFW as biologists estimate that California sea lions ate at least 18 percent of the returning adults prior to March, driving this population closer to extinction.

A CALIFORNIA SEA LION CAPTURES A SALMONID BELOW WILLAMETTE FALLS. (BRYAN WRIGHT, ODFW)

In the absence of federal approval to lethally remove the California sea lions at Willamette Falls, ODFW attempted a stop gap program of capturing and relocating sea lions this spring. “It’s our responsibility and mandate from the people of Oregon to ensure these fish runs continue,” said Dr. Shaun Clements, ODFW’s senior policy advisor.   “So it’s incredibly frustrating to us that federal laws prevent us from taking the only steps effective at protecting these fish from predation.”

During the course of five weeks in February and March, ODFW relocated 10 California sea lions to a beach south of Newport. All marked animals returned, most travelling the 210 miles within 4-6 days. One was even captured and relocated to the coast twice, but came back on both occasions. “Clearly our experience on the Willamette River this year demonstrated the  futility of relocating sea lions as a way of stopping them from driving our native fish runs to extinction,” said Clements.

That’s one reason why ODFW has decided to leave its traps on the Willamette and transition sea lion operations to Bonneville – where the agency already has federal authorization to lethally remove sea lions. “It’s disheartening given what’s happening in the Willamette, but we don’t have enough staff to cover both locations so we’re moving to a place where we can be more effective,” said Bryan Wright, ODFW’s Marine Mammal Program Lead.

Currently the run of upper Willamette wild steelhead stands at 1,338, which is slightly higher than in 2017 but still well below historical runs that often topped 10,000. In contrast, the California sea lion population is exceptionally healthy and fluctuates between 250-300,000 animals. According to Wright, “Removing these few male animals that have habituated in freshwater would have no impact to the sea lion population but would provide much needed relief to fish runs and prevent similar crises from occurring elsewhere.”

ODFW has applied to the federal government for authorization to lethally remove sea lions from at Willamette Falls under Section 120 of the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Even if that application is approved, it won’t be until 2019 at the earliest. ODFW senior officials are also working with the region’s congressional delegation to address the inflexibility of the MMPA to deal with these issues in a more timely manner.

“This isn’t just about the Willamette steelhead, which we know are in serious trouble,” said Clements. “We also know that predation on white sturgeon has increased dramatically this year, and that sea lions are preying on salmon, steelhead, and sturgeon in other rivers like the Sandy and Clackamas. Effective management will only be possible if the US Congress changes the law to allow managers to proactively prevent sea lions habituating to these bottlenecks in freshwater.”

ODFW plans to leave its sea lion traps in the Willamette, continue to monitor predation, and, if the opportunity arises, trap another sea lion or two this spring. Additionally, ODFW is conducting limited monitoring of sea lions that are foraging in the Clackamas and Sandy rivers. ODFW is not authorized to do anything other than non-lethal hazing in these locations, and though hazing has proven ineffective in other systems, the department may run some hazing operations from time to time on the Clackamas River.

Lake Washington Sockeye, Fishing Subject Of April 24 Meeting

Lake Washington salmon and fisheries will be the subject of a meeting next week in Renton.

State biologists will be presenting on sockeye, coho, Chinook and steelhead at the Maplewood Greens Golf Course the evening of April 24.

LAKE WASHINGTON SOCKEYE ANGLERS DURING THE 2006 FISHERY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

According to an agenda for the meeting of King County’s Cedar River Council, discussions will include escapement data over the past 20 years and lost sport and tribal fishing opportunities.

It also lists findings on the big metro lake’s sockeye runs as well as the outlook for the salmon stock.

Despite the promise of the new Seattle Public Utilities hatchery built on the Cedar River, there hasn’t been a sport sockeye season on Lake Washington since 2006, and this year’s forecast of just under 40,000 is well below the threshold for a fishery.

Tuesday’s meeting begins at 7 p.m. The golf course is located at 4050 Maple Valley Highway, Renton, WA 98058.

Lower Columbia Springer Anglers Get Another Day Of Fishing

Spring Chinook anglers can chase their quarry again this Saturday, April 14, on the Columbia below Bonneville Dam.

State salmon managers made the decision to reopen the fishery yesterday afternoon after a very long conference call. Official rule-change notices haven’t been posted at this point, but here’s where to find ODFW’s and WDFW’s.

(ANDY WALGAMOTT)

They had initially proposed two days, the second being Wednesday, April 18, but there was quite a bit of pushback from upstream recreational and tribal fishing interests as well as from a higher-up at WDFW, according to Bill Monroe reporting in The Oregonian.

A fact sheet that came out before the meeting said that through April 7, anglers had accounted for 3,680 of the 7,157 available upriver mortalities, leaving 51 percent of the catch allocation at the 30 percent buffered runsize still available.

The forecast calls for 166,700 springers bound for tribs beyond Bonneville.

