Tag Archives: poaching

Salem Couple, Others Cited For Poaching Multiple Bucks, Other Animals

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

On February 14, 2018, the LaPine Office of the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division completed a four month investigation into the unlawful killing of several Winter Range Trophy Class Mule Deer Bucks. They were assisted by Fish and Wildlife Troopers from both the Klamath Falls and Salem offices.

(OSP)

The investigation originated when a trooper located a trophy class buck deer shot near Cabin Lake Road in Lake County with the assistance from the OSP Fish and Wildlife Aircraft during winter range patrol. That incident led to a search warrant being executed at the residence of G.W. Todd FULFER, age 40, and his wife Samantha GERMAN-FULFER, age 27, in Salem, on January 31, 2018. Evidence at the residence, along with additional information, led Fish and Wildlife Troopers to the Albany home of Scott Allan HARRIS, age 55. Upon the service of a second search warrant, additional evidence was seized including several trophy class antlers.

A fourth suspect, Jacen Todd FULFER, age 19, was contacted at his residence in Lebanon, as officers conducted their investigations in Salem and Albany.

All four suspects were cited into Lake County Circuit Court on a variety of charges ranging from Take/Possession-Buck Deer (Felony), Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Waste of Game Mammal, and Hunting Game Mammal Prohibited Method.

The investigation produced evidence indicating both Samantha GERMAN-FULFER and her husband, GW Todd FULFER, committed wildlife crimes in Lake, Jefferson, Benton, Linn, and Marion Counties. In addition to the multiple deer suspected to have been poached by the FULFERS in 2017, evidence at the residence suggested that a wild turkey and pheasant were also harvested illegally. The suspects were also cited into the other counties for Felon in Possession of a Firearm and various Wildlife Crimes.

Anyone with any information is encouraged to contact either the TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888, *OSP (*677) or by calling Oregon State Police Dispatch at 541-776-6111.

Reward For Info On Poaching Of Rogue Valley Elk Upped

Thanks to contributions from local hunters, the reward for information on the poaching of a bull elk north of Medford has doubled.

One thousand dollars is now on offer for helping bring the person(s) responsible for illegally shooting the four-point on the morning January 27 to justice.

(OSP)

Oregon fish and wildlife troopers arrived at 9 a.m. to the scene, about a mile south of Highway 234 along Agate Road, south of Sams Valley, and found the mortally wounded bull, which had been shot behind the left shoulder.

“A witness in the area said that two hours prior to the troopers arrival, he had observed a newer, white, full-size truck that had stopped in the roadway just east of where the bull was located,” OSP reported. “The witness reported the passenger of that vehicle fired the shot. The vehicle then left the area.”

Along with the standing offer of $500 through the Turn-In-Poachers fund, the  Rogue Valley Chapter of Oregon Hunters Association has added another $500.

Anyone with information can call the TIP line at (800) 452-7888 or state police dispatch  (541-776-6111).

 

Record Payout For Oregon Anti-poaching Reward Program In 2017

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION

The Oregon Hunters Association’s Turn In Poachers (TIP) reward fund paid a record $24,200 in rewards to informants in poaching cases last year, according to a report delivered to the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission by OHA State Vice President John Gander on Friday, Feb. 9 in Portland.

OREGON STATE POLICE CREDITED THE TURN-IN-POACHERS PROGRAM IN PART FOR DEVELOPING SUSPECTS, INCLUDING NATHAN W. CROUCH, IN THE SHOOTING AND WASTING OF TWO BULL ELK NEAR ELGIN IN NOVEMBER 2016. (OSP)

The rewards were paid in 50 separate fish and wildlife violation cases reported to Oregon State Police Offices throughout the state.

Both the number of cases and reward sums easily eclipsed all previous marks in the program’s 32-year history. Reward cases in recent years have typically numbered from 20 to 35, and total reward amounts averaged approximately $10,000.

OHA in 2017 increased the standard reward amounts, which now range from $100 for birds, fish and furbearers to $500 for deer, elk and antelope and $1,000 for bighorn sheep, mountain goat and moose.

