Tag Archives: osp

Cannon Beach Ocean Patrol Finds Big Overlimit Of Lings

Five people stopped off Oregon’s North Coast were criminally cited for going way over the limit on lingcod and rockfish as well as retaining undersized fish, and apparently it wasn’t their first time doing so.

A CROPPED OREGON STATE POLICE IMAGE SHOWS THE OVERLIMIT CATCH OF LINGCOD AND ROCKFISH. (OSP)

“The boat owner said that they had done this before, and if he had seen the troopers coming from further away, he would have dumped all of the extra fish overboard,” reported state fish and wildlife troopers in their latest newsletter.

The incident occurred during a joint OSP-WDFW ocean patrol from the mouth of the Columbia River south to Cannon Beach.

Somewhere off the popular seaside destination, the crew spotted a fishing boat and decided to make contact with it.

As they approached, one occupant of the boat tossed a couple lings overboard, according to OSP, and when they came alongside troopers also saw “multiple undersized lingcod on the deck.”

The quintet claimed that those fish and some in a cooler were the only catch of the day, but a consent search turned up many more.

In the holds were 37 lings, 16 of which were under the size limit – the daily limit is two, 22 inches or better – and 22 rockfish, according to troopers.

“The anglers were found to be 27 lingcod over their daily limit and six rockfish over their limit,” OSP reports.

The five received criminal citations for exceeding daily limits on lingcod and marine fish, and retaining undersized lings. The fish were seized.

The case is similar to one reported here last year in which four individuals checked at the Hammond Marina were criminally cited for being 54 over the limit on rockfish, and one of them for keeping a too-short ling and an off-limits cabezon.

Seized fish are typically donated to local food banks.

Willamina Cow Elk Poaching Update: Tip Leads To Citations For 3 People

OSP update  1:50 p.m., March 28, 2019

Thanks to a tip from the public, Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers cited three subjects for Unlawful Take/Possession of Antlerless Elk.  The elk meat was seized and donated to local charities.

Oregon State Police would like to thank the public and media for assistance in bringing this case to a resolution.

THE FOLLOWING IS THE ORIGINAL PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers are seeking the public’s help in identifying suspect(s) involved in the killing of 3 cow elk on Willamina Creek Rd, just past mile post 8 near the upper bridge.

OREGON STATE FISH AND WILDLIFE TROOPERS BELIEVE THE THREE COW ELK WERE SHOT ABOUT 8 MILES NORTH OF WILLAMINA. (OSP)

Troopers found evidence of 3 elk that had been shot with high powered rifles on private timber property and pulled out to Willamina Creek Rd with ATV’s. A tip later the next day led Troopers to three cow elk hides dumped on NW Fir Crest Rd just west of the town of Carlton. Based on the evidence found at both sites, the elk were most likely killed between March 20, 2019 and March 23, 2019.

THE HIDES OF THREE ELK WERE FOUND DUMPED SOUTHWEST OF CARLTON. (OSP)

Please see the attached maps for precise location information of the kill sites and the dump site. Anyone who may have information that will help identify suspect(s) is asked to call the TIP line at 1-800-452-7888 or dial *OSP and refer information to Senior Trooper Boeholt or Trooper Tayler Jerome.

GOOGLE MAPS SHOW THE LOCATION THE HIDES WERE DUMPED. (OSP)

Information leading to an arrest is eligible for either a cash reward or up to 6 Preference Points. Oregon Hunter’s Association (OHA) has pledged an additional cash reward for a total cash reward option of $2500.

‘Winter Weakens, Spring Kills’ – ODFW, Shed Hunters Group Urge Antler Seekers To Hold Off

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

In January, deer and elk in Oregon were in good body condition, and it looked like another mild winter for the state. Then came February.

HEAVY LATE WINTER SNOWS HAVE OREGON WILDLIFE OFFICIALS ASKING ANTLER SEEKERS TO HOLD OFF TILL THE RANGE GREENS UP AND DEER AND ELK CAN BEGIN TO RECOVER FROM THEIR WEAKENED STATES. (ODFW)

“We got two feet of snow in 24 hours here in central Oregon, and then another foot over the next 36 hours,” said Rob Tanner, co-founder and president of Oregon Shed Hunters, a group created to preserve the sport and promote ethical shed hunting. “It’s as much snow as I’ve seen in the 20 years I’ve lived here.

The local animals that I have been seeing are struggling,” he added.