But this year’s return is coming in very sluggishly, with the tally breaking the triple-digit mark 20 days later than the 10-year average and the overall count of 125 through April 11 still the lowest on record for this same point of the run.

The Columbia has been running “slightly lower, colder, and clearer than recent 5-year averages for the first half of April,” managers reported.

Still, those are highly fishable conditions — at least if you’re not a plunker. Boaters have accounted for most of the catch.

“Given an available balance on the pre-season, buffered allocation of upriver spring Chinook(3,477 fish balance), there is potential for additional angling opportunity,” the fact sheet stated.

WDFW honchos have essentially been reacting to last year when a slow-developing run led to early closures in Eastern Washington.

It’s unclear how the rest of the 2018 springer run will proceed, but two things are for certain:

“Enjoy Saturday fishing, and in the meantime we will work hard to have a hearing to review the impacts as soon as is reasonable after the one day reopener,” read an email blast from the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association out last night.

 

Sportfishing Leaders React To 2018 Salmon Seasons

Northwest salmon anglers are digesting news from the just-concluded season-setting process, which brought — as it always does — a mix of tasty, so-so and stomach-turning results.

Puget Sound and Southern Oregon anglers should be happier than in recent years, Washington Coast and Buoy 10 fishermen will be somewhat disappointed, and Skokomish River egg drifters are gnashing their teeth — again.

SILVER SALMON ANGLERS FISH AMIDST A BLIZZARD OF SEAGULLS AT POSSESSION BAR DURING 2014’S EVERETT COHO DERBY. THE PAST TWO YEARS’ DERBIES HAVE BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO RESTRICTED FISHERIES, BUT THIS YEAR’S LOOKS TO BE BACK ON. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Those are very broad brush strokes and we’ll all be able to drill deeper into the details of Chinook and coho seasons as the days and weeks go by and the LOAF, or list of agreed-to fisheries, is posted, singling out our waters for their 2018 opportunities or looking elsewhere for different ones.

In the meanwhile, there’s some reason for optimism in the sportfishing community, including from Gabe Miller, who says there’s “a lot to look forward to this season, particularly in the Puget Sound region.”

“We are looking at substantially more coho opportunity than we have the past few years, especially in North Puget Sound,” says Miller, who works at Sportco in Fife and is vice president of the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association. “Another bright spot is South Sound Chinook, which should provide anglers with plenty of harvest opportunity this summer and through the fall.”

He said that in the wake of 2016’s and 2017’s fishery restrictions, which affected coho the hardest, 2018’s seasons “should look a little more like what anglers were used to seeing in the past.”

A WDFW CHART OUTLINES MARINE AREA FISHERY TIMING FOR CHINOOK AND COHO. (WDFW)

Mark Yuasa, the boating and fishing director for the Seattle-based Northwest Marine Trade Association, said that these days salmon anglers need to be mobile with their boats.

“I’m pretty happy about what’s in store for anglers in late-summer and early-fall for coho fishing in Puget Sound, which is something we haven’t had for several years. We’ll also have some decent summer Chinook fisheries in certain areas,” he said.

While Puget Sound salmon are rebounding from the Blob, Columbia River Chinook are still in a bit of a rough patch, with this year’s Washington and North Oregon Coast quota dropping by 40 percent.

That’s not the best of news for Astoria, Ilwaco, Westport, La Push and Neah Bay, but there will still be good numbers of salmon caught out here, thanks to a coho quota of 42,000, the same amount as last year and which held up into early September.

“We are cautiously optimistic with the seasons set for Marine Area 1 and the Columbia River,” says Liz Hamilton, NSIA’s executive director. “The managers did a good job at getting close to management objectives, and we are hoping the seasons proceed as planned. The numerous stock constraints this year were challenging. With any luck, the upriver brights will show enough strength by mid-September to provide some extra fishing time to the river above Buoy 10.”

“Fingers crossed,” she added.

GUIDE BOB REES NETS A CHINOOK AT BUOY 10. THIS YEAR’S FISHERY WILL BE A DEPARTURE FROM RECENT ONES, WHAT WITH ITS ONE-SALMONID LIMIT FROM AUG. 1-24 DUE TO ONE OF THE SMALLER RETURNS OF THE PAST DECADE. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Well south of the mouth of the big river, Chinook anglers will be able to get back on the ocean between Humbug Mountain and the California border, which was closed last year, and ODFW is touting a “strong forecast” of fall kings back to the Rogue as one of the coast’s “bright” spots.

Oregon Coast coho are down, but there’s still enough for a 35,000 hatchery silver quota, with limited September fishing for wild and clipped coho.

Meanwhile, behind the scenes, the biologists and run modelers and fishery managers are breathing a collective sigh of relief that, finally, it’s all over, and the whole pile of paperwork is now headed for the feds’ desk for them to, hopefully, make faster work than they have with the Skagit-Sauk steelhead sign-off.

At least one state source says that this year’s extraordinary “plenary session,” which brought Washington and tribal fisheries leaders together last week, was a “huge success” and played a key role in helping the comanagers reach an agreement on schedule.

