Tag Archives: oregon state police

OSP Looking For Tips On Poached Starkey Buck

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help in locating the subjects who shot and left to waste a mature mule deer buck in the Starkey Wildlife Management Unit in Union County.

(OSP)

On Saturday October 28th, 2017 an elk hunter notified Oregon State Police that he had located the carcass of deer. Senior Trooper Kris Davis responded to the scene to investigate. It is believed the deer was killed on the evening or night of Thursday October 27th or the morning of Friday October 28th. During this time the 1st season Rocky Mountain elk season was open. Only the antlers and skull cap were removed from the deer, all of the meat was left and was wasted. The deer was killed off the 21 road, 500 and 410 spurs. This location is near Dark Canyon, west of the Spring Creek area off I-84 outside of LaGrande.

Anyone with information is encouraged to contact Senior Trooper Kris Davis at the LaGrande Patrol Office, 541-805-4757. Callers can also stay anonymous by calling the Turn In Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888.

More Details Emerge On Oregon Elk Hunter’s Killing Of A Wolf

A series of news stories are providing more details as well as commentary on the shooting of a wolf by an elk hunter in Northeast Oregon’s Starkey Wildlife Management Unit in late October.

Following last Thursday’s press release from the state police, first out was an Oregonian piece on Saturday morning based on a troopers case report obtained by the paper.

Reporter Andrew Theen wrote that Brian Scott, 38, had three wolves in his vicinity and one “had targeted me … and was running at me to make contact,” according to the documents.

A SCREENSHOT OF ODFW’S WOLF ALBUM ON FLICKR SHOWS A NUMBER OF THE WILD CANIDS ACROSS THE STATE.

That article was followed the next day by an actual interview of Scott at his Clackamas home by freelance Oregonian outdoor writer Bill Monroe.

“It meant to make contact,” Scott told Monroe while pecking at his breakfast. “I was terrified. I screamed and raised my rifle. All I saw (in a scope) was hair so I shot.”

After confirming the animal was a wolf with his hunting partners, Scott contacted the Oregon State Police and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, who arrived with “forensic equipment, GPS units and a video camera; surveying the scene and evidence and taking Scott’s statement,” Monroe wrote.

OSP’s press release, which was also posted by ODFW, stated “The Union County District Attorney’s Office was consulted regarding the investigation and based upon the available evidence the case will not be prosecuted as this is believed to be an incidence of selfdefense.”

In Theen’s Saturday article, a member of Oregon Wild questioned the path of the killing bullet, described as hitting the wolf’s right side and exiting on the left.

In a Monday story, Eric Mortenson of the Capital Press interviewed renowned retired Northern Rockies wolf expert Carter Niemeyer, who said he is in “doubt” about Scott’s story based on the wound channel which suggests a broadside shot.

Interviewed by Monroe, Scott said he couldn’t explain that as he had had other priorities in that moment in the woods.

“I screamed, raised the rifle and saw fur,” he told Monroe. “Who knows how it was moving in that split second? I don’t and was more interested in defending myself.”

It’s possible the bullet deflected off bone.

As with nearly every single bit of wolf news, this incident caused quite a stir on social media and in story comments.

It was always going to, as it was the first time an Oregon hunter has killed a wolf in what was classified as self defense (Washington’s first occurred in 2013 in the Pasayten Wilderness).

In the end, there are bits of wisdom worth gleaning.

Wolf attacks on humans remain very rare; wolf encounters with humans in the Northwest are increasing as wolf populations continue to increase; some of those are occurring at close range; we don’t all have the same comfort levels in terms of personal safety; we don’t all have the same experience with wolf behavior; and nobody can say with absolute certainty how every single wolf will act — they’re wild animals.

“If you see a wolf or any other animal and are concerned about your safety, make sure it knows you are nearby by talking or yelling to alert it to your presence,” advised Roblyn Brown, ODFW acting wolf coordinator. “If you are carrying a firearm, you can fire a warning shot into the ground.”

“That would have been the first logical thing to do,” Niemeyer told Mortenson of the Press. “The gunshot and a yell from a human would turn every wolf I’ve ever known inside out trying to get away.”

Niemeyer also suggested carrying bear repellent, which Spokane Spokesman-Review outdoor columnist Rich Landers had in hand during a similar incident this summer with his dog and two wolves.

