Tag Archives: rainbow trout

55 Washington Lakes Being Stocked For Fall Fishing

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

With thousands of rainbow trout destined for Washington lakes before November, anglers should have plenty of places to enjoy great fishing this fall and through the holiday season.

XANDER YARNOLD AND HIS GRANDPA JIM GILBERTSON TEAM UP TO LAND A NICE-SIZED RAINBOW TROUT AT LELAND LAKE NEAR QUILCENE YESTERDAY. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will stock at least 55 Washington lakes with catchable-size trout this fall. Additionally, the department stocks millions of smaller trout each spring, many of which will have grown to catchable size.

“Fall is the time to reel in a nice-sized trout, and our crews are working hard to build on a Northwest tradition of fishing through the seasons,” said Steve Caromile, WDFW’s warmwater fish program manager. “Most of the stocked trout are 13 to 15 inches long, with a few larger ones in the mix.”

Some of the lakes recently stocked include Island Lake in Kitsap County; Island, Lost, Nahwatzel, and Spencer lakes in Mason County; Lake Sylvia in Grays Harbor County; and Gibbs, Teal and Leland lakes in Jefferson County.

Dozens of additional lakes will be stocked throughout the state in October and November providing fishing opportunities into the new year.

The complete list of lakes to be stocked, and the department’s recently updated stocking plan, are available for viewing at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/fall-into-fishing/.

The fall fish plants are in response to anglers’ requests to increase fall and winter trout fishing opportunities, said Caromile.

The effort also includes stocking lakes across the state for the Nov. 23 Black Friday opener, which offers anglers the opportunity to skip the shopping malls, get outside and enjoy fishing on the day after Thanksgiving.

For up-to-date stocking information this fall, anglers should follow the department on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook, accessible from http://wdfw.wa.gov, or see the department’s weekly catchable trout stocking report at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/.

XANDER YARNOLD SHOWS OFF HIS LELAND LAKE CATCH, A PAIR OF FRESHLY STOCKED, POWERBAIT-BITING ‘BOWS TO 17 INCHES LONG. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

To participate, anglers must have a current Washington freshwater fishing license valid through March 31, 2019.

Licenses can be purchased by telephone at 1-866-246-9453, at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov, or at hundreds of license vendors across the state. For details on license vendor locations, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/.

FISHING WAS ACTUALLY SCHOOLWORK FOR XANDER, A BIOLOGY LESSON. HE READS WHILE PATIENTLY WAITING FOR MORE FISH TO BITE AT LELAND. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

5 Coos Bay-area Lakes To Be Stocked With Nice-sized ‘Bows

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

Anglers looking for large rainbow trout should head to Coos Bay area lakes soon. Next week, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is stocking five lakes with 14 to 16-inch rainbow trout for great fall fishing.

FALL FINDS NORTHWESTERNERS FOLLOWING SALMON RUNS AND HEADING TO HUNTING CAMP, BUT ONE WESTERN OREGON FAMILY MAKES ITS WAY TO COOS COUNTY FOR TROUT FISHING. (ODFW)

Upper Empire Lake is getting 3,200 trout. Lower Empire will not be stocked due to low water, warm temperatures and weeds. Instead, Butterfield Lake, accessed through Riley Ranch County Park will now receive 1,400 rainbows. Butterfield anglers might also hook into a warmouth, an unusual fish that looks like a crappie with a bass head.

Saunders Lake will receive 1,300 trout. This lake is about five miles north of North Bend and is an easily accessed, pleasant place to take the family fishing. Three miles south of Bandon, Bradley Lake is getting 1,600 trout and Powers Pond will receive 1,300.

This is ODFW’s final trout stocking of the year for Coos County and gives anglers a “last chance” opportunity before winter hits and the weather is not conducive to trout fishing. The rainbow trout harvest limit in most lakes is five fish per day, two daily limits in possession.

Check myodfw.com for fishing tips and the latest Recreation Report.