THE STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE’S SEAN YANNITY SPEAKS DURING THE PLENARY SESSION. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

In 2016, talks between the state and tribes dragged on for a month and a half before a deal was struck.

“This year there was a feeling of unity among all parties involved in a process that has long been a bitter battle filled with arguments, cultural indifference and over who was going to catch that ‘last salmon’ dating back to the Boldt Decision,” said NMTA’s Yuasa. “It was a good feeling to get everyone for the most part on the same table to address issues for the upcoming fishing seasons and save salmon populations, which are an iconic piece of Northwest history. We all need to swallow a bitter pill from time to time, but in the end you’ll find some exciting fishing this year.”

He was on hand during that one-hour say-what-you-wish confab in which sport and tribal fishermen talked about the importance of salmon habitat, heritage and the problems of pinnipeds.

So too was Tom Nelson, cohost of 710 ESPN Seattle’s The Outdoor Line. He expressed mixed feelings about what he heard in that packed Lynnwood hotel room and what eventually came out of another in Portland.

THE OUTDOOR LINE HOST TOM NELSON (RIGHT) LISTENS AS NWIFC’S LORRAINE LOOMIS SPEAKS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“I’m disappointed that the nontribal part of the allocation took the biggest part of the cut and the Makahs will keep fishing at the same level as last year,” he said on a last-minute Chinook hangup yesterday. “Even a token movement on their behalf would have given something to the feeling of the plenary session.”

Essentially, impact rates on low mid-Hood Canal Chinook stocks put Puget Sound fisheries in jeopardy, so state managers reduced the coastal king guideline and there were losses in Areas 8-1 and 9.

“That said, we’re going coho fishing in Admiralty Inlet in September,” Nelson said.

That’s the best place, by catch stat, to put out herring strips or cast from the beach for silvers in late summer. Last year it wasn’t even available to boaters, and only through Labor Day for shore fishers, due to very low forecasted Skagit and Stillaguamish coho returns.

And while Nelson called losing September Chinook fishing in the San Juan Islands “brutal,” he noted it would help address starving orca issues, as Fraser-bound kings are a key feedstock for the marine mammals.

The Makah Tribe’s Russ Svec was among those who spoke during the plenary session, saying, “Today is a good day to see everyone talking with one voice.”

But one person who wasn’t buying the good feels was longtime sportfishing advocate Frank Urabeck, who was angry that there still is no resolution to the Skokomish River problem, which leaves recreational anglers unable to access state-hatchery-reared Chinook and coho in the southern Hood Canal stream.

“What is a shame is that the other Puget Sound tribes let this happen, making a mockery of the recent NOF state/tribal ‘Kumbaya’ plenary session,” Urabeck said.

A SIGN POSTED ALONG THE SKOKOMISH RIVER BY THE SKOKOMISH TRIBE WARNS ANGLERS AWAY FROM THE BANKS AS 2016’S RETURN OF CHINOOK TO THE STATE HATCHERY FILL THE RIVER. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

He also laid blame at the feet of WDFW Fish Program Manager Ron Warren and other state officials for failing to get the fishery restarted, and expressed doubt that it’s all about a reservation boundary dispute for the Skokomish Tribe.

“It is more likely there are other self-interest reasons and the tribe is just using the land ownership claim to significantly increase their harvest of Chinook salmon, including ESA-listed natural origin fish,” Urabeck said.

He’d gone so far as to call for a new nontribal commercial fishery in Hood Canal, where fall Chinook can otherwise be difficult for recreational anglers to catch, to access the state share.

Urabeck claimed that some observers feel the river has been lost to sport fishing and said that many anglers don’t feel public money should fund WDFW’s George Adams hatchery.

FRANK URABECK, LEFT, CHECKS HIS NOTES DURING A RALLY HELD AT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON’S GEORGE ADAMS SALMON HATCHERY THE FIRST SUMMER THAT THE SKOKOMISH WAS NOT OPEN FOR SPORT FISHING DUE TO A CLAIM THAT THE ENTIRE WIDTH OF THE RIVER WAS PART OF THE SKOKOMISH RESERVATION. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Radio’s Nelson might have summed up the whole months-long salmon-season-setting process best for all parties.

“Every North of Falcon you’re sort of left with that kissing-your-sister feeling,” he quipped.

He reiterated his support for working with the tribes on a host of problems facing Western Washington salmon.

“Now let’s move forward from here with the tribes,” Nelson said. “Let’s reach out to the Stillys [Stillaguamish Tribe] and stand shoulder to shoulder with them” on a Fish and Wildlife Commissioner’s recent proposed conservation hatchery and marine predation issues.

Details On Washington’s 2018 Salmon Fisheries

THE FOLLOWING IS THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE BREAKDOWN OF 2018 SALMON FISHERIES

Puget Sound
Below is key information for Puget Sound salmon fisheries this year. More details will be available in the 2018-19 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, which will be available in June.