Landers wrote about that again in a Monday blog post, as well as offered this observation:

“The wilds won’t miss one wolf as the still-endangered species is multiplying beyond expectations in the Northwest. Meanwhile, the other two wolves likely learned a tad more fear of humans. That’s a recipe for success.”

I’ll second that, and for my part I’ll point out that somewhat underplayed in all of this was that Scott did the exact right thing to do: He immediately called OSP and ODFW to come investigate. That’s stand-up. That’s jumping from the frying pan into potentially a bonfire.

The results of that evidence collecting won’t ameliorate the hard-core wolfies, but what ever will.

For the rest of us outside the fringes, it yields several lessons, even as it put a pall on the hunting season of the man at the center of the story.

“People envision this jerk hunter out to kill anything, but that’s not me,” Scott told Monroe. “It frustrates me they don’t understand. I’m a meat hunter. I was looking for a spike elk. This wasn’t exciting. It ruined my hunt.”

OR Troopers Seize 8×6 Elk Shot On Timberland Closed Due To Fire Danger

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

On September 8, 2017, OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers seized an 8X6 bull elk [shot] on private timber property.

(OSP)

The suspect, Cody Miller, age 27 of Idleyld Park shot the bull with a bow on September 4, 2017 on Roseburg Forest Product property which was closed to the public due to fire dangers.

Cody Miller was assisted by Dylan Miller, age 27 of Idleyld Park, Brian Philpott, age 25 of Glide and two juvenile males.

The Trophy Bull was seized and Cody Miller was issued criminal citations and released for Hunting on Another Enclosed Land, Unlawful Take Bull Elk and Counseling in a Wildlife Violation.

Dylan Miller and Brian Philpott were issued criminal citations for Criminal Trespass and Aiding in a Wildlife Offense.

Reward Offered For Info On Bald Eagle Found Shot Near Gaston

There’s now a reward of up to $1,000 for information that leads to a conviction in the illegal shooting of a bald eagle southwest of Portland last month.

The male raptor was found outside Gaston, off Old Highway 47 and Looking Glass Drive, on June 28 following reports of an injured eagle in the area.

INSPECTION OF THIS BALD EAGLE AT THE AUDUBON SOCIETY IN PORTLAND LED AUTHORITIES TO BELIEVE IT HAD BEEN SHOT. (OSP)

The reward is being offered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Bald and golden eagles are protected under a pair of federal acts, and harming one comes with a $5,000 fine and up to a year in jail.

Anyone with information on the case is being asked to call USFWS’s Oregon Office (503-682-6131) or the state police (800-452-7888). Case number is SP17221814.

Lane Co. Chief DA Named OSP’s Wildlife Prosecutor Of Year

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE

On July 19, 2017, the Lane County District Attorney’s Office Chief Deputy District Attorney, Erik Hasselman, was presented with the 2016 Wildlife Prosecutor of the Year award during the Oregon District Attorney’s Association summer training conference held in Seaside, Oregon. Chief Deputy Hasselman received the award in front of hundreds of his peers and colleagues.

LANE COUNTY CHIEF DEPUTY PROSECUTOR ERIK HASSELMAN. (OSP)

The 2016 Wildlife Prosecutor of the Year Award was presented on behalf of the Oregon Sportsmen’s Coalition by Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division Captain Jeff Samuels, Lieutenant Dave Gifford, and Sergeant Chris Ashenfelter, along with Director Curt Melcher of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Chief Deputy Hasselman was nominated for the award by the Oregon State Police South Valley Fish and Wildlife Team as he has shown a vested interest in protecting Oregon’s natural resources. He is considered a member of the team and is in constant communication with and calls Troopers about fish and wildlife cases he hears about even before the reports arrive at the DA’s Office. Mr. Hasselman, as a chief deputy district attorney responsible for handling serious person crimes, has much on his plate though he takes on fish and wildlife cases with enthusiasm and holds violators accountable for their unlawful actions. He actively puts out press releases to inform the community on poaching cases and through his vigorous prosecution has people talking about the penalties for poaching which creates an effective deterrent factor. Mr. Hasselman shares the passion and commitment each of the Troopers have for protecting the fish, wildlife and natural resources of the State.