OSP Wildlife Troopers’ August Newsletter Details Interesting Case

Not all game warden work is an open and shut case.

A bighorn sheep seized in late summer by Oregon wildlife troopers was later returned to the hunter after video evidence showed her first shot had in fact killed it.

(NICK MYATT, ODFW)

The incident is detailed in the August monthly newsletter of the state police’s Fish and Wildlife Division, with a trooper out of the Lakeview office initially responding to a report that a ram had been shot by someone without a tag.

According to the reporting individual, the shooter had twice fired at and missed the wild sheep, and then a person accompanying the tagholder had fired and downed the animal.

When the trooper met the pair as they came out of the field with the bighorn, he found that the hunter had failed to validate her once-in-a-lifetime tag and cited her for it. While the other admitted to shooting at the bighorn lest it get away, they claimed they had in fact missed it.

Nonetheless, both the rifle and ram were seized by the officer.

But the case wasn’t closed quite yet.

“Hours later, a video from an unrelated hunter group was located and it showed the sheep was killed by the first shot which was from the lawful tag holder,” OSP’s newsletter states.

No word on the gun, but with the video evidence, troopers were able to return the sheep to the hunter.

While that case featured interesting twists and turns, others written up in the August report are more straight ahead.

Here are some of those cases:

A F&W Trooper received a call regarding five elk being shot by three male subjects. Troopers responded to the location. Subsequent to an interview, a male subject admitted he shot an elk for himself and an elk for his wife. Ultimately three male subjects killed five elk but only had three tags. It was unknown which male subject killed the fifth elk as they were all shooting into a herd of an estimated 100 elk. The Troopers seized two elk and a rifle as evidence. The male subject who killed the two elk was cited for Lend, Borrow or Sell Big Game Tag and Take/Possession of Antlerless Elk. The female was cited for Lend, Borrow or Sell Big Game Tag. The two other male subjects were both cited for Aiding/Counseling in a Wildlife Offense.

A F&W Trooper observed a subject angling on the North Santiam River in Linn County near a Forest Service Road. The investigation revealed that the subject had caught and retained 21 hatchery trout and had a fish on his line when he was contacted. The subject was criminally cited for Exceeding Daily Bag Limit of Fish and a fishing pole was seized. The trout were seized and donated to the Union Gospel Mission in Salem.

A F&W Trooper was working an evening shellfish patrol on Nehalem Bay when he contacted a group of subjects crabbing from the Wheeler City dock at dusk. The subjects were just leaving and had a white cooler with them. When asked to show their catch the subjects revealed 20 male Dungeness crab, 18 of which were measured and found to be undersize by at least an inch. Two subjects were cited for Take/Possession of Undersize Dungeness Crab. One subject gave the Trooper a Washington Driver’s license and a resident shellfish license. The subject was additionally cited for Falsely Applied for License or Tag.

A F&W Trooper noticed that a local resident had built a large beach out into an essential salmonid habitat stream. The Trooper contacted the landowner who admitted to using about five yards of sand to construct the beach. The case was referred to Department of State Lands for civil action and the landowner is currently working with DSL and ODFW to repair the damage he caused.

Elsewhere is a blurb that describes how troopers helped two families who experienced flat tires in the Ochocos, including loaning a portable air compressor to one man so he could safely make his way back home to Redmond and then later return the device, all on the promise of a handshake.

Great job, troopers!

Groundbreaking Set For $16.4 Million Puyallup Hatchery Renovation Project

Washington fish and wildlife officials, local tribal representatives and state lawmakers will break ground tomorrow to mark the start of a $16.4 million renovation of the historic Puyallup Hatchery.

THE FACADE OF THE PUYALLUP HATCHERY REFLECTS THE ERA IT WAS BUILT IN, THE YEARS RIGHT AFTER WORLD WAR II. THE FACILITY WILL UNDERGO A $16.4 MILLION RENOVATION THAT WILL INCREASE TROUT, SALMON AND STEELHEAD CAPACITY TO SUPPORT SPORTFISHING AND CONSERVATION PROGRAMS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The remodel will increase salmon and trout production at the facility built in the 1940s, resulting in more sport opportunity, as well as support conservation programs in the watershed.