CENTRAL PUGET SOUND SUMMER CHINOOK ANGLERS CAN LOOK FORWARD TO A QUOTA OF OVER 10,000 HATCHERY KINGS LIKE THIS ONE SHERRYL CHRISTIE CAUGHT AT BUSH POINT IN 2016. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Marine areas 9 (Admiralty Inlet) and 10 (Seattle/Bremerton): Marine Area 9 will be open July through September with a chinook quota of 5,563 fish, which is similar to last year’s quota. Marine Area 10 is scheduled to be open June through mid-November for coho fishing with hatchery chinook retention allowed mid-July through August. The chinook quota for Marine Area 10 is 4,743 fish, up significantly from 2017.

Baker Lake sockeye: The forecast for sockeye returning to Baker Lake is strong enough to allow for a lake fishery, open July 7 through early September, and a fishery on the Skagit River.

North Sound freshwater: Anglers will have the opportunity to retain wild coho in the Nooksack River and coho in the Skagit and Cascade rivers, where gamefish fisheries have been restored this year.

Skokomish River: A portion of the Skokomish River remains closed to non-tribal fishing this year, due to an ongoing dispute over whether the river is part of the Skokomish Reservation. WDFW will continue to work with the Skokomish Tribe to resolve the matter. The closed area includes the section of river from the Tacoma Public Utilities power lines (near the mouth of the river) upstream to the Bonneville Power Administration power lines (upstream and west of Highway 101).

Marine areas 8-1 and 8-2: Both areas will be open to fishing for coho in August and September. The areas will re-open to fishing for hatchery chinook in December.

Marine Area 7: Anglers can fish for chinook and coho in Marine Area 7 beginning July 1. The area closes after Labor Day to chinook retention but remains open for coho fishing through September. The area re-opens for salmon fishing in January.

Marine areas 5 (Sekiu) and 6 (East Juan de Fuca Strait): Both areas open in early July (July 1 in Marine Area 5, July 3 in Marine Area 6) for hatchery chinook and hatchery coho. Anglers can retain hatchery chinook through mid-August and hatchery coho through September. Marine Area 6 reopens Feb. 1 while Marine Area 5 reopens Feb. 16 for hatchery salmon.

A WDFW CHART OUTLINES MARINE AREA FISHERY TIMING FOR CHINOOK AND COHO. (WDFW)

South Sound freshwater: Anglers will have the opportunity to fish for coho in Minter Creek beginning Oct. 16. Strong hatchery chinook returns are expected to several south Sound rivers this year.

Southern Resident Killer Whales: The governor and NOAA Fisheries have instructed WDFW to take steps to help recover killer whales. In meeting conservation objectives for wild salmon, the co-managers are also limiting fisheries in areas where southern resident killer whales are known to feed. The adjustments will aid in minimizing boat presence and noise, and decrease competition for chinook and other salmon in these areas critical to the declining whales.

Washington’s Ocean Waters (Marine areas 1-4)
More details on these fisheries will be available in the 2018-19 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, which will be available in June.

Catch quotas

The Pacific Fishery Management Council approved a recreational chinook catch quota of 27,500 fish, which is 17,500 fewer fish than 2017’s quota of 45,000. The PFMC, which establishes fishing seasons in ocean waters three to 200 miles off the Pacific coast, also adopted a quota of 42,000 coho for this year’s recreational ocean fishery – the same as last year’s coho quota.

Fishing seasons

Recreational ocean salmon fisheries for chinook and hatchery coho will be open daily beginning June 23 in marine areas 1 (Ilwaco), 3 (La Push), and 4 (Neah Bay). Marine Area 2 (Westport) will be open Sundays through Thursdays beginning July 1.  All areas will close Sept. 3 or when the catch quota is met.

In marine areas 1, 2, and 4, anglers can retain two salmon, only one of which can be a chinook. Anglers fishing in Marine Area 3 will have a two-salmon daily limit. In all marine areas, anglers must release wild coho.

Coastal fisheries including Grays Harbor and Willapa Bay
Below is key information for coastal salmon fisheries this year. More details will be available in the 2018-19 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, which will be available in June.

Grays Harbor Area

The Area 2-2 Humptulips North Bay chinook fishery begins in August and runs through Sept.15.

The Area 2-2 East Bay coho fishery begins two weeks later than 2017 and is scheduled Oct. 1-Nov. 30.

The Chehalis River spring chinook fishery is scheduled May 1-June 30 while the jack fishery in the lower river runs Aug. 1-Sept. 15.

The Humptulips River is scheduled to be open for salmon fishing Sept. 1-Nov. 30, about two months fewer than last year. Anglers can keep one wild chinook during the month of September but must release wild chinook the remainder of the fishery.

Willapa Bay Area

The season in Willapa Bay (Area 2-1) is similar to last year and is scheduled Aug. 1-Jan. 31. Anglers can keep three adult salmon, one of which may be a coho.
The freshwater rivers in the Willapa Bay area have similar seasons to 2017. Anglers may retain one wild coho.

