Tag Archives: razor clams

Next Round Of Washington Razor Clam Digs Set

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Razor clam diggers can return to various ocean beaches for a four-day opening beginning Dec. 6.

(JASON BAUER)

State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and evening low tides:

  • Dec. 6, Thursday, 6:01 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 7, Friday, 6:40 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 8, Saturday, 7:16 p.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 9, Sunday, 7:53 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results.

Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly in the fall when the best low tides come after dark, he added.

WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Dec. 20-23, pending results of future toxin tests. More information on planned digs can be found on WDFW’s razor clam webpage at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2018-19 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

 

New Report Paints Rough Future For Northwest Fish, Wildlife

A new report paints a rough go of it for fish, shellfish and wildlife in the Northwest.

Released over the recent long holiday weekend, the federal Fourth National Climate Assessment looks at economic and other impacts that warming and drying could have on our region by the end of this century.

It projects that Washington salmon habitat will be reduced by 22 percent under a scenario that includes continued high emissions of greenhouse gases.

A SCREEN GRAB FROM A USGS VIDEO SHOWS A SOCKEYE SUFFERING FROM LESIONS SWIMMING AROUND DRANO LAKE IN AN ATTEMPT TO ESCAPE THE HOT WATERS OF THE MAINSTEM COLUMBIA RIVER DURING A DEADLY EARLY SUMMER 2015 HEATWAVE. (USGS)

“This habitat loss corresponds to more than $3 billion in economic losses due to reductions in salmon populations and decreases in cold-water angling opportunities,” the report states.

Higher fall and winter flows and less and warmer water in spring and summer will impact Chinook, coho, sockeye, pink and chum salmon spawning, hatchery production and reintroduction efforts.

“Recreational razor clamming on the coast is also expected to decline due to cumulative effects of ocean acidification, harmful algal blooms, higher temperatures, and habitat degradation,” it adds.

A 2016 bloom affecting Washington’s South Coast led to a 25 percent increase in the number of local families in need of food bank help due to the importance of digging dollars, the report states.

It says that deer and elk may actually thrive due to less winterkill and improving habitat because of increased wildfires, but could also be impacted by “increases in disease and disease-carrying insects and pests.”

“If deer and elk populations increase, the pressures they place on plant ecosystems (including riparian systems) may benefit from management beyond traditional harvest levels,” it states.

With droughts and more drying hitting key wetland areas, “Further management of waterfowl habitat is projected to be important to maintain past hunting levels,” the report adds.

At its heart for the region, the assessment states that what we saw in 2015 due to the Blob — very low snowpack, early meltout, high summer temperatures, large wildfires — could be a prelude of what is to come.

“Low summer stream levels and warm waters, which amplified a naturally occurring fish disease, resulted in widespread fish die-offs across the region, including hundreds of thousands of sockeye salmon in the Columbia and Snake River Basins. And for the first time ever, Oregon implemented a statewide daily fishing curtailment beginning in July 2015 to limit added stress on the fish from fishing,” the report reminds readers.

In the ocean, that summer saw “the largest harmful algal bloom recorded” and it hyperlinks to a 2016 paper that lists cool-water species such as subarctic copepods, krill, Dungeness, mussels, salmon and groundfish as Blob losers while tropical copepods, market squid, California rockfish and tuna were winners because of the warm waters.

“This is worrisome because the [2013-15 warm water anomaly] may be a harbinger of things to come. As [sea surface temperatures] continue to rise with increasing global temperatures, many of the same scenarios observed during the WWA may be repeated, with dramatic ecological and economic consequences,” that paper in Oceanography states.

Required by Congress to be produced at regular intervals, this fourth climate assessment was worked on by 13 federal agencies with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as the lead.

As for what to do to head off the changes, the report states:

“Communities, governments, and businesses are working to reduce risks from and costs associated with climate change by taking action to lower greenhouse gas emissions and implement adaptation strategies. While mitigation and adaptation efforts have expanded substantially in the last four years, they do not yet approach the scale considered necessary to avoid substantial damages to the economy, environment, and human health over the coming decades.”

Gobble, Gobble! Thanksgiving Weekend Razor Clam Dig Coming Up

THE FOLLOWING IS A WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

Razor clam diggers can return to various ocean beaches for a four-day opening beginning Nov. 22.