The Oregon Sportsmen’s Coalition, which consists of volunteer outdoor enthusiast organizations opposed to the unlawful and unethical taking of wildlife to include the Oregon Hunters Association, sponsored the award. This is the tenth annual presentation of the Wildlife Prosecutor of the Year Award. Chief Deputy Erik Hasselman is commended for his efforts.

OSP’s Mid-Columbia Fish And Wildlife Troopers Named 2016 Team Of The Year

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE

The Oregon State Police (OSP), Mid-Columbia Fish and Wildlife Team (The Dalles) was recently awarded with the OSP Fish and Wildlife Division Team of the Year award for 2016 accomplishments. The Mid-Columbia Team consists of highly motivated, dedicated and tenacious troopers who enforce fish and wildlife laws and protect Oregon’s natural resources, citizens and visitors in five counties; Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman, Wasco and Wheeler.

PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, BACK ROW: SENIOR TROOPER SWEDE PEARSON, SENIOR TROOPER JUSTIN FRAZIER, SERGEANT LES KIPPER. FRONT ROW, SENIOR TROOPER MARK JUBITZ, SENIOR TROOPER BRENT OCHESKEY, TROOPER JASON WALTERS AND SENIOR TROOPER THAD ROUTSON. NOT PRESENT: SENIOR TROOPER CRAIG GUNDERSON. (OSP)

Together, the Mid-Columbia Team proved that through perseverance, dedication and quality investigations their collaborative work enabled them to successfully hold person(s) accountable for the following cases during 2016: Team members initiated an ongoing multi-state major serial poaching investigation where several individuals unlawfully killed up to 30 animals throughout several counties in Oregon and up to 50 animals throughout several counties in Washington. Troopers are continuing to work closely with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife sharing information and coordinating conclusion of this investigation.

A team member investigated a serious boat collision occurring in the Columbia River between two boats which caused serious injury to several occupants. The investigation resulted in a guilty plea by one boat operator for BUII, two counts of Assault IV and reckless boating.

Team members responded to a report of the possible poaching of bighorn sheep along Interstate 84 in Gilliam County. The suspects were located, identified, arrested and lodged in jail after two bighorn sheep were located with their heads removed and placed in garbage bags. Upon a thorough investigation, the hard work of the troopers led to the successful prosecution of the two suspects.

They conducted several boat patrols during the fall commercial fishing season, making several arrests and seizures of fish and gill nets used while fishing illegally; primarily by unlawful drift netting through river mouth sanctuaries.

Team members also worked closely with Patrol Division Troopers, assisting with traffic crashes and other calls for service. Additionally, they work well with other local and county law enforcement partners within five counties to provide the best service to the citizens of Oregon.

In addition to their normal Fish and Wildlife Division duties and activities, the Mid-Columbia Team members performed an array of other assignments ranging from being members of, or instructors in various fields including the Oregon State Police Critical Incident Response Team providing support to law enforcement officers who have been involved in critical incidents, to instructing recruit troopers in the enforcement of fish and wildlife laws, as well as, providing quality instruction to other Department members in firearms training, defensive tactics and boat operations to name a few.

The Mid-Columbia Fish and Wildlife Team is commended for a job well done and for their commitment to protecting people, property and Oregon’s natural resources.

Eagle’s Talons Cut Off, Carcass Dumped Near Brookings; OSP Seeking Info

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

On March 20, 2017, an OSP Fish and Wildlife Division Trooper responded to a report of a Bald Eagle that had been killed and dumped at the mouth of the Winchuck River near Brookings. The Bald Eagle’s talons had been cut off and illegally taken.

THE EAGLE’S TALONLESS LEGS. (OSP)

(OSP)

An examination of the Bald Eagle showed no sign of visible injuries that would have led to the death of the bird. The taking of the Eagle’s talons without a permit is a violation of the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act of 1940. Penalties under the Act can include jail time and a fine of $100,000 or more, depending on the circumstances. Bald Eagles are also protected under Oregon’s Wildlife Laws.

Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to contact Senior Trooper Paul Rushton at the number listed below. It should be noted that this incident is unrelated to another press release where an OSP Trooper helped rescue two injured Bald Eagles in the Brookings Area.

Senior Trooper Paul Rushton: 541-531-5896