At this time of year, deer and elk are in taking in little nutrition, relying on their body reserves and what forage they can get to under the snow and outer crust of ice. Being forced to make extra movements in response to dog, vehicle or human disturbance weakens them further, using up what little energy they have left. Even in years with more typical winter weather patterns, most winter mortality of deer and elk occurs in March and April—or as wildlife biologists put it, “Winter weakens, spring kills.”

A PAIR OF BULL ELK MOVE THROUGH A PORTION OF THE SNOWY WENAHA WILDLIFE AREA. SOME PARTS OF CENTRAL AND EASTERN OREGON RECEIVED GREATER THAN 160 PERCENT OF AVERAGE SNOWPACK. (ODFW)

ODFW is conducting its annual herd composition surveys the next few weeks and will know more about over-winter survival of big game later this spring. But already it’s clear that deer and elk will be especially vulnerable to stress during early spring this year—making responsible shed hunting even more critical.

ODFW wildlife biologists are encouraging shed hunters to be considerate of big game and even delay their search this year. “Our winter ranges are still covered in snow and deer are having a difficult time, so I encourage shed hunters to wait until after snow melts and even after green-up has started,” said Deschutes District Wildlife biologist Corey Heath. “Most antlers are buried now anyway.”

Oregon Shed Hunters agrees. “Our recommendation is that given the late storm and late pressure on animals, to hold off on shed hunting until the snow melts and give the animals time to disperse and access feeding areas,” said Tanner.

More about shed antlers and rules for hunting them in Oregon

Oregon’s buck deer shed their antlers from late December through March. Elk started shedding in late February and will continue into April. Shed hunters collecting these antlers, especially in early spring when deer and elk are at their most vulnerable, need to follow these rules:

  • Avoid disturbing big game animals: Don’t approach animals.
  • Respect winter range and road closures: Several wildlife areas (Elkhorn, Ladd Marsh, P.W. Schneider, Wenaha, White River) are closed until early to mid-April, and other winter range areas in central and northeast Oregon are closed or have travel restrictions. See the 2019 Oregon Big Game Regulations for details, http://www.eregulations.com/oregon/19orhd/regulations-wildlife-areas-refuges-special-areas/
  • Keep vehicles on open roads—or travel by foot or horseback. The ground will be especially water-logged this year and off-roading in the wrong place will damage critical wildlife and fish habitat.
  • Don’t be in the same spot every day. Deer and elk might need to be in that spot for food or cover, and your presence will keep them from it.
  • Keep dogs under your control (and leashed at ODFW wildlife areas).  Don’t let dogs approach or follow wildlife. State law prohibits dogs (and people) from harassing wildlife. Reminder that dogs must be leashed at ODFW wildlife areas except when hunting game birds, in a posted dog training area, or in a parking area, campground or road open to vehicle traffic.
  • Don’t trespass on private property. You always need permission to be on private land. Antlers that are shed on private land belong to the landowner under Oregon statutes.
  • Know what you can keep: Only naturally shed antlers of deer and elk may be kept. Antlers attached to skulls may not be collected.

Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Troopers are conducing winter range patrols, using multiple resources such as ATVs, trail cameras and aircraft, to protect deer and elk during this critical time from both poachers and shed hunters violating road closures. Last year, they issued 41 citations and 41 warnings for various wildlife offenses from November-March on winter range.

AN OREGON FISH AND WILDLIFE TROOPER PATROLS THE STARKEY UNIT. ACCORDING TO STATE GAME MANAGERS, LIMITING DISTURBANCE OF BIG GAME BY THE PUBLIC IS A PATROL PRIORITY. (ODFW)

“Limiting disturbance to big game on winter range is critical for their over-winter survival and it’s an enforcement priority for us this time of year,” said Craig Heuberger, Lieutenant, Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division

Some states concerned about shed hunters’ impact on big game have put seasons in place. Oregon currently has no specific season or plans to implement one, but wildlife managers share concerns about disturbances to big game.

4 Elk Poached, Wasted In 2 Oregon Coast Counties

Oregon wildlife troopers are asking for the public’s help to solve a trio of recent poaching cases involving four elk and a hawk.

TWO OF THREE COW ELK FOUND DEAD EAST OF TILLAMOOK EARLIER THIS MONTH. (OSP)

They say that the three cows and five-point bull were found earlier this month in Tillamook and Lincoln Counties, all shot by a rifle, and they say a redtail found injured in Jackson County had been shot as well.