OHA State Coordinator Duane Dungannon, whose OHA Office issues the reward checks, believes the increased reward amounts likely contributed to the sharp increases in cases as well as the sum of rewards.

“Obviously increasing the amounts of each reward will result in a greater total paid for the year, but the jump in the number of TIP cases – where a caller requests the reward – suggests there’s more going on,” Dungannon said. “The rewards offered are included in news releases published in local media when a poaching case occurs and police are looking for leads, so members of the public can see that we’re offering them some sizable sums to do the right thing.”

An increased level of public awareness may be a factor, as well, according to Lieutenant Craig Heuberger of the Fish and Wildlife Division at the Oregon State Police headquarters in Salem.

“I think it is a combination of different things,” Heuberger said. “We are doing a better job of advertising the TIP program through social media such as our monthly newsletter, Twitter, and Facebook. When we make a TIP case and are able to promote it, we try to channel that information out to the public every chance we get.

THE UPDATED TURN IN POACHERS LOGO FEATURES THE OREGON STATE POLICE’S NEW MOBILE NUMBER, *OSP. (OHA)

“Internally we have changed the administration of the TIP program to make it easier for the Troopers to get the information they need to promote the TIP program to the public, and we have also streamlined the reporting mechanism to make it easier for Troopers to turn the documentation in that is needed to facilitate a TIP request to OHA.”

Started in 1986 with startup funds from OHA and Leupold & Stevens, the TIP fund is largely self-sustaining as the result of courts ordering convicted violators to pay restitution to the fund. The $23,917 restitution paid to the reward fund in 2017 nearly equaled the reward amounts paid for the year.

Poaching will be a major emphasis in the current state legislative session that opened this week. One bill would better enable courts to apply the penalties already in place for poaching. In addition, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will present a proposal for a poaching public awareness campaign, mandated by a budget note requested by OHA and attached to the agency’s budget when it was approved last year.

OHA chapters and other conservation groups sometimes pledge additional amounts in particularly heinous poaching cases. Reward offers have exceeded $17,000 in a few cases, including one involving a recent northeast Oregon bighorn sheep poaching and another in a southern Oregon elk killing and wasting spree that took place for an extended period of time. When the reward of $17,500 was offered, the elk killing stopped.

OHA (oregonhunters.org) is the state’s largest Oregon-based pro-hunting organization, with 10,000 members and 26 chapters statewide. Its mission is “Protecting Oregon’s wildlife, habitat and hunting heritage.”

How the TIP Program Works

Callers can remain anonymous and still collect a reward from OHA if the information leads to a citation.
TIP hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or dial *OSP (24/7)
TIP email: TIP@state.or.us (monitored weekdays 8 a.m to 5 p.m.)
Use the TIP hotline on weekends and evenings.

Standard rewards:

Bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose: $1,000.
Elk, deer, antelope: $500.
Bear, cougar, wolf: $300.
Habitat destruction: $300.
Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags: $200.
Game fish, shellfish, upland birds, waterfowl, furbearers: $100.

OSP Wildlife Troopers Seek Info On Poaching Of Jackson Co. Bull Elk Last Saturday

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESSS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

On January 27 at approximately 9:00 am, Central Point Fish and Wildlife Troopers were called to the Sam’s Valley area near Agate Road to investigate the possible shooting of a bull elk. This is in Jackson County and is approximately one mile south of Highway 234.

(OSP)

When Troopers arrived they found a four point bull elk standing in a pasture with what appeared to be a bullet wound just behind his left shoulder blade. Shortly after their arrival, the bull succumbed to his injury. A witness in the area said that two hours prior to the Troopers arrival, he had observed a newer, white, full size truck that had stopped in the roadway just east of where the bull was located. The witness reported the passenger of that vehicle fired the shot. The vehicle then left the area.

Anyone with any information is encouraged to contact either the TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or by calling Oregon State Police Dispatch at 541-776-6111.

Pendleton 18-year-old Arrested For Allegedly Poaching Multiple Deer, Elk

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE’S FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

After a lengthy investigation involving Troopers of the Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish & Wildlife Division in Pendleton, a Pendleton area man was arrested on January 6, 2018 for multiple misdemeanor charges related to the illegal taking of wildlife on private and public lands within Umatilla County.