Columbia River
Below is key information on the major Columbia River salmon fisheries this year. More details will be in the 2018-19 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, which will be available in June.

Summer fishery

The summer season on the mainstem Columbia River from the Astoria-Megler Bridge upstream to Bonneville Dam will be open from June 22 through July 4 for hatchery (adipose fin-clipped) summer chinook. Bonneville Dam to Hwy. 395 near Pasco is open from June 16 through July 31. The daily limit will be two adult hatchery salmonids. All sockeye must be released.

Fall fisheries

During fall fisheries, anglers fishing from the same boat may continue fishing for salmon until all anglers have reached their daily limits in the following areas of the mainstem Columbia River:

  • Buoy 10 salmon fishery will be open from Aug. 1 through Aug. 24 for chinook retention.  The daily limit is one salmonid (chinook, hatchery coho or hatchery steelhead). From Aug. 25 through Dec. 31, anglers will have a daily limit of two salmonids, but chinook must be released and no more than one hatchery steelhead may be kept.
  • Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to the Lewis River will be open from Aug. 1 through Sept. 2 for chinook retention. The daily limit is one adult salmonid. From Sept. 3 through Dec. 31, anglers will have a daily limit of two adult salmonids, but chinook must be released and no more than one hatchery steelhead may be kept.
  • Lewis River upstream to Bonneville Dam will be open Aug. 1 through Sept. 14 for chinook retention. The daily limit is one adult salmonid.  During Sept. 15 through Dec. 31, anglers will have a daily limit of two adult salmonids, but chinook must be released and no more than one hatchery steelhead may be kept.
  • Bonneville Dam upstream to the Hwy. 395 Bridge at Pasco will be open Aug. 1 through Dec. 31 with a daily limit of two adult salmonids with no more than one chinook and no more than one hatchery steelhead.

Sockeye, chum and jacks

Columbia River anglers are reminded that retention of sockeye and chum salmon is prohibited. Catch limits for jack salmon – salmon that return at a younger age – follow typical permanent regulations and will be listed in the 2018-19 pamphlet.

THE FOLLOWING IS A JOINT PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE AND THE NORTHWEST INDIAN FISHERIES COMMISSION

With low returns of chinook and coho salmon expected back to numerous rivers in Washington, state and tribal co-managers Tuesday agreed on a fishing season that meets conservation goals for wild fish while providing fishing opportunities on healthy salmon runs.

The 2018-19 salmon fisheries, developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty tribal co-managers, were finalized during the Pacific Fishery Management Council’s meeting in Portland, Ore.

Information on recreational salmon fisheries in Washington’s ocean waters and the Columbia River is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/. The webpage also includes information on some notable Puget Sound sport fisheries, as well as an overview of chinook and coho fishing opportunities in the Sound’s marine areas.

A variety of unfavorable environmental conditions, including severe flooding in rivers and warm ocean water, have reduced the number of salmon returning to Washington’s rivers in recent years, said Ron Warren, head of WDFW’s fish program.

In addition, the loss of quality rearing and spawning habitat continues to take a toll on salmon populations throughout the region, where some stocks are listed for protection under the federal Endangered Species Act, he said.

“It’s critical that we ensure fisheries are consistent with ongoing efforts to protect and rebuild wild salmon stocks,” Warren said. “Unfortunately, the loss of salmon habitat continues to outpace these recovery efforts. We need to reverse this trend. If we don’t, salmon runs will continue to decline and it will be increasingly difficult to develop meaningful fisheries.”

WDFW’S RON WARREN AND NWIFC’S LORRAINE LOOMIS SPEAK DURING A RARE BUT WELL-ATTENDED STATE-TRIBAL PLENARY SESSION LAST WEEK ON WESTERN WASHINGTON SALMON. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

A bright spot in this year’s salmon season planning process was a renewed commitment by Indian and non-Indian fishermen to work together for the future of salmon and salmon fishing, said Lorraine Loomis, chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.

“No fisherman wants to catch the last salmon. We know that the ongoing loss of habitat, a population explosion of hungry seals and sea lions and the needs of endangered southern resident killer whales are the real challenges facing us today. We must work together if we are going to restore salmon to sustainable levels,” she said.

Low returns of some salmon stocks prompted state and tribal fishery managers to limit opportunities in many areas to protect those fish.

For example, recreational anglers will have less opportunity to fish for chinook salmon in both the Columbia River and Washington’s ocean waters compared to recent years. Tribal fisheries also will be restricted in certain areas to protect weak stocks.

In meeting conservation objectives for wild salmon, the co-managers are limiting fisheries in areas where southern resident killer whales are known to feed. The adjustments will aid in minimizing boat presence and noise, and decrease competition for chinook and other salmon in areas critical to the declining whales.

Details on all recreational salmon fisheries will be provided in the 2018-19 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, which will be available in late June.

For information on tribal fisheries, contact the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission (http://nwifc.org/).