A FULL MOON RISES BEHIND A RAZOR CLAM DIGGER AT COPALIS BEACH IN DECEMBER 2017. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and evening low tides:

·        Nov. 22, Thursday, 5:55 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis

·        Nov. 23, Friday, 6:36 p.m.; -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

·        Nov. 24, Saturday, 7:20 p.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

·        Nov. 25, Sunday, 8:05 p.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results.

Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly in the fall when the best low tides come after dark, he added.

WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Dec. 6-9, pending results of future toxin tests. More information on planned digs can be found on WDFW’s razor clam webpage at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2018-19 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

WDFW OKs Digs At Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis Late Next Week

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Razor clam diggers can return to various ocean beaches for a four-day opening beginning Nov. 8.

(JASON BAUER)

State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and evening low tides:

•  Nov. 8, Thursday, 6:57 p.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
•  Nov. 9, Friday, 7:36 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
•  Nov. 10, Saturday, 8:15 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
•  Nov. 11, Sunday, 8:56 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results.

Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly in the fall when the best low tides come after dark, he added.

WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Nov. 22-25, pending results of future toxin tests. More information on planned digs can be found on WDFW’s razor clam webpage athttps://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2018-19 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

November Weather Schmeather — Too Much To Do This Month On Westside: Yuasa

Editor’s note: The following is Mark Yuasa’s monthly fishing newsletter, Get Hooked on Reel Times With Mark, and is run with permission.

By Mark Yuasa, Director of Grow Boating Programs, Northwest Marine Trade Association

This is the time of the year when anglers often deal with torrential rainfall and windy weather situations. Tack on a lack of fishing opportunities for Puget Sound winter chinook and you just might think November is a lost cause.

Such distress could have you crying out the “sky is falling” like Chicken Little aka “Henny Penny,” but no need to dig that deep into the abyss as there are places to go and fish to catch.

KAYAK FISHING GURU BRAD HOLE SHOWS OFF A CHUM SALMON. (BRAD HOLE)

First and foremost are chum salmon who don’t get the respect despite being one of the hardest-fighting salmon species often ripping line off the reel like an angry king.

A preseason fall chum forecast of 1.2-million – 543,000 destined to central, south-central and southern Puget Sound (Areas 10, 11 and 13) and another 500,000 heading to Hood Canal (12) – should be reason enough to get anglers hungry for something other than a turkey dinner on Thanksgiving.

“The chum run this season is decent and similar to preseason forecasts the last couple of years although northern Puget Sound returns – Nooksack, 77,152; Stillaguamish, 21,640; and Snohomish, 26,091 – are poor,” said Marisa Litz, a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) biologist.

A look back to 2017, revealed central, south-central and southern Puget Sound had a return of 584,420 chum; Hood Canal, 1,060,763; Nooksack-Samish, 45,028; Skagit, 7,108; Stillaguamish, 3,749; and Snohomish, 2,707.

“November is when the recreational fisheries really get going at Whatcom Creek (in Bellingham), Hoodsport (in Hood Canal) and Kennedy Creek (in Totten Inlet),” Litz said. “Look for a later timed chum run in Chehalis and Satsop (river systems).”

Estuarial locations are prime staging spots like Johns Creek in Oakland Bay; Chico Creek in Dyes Inlet; Curly Creek near Southworth; North Bay near Allyn; Perry Creek in Eld Inlet; McLane Creek, Eagle Creek south of Potlatch State Park; and the public-access shores off Highway 101 from Eldon to Hoodsport.

Recent WDFW fish checks showed 27 anglers Sunday (Oct. 28) caught 27 chum at Hoodsport in Hood Canal; six anglers caught Sunday (Oct. 28) three at John’s Creek estuary in Oakland Bay near Shelton; and four anglers Saturday (Oct. 27) caught two at Kennedy Creek estuary in Totten Inlet.

In marine areas, anglers will target chum at Jefferson Head; West Point south of Shilshole Bay; Point Monroe; Allen Bank off Blake Island; Southworth; Colvos Passage; Point Dalco off south side of Vashon Island; Point Defiance Park at Clay Banks off Tacoma; Anderson Island; and Fox Island.