(OSP)

In September of 2017 an OSP Fish & Wildlife Trooper received information about alleged illegal hunting activities. As the investigation progressed, the primary suspect was identified as JOSEPH REIDE ST. PIERRE, age 18, from Pendleton, who was alleged to be illegally Hunting, Taking, and Wasting Wildlife on both Public and Private Properties in Umatilla County.

Information obtained during the investigation alleged that JOSEPH REIDE ST. PIERRE was involved in the Unlawful Taking of Wildlife as far back as the fall of 2016, to include a large mule deer buck, 3 large whitetail bucks, and two antlerless elk.

On Saturday January 6th, 2018 JOSEPH REIDE ST. PIERRE was lodged at the Umatilla County jail for probable cause and arraigned on Monday January 8, 2018 for the following charges;
* Unlawful Take of Buck Deer Closed Season-4 counts
* Unlawful Waste of Game animal-2 counts
* Hunting on the Cultivated Lands of Another- 3 counts
* Unlawful Discharge of a Firearm Across a Public Way -2counts
* Hunting prohibited method: Shotgun with shot restrictions — 1 count
* Unlawful Take of Antlerless Elk — 2 counts
* Exceeding Annual Bag Limit Elk- 1 Count
* Criminal Trespass In The Second Degree-1 counts
* Criminal Trespass While in Possession of a Firearm-1 count
* Unlawful Discharge of a Firearm from a Motor Vehicle-1 count
* Hunting with the Assistance of Artificial light- 1-count
* Assisting of Aiding another in committing wildlife violation, Unlawful Taking of Buck Deer-2 counts

Anyone with information related to this investigation is asked to call the Turn-in-Poacher TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or contact Trooper Tom Juzeler or Senior Trooper Ryan Sharp at the Pendleton office of the Oregon State Police 541-278-4090.

IDFG Looking For Tips In Poaching Of Big Buck East Of Boise Last Weekend

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME

Fish and Game is asking the public for information regarding the recent poaching of a large mule deer buck. The poaching incident likely occurred during the weekend of January 6th.

(BEN CADWALLADER, IDFG)

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information in the case and callers can remain anonymous. Contact CAP at 1-800-632-5999 twenty four hours a day.

Responding to the initial report, Fish and Game conservation officer Ben Cadwallader found the carcass of a large buck mule deer just one-half mile east of Arrowrock Dam off of the Middle Fork Boise River Road. “Based on the condition of the carcass, the deer was likely shot either this past Friday or Saturday,” Cadwallader said. The deer hunting season closed more than two months ago in this area.

Evidence was collected at the scene, but Cadwallader hopes to learn more about the case from an eyewitness or others who have knowledge of the poaching incident. “I am very interested in visiting with anyone who has information regarding this poached deer,” Cadwallader noted.

In addition to the CAP hotline, persons with information regarding this case may also contact the Fish and Game Nampa office at 208-465-8465 weekdays and Idaho State Police at 208-846-7550 on weekends.

 

More Details Come Out On 2 Poached NE WA Wolves

Washington wildlife managers are adding and correcting details from the weekend’s story that two female wolves have been found shot dead in Northeast Washington in recent weeks and are the subject of poaching investigations.

WDFW this afternoon reports that one was retrieved last Tuesday, Dec., 5, 15 miles southwest of the town of Republic in Ferry County.

A TRAIL CAM SHOT CAPTURED A MEMBER OF THE PROFANITY PEAK PACK. (WDFW)

It had been part of the Profanity Peak Pack in the northern portions of the county when it was radio-collared in fall 2016, but wasn’t associated with any group of wolves this fall, according to the agency.

The animal’s collar had quit transmitting early last month.

The other wolf was classified as a breeding female, and it was discovered by hunters 10 miles southeast of Colville in Stevens County on Nov. 12.

WDFW is assuming that since it was within the range of the Dirty Shirt Pack, it was a member.