The cow elk were investigated Jan. 12 and were found in a clear-cut 2.5 miles up a road off Highway 6 in the Fox Creek area east of Tillamook. OSP reported that they had been killed with a high-powered rifle and left to waste, but said that evidence was gathered at the scene.

Tipsters are being asked to call OSP Dispatch (503-842-4433) and reference case number SP19-013862.

As for the bull, it was found by a landowner on Jan. 8 near Hidden Valley Road just west of Toledo.

It too was left to waste, OSP reported. Informants are being told to contact Trooper Jason Adkins (800-452-7888; 541-961-8859; TIP@state.or.us) and to reference case SP19-022825.

And the hawk was found Jan. 16 in Central Point behaving oddly and determined to have been shot. It was captured and taken to a local wildlife rehab center but died from its injury.

Anyone with info can call OSP dispatch (541-776-6111) and reference case SP19-018083.

OSP Looking For Tips In Whitetail, Elk Poaching Cases

Oregon state troopers are looking for information on whomever killed three deer and an elk in different parts of the state recently.

They say three whitetails were illegally shot in Baker County and their heads and hides were dumped northeast of Keating.

It wasn’t clear when the deer were shot or their sex, but their remains were located on Mother Lode Road.

OSP is asking anyone with info to call their dispatch center (800-442-2068) or dial *OSP and ask for Sergeant Cyr.

As for the elk, the cow was shot with a rifle and left to waste the morning of Thursday, Dec. 27, in a clearcut northwest of Roseburg by Douglas County’s Wolf Creek Ranch.

(OSP)

“A vehicle of interest is a compact truck occupied by two or more adult males (late teens or early 20’s) which traveled from Bullock Road to Tyee Access Road that morning,” OSP said in a press release.

Informants are asked to call (800)-442-2068) or dial *OSP and reference Senior Troopers Stone or Weaver.

Those whose tips lead to an arrest or citation stand to collect a reward or preference points.

Home Security System Helps Oregon Troopers Track Down Alleged Buck Poacher

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

On December 6, 2018, an Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Trooper from the Roseburg Area Command responded to the report of a poaching and trespassing incident that occurred on December 5, 2018, in the Drain area.

Investigation revealed that a large black tail buck deer was shot within feet of a residence in Drain.  The event was captured on the home security system.    With assistance from the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, subjects of interest was identified.

On December 14, 2018, Troopers and Sheriff’s Deputies contacted the subjects of interest at their residence. The antlers and head for a 4X3 black tail deer were recovered  The meat that was recovered from a butcher shop will be donated to a charity.

Trent M. Tinnes (25) of Drain was lodged at the Douglas County Jail for:

  • Unlawful Take of Buck Deer: Prohibited Method ( rifle during archery season)
  • Unlawful Take of Buck Deer: Prohibited Weapon ( .17 Caliber Rifle)
  • Unlawful Take of Buck Deer: Prohibited Hours
  • Hunting While in Violation of Criminal Trespass
  • Criminal Trespass with a Firearm
  • Recklessly Endangering Another Person x 2

Travis D. Tinnes (21) of Drain was criminally cited and released for:

  • Aiding/ Counseling in a Wildlife Offense
  • Driving While Suspended Misdemeanor

Huge Oregon ‘Archery’ Buck Actually Killed With A Rifle; Shooter Sentenced

A ginormous Southern Oregon mule deer buck that a Lane County resident said he arrowed was actually killed with a rifle, according to state police who say that last month he was convicted and sentenced for the offense.

AN OREGON STATE FISH AND WILDLIFE TROOPER POSES WITH THE EIGHT-POINT BUCK. (OSP)

The story began in 2015 when Kevin H. Noel reported killing the eight-pointer in the Steens Mountain Unit on an archery tag during the bowhunting season.

Afterwards he took it to one of the winter sportsmen’s show to get it measured and ended up placing first in the nontypical category for the species.

The 218 5/8-inch rack also scored as the eighth biggest of all time taken in the Beaver State by a bowman.

But according to the Oregon State Police, this past spring as they investigated Noel for unspecified “other crimes” they learned that he may not have used a bow and arrow to down the trophy after all, but a rifle instead.

That violated his tag and sparked wildlife troopers to take a closer look, and they eventually seized the mount and arrested Noel.

That led to a jury trial and a guilty verdict during a trial in Lane County last month, according to OSP.

