Tag Archives: quail

Upland Bird, Waterfowl Seasons Begin In Oregon This Weekend

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Several of Oregon’s major bird hunting seasons open in October, including duck (Oct. 5 for Zone 2 eastern Oregon, Oct. 12 for Zone 1 Western Oregon and the Columbia Basin) and chukar, gray partridge and pheasant plus remaining quail seasons (opening on Oct. 5).

CHAD ZOLLER POSES WITH A PAIR OF LONGTAILED ROOSTERS HE BAGGED ON HIS FAMILY’S NORTH-CENTRAL OREGON FARM LAST SEASON. (HUNTING PHOTO CONTEST)

 

Bird hunters will be using ODFW’s new electronic licensing system and have the choice of using either paper or electronic licenses and validations. SportsPac holders are reminded to redeem your 2019-20 Upland Game Bird and Waterfowl Validations by logging in and “purchasing” (at zero cost) these documents before hunting. The free Migratory Game Bird HIP Validation survey can also be completed online in your account. Bird hunters can also purchase or redeem all these documents at license sale agents.

Federal duck stamps (required for duck, goose, merganser, brant hunting) are not sold through ODFW’s licensing system and will not appear on the MyODFW app or in your online account. Hunters need to carry their federal duck stamp in addition to their ODFW licenses. Purchase your stamp at a post office or another location that sells them (such as an outdoor retailer or national wildlife refuge). Electronic Federal duck stamps can also be purchased from several vendors online, see https://www.fws.gov/birds/get-involved/duck-stamp/e-stamp.php for more information.

More fall turkey tags are available for eastern Oregon this year. Fall turkey hunters who choose e-tagging need to use the same method as big game hunters: Validate your turkey tag on the MyODFW app after you harvest it, and then attach flagging tape or some other material to the turkey with Confirmation number, ODFW ID and other information. See page 18 of the Game Bird Regulations for details.

VALLEY, OR CALIFORNIA, QUAIL TAKE TO WING. (HUNTING PHOTO CONTEST)

Below are some highlights on what bird hunters should expect this season. Visit the 2019-20 Game Bird Hunting Forecast to find out more.

Duck: North American duck populations are down from recent highs but still 10 percent above the long-term average. Closer to home, breeding mallard numbers in California, Oregon and Washington were down slightly from last year, though wetland conditions, especially in eastern Oregon, were excellent this spring. The only regulation change hunters should be aware of this season is that the bag limit for pintail has decreased to one per day.

Pheasant: Eastern Oregon’s pheasant numbers have declined after last year’s peak. Production was positive, but overall hunters will find fewer birds on the ground. The highest densities were found in the Malheur, Umatilla, Heppner and Mid-Columbia, districts, respectively. Pheasant brood production was highest in the Heppner, Malheur, Umatilla and Mid-Columbia, districts, respectively.

California quail: Statewide California (valley) quail populations continue on their upward trend, particularly in the high desert. Of the areas surveyed, the highest production effort by California quail was in the Harney, Wallowa, and Mid-Columbia districts, respectively. Biologists found the highest overall densities in the Harney, Malheur and Umatilla districts.

Chukar: Known for their large annual population fluctuations, chukar are down slightly statewide, but are on the increase in southeast Oregon. Overall, Malheur and Harney districts found the highest densities of chukar, followed by the Heppner District. The Malheur and Grant districts had the highest chukar production with an average of 4.5 chicks/adult, followed by Harney (3.6 chicks/adult).

Sign Up For Washington Hunter Ed

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) reminds prospective hunters to complete their hunter education class before hunting season.

“It’s a great time to enroll in hunter education to ensure you can participate in fall hunting seasons,” said David Whipple, WDFW hunter education division manager.

LONGTIME HUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR RANDALL ABSOLON WALKS A PROSPECTIVE SPORTSMAN THROUGH FIRING A BOLT-ACTION RIFLE. (WDFW)

WDFW offers both traditional and online options to complete the hunter education requirement.

“The traditional classroom experience includes direct instruction from certified volunteer instructors, which can be important for younger students,” Whipple said. “The online course offers the same content, but on the student’s schedule. If you take the online course, you must still complete an in-person field skills evaluation.”