WDFW says the project will allow them to rear an extra 50,000 rainbow trout, along with 800,000 spring Chinook, 300,000 coho and 200,000 steelhead at the facility.

The coho represent new capacity and will be adipose-fin clipped, according to agency hatchery manager Eric Kinne.

A WDFW WORKER CLEANS A RACEWAY AT THE PUYALLUP HATCHERY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The springers are for release at the White River acclimation ponds and are part of a restoration program, he says. They’re marked with a ventral clip.

Details on the steelhead are “still being worked out,” Kinne says.

Salmon production will begin in fall 2019, when work at the site is expected to wrap up.

NETS AND A SIPHON HANG ON THE WALL OF THE PUYALLUP HATCHERY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Funding comes from the state Capital Budget and sale of general obligation bonds, according to WDFW. Puyallup’s Prospect Construction won the construction bid.

The groundbreaking is scheduled for 5 p.m. at the hatchery, 1416 14th Street SW, Puyallup, just southwest of the state fairgrounds and along lower Clarks Creek. The public is welcome.

A HATCHERY WORKER SETS A METAL FENCE IN PLACE TO CORRAL RAINBOW TROUT IN A REARING POND AT THE PUYALLUP HATCHERY. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

SW WA Fishing Report (5-29-18)

THE FOLLOWING ARE ODFW AND WDFW REPORTS FORWARDED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Estuary WSG Update

From: Jimmy Watts <Jimmy.W.Watts@state.or.us>
Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 2:49 PM
Subject: Estuary WSG Update

Over the Memorial Day Weekend, sturgeon anglers in the estuary made 3,609 trips and kept 466 white sturgeon

DAVE ANDERSON CAUGHT THIS STURGEON IN THE COLUMBIA ESTUARY OVER THE HOLIDAY WEEKEND. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Columbia River Estuary White Sturgeon Sport Update

https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html

TAC meeting – 29 May 2018

The Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) met this morning and after reviewing available information it was agreed that there was insufficient reason to change the run update from last week. So the spring Chinook forecast of upriver Spring Chinook at the Columbia River mouth remains 116,500. TAC expects that LCR harvest estimates from the sport fishery and SAFE fisheries later today, as well as additional information from fish passage at Bonneville will provide a clearer picture at next weeks TAC meeting for consideration of run size.

River flows continue to be very high and preliminary reports indicate river conditions have been suboptimal.

Washington Columbia River mainstem and its tributaries sport sampling summaries for May 21-28

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – (I-5 Br downstream) – 7 bank rods and 1 boat rod had no catch.  Above the I-5 Br. – 64 bank rods kept 12 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook.  12 boat rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook and 1 steelhead.

Last week Tacoma Power employees recovered 34 winter-run steelhead, 134 spring Chinook adults, six spring Chinook jacks, and nine summer-run steelhead during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released one winter-run steelhead into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton and they released three winter-run steelhead into the Cispus River near Yellow Jacket Creek.

Tacoma Power also released five spring Chinook adults and one spring Chinook jack into Lake Scanewa near Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 6,320 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Tuesday, May 29. Water visibility is 14 feet and the water temperature is 48.7 degrees F.

From the Lexington (Sparks) Road Bridge upstream to 400 feet or boundary markers below the barrier dam – From June 1 through July 31, barbed hooks will be allowed for salmon, steelhead, and cutthroats.

Starting June 1, the area that is closed to fishing below the Cowlitz River barrier dam will expand from 100 feet to 400 feet to help increase the number of spring Chinook arriving at the salmon hatchery. We had projected that 5,000 spring Chinook would return to the river this year, but they’re tracking well below that now. Expanding the area that’s closed to fishing will help ensure we can meet hatchery broodstock goals and continue to move fish to the upper Cowlitz watershed for fishing opportunities and reintroduction efforts. The no-fishing zone will be posted with signs until further notice.