Hitting a “trifecta” is a possibility in south-central and southern Puget Sound (Areas 11 and 13) for a coho, chum and hatchery chinook. Note: In Area 13 you must release wild coho.

Those looking ahead should put Marine Catch Areas 8-1 and 8-2 (east side of Whidbey Island) on the “must do list” which reopens Dec. 1 through April 30 for hatchery-marked chinook. WDFW has set a preseason chinook encounter prediction of 5,473 for both areas. The fishery could shutdown if the encounters exceed 80 percent.

Lastly, don’t forget to bring along your crab pots as some areas of Puget Sound are also open daily through Dec. 31 for Dungeness crab.

Late-season trout are viable option

More than 147,000 rainbow trout will be planted in many statewide lakes to keep the good times rolling through the winter holidays.

“Some lakes in (Puget Sound) region will be getting thousands of trout,” said Justin Spinelli, a WDFW biologist.

Beaver Lake is receiving three allotments of 700 to 800 rainbow trout averaging 1 ½ pounds apiece. The first occurred in mid-October, and others are scheduled around Nov. 20 and Dec. 20.

“Instead of dumping all the fish in at one time we have spread out the plants to make the fishery less of a “circus-like” atmosphere and will allow folks to catch fish well into January and beyond,” Spinelli said of the year-round 60.3-acre lake located on the Issaquah Plateau.

WDFW is ramping up plants at Gissburg Ponds and Tye in Snohomish County; Campbell, Clear and Grandy in Skagit County; Black, Long and Offutt in Thurston County; American and Tanwax in Pierce County; and Anderson in Jefferson County.

“We will also stock Lake Goodwin (northwest of Marysville) in mid-December and this has developed into a nice winter trout fishery,” Spinelli said.

For a list of stocked lakes, go to http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/fall-into-fishing/. To view the WDFW weekly plants, go to https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/.

Razor clam season off to a good start

The coastal razor clam season opened last month with very good digging success.

From Oct. 11-13, 9,545 diggers coast-wide had 139,005 razor clams. Diggers averaged 14.8 at Twin Harbors; 14.7 at Copalis; and 14.2 at Mocrocks. The daily limit is the first 15 clams dug regardless of size or condition.

Digging was spotty to fair on Oct. 25 and 27 at Twin Harbors and Copalis; and Oct. 26 and 28 at Twin Harbors and Mocrcocks and that was due in part to rough surf and breezy conditions.

All digs are reliant on testing for a marine toxin known as domoic acid — a natural marine toxin produced by certain types of marine algae. A high amount of marine toxins can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in adequate quantities. WDFW usually gives final approval one to two weeks prior to each series of digs.

Tentative dates are Nov. 8, 10, 23 and 25, and Dec. 7, 9 and 20 at Twin Harbors and Mocrocks; Nov. 9, 11 and 22, and Dec. 6, 8, 21 and 23 at Twin Harbors and Copalis; Nov. 24 at Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks; and Dec. 22 at Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Mocrocks.

For details, visit https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclam.

2019 NW Salmon Derby Series

The 2018 NW Salmon Derby Series ended on a high note and plans for 2019 include 14 derbies in Washington, Idaho and British Columbia. We should have an announcement soon on our new boat/motor sponsor!

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

First up are the Resurrection Salmon Derby on Jan. 4-6 in Anacortes (http://www.resurrectionderby.com/); Roche Harbor Salmon Classic on Jan. 17-19 (https://www.rocheharbor.com/events/derby), there is currently a waiting list; Friday Harbor Salmon Classic on Feb. 7-9 (http://fridayharborsalmonclassic.com/); and Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby on March 8-10 (http://gardinersalmonderby.org/).

For details, go to www.NorthwestSalmonDerbySeries.com.

While many are getting their holiday shopping lists, and dinner or party plans in order, I’ll be gathering my rain gear and heading out the door to my favorite fishing or razor clam spots.

After all there’s nothing like a feisty chum tugging on the end of your fishing line or digging up a batch of tasty razor clams from a coastal beach!

Clatsop Co. Razor Clamming A No-go Till Next March To Let Bivalves Grow

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The popular razor clam season on Clatsop County beaches will remain closed until March 1, 2019.