All hunters born after Jan. 1, 1972 must complete a hunter education course to buy a hunting license. To find a course and learn about hunter education requirements, new hunters should visit the WDFW hunter education webpage at https://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/requirements/education/basic.

HUNTER ED STUDENTS LISTEN TO AN INSTRUCTOR. ALL PROSPECTIVE HUNTERS BORN AFTER JAN. 1, 1972 MUST TAKE THE COURSE BEFORE GETTING THEIR LICENSE, THOUGH ONE-YEAR DEFERRALS ARE AVAILABLE IN SOME CIRCUMSTANCES. (WDFW)

Those who are unable to complete a hunter education course before the fall hunting seasons may qualify for a hunter education deferral. For more information on the deferral, visit https://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/requirements/education/deferral-program.

 

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Washington 2017 Deer, Elk, Bird Hunting Prospects Out

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

With hunting seasons for deer, elk, waterfowl and upland game birds set to get underway in September, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has issued its annual online guide to hunting opportunities throughout the state.

LOOKING FOR EVERGREEN STATE DEER, ELK, UPLAND BIRDS AND WATERFOWL PROSPECTS? WDFW’S 2017 HUNTING FORECASTS ARE NOW AVAILABLE FOR ALL OF WASHINGTON’S DISTRICTS. (BROWNING PHOTO CONTEST)

WDFW’s Hunting Prospects report, available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/prospects/, provides updated information about game populations, hunting rules and land access in every game-management district in the state.

“This report was compiled by local wildlife biologists to help hunters succeed in the field,” said Anis Aoude, WDFW game division manager. “Whether you’re a seasoned hunter or just getting started, you’ll likely find some helpful information in Hunting Prospects.”

State game managers expect another good year of hunting, although hunters can expect new restrictions on deer and elk hunts in some areas due to the harsh conditions last winter. Meanwhile, hunting prospects for gamebirds are looking up, according to the report.

“This last winter was one of the tougher ones we’ve seen in recent years, and we have to give the herds – particularly those east of the Cascades – some time to rebuild,” Aoude said. “Fortunately, most Washington deer and elk benefitted from a previous string of mild winters, so the affected herds are only slightly below our population objectives.”

Late spring rains also delayed nesting for doves and some other upland game birds, but observations in the field indicate a good hatch this year, said Kyle Spragens, WDFW waterfowl manager.

Especially encouraging is the boom in the state’s waterfowl populations, which have rebounded from the drought of 2015, Spragens said. Among the various species of ducks and geese that breed in Washington state, Canada geese are up by 17 percent, mallards are up by 74 percent and wood ducks are up by 76 percent from last year.

“This year’s long, wet spring was a boon to waterfowl in our state,” Spragens said. “Those local birds will be the focus of hunters’ attention until northern birds arrive later in the year from Canada and Alaska.”

Aoude asks that hunters pay special attention to several new rules that will take effect this year:

  • Youth-only hunts: The traditional bird hunt for hunters under age 16 has been split between two weekends this year, providing more options for them and the non-hunting parents, guardians and mentors who accompany them. The youth hunt for waterfowl is scheduled Sept. 16-17, followed by the youth hunt for pheasant and other upland game birds Sept. 23-24.
  • Goose bag limits: Starting Oct. 14, hunters in most areas will be allowed to take up to six white geese and 10 white-fronted geese – in addition to their limit of four Canada – per day. The change reflects the large number of white geese on the northern breeding grounds.
  • Special deer hunts: Youth hunters and hunters with disabilities can hunt any deer in Game Management Units (GMU) 101, 105, 108, 111, 113, 117, and 121 from Oct. 14-15 and Oct. 21-22 during the modern firearm general season.
  • Hoof disease precaution: Several units have been added to the list of GMUs where hunters are required to remove and leave behind the hooves of harvested elk to reduce the spread of elk hoof disease. Those units include GMUs 633 and 636 in Mason County, and 407, 418, 437, and 454 in north Puget Sound.

These and other hunting regulations are described in WDFW’s Big Game Hunting pamphlet or Migratory Waterfowl and Upland Game pamphlets, available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulations/.

However, for an overview of how those hunting seasons are shaping up in specific areas of the state, Aoude recommends checking the Hunting Prospects report.

“Most serious hunters are eager to get all the information they can before they go afield,” Aoude said. “The Hunting Prospects are designed to fill that demand.”