East Fork Lewis River from the mouth to 400 feet below Horseshoe Falls (except closures around various falls) and the Washougal River from the mouth to Salmon Falls Bridge – Under permanent rules these areas will be open to fishing with bait for hatchery steelhead beginning the first Saturday in June.

Kalama River – 9 bank and 3 boat anglers had no catch.

Lewis River (mainstem) – 5 bank rods had no catch.  11 boat rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook.

Lewis River (North Fork) – 33 bank rods kept 7 adult spring Chinook and 1 steelhead.  8 boat rods had no catch.

Wind River (mouth) – 3 bank rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook.  96 boat rods kept 32 adult and 2 jack spring Chinook and released 1 adult spring Chinook.

Drano Lake – 145 boat rods kept 53 adult and 2 jack spring Chinook and released 7 adult spring Chinook.

Klickitat River from the mouth (Burlington Northern Railroad Bridge) upstream to the Fisher Hill Bridge and from 400 feet upstream from #5 fishway upstream to the boundary markers below the salmon hatchery – Effective June 1, the salmon daily limit is 6 hatchery Chinook of which no more than two may be adults. In addition, up to 3 hatchery steelhead may be retained. Wild chinook must be released. Open 7 days per week.

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam –  Last week we sampled 495 anglers, including 74 boats, with 32 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook and 16 steelhead.  23 (72%) of the adult Chinook and 14 (88%) of the steelhead were kept.

Fish were caught throughout the river.

Trout

Recent plants of rainbows and cutthroats into SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish per Pound
Hatchery
Notes

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 21, 2018
Cutthroat
3,259
1.88
SKAMANIA HATCHERY

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 21, 2018
Rainbow
1,500
1.3
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Cutthroat
3,237
2.26
SKAMANIA HATCHERY

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
1,700
1.3
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

HORSETHIEF LK (KLIC)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=HORSETHIEF+LK+%28KLIC%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
4,000
2.5
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

LITTL WHITE SALMON R<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LITTL+WHITE+SALMON+R&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
3,022
2.25
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

SPRING CR 30.0106<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SPRING+CR++++30.0106&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
3,030
2.27
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

BATTLE GROUND LK (CLAR)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=BATTLE+GROUND+LK+%28CLAR%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Clark County – Region 5
May 23, 2018
Rainbow
1,835
2.26
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

LEWIS CO PRK PD-S (LEWI)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LEWIS+CO+PRK+PD-S+%28LEWI%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Lewis County – Region 5
May 24, 2018
Rainbow
720
1.8
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

SWIFT POWER CANAL (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SWIFT+POWER+CANAL+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 24, 2018
Rainbow
2,670
2.67
SPEELYAI HATCHERY

SWOFFORD PD (LEWI)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SWOFFORD+PD+%28LEWI%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Lewis County – Region 5
May 24, 2018
Rainbow
3,600
1.8
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

Swift Reservoir – Expected to be planted with 45,000 catchable size rainbows before the June 2nd opener.

Shad

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – 60 shad anglers (including 10 boats) kept 289 and released 191 fish, an average of 6 fish per person.  A check of bank anglers just below Bonneville Dam today averaged 11.6 fish kept/released per person based on mainly incomplete trips.  Some anglers had up to 50 fish!

Idaho Angler Sets New High Mark For C&R Rainbows With 30-plus-incher

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME

Would you release a 30.5-inch rainbow trout if you caught it? David Raisch of Pocatello did, and he’s now a state-record holder.

FLY FISHING GUIDE DAVID RAISCH AND HIS 30.5-INCH SNAKE RIVER RAINBOW TROUT. (DAVID RAISCH VIA IDFG)

Raisch caught his record fish in late March and recently submitted it into Idaho Fish and Game’s catch and release records, which allows anglers to claim a state record while letting the fish live. The program started in 2016, and it complements the traditional “certified weight” records that require anglers to weigh the fish on a certified scale, which means the fish is typically killed.