OSP reports that last week, Lane County Circuit Court Judge Debra Velure sentenced Noel to pay a $6,250 fine, gave him 15 days in jail, suspended his hunting license for three years and put him on probation for three years while also forfeiting the buck.

And according to OSP, Velure also said Noel couldn’t “participate in any hunting excursions for the next three years.”

Arrow Removed From Roseburg Deer; OSP Looking For Culprit

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Officers are asking for the public’s assistance in locating and apprehending the person(s) responsible for shooting a female deer in the head with an arrow on July 4, or July 5, 2018.

(OSP)

An OSP Fish and Wildlife Officer and ODFW Wildlife Biologist responded to the 800 block of San Souci Drive west of Roseburg on July 6, 2018.

The arrow was removed and the deer returned to its small fawn nearby.

Preliminary investigation has revealed that the animal was likely shot from a residence on Braunda Drive, San Souci Drive, or Bellwood Lane.

Those with information are asked to contact Sr. Trooper Stone directly at (541) 817-4472 or OSP dispatch at (541) 440-3333. Those with information can remain anonymous and a TIP reward will be offered for information leading to a citation or arrest in the case.

Linn Co. Man Arrested On Wildlife, Firearms Possession Charges

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

Fish and Wildlife Division troopers from the Mid-Valley Team (Salem/Albany) served search warrants on the residence of Nathan J. Rice (age 40) of Sweet Home.  Rice is a convicted felon, on post-prison supervision, and is currently serving a lifetime hunting suspension.  Troopers received information Rice was in possession of multiple firearms and wildlife parts associated with two unlawfully killed buck deer.  The search yielded eight firearms, many of which were fully loaded, and multiple sets of trophy blacktailed deer and elk antlers.  The troopers seized the firearms, antlers, and game meat.

NATHAN J. RICE. (OSP)

Rice was lodged at the Linn County Jail on a parole violation detainer and issued criminal citations for Possession of Firearm by Felon (8 counts), Take/Possession Buck Deer (17 counts), Take/Possession Bull Elk (2 counts), Lend/Borrow Big Game Tag, Exceeding Bag Limit of Game Mammal, and Aiding in Wildlife Offense (2 counts).    Additional suspects and charges pending follow-up investigation.

WEAPONS AND GAME PARTS SEIZED AT THE HOME OF NATHAN J. RICE. (OSP)

A violation of any provision of the wildlife laws (such as the unlawful take of deer), or any rule adopted pursuant to the wildlife laws, is a Class A misdemeanor if the offense is committed with a culpable mental state in Oregon. If convicted, a person can be charged with the maximum penalty of $6250, have their hunting privileges suspended and forfeit weapons or other items used in the commission of the crime(s).

Anyone with information regarding  wildlife violations is encouraged to report the information to the Oregon State Police Turn in Poacher (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888. Information can remain anonymous.

Man Caught Illegally Gillnetting Under Ferry Dock

A man caught tending an illicit gillnet at a Lower Columbia ferry pier last month was cited for that as well as fishing for salmon during a closed season.

(OSP)

The incident occurred on the Oregon side of the Westport-Cathlamet run, in Westport Slough, a side channel of the Columbia, and is detailed in the latest OSP Fish and Wildlife Division newsletter. 

According to the report, Astoria-based troopers got a tip that there was a gillnet stretched between pilings under the landing.

After they checked the tide tables they figured that the perpetrator would most likely pull the net around 10:30 that evening, so they set up and waited.

Sure enough, when the day’s last ferry departed at 10:15, it wasn’t long before a man pulled up in a car, took a look around, and carried a fishing rod down to the dock.

Troopers watched as he then hooked the net and yarded it up to untie from the dock.

They moved in as the man initially hid behind pilings and then claimed the net wasn’t his, that he’d seen it in the morning and had returned to remove it.

As it turns out, however, the “good samaritan” wasn’t all he was cracked up to be.

“After maintaining his story, he was confronted with the fact there was a second piece of gillnet in the back seat of his car,” troopers detail.

They say the man eventually admitted that he and another person had put the gillnet in the day before, and that he’d also been fishing there too, both of which were violations.

“The subject was cited criminally for Attempt to take fish prohibited method — gillnet and Angling for salmon during close season,” troopers report.

Great job, troopers!

Elsewhere in the monthly newsletter are reports on a bull elk illegally killed in the Wimer area, an unlawful black bear kill that led to other citations in Linn County, more gaper clam capers, and a check on Lookout Point Reservoir walleye angler catch stats.