PFMC Adopts 2018 Oregon Ocean Salmon Seasons

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE BULLETIN

The Pacific Fishery Management Council finalized their recommendations for ocean salmon seasons on Tuesday, April 10.  Draft copies of the adopted seasons will be available at the PMFC’s website in the near future (www.pcouncil.org), and graphics of the recreational and commercial troll seasons will also be available on www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp/salmon/ by Thursday, April 12.  Seasons are not official until being given final approval by the Secretary of Commerce, and adopted by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission for waters within 3 nautical miles of shore.

ROGER GOODMAN CAUGHT THIS 30-POUND CHINOOK OFF NEWPORT WHILE TROLLING WITH HERRING. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

The adopted regulations reflect the continuing relatively low abundances for numerous ocean salmon populations.  The Rogue River fall Chinook and Klamath River fall Chinook populations both have shown improvements in the last year, and are expected to provide for improved Chinook salmon fishing this year off the Oregon Coast.

Recreational Season Summary:

Ocean waters off the Columbia River from Leadbetter Pt., Washington to Cape Falcon, Oregon will be open for recreational salmon fishing from June 23 through the earlier of September 3 or quota with a hatchery mark selective coho quota of 21,000 and a Chinook guideline of 8,000.  The daily bag limit will be two salmon, but no more than one Chinook and all coho must have an adipose fin clip.

Recreational seasons on the central Oregon Coast (Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt.) opened for Chinook on March 15 and will continue through October 31 without interruption.   Coho seasons will have quotas of 35,000 adipose fin-clipped coho in the hatchery mark selective season from June 30 through September 3, and an additional 3,500 coho quota in the September non-selective coho season that will be open each Friday and Saturday beginning on September 7 and continue through the earlier of September 29 or quota.  In October, the recreational season will be restricted to salmon fishing only inside of the 40 fathom management line.

The area from Humbug Mt. to the OR/CA border will be open for recreational Chinook from May 19 through August 26.  A limited state waters fishery off the Chetco River in October will be considered by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission in Astoria on April 20.

Commercial Troll Season Summary:

The commercial troll salmon seasons North of Cape Falcon will have a very limited coho salmon season again this year.  The fishery will be managed by quotas, season length, and landing week (Thursday-Wednesday) limits.  The early Chinook only season will start on May 1 and continue through the earlier of June 30 or the overall quota of 16,500 Chinook or the Leadbetter Pt. to Cape Falcon subarea cap of 4,600 Chinook.  The summer fishery from July 1 through the earlier of the overall Chinook quota of 11,000, the overall quota of 5,600 coho, or the Leadbetter Point to Cape Falcon subarea cap of 1,300 Chinook.  Landing week limits of 50 Chinook and 10 adipose fin-clipped coho will be in effect.  Mandatory call-in requirements within an hour of landing are in place for all quota managed seasons.

From Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. the Chinook seasons will have a number of open periods throughout the season starting on May 4 (May 4-14, May 19-31, June 4-12, June 16-30, July 5-12, July 16-31, August 3-7, August 13-17, August 25-29, and September 1 through October 31).  Beginning September 1, a 50 Chinook weekly limit (Thursday through Wednesday) will be in place, and the fishery will be limited to fishing only shoreward of the 40 fathom curve during the month of October.

From Humbug Mt. to the OR/CA, the commercial troll fishery will be open for the same dates as listed for the Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. area from May through August (May 4-14, May 19-31, June 4-12, June 16-30, July 5-12, July 16-31, August 3-7, August 13-17, and August 25-29).  However, monthly quotas of 1,500 in June, 2,000 in July, and 500 in August may result in seasons closing earlier in each month.  Unused quota may be transferred forward to the next open quota period on an impact neutral basis.  From June through August, landing week (Thursday-Wednesday) limits of 50 Chinook will be in effect.  Mandatory call-in requirements within an hour of landing are in place for all quota managed seasons.

State waters fall Chinook terminal area fisheries are anticipated to be considered for waters adjacent to the Elk River and the Chetco River by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission at their meeting in Astoria on April 20.

Other Information:

Both commercial troll salmon fishermen and recreational anglers should review the full regulations prior to participating in the ocean salmon fisheries.  Commercial reporting requirements via phone or email remain in effect for all quota managed salmon seasons.

‘Removal Of Barrier Culverts Would Be Lifeline For Salmon, Fishing Families’ – NSIA Et Al In SCOTUS Brief

Regional fishing organizations filed a brief on Monday supporting the removal of culverts to help recover Western Washington salmon, a case that will be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in less than two weeks.

GRANSTROM CREEK, A TRIBUTARY OF THE SAUK RIVER, FLOWS THROUGH A BOX CULVERT PUT IN BY SKAGIT COUNTY. IT REPLACED A PERCHED CULVERT. THE WHITE PLASTIC TUBES AND YOUNG TREES AT RIGHT ARE PART OF A LARGER SEATTLE CITY LIGHT HABITAT RESTORATION PROJECT TO BENEFIT SALMON AND WILDLIFE. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The “friend of the court” arguments from the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association, Association of Northwest Steelheaders, Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations and others urge justices to uphold a 2016 Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that the state must make hundreds of stream barriers more passable to Chinook, coho, steelhead and other stocks.