ODFW SAYS PUBLIC COMMENT FAVORED ALLOWING CLATSOP COUNTY RAZOR CLAMS TO GROW LARGER BEFORE REOPENING DIGGING. (ODFW)

Extension of the annual conservation closure only applies to Clatsop County beaches, and prohibits all harvest of razor clams (both recreational and commercial) along the 18 mile stretch of beach from Tillamook Head (Seaside) to the mouth of the Columbia River. 

The closure is in place to protect undersize clams and provide better clamming opportunities on Clatsop beaches next year. ODFW’s annual stock assessment survey for razor clams earlier this year found that most clams were too small to be harvested by commercial clammers or desired by recreational clammers. The population was dominated by small clams with shell lengths between 2-3 inches.

ODFW hosted a public meeting Oct. 22 in Seaside to ask for feedback on potential management actions, including closure of the season until spring. Members of the public who attended the meeting and sent in comments supported ODFW’s proposal to delay opening of the season and give clams a chance to grow into a size suitable for harvest.

“We had great feedback from those who attended the meeting and those who could not. The consensus was to give the small clams a chance to grow and delay until the spring to provide a quality razor clamming experience,” stated Matt Hunter, ODFW Shellfish Project Leader. “During the closure, ODFW shellfish staff will continue to monitor the growth of razor clams to ensure they are growing adequately.” 

Typically, razor clamming reopens Oct. 1 each year after an annual July 14-Sept. 30 conservation closure. Check the latest regulations at ODFW’s Clamming and Crabbing Report, https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/crabbing-clamming-report/marine-zone

Oct. 25-28 Razor Clam Digs Scheduled At 3 Washington Beaches

THE FOLLOWING IS A WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

Razor clam diggers can return to various ocean beaches for a four-day opening beginning Oct. 25.

State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

RAZOR CLAMMERS WORK THE BEACH DURING AN EARLY 2010 SEASON. (JASON BAUER)

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and evening low tides:

  • Oct. 25, Thursday, 7:55 p.m.; -0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 26, Friday, 8:36 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 27, Saturday, 9:19 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 28, Sunday, 10:08 p.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results.

Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly in the fall when the best low tides come after dark, he added.

WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Nov. 8-11, pending results of future toxin tests. More information on planned digs can be found on WDFW’s razor clam webpage at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2018-19 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

Fall’s First Razor Clam Dig Set For Oct. 11-13

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The first razor clam dig of the fall season will get underway Oct. 11-13 at various ocean beaches.

RAZOR CLAMMERS WORK THE BEACH DURING AN EARLY 2010 SEASON. (JASON BAUER)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has approved the dig on evening tides at Twin Harbors, Copalis, and Mocrocks after marine toxin tests showed that clams on those beaches are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and evening low tides:

•       Oct. 11, Thursday, 8:58 p.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

•       Oct. 12, Friday, 9:41 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis

•       Oct. 13, Saturday, 10:26 p.m.; +0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results.

Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly in the fall when the best low tides come after dark, he added.

“Digging after dark brings with it the spectacle of thousands of small lights representing individual razor clam diggers working their way up and down the beach,” said Ayres.

WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Oct. 25-28, pending results of future toxin tests. More information on planned digs can be found on WDFW’s razor clam webpage at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2018-19 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

ODFW Delays Razor Clam Digging on Clatsop County Beaches

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW will delay the opening of fall razor clam harvest along the Clatsop beaches from the traditional date of Oct. 1 to Nov. 1 at the earliest , to allow time to collect public feedback on management options in light of a recent stock assessment.

OREGON SHELLFISH MANAGERS SAY ITS NORTHERN RAZOR CLAM POPULATION IS ON THE SMALL SIDE. ONE OPTION IS TO POSTPONE DIGGING THROUGH THE WINTER TO ALLOW THEM TO GROW TO LARGER SIZE. (ODFW)

Extension of the annual conservation closure only applies to Clatsop County beaches, and prohibits all harvest of razor clams (both recreational and commercial) along the 18 mile stretch of beach from Tillamook Head (Seaside) to the mouth of the Columbia River, until the closure is lifted. 

ODFW recently completed the annual stock assessment survey for razor clams along the Clatsop beaches. The survey found that most clams are too small to be harvested by commercial clammers or desired by recreational clammers. 

