Tag Archives: Pikeminnow

Columbia-Snake Pikeminnow Program Catch Nears 70,000

Pikeminnow catches ticked up over the previous week on the Columbia and Snake Rivers, with 10,950 qualifying fish brought in for the sport reward program June 12-18.

Once again The Dalles station recorded the highest number overall, with 3,915 checked, a dropoff of about 900 fish over June 5-11, but this year’s catch to date of 31,563 there has already surpassed nine of the last 10 complete seasons.

A SCREEN SHOT OF A MAP PUT TOGETHER BY THE NORTHERN PIKEMINNOW SPORT-REWARD PROGRAM SHOWS BOAT LAUNCHES AND HOT SPOTS AROUND CATHLAMET, WHERE THE LOWEST CATCH STATION ON THE COLUMBIA IS. DOZENS MORE STRETCH UPSTREAM TO PRIEST RAPIDS DAM, AND UP THE SNAKE TO CLARKSTON. (PIKEMINNOW.ORG)

Action heated up on the Snake, where Boyer Park took in 1,102 pikeminnow, while on the Lower Columbia, 899 were recorded at Kalama.

Speaking of Kalama, it saw the highest catch per registered angler of the week, with 45 fishermen accounting for those 899 pikeminnow, an average of 20.0 fish each.

Other stations seeing relatively high catch per angler include Washougal (13.7), The Dalles (12.1) and Cascade Locks (11.1).

Thirty-one specially tagged pikeminnow were caught last week, with seven of those turned in at Bingen, six each at The Dalles and Columbia Point, five at Washougal, and one each at Cathlamet, Rainier, Kalama, Gleason, Giles French, Umatilla and Boyer Park.

Since the 2017 season started May 1, 69,195 qualifying pikeminnow have been removed from the Columbia and Snake, 69,340 overall.

The sport reward program pays anglers from $5 to $8 per pikeminnow, with tagged ones worth $500. The idea is to reduce the numbers of the native species that prey on young salmon and steelhead in the Columbia hydropower system.

For more details, including fishing maps, check out pikeminnow.org, and if you’re interested in putting your angling skills to work, check out the June 22 seminar coming to Longview and put on by program leader Eric Winther.

Pikeminnow Program Catch Nears 60,000 Since May 1; How-to Seminar Coming Up

Pikeminnow catches dipped slightly last week from 2017’s top period so far on the Columbia and Snake Rivers, with 10,804 qualifying fish brought in for the sport reward program.

The Dalles station recorded the highest number overall, with 4,818 checked, a bit down from the previous week, but this year’s catch to date of 27,674 there has already surpassed three of the last six complete seasons.

THE PIKEMINNOW SPORT REWARD PROGRAM OFFERS INCENTIVES TO CATCH THE SPECIES FROM THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA UP TO TRI-CITIES, AND IN THE SNAKE FROM TRI-CITIES UP TO CLARKSTON. (PIKEMINNOW.ORG)

Columbia Point Park in Tri-Cities took in 1,191 pikeminnow and Bingen 858.

Highest catch per registered angler was at Bingen, where 56 fishermen brought in 858 pikeminnow, an average of 15.3 fish each.

Other stations seeing relatively high catch per angler include The Dalles (11.9), Washougal (9.9) and Cascade Locks (9.1).

Seventeen specially tagged pikeminnow were caught last week, with six of those turned in at Columbia Point Park, four at The Dalles, two at Cathlamet and one each at Washougal, Beacon Rock and Bingen.

Since the 2017 season started May 1, 58,245 qualifying pikeminnow have been removed from the Columbia and Snake, 58,359 overall.

The sport reward program pays anglers from $5 to $8 per pikeminnow, with tagged ones worth $500. The idea is to reduce the numbers of the native species that prey on young salmon and steelhead in the Columbia hydropower system.

For more details, including fishing maps, check out pikeminnow.org, and if you’re interested in putting your angling skills to work, check out the June 22 seminar coming to Longview and put on by program leader Eric Winther.

 

Rig of the Month– Henny Penny’s Pikeminnow Bait

Story and photographs by Don Talbot

Chicken liver balls are a great bait to use for pikeminnow when you’re sitting on anchor in a hole and looking to draw in hungry fish.

ROTM 2

Step 1

Step 1: Gather the following supplies to make 250-plus chicken liver balls:
• 6-foot-long work table
• Bowl of water and sponge to wet the table
• Scissors
• Five containers of chicken livers
• Five packs of Spawn Net
• Two packs of Miracle Thread
• Attractant


Step 2:
Cut the Spawn Net up into squares. Each pack makes 50 to 60 squares.

ROTM 3

Step 4

Step 3: Wet the table so that the netting doesn’t blow away, and then place the squares in rows up and down the table.


Step 4:
Cut the chicken livers into thumbnail-sized chunks and place each in the middle of a square.

ROTM 4

Step 5

 

Step 5: Grab and twist the four corners of the netting together around the liver.

rotm 5

Step 6

Step 6: Wrap the Miracle Thread around the twisted liver ball end 10 times and pull to break.

Step 7: Cut the tag end of the netting off and place the bait into the chicken liver container.

ROTM 6

Step 7

Step 8: Marinate with your favorite fish oil – this is one of my secret weapons! I use Super  Dipping Sauce in garlic scent.

Step 8

Step 8

 

 

Step 9: Put the loaded containers back into your refrigerator or freezer. I like to keep my liver balls on ice, as I like fresh bait most of the time for pikeminnow fishing.

 

 

HOW TO RIG

ROTM 8

Step 1: Load your reel with 100 yards of 20- to 30-pound braided line, which helps to detect the bite better.
Step 2: Slide a snap swivel up the braid to clip to a 1- to 6-ounce cannonball, and then add a 6mm rubber bead or other bumper to help minimize metal-to-metal noise.
Step 3: Tie a good barrel swivel to the end of the braid and then attach a 3-foot-long, 20-pound-test leader rigged with a size 4 Gamakatsu hook.
Step 4: Barely hook the liver ball so that the fish will hook itself while biting the bait.
Step 5: Dunk in your favorite marinade and cast away. NS