Raisch was fly fishing in the Snake River when he landed the record rainbow, which coincidentally is where the previous record of 29.3 inches was caught.

If you catch a big fish and want to enter it in the catch and release records, here are the general guidelines:

  • Fish must be released alive.
  • All fish must be measured and photographed in the water.
  • Catch-and-Release Records are based only on the total length from snout to tip of tail. Measure the total length from the tip of the snout to the end of the tail, with lobes of tail squeezed together.
  • Fish must be photographed directly next to a ruler/tape or an object of known verifiable length (such as the fishing rules booklet).
  • At least one photo of the angler with the fish.
  • At least one witness to the measurement and release.
  • White Sturgeon records must be broken by a minimum of 2 inches.
  • Records for all other species must be broken by a minimum of ½ inch.
  • All applications must be submitted within 30 days of the catch date.

Here are more details on all of Idaho’s record fish and how to submit fish into the record books.

‘Most Fun-packed Family Fishing Event’ On Central Coast Coming To Waldport Saturday

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Family fishing is coming to Waldport on Saturday, May 19 when the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and First Baptist Church of Waldport host a family fishing event at Eckman Lake.

ANGLERS CAST FROM THE ECKMAN LAKE PIER FOR STOCKER TROUT RELEASED BY ODFW FOR A FAMILY FISHING EVENT. (ODFW PHOTO)

The event will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. for youth ages 17 and younger.  Each participant will be able to catch two rainbow trout from a fish enclosure stocked with more than 2,000 rainbow trout, including 50 “trophy” fish.

“This is the most fun-packed family fishing event on the mid Coast,” said Christine Clapp, ODFW biologist. The First Baptist Church of Waldport hosts a carnival for children of all ages,across the street, so there is plenty to do and see. “Families are bound to make memories that will last a lifetime, said Clapp.

Additional features of the event carnival include a bouncy house, obstacle course, target practice games, cotton candy and lots of other fun activities. Kids can also make their own fishing lures and flies, get some extra cast practice with a backyard game, and learn about fish anatomy and physiology while volunteers clean their catch.

Eckman Lake is located about 2.5 miles east of Waldport on Highway 34. The family fishing area will be set up at Nelson State Recreation Area across from the First Baptist Church parking lot.

The event is open to everyone, and no pre-registration is required. Participants can register at the church upon arrival to get a free goodie bag. Anglers 11 years old and younger do not need a fishing license but 12-17 year olds will need a youth license, which can be purchased for $10 at any ODFW license agent, ODFW office or on-line at ODFW’s website (www.odfw.com). Licenses will not be sold at the event. The youth license includes angling, hunting, shellfish and the Columbia River basin endorsement.

Yuasa Reviews Washington 2018 Salmon Seasons, Looks Ahead To Halibut, Shrimping

Editor’s note: The following is Mark Yuasa’s monthly fishing newsletter, Get Hooked on Reel Times With Mark, and is run with permission.

By Mark Yuasa, Director of Grow Boating Programs, Northwest Marine Trade Association

The months are flying by faster than a coho hitting your bait in the prop wash.

It felt like “Yesterday” – an ode to a classic Beatles song – when we gathered in Lacey on Feb. 27 to see what the salmon forecasts had in store for us. Now a season package is “Signed, Sealed and Delivered” – did you say Stevie Wonder? – for anglers to digest and begin making plans on where to wet a line.

The process known as “North of Falcon” (NOF) culminated April 6-11 in Portland, Oregon, and I was on-hand as a sport-fishing observer.

JUSTIN WONG HOLDS UP A NICE KING SALMON HE CAUGHT LAST SUMMER IN THE OCEAN OFF WESTPORT. (MARK YUASA, NMTA)

When proposed seasons came to light in mid-March it was like a feisty trophy king tugging on end of a line, which after a long battle unhooked itself at the boat causing the lead weight to smack you right in the eye.