“Razor clams are moderately abundant on Clatsop beaches this fall, but the population is currently dominated by small clams with shell lengths between 2-3 inches,” said ODFW Shellfish Biologist Matt Hunter. “Recreational clammers typically try to avoid these small clams, and they are smaller than the 3 ¾” minimum size allowed for commercial harvest.” 

According to Hunter, domination of the razor clam population by small clams is far from normal. “In 2004, we also saw large numbers of small razor clams along Clatsop beaches, but they were more variable in size with a few medium and large clams,” he explained. “Right now, it is difficult to find any razor clams larger than 4 inches.” 

During the month of October, ODFW staff will hold a public meeting to solicit feedback regarding potential management actions that may be taken to protect undersize clams and provide better clamming opportunities next spring. Options include extending the closure through the winter to give clams time to grow into a size suitable for harvest.

Recently, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife delayed the traditional October razor clam digs on the Long Beach peninsula until late December due to similar concerns about the population and small size of clams. In Oregon, the population includes even fewer medium and large razor clams.

 Most beaches along the Oregon coast are currently open for razor clamming.  However, the south coast from the south jetty Umpqua River to the California border remains closed to razor clamming due to elevated marine biotoxins. Harvest of razor clams may be postponed at anytime due to elevated domoic acid or other marine biotoxins. 

Bay clams and crab remain open for recreational harvesting along the entire Oregon coast. Mussels are open for recreational harvest along most of the Oregon coast, but harvest of mussels is closed from the south jetty of the Coquille River to the California border. For more information please call ODA’s shellfish safety information Hotline at (800) 448-2474 or visit the ODA Recreational Shellfish Biotoxin Closures webpage or ODFW’s Recreation Report – Crabbing and Clamming page

WDFW Sets Tentative Fall-Winter Razor Clamming Schedule, Numbers Mostly Up

THE FOLLOWING IS A WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has announced a tentative schedule for the fall razor clam season set to begin in early October.

CADEN AND NATHAN HOLDER DISPLAY RAZOR CLAMS DUG ON THE WASHINGTON COAST THIS PAST JANUARY. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Final approval of all scheduled openings will depend on results of marine toxin tests (https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/domoic_levels.html), which are usually conducted about a week before a dig is scheduled to begin.

“We’re releasing a tentative schedule to give people plenty of time to make plans to go digging this fall,” said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for WDFW.

State shellfish managers are also seeking public input on management options, including scheduling for spring digs. Comments on the spring digs can be sent via email to razorclams@dfw.wa.gov.

A summary of last season and an overview of the recently completed razor clam stock assessment is available via WDFW’s 2018-19 Razor Clam Management Plan at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/seasons_set.html.

Based on beach surveys conducted this summer, WDFW estimates the total razor clam population on most Washington’s beaches has increased significantly from last season, which means more days of digging this season. The exception is Long Beach, an area that is recovering after a decline in clam survival due to low salinity in winter 2017.

“The good news is that future digging opportunities look really great, with some opportunity even at Long Beach,” Ayres said. “This is shaping up to be a great season for digging on the coast.”

Proposed razor clam digs through December are listed below, along with evening low tides and beaches:

  • Oct. 11, Thursday, 8:58 p.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 12, Friday, 9:41 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 13, Saturday, 10:26 p.m.; +0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

 

  • Oct. 25, Thursday, 7:55 p.m.; -0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 26, Friday, 8:36 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 27, Saturday, 9:19 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 28, Sunday, 10:08 p.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

 

  • Nov. 8, Thursday, 6:57 p.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 9, Friday, 7:36 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Nov. 10, Saturday, 8:15 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 11, Sunday, 8:56 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis

 

  • Nov. 22, Thursday, 5:55 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Nov. 23, Friday, 6:36 p.m.; -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 24, Saturday, 7:20 p.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 25, Sunday, 8:05 p.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

 

  • Dec. 6, Thursday, 6:01 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 7, Friday, 6:40 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 8, Saturday, 7:16 p.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 9, Sunday, 7:53 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

 

  • Dec. 20, Thursday, 4:51 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 21, Friday, 5:35 p.m.; -1.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 22, Saturday, 6:20 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 23, Sunday, 7:05 p.m.; -1.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis

WDFW is working with staff at Olympic National Park to assess possible digging dates on Kalaloch beach, said Ayres.

For more information about recreational razor clamming, visit WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.