Earlier press reports listed the wolves as belonging to that pack and the Smackouts, the latter of which drew outrage from Conservation Northwest, which has worked closely to prevent the pack from tangling with a local producer’s livestock over the years.

Still, it along with two other organizations subsequently, are offering up to $20,000 in reward for info on the cases.

Anyone with information is being asked to call (877) 933-9847 or (360)902-2936.

Killing a wolf in the federally delisted part of the state is listed as a gross misdemeanor, with a penalty of as much as a year in prison and a maximum fine of $5,000, according to WDFW.

Judge Hammers Elgin Man For Poaching, Wasting 2 Northeast Oregon Bull Elk

A Northeast Oregon man must serve two months in jail, has lost his hunting license for eight years and will have to pay $17,000 in fines and restitution after pleading guilty to poaching two bull elk at night from a road and with the aid of a light in mid-November 2016, wasting both animals completely.

NATHAN CROUCH AND THE TWO NORTHEAST OREGON BULL ELK HE POACHED AT NIGHT IN MID-NOVEMBER 2016 AND LEFT TO WASTE. (OSP)

Nathan Crouch, 27, who was on the lam in Nevada until last month, was recently sentenced by Union County Circuit Court Judge Thomas Powers for the four wildlife misdemeanors, according to local news outlets.

The case outraged Elgin-area residents, who provided Oregon State Police fish and wildlife troopers with “overwhelming support” in identifying Crouch as well as Dylan Crouch, then 22, and Briana Black, then 18, as suspects.

According to a report today on My Columbia Basin, Nathan Crouch admitted to shooting both elk, six- and five-point bulls.

The La Grande Observer reports that as Dylan Crouch held a spotlight on the bulls, Nathan Crouch shot them.

Black was in the vehicle.

All three are from Elgin.

Last winter Black and Dylan Crouch pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor wildlife violation and were sentenced to five days in jail, three months of probation and a loss of hunting privileges until mid-2020, the Observer‘s Cherise Kaechele reported.

Under Oregon law, poachers who kill a bull elk with six or more points on a side are on the hook for a $15,000 penalty payable to the Department of Fish and Wildlife.

“The defendants in this case just left these animals to rot,” My Columbia Basin reports Union County Senior Deputy District Attorney Christopher L. Storz said. “They took nothing and, by the time they were found, no meat was salvageable. Cases like this one emphasize the need for felonies in the Oregon Game Code, something that currently just isn’t provided for under Oregon law.”

OSP Looking For Suspect(s) Who Shot 3 Mule Deer, Drove Over 2

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE’S FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division in Baker City is asking for the public’s assistance in locating the person(s) responsible for the unlawful taking and waste of three mule deer (one buck, two does) that were discovered on private property off of Hunt Mountain Lane.

(OSP)

A Fish and Wildlife Officer responded to the call on Saturday November 25th and believes this happened after dark on Friday night November 24th. The officer located two mule deer does that were shot, driven over by a vehicle, and left to waste. The officer also located a buck that was shot, had the antlers removed, and was left to waste.

A reward is being offered by the Oregon Hunters Association through the Turn-In-Poachers (T.I.P.) program for any information leading to an arrest in this or any other wildlife case. Callers can remain anonymous. The T.I.P. program number is 1-800-452-7888.

Anyone with any information is encouraged to contact either the TIP hotline or by calling Sergeant Cyr at the Oregon State Police Worksite in Baker City at 541-523-5867 extension 4170.

Wardens Have ‘Multiple Leads’ On Moose Poached Near Lake Wenatchee

Word that a moose was poached, had its head chopped off and was mostly wasted in Chelan County earlier this fall enraged many on Facebook, and they shared the call for tips widely, helping game wardens searching for whomever illegally killed the locally rare big game animal.

“We are currently following up on multiple leads obtained by hunters and citizens that were in the area around the time of the poaching,” says WDFW Officer Blake Tucker today. “We have had quite a bit of help from the public, which is what is going to get this case solved.”

As a hunter, I know it’s the health of the herd that matters the most, not so much the individual animal, and that critters at the edge of their range are naturally few and far between. But this one particularly galls me.