While grief and a swollen black eye set in, you might have been down in the dumps. But, my mantra has been to never whine about what you can’t do or lost (the trophy king in paragraph above), and more on making the most of the present moment.

Life throws you lemons so make sweet lemonade because if you don’t your head will go into a swift-moving tidal tail-spin and turn your fishing line into a messy tangled web of hurt.

The initial good news is environmental conditions – El Nino, warm water temperatures, a “Blob” and droughts – that have plagued us with restrictions going back to 2015-16 appear to be in the rear-view mirror.

Secondly, was the warmth (albeit mixed feelings by some NOF attendees) of unity and transparency between user groups despite a usual difference in opinions over how the whole pie of sport, tribal and non-tribal fisheries was divvied up.

These are signals of “baby steps” in a complicated process that long has been filled with arguments, bitterness, cultural indifference, protests and a fight over that “last salmon” dating back to Boldt Decision.

The true litmus test of how long this “hand-holding” philosophy will last between all parties is essential as we move forward to ensure our iconic Pacific Northwest salmon runs will be around for generations to come. Even more so as we carry the torch of a long-term Puget Sound Chinook Management Plan to the federal fishery agency’s table later this year, which will dictate how we fish from 2019 to 2029 and beyond.

“Now that we’ve finished this process we need to work on being responsible with conservation, habitat issues and simply change our philosophy to create a long-term management plan,” Ron Warren, the WDFW salmon policy coordinator said at conclusion of Portland meetings.

While being mindful of that briny future, let’s go over highlights of our fisheries at hand.

A positive are extended seasons – something that hasn’t happened for several years – for hatchery coho in northern Puget Sound (Area 9) from July through September, and non-select coho in central Puget Sound (Area 10) from June through mid-November. The Puget Sound coho forecast is 557,149.

Another shining star is a South Sound hatchery chinook forecast of 227,420 up 21 percent from 10-year average and a 35 percent increase from 2017.

The northern Puget Sound summer hatchery chinook catch quota is 5,563 – a similar figure to 2017 – and is expected to last one-month when it opens in July.

The elevated forecast is a blessing when south-central Puget Sound (Area 11) opens June 1 especially in popular Tacoma-Vashon Island area. A central Puget Sound hatchery chinook fishery starts July 16 with a cap of 4,743. Area 10 has a coho directed fishery in June at popular places such as Jefferson Head-Edmonds area.

A hatchery king season opens at Sekiu on July 1, and Port Angeles on July 3. Both switch to hatchery coho in mid-August through September.

A summer king fishery in San Juan Islands (Area 7) opens July to August, but September is chinook non-retention.

Late-summer and early-fall coho fisheries will occur in Areas 5, 6, 7, 8-1, 8-2, 11, 12 and 13.

On coast, Ilwaco, La Push and Neah Bay open daily starting June 23, and Westport opens Sundays to Thursdays beginning July 1. Hatchery coho quotas are same as 2017 although chinook quotas are down a decent amount. The popular Buoy 10 salmon fishery opens Aug. 1.

On freshwater scene, a sockeye forecast of 35,002 to Baker River is strong enough to allow fisheries in Baker Lake from July 7-Sept. 7, and a section of Skagit River from June 16-July 15.

The Snohomish, Skykomish and Snoqualmie open Sept. 16 for coho. Sections of Skykomish, Skagit and Cascade open for hatchery chinook beginning June 1. For details on seasons, visit WDFW at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/.

Bounty of May fishing options

There’s nothing more exciting than pulling up a pot loaded with prawn-size spot shrimp during a season that begins May 5.

“I am more positive this year on our spot shrimp projections than the last couple of years,” said Mark O’Toole, a WDFW biologist who is retiring May 18 after an illustrious 36 years with the department, and many thanks for your valued input on shrimp and other fish policies!