“Salmon fishing has provided economic opportunity and a way of life for generations. Culverts owned by the State of Washington block access to vast areas of salmon habitat and spawning grounds, crippling these fisheries. Harm to Washington’s salmon fisheries directly harms fishing families and businesses throughout the Northwest and Alaska,” the group’s attorneys write.

Even as the state is bringing culverts up to snuff, the overall cost of the fixes and that some might not actually help fish led state Attorney General Bob Ferguson to appeal the Ninth’s ruling “on behalf of the taxpayers” to the highest court in the land.

But with fishing businesses and fisheries increasingly feeling the pinch as kings, silvers and steelies decline, NSIA et al are “skeptical” the state would hold to doing the repairs if the proverbial fish bonker of court action wasn’t hovering over its head.

“With salmon populations hovering at such precariously low levels, the significant increase of spawning and rearing habitat that will result from removal of the state’s barrier culverts would be a lifeline for salmon and fishing families alike,” the organizations argue. “The district court correctly found that removal of the state’s barrier culverts would immediately benefit these imperiled populations, and the district court’s injunction is an essential step to preserving these valuable runs.”

COHO IN PARTICULAR AS WELL AS STEELHEAD CAN BENEFIT FROM THE REMOVAL OF PASSAGE-BLOCKING CULVERTS BELOW WASHINGTON ROADS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The case is essentially a continuation of 1974’s massive Boldt Decision and could have as strong of ramifications, except not just on state and tribal fishermen alone this time.

It was originally brought by the Suquamish Tribe, who were joined by other tribes in Western Washington, and the basic argument, per the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, is that “tribal treaty rights to harvest salmon include the right to have those salmon protected so they are available for harvest.”

In recent weeks a number of parties have signed on in support of one side or the other.

Besides NSIA and others, former Washington Governor Dan Evans, a conservation-minded Republican, a number of area public officials, along with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Navajo Nation and others have filed amicus curiae briefs on behalf of the petitioners, or federal government.

Lining up with Washington are 11 other states, including Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, a number of home-building organizations and farm bureaus, and the American Forest & Paper Association and National Mining Association.

A decision is expected in June.

Yuasa: Salmon Fisheries, Fishery Planning Mark April Doin’s

Editor’s note: The following is Mark Yuasa’s monthly fishing newsletter, Get Hooked on Reel Times With Mark, and is run with permission.

By Mark Yuasa, Director of Grow Boating Programs, Northwest Marine Trade Association

April 2018

This is a very busy time of the year with plenty of salmon fishing options, and many are also making summer plans as 2018-19 seasons are being finalized this month.

Before we chomp away at what the crystal ball has in store for us, let’s focus on spring-fling fishing plans that involve lots of chinook fishing fun. The San Juan Islands and eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca have been the main focal point for hatchery chinook especially at places like Coyote, Partridge, Hein, Eastern, Middle and McArthur banks.

KYLE MADISON SHOWS OFF A DERBY-WINNING BLACKMOUTH CAUGHT IN MARCH. THE 16.85-POUNDER TIED FOR FIRST AT THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA SALMON DERBY AND SCORED THE PORT ANGELES ANGLER $2,000. (MARK YUASA, NMTA)

In the San Juan Islands fish are biting at Thatcher Pass; Peavine Pass; Speiden Island; Spring Pass; Clark and Barnes Islands; Parker Reef; Point Thompson; Doughty Point; Obstruction Pass; Waldron Island; Lopez Pass; and Presidents Channel.

The San Juan Islands in Area 7 are open through April 30; and depending on which side of the outer banks you’re fishing on the closing date is either April 15 in Area 6 or April 30 in Area 7.

Even more exciting is the fact that Strait of Juan de Fuca has awakened from its winter slumber.

I love the throwback feeling you get when you drive into the town of Sekiu, and this is by far one of my favorite places to target in spring with options to fish on both sides of a tidal exchange. The doors on this fishery remains open through April 30.

On a low tide, look for baitfish schools and hungry chinook nipping on their heels at the Caves just outside the Olson’s Resort jetty, and then point your boat west to Eagle Point and Hoko Point.

On the flood tide, head east to Slip Point buoy – then mooch or troll – your way down toward Mussolini Rock, the Coal Mine and even further to Pillar Point.

Those who don’t want to travel that far should wet a line in northern Puget Sound, which is open through April 15. Midchannel Bank off Port Townsend, Possession Bar, Double Bluff off south Whidbey Island, Point No Point and Pilot Point have been the go to places.

Another locale quietly producing decent catches is south-central Puget Sound (Area 11) in Tacoma. Hood Canal (Area 12) is open through April 30, and southern Puget Sound is open year-round.