Though there’s not a hunting season here now, one day we’ll be able to put in for a bull permit or two, yet the illegal kill north of Lake Wenatchee may have pushed that further out into the future.

This is one of two main areas of Central Washington where moose are moving to from the core of their range in the state’s northeast corner, where 178 tags were available for this year.

A WDFW map shows a number of citizen observations in the upper Wenatchee River watershed just last year.

WDFW’S MOOSE OBSERVATION MAP SHOWS THE LOCATIONS OF 329 PUBLIC REPORTS IN 2016, 320 OF WHICH CORRESPOND WITH SIGHTINGS OF ACTUAL MOOSE. THE OTHER NINE REPORTS WERE NONSIGHTINGS, IMPORTANT DATA TO ALSO COLLECT TO BETTER DETERMINE POPULATIONS. (WDFW)

It was here that a decade or more ago I first heard of moose in the area: One of my dad’s old coworkers, Neil B., talked about seeing one up the Chiwawa.

That was a sign, it turned out. Moose are not unlike wolves in that young ones tend to disperse in search of good habitat, and they appear to be finding it — and one another.

In 2013, reader Mike Quinn, who hunts this part of the state, began telling me about moose he’d been spotting then capturing on trail cameras.

CHELAN COUNTY BULL MOOSE. (MIKE QUINN/FLICKR.COM)

Subsequent images from Quinn’s cams captured a couple little moose trains moving through the woods — in a 2014 photo, a cow and its bull calf followed by an adult bull, and in a 2016 shot, a cow and two calves.

The moose that was poached earlier this fall — its carcass was found about 50 yards off a logging road in the Meadow Creek area with only the head and a bit of meat taken — may or may not have been one of those animals. It’s a loss to a budding population either way.

IMAGES FROM THE SCENE WHERE A MOOSE WAS POACHED NEAR LAKE WENATCHEE EARLIER THIS FALL. (WDFW)

(WDFW

The aforementioned WDFW map is part of a two-page synopsis of the agency’s public moose survey program for last year, which suggests a high calf:cow ratio among those colonizing the eastern slopes of the North Cascades.

According to extrapolated data from 20 observations in Okanogan County — to the north of Chelan County — one could expect 83 calves per 100 cows there.

Admittedly, the sample size is small, and state wildlife biologists, aided by aircraft and tracking snow on the ground, might come up with a different ratio.

But for what it’s worth, that figure is four times as high as citizen reports for Pend Oreille County, where moose began filtering into the state in the 1950s and where the first few tags were offered in the 1970s.

If they’re that fecund in Okanogan County, it seems probable that those in Chelan County might be doing similarly well — possibly better with one less predator currently in the portfolio.

While Alces alces is often photographed belly deep in ponds, those in this part of the state are actually benefiting from changes on dry land.

The large-scale wildfires of recent decades “have improved moose habitat,” says WDFW, and that’s included the eruption of willows and other browse across blaze-scarred landscapes.

Last month, as we pulled a mule deer buck out of an area that has seen two major fires, there on the ground were the telltale round doots of a moose. A friend found the first such pellets not far away several years ago.

While moose numbers are clearly growing, it’s unknown how many are actually in Chelan and Okanogan Counties. Ironically, biologists need more data from people who don’t actually see any to get a better idea of how many there might be.

“To obtain accurate data, we need more dedicated participants who will not only submit a report when they see a moose, but also report hours afield when they do not see any moose. For example, if you plan to deer hunt for four consecutive days, submit a report for each day you are hunting, whether you see a moose or not,” says WDFW’s moose man, Jared Oyster, in the annual survey report for 2016.

Year-over-year trends are helpful, but knowing how many bulls, cows and calves are in the area will go a long way towards setting up a limited hunt once a big enough herd has established itself.

Unfortunately, there’s now one fewer moose around Lake Wenatchee because some jackass or jackasses poached it, stealing the future from legitimate hunters.

Anyone with information on the case can contact WDFW’s regional office at (509) 662-0452 and ask for Officer Tucker.

Whomever’s guilty faces as much as $9,000 in fines and penalties and up to a year in jail.