BIG PRAWN-SIZE SPOT SHRIMP COME INTO PLAY IN THE MONTHS AHEAD AROUND THE PUGET SOUND REGION. (MARK YUASA, NMTA)

“In general, last year was another good season with relatively high abundance,” he said. “The catch per boat ended up being higher for all areas.”

Look for good shrimping in Strait; San Juan Islands; east side of Whidbey Island; central, south-central and northern Puget Sound; and Hood Canal. Test fishing conducted this spring showed marginal abundance in southern Puget Sound.

Hit pause button on spring chores since trout fishing in statewide lowland lakes is now underway.

Justin Spinelli, a WDFW biologist says 460,000 trout went into Puget Sound region lakes on top of 500-plus statewide lakes planted with 16,840,269 trout – 2,171,307 of them are the standardized size averaging about 11 inches compared to 8-inches in past seasons.

If you prefer a large-sized halibut then head out on May 11. The Washington catch quota is 225,366 pounds down from 237,762 in 2017, and a bump up from 214,110 in 2016, 2015 and 2014. Dates for Neah Bay, La Push, Westport and Strait/Puget Sound are May 11, 13, 25 and 27. Depending on catches other dates are June 7, 9, 16, 21, 23, 28 and 30. Ilwaco opens May 3 with fishing allowed Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays.

Once you get your halibut fix add some black rockfish and lingcod to the cooler. Ilwaco, Westport, Neah Bay and La Push are open for both, and some Puget Sound areas are open for lingcod.

NW Salmon Derby Series hits pause button

While we take a break from a spectacular winter derby series be sure to keep sight of the PSA Bellingham Salmon Derby on July 13-15.

2018 NORTHWEST SALMON DERBY SERIES GRAND PRIZE BOAT. (MARK YUASA, NMTA)

More great news is Edmonds Coho Derby on Sept. 8 and Everett Coho Derby on Sept. 22-23 – the largest derby on West Coast – are likely back on “must do” list. In mean time, check out derby’s grand-prize KingFisher 2025 Falcon Series boat powered with Honda 150hp motor and 9.9hp trolling motor at Anacortes Boat & Yacht Show on May 17-20 at Cap Sante Marina. The $65,000 boat also comes on an EZ-loader trailer, and fully-rigged with Scotty downriggers; Raymarine Electronics; custom WhoDat Tower; and Dual Electronic stereo. Details: http://www.nwsalmonderbyseries.com/.

I’m sprinting out the door with rod in hand so see you on the water!

SW WA, Lower Columbia Fishing Report (4-17-18)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORTS ORIGINATED WITH WDFW AND WERE TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Washington lower Columbia mainstem sport sampling summary – Sat. April 14

From Bonneville Dam downstream to the top of Puget Is., nearly 1,200 salmonid boats and over 600 bank anglers were counted during last Saturday’s flight.

WASHINGTON SIDE CATCH STATS FOR BOAT ANGLERS ON THE APRIL 14 COLUMBIA RIVER SPRING CHINOOK REOPENER. (WDFW)

MASON WEINHEIMER STRUGGLES TO LIFT A 20-POUND HATCHERY SPRING CHINOOK CAUGHT ON THE APRIL 14 REOPENER. HE WAS FISHING IN THE VANCOUVER AREA WITH HIS DAD, JOSH, WHO REPORTED PRETTY FAST ACTION “THAT WAS A GREAT DAY, STARTED AT 12:30 AND BACK ON THE TRAILER AT 3:30,” HE EMAILED. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Washington Columbia River tributaries and lakes sampling summaries – April 9-15

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – From the I-5 Br downstream: 120 bank rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook and 2 steelhead. 17 boat rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook. Above the I-5 Br: 146 bank rods kept 14 adult spring Chinook and 20 steelhead and released 2 steelhead. 199 boat rods kept 3 adult spring Chinook and 49 steelhead and released 4 steelhead.