Other great spring-time options are Columbia River spring chinook, bottom-fishing for lingcod and black rockfish or razor clam digging off the coast, and statewide trout and kokanee fishing.

Word on NW Salmon Derby Series

We’ve hit the pause button on derby series with March ending on a high note!

The Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby March 9-11 saw one of the largest number of tickets sold in some years – 857 compared to 739 last year, plus 232 fish weighed-in.

A tie for top fish was Micah Hanley of Mount Vernon and Kyle Madison of Port Angeles with a 16.85-pound hatchery chinook worth $10,000 and $2,000 respectively. Top prize in a tie-breaker goes to whomever caught the fish first. The total fish weight was 1,891 pounds and fish averaged 8.15 pounds.

The Everett Blackmouth Salmon Derby on March 17-18 saw 125 boats with 383 participants hitting the water and 130 weighed-in. First place went to Sam Shephard of Tulalip with a 11.82-pound fish, which earned a prize of $4,000.

Next up is Bellingham Salmon Derby on July 13-15 hosted by the Bellingham Chapter of PSA.

Be sure to check out grand prize $65,000 KingFisher 2025 Falcon Series boat at the PSA Monroe Sportsman Show on April 20-22 (http://monroesportsmanshow.com/). It is powered with a Honda 150hp and 9.9hp trolling motors on an EZ-loader trailer, and fully-rigged with Scotty downriggers; Raymarine Electronics; custom WhoDat Tower; and Dual Electronic stereo. Drawing for the boat will take place at conclusion of derby series. For details, go to http://www.nwsalmonderbyseries.com/.

2018 salmon season setting process update

Final salmon seasons will be adopted at Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting on April 6-11 in Portland, Oregon.

After six weeks of this setting process, negotiations between the state and tribes seem to paint a brighter picture on what anglers can expect in 2018-19 although chinook and coho returns are still in recovery phase after several years of poor ocean and weather conditions.

As of press time for this publication, there was some very early concepts of possibilities, and if all the stars align we could see Puget Sound coho fishing coming back into the mix during late-summer and early-fall from Sekiu clear into Puget Sound. Summer chinook fishing options will closely resemble last year’s package with a few expansions.

Ocean fisheries also came to light, and it could be leaner for chinook and coho although sometimes abundance doesn’t relate to ocean availability so there’s a lot of guessing in terms of what will pan out.

Tentative opening dates at Ilwaco, Westport, La Push and Neah Bay will either be June 23, June 24, June 30 or July 1. A general closure date is Sept. 3 or however long it takes for quotas to get eaten up at each port. The popular Buoy 10 salmon fishery will open Aug. 1.

One hot topic is the killer whale situation as WDFW and federal agencies deal with human interaction on local waterways. WDFW is looking for ways to avoid this, and has proposed various ideas like a sport-fishing closure along the west side of San Juan Island in the summer that has drawn some resistance by those attending the North of Falcon meetings.

Many find the whole process befuddling, and while it’s easy to get discouraged I take the approach to be mobile with my tow vehicle and boat; actively take part in the season-setting process; and be an advocate for salmon recovery.

You can groan about what isn’t happening in your neck of the woods or you can high tail it to where the fishing is good albeit the coast, Puget Sound, Strait or connecting inner-waterways.

Meeting conservation objectives and getting the right folks at WDFW to spearhead the policy front is also of upmost importance as well as maximizing selective salmon fisheries to provide opportunity while protecting poor wild chinook and coho runs.

I’ll get off my soap box as it’s time to go fishing. See you on the water!

State, Tribal Fishery Managers To Talk Salmon, Answer Questions At April 3 NOF Meeting

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Anglers, commercial fishers, and others interested in salmon in Washington can take part in an informal discussion with state and tribal fish managers on April 3.

The public meeting is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. at the Lynnwood Embassy Suites, 20610 44th Ave. W., Lynnwood.

The plenary session takes place during the annual salmon season-setting process known as North of Falcon, which includes a series of public meetings involving federal, state, tribal and industry representatives as well as other concerned citizens.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will meet with the public earlier in the day on April 3 to consider proposals for potential recreational and non-treaty commercial salmon fishing seasons this year. Those discussions will continue in the late afternoon.

Representatives of the state’s treaty tribes will join state fish managers after lunch to discuss with the public a variety of salmon-related issues including conservation objectives for Puget Sound chinook salmon, habitat restoration efforts and salmon fisheries. The public will be invited to ask questions after brief opening remarks by the state and tribal co-managers.

The annual process of setting salmon fishing seasons is held in conjunction with public meetings conducted by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC). The council is responsible for establishing fishing seasons in ocean water 3 to 200 miles off the Pacific coast.

The PFMC is scheduled to adopt final ocean fishing seasons and harvest levels at its April 6-11 meeting in Portland, Ore. The 2018-19 salmon fisheries package for Washington’s inside waters is expected to be completed by the state and tribal co-managers during the PFMC’s April meeting.

Information about the salmon season-setting process, as well as a list of other meetings, is available on WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/.