Most of the spring Chinook were checked at the barrier dam; steelhead at the trout hatchery.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 775 winter-run steelhead, 39 spring Chinook adults and two jacks during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 40 winter-run steelhead into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton and they released 14 winter-run steelhead and one spring Chinook adult into the Cispus River, near Yellow Jacket Creek.

Tacoma Power also released 33 winter-run steelhead and one spring Chinook adult into Lake Scanewa near Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 6,340 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, April 16. Water visibility is 6 feet and the water temperature is 44.6 degrees F.
Kalama River – 33 bank anglers released 1 steelhead. 7 boat anglers had no catch.

Mainstem Lewis River – 15 bank rods released 1 adult spring Chinook. 1 boat angler had no catch.

North Fork Lewis River – 20 bank rods had no catch. 17 boat rods kept 3 adult spring Chinook and released 2 steelhead.

Wind River – 3 boat anglers had no catch.

Drano Lake – 4 boat anglers had no catch.

Klickitat River – 4 bank anglers had no catch.

Trout

Recent plants of catchable size rainbows and cutthroats. No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish per Pound
Hatchery
Notes

LACAMAS LK (CLAR)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LACAMAS+LK+%28CLAR%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Clark County – Region 5
Apr 09, 2018
Rainbow
6,000
2
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

BATTLE GROUND LK (CLAR)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=BATTLE+GROUND+LK+%28CLAR%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Clark County – Region 5
Apr 10, 2018
Rainbow
2,000
2.5
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

BATTLE GROUND LK (CLAR)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=BATTLE+GROUND+LK+%28CLAR%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Clark County – Region 5
Apr 11, 2018
Cutthroat
4,179
2.5
SKAMANIA HATCHERY

HORSESHOE LK (COWL)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=HORSESHOE+LK+%28COWL%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Cowlitz County – Region 5
Apr 11, 2018
Rainbow
3,367
2.6
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

KRESS LK (COWL)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=KRESS+LK+%28COWL%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Cowlitz County – Region 5
Apr 11, 2018
Rainbow
3,120
2.6
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

Tacoma Power released 1,600 rainbow trout into South Lewis County Park Pond.

ODFW’s 2018 Free Family Fishing Events Kick Off April 7 At Canby Pond

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Youth anglers are invited to Canby Pond on Saturday, April 7 for the first of 30 free family fishing events that will take place at locations across Oregon in 2018, compliments of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Outdoor Program.

CANBY POND, WHERE SABRINA LITTLE CAUGHT THIS RAINBOW A FEW SPRINGS AGO, IS THE SITE OF THE FIRST OF 30 FREE FAMILY FISHING EVENTS BEING PUT ON BY THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

This free event is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

To bolster the odds of catching fish, ODFW will release hundreds of rainbow trout into the pond for the event. In addition, ODFW staff and volunteer instructors will be on location to set people up with rods, reels, tackle, and bait. In addition to stocked trout, the pond contains resident largemouth bass, crappie and bluegill.

“We want to make this experience as fun and easy as possible by providing participants everything they need be successful,” said Jeff Fulop, ODFW fishing event coordinator.

Canby Pond is designated under Oregon fishing regulations as a youth-only and angler with disabilities fishing venue. As such, it is restricted to youngsters ages 17 and under as well as persons in possession of a valid Oregon Disabilities Hunting and Fishing License. Under the 2018 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations, youngsters do not need a fishing license until the age of 12. Those ages 12-17 must have a youth license in possession, and these can be purchased for $10 at any ODFW field office, license agent or online at myodfw.com. Licenses will not be issued at the event and must be purchased ahead of time.

Canby Pond is a one-acre pond located at Canby Community Park in the southwest portion of Canby. Access the park by traveling south from Hwy. 99E on SW Berg Parkway.

Canby Pond is one of 350 water bodies in Oregon that ODFW regularly stocks with hatchery trout. Persons who are unable to participate in the Canby youth fishing event can explore many other fishing opportunities, stocking schedules and locations at ODFW’s website, myodfw.com under the Fishing tab.