Tag Archives: Oregon hunters association

Big Turnout, 4 Tons Of Trash Collected In Annual Yaquina River Cleanup

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE U DA MAN FISHING TOURNAMENT

On Saturday, April 20th, the U Da Man (UDM) Fishing Tournament, in conjunction with Oregon SOLVE, held its 3rd Annual Port to Port Yaquina River Clean Up.

This event is sponsored by the Ports of Newport and Toledo, Dahl Disposal of Toledo, Thompson’s Sanitary Service of Newport, JC Thriftway Market and Englund Marine & Industrial Supply of Newport.

PARTICIPANTS IN THE PORT TO PORT CLEANUP POSE WITH TRASH COLLECTED ALONG THE LOWER YAQUINA RIVER DURING LAST WEEKEND’S EVENT. (U DA MAN)

Fifty-two volunteers worked from boats and the road shoulders from the Port of Toledo airport boat launch starting at 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. This is the largest group of volunteers we have had for this event. Two 20-yard dumpsters were filled with an estimated 8,000 pounds of debris and trash by the end of the day.

Volunteers represented local community members, along with the many members of the Longview Hills Fishing Club, Central Coast Fly Fishers, students from the Newport and Toledo High Schools, Angell Job Corp, First United Methodist Church Youth Group of Corvallis, ODFW, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Marine Patrol, Depoe Bay Salmon Enhancement, Oregon Hunters Association and Oregon SOLVE.

The UDM group wants to thank all the sponsors and volunteers who assisted us this year. We simply could not have this much impact on the Yaquina River habitat without all the people power and donations provided for this yearly event.

OHA Annual Convention Set For Mid-May in Lincoln City

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION

The auction of an Oregon Access and Habitat Statewide Elk Tag – good for a four-month season nearly anywhere in the state, and the drawings for 12 dream hunt raffles for deer, elk, pronghorn, bighorn sheep and mountain goat will highlight the events when the Oregon Hunters Association’s annual State Convention returns to Chinook Winds Casino in Lincoln City on May 18.

The statewide elk tag and big game hunt raffles are sponsored by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and generate funds earmarked for each species, as well as wildlife habitat and hunting access programs.

The public is welcome to attend the event or bid on the statewide elk tag by telephone the night of the event. For ticket information, visit www.oregonhunters.org. For more information, or to register to bid by phone, contact the OHA state office at (541) 772-7313. Tickets must be purchased by May 8.

Other highlights of the live and silent auctions, which feature more than 100 items, include safaris in Africa and Argentina, North American hunting and fishing trips, getaways, top quality firearms, hunting gear and fine art.

The annual convention is the biggest fund-raising banquet of the year for OHA, the largest Oregon-based pro-hunting group with 26 chapters and 10,000 members statewide.

Other featured raffles at the event will offer more than 100 items worth more than $30,000, including firearms, hunting optics, gear and wildlife art. Raffles include the popular annual Les Schwab Raffle, this year featuring a Sig optics combo, and the new Coastal Farm & Ranch Raffle, featuring a Nosler Custom M48 Liberty rifle.

One OHA membership is required per couple or group. A one-year membership is $35 for individuals and $45 for families and includes a subscription to Oregon Hunter magazine and the Oregon Hunter’s Calendar.

There will be complimentary drawings for kids, ladies, OHA life members and – on Armed Forces Day – our veterans.

All funds raised stay in Oregon to support OHA’s mission of protecting Oregon’s wildlife, habitat and hunting heritage.

 

Willamina Cow Elk Poaching Update: Tip Leads To Citations For 3 People

OSP update  1:50 p.m., March 28, 2019

Thanks to a tip from the public, Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers cited three subjects for Unlawful Take/Possession of Antlerless Elk.  The elk meat was seized and donated to local charities.

Oregon State Police would like to thank the public and media for assistance in bringing this case to a resolution.

THE FOLLOWING IS THE ORIGINAL PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers are seeking the public’s help in identifying suspect(s) involved in the killing of 3 cow elk on Willamina Creek Rd, just past mile post 8 near the upper bridge.

OREGON STATE FISH AND WILDLIFE TROOPERS BELIEVE THE THREE COW ELK WERE SHOT ABOUT 8 MILES NORTH OF WILLAMINA. (OSP)

Troopers found evidence of 3 elk that had been shot with high powered rifles on private timber property and pulled out to Willamina Creek Rd with ATV’s. A tip later the next day led Troopers to three cow elk hides dumped on NW Fir Crest Rd just west of the town of Carlton. Based on the evidence found at both sites, the elk were most likely killed between March 20, 2019 and March 23, 2019.

THE HIDES OF THREE ELK WERE FOUND DUMPED SOUTHWEST OF CARLTON. (OSP)

Please see the attached maps for precise location information of the kill sites and the dump site. Anyone who may have information that will help identify suspect(s) is asked to call the TIP line at 1-800-452-7888 or dial *OSP and refer information to Senior Trooper Boeholt or Trooper Tayler Jerome.

GOOGLE MAPS SHOW THE LOCATION THE HIDES WERE DUMPED. (OSP)

Information leading to an arrest is eligible for either a cash reward or up to 6 Preference Points. Oregon Hunter’s Association (OHA) has pledged an additional cash reward for a total cash reward option of $2500.

Hunters Express Concerns Over Oregon Pilot ‘Excessive Elk Damage’ Bill

Oregon lawmakers this morning heard arguments for and against a bill that would begin a pilot program to alleviate “excessive elk damage,” with hunting organizations expressing concern and ranchers demanding action.

House Bill 3227 drew a full house during public comment in Salem before the lower chamber’s Natural Resources Committee, which also heard from the Department of Fish and Wildlife about what tools are in its toolbox for when too many of the prized ungulates gather on valley floor pastures.

A PAIR OF ELK SPAR AT THE WENAHA WILDLIFE AREA, WHERE STATE WILDLIFE MANAGERS HAD TO FEED WAPITI DURING A RECENT HARSH WINTER. OTHER ELK HAVE FOUND THAT THE REGION’S SETTLED VALLEY FLOOR OFFERS ANOTHER ALTERNATIVE, BUT ONE THAT RANCHERS AND LANDOWNERS ARE GROWING FRUSTRATED BY. (KEITH KOHL, ODFW)

This winter and the harsh one of 2016-17 have seen large numbers pushed into the lowlands and farmers and ranchers fields and haystacks, where some apparently have taken up year-round residence too.

But even as they acknowledge that that’s a problem, hunters are worried about nebulous language in the bill, including what exactly “excessive” means and how it opens up the current landowner damage program to allow any “persons” to get a tag to kill antlerless on the property or leases of producers and others who complains they’re suffering too high of an impact from elk.

“The Oregon Hunters Association opposes House Bill 3227, as it does not consider elk biological factors, environmental conditions, most hunters interests, or the effectiveness of collaborative efforts,” wrote Ken McCall, OHA resource director. “It places elk management in the hands of landowners rather than with trained professionals within ODFW. Elk distribution issues are complex, and a one-sided approach is not the answer.”

Blake Henning, conservation chair of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, called it a “heavy-handed approach” in written testimony and said the problem was a result of other issues.

“This bill treats the symptoms of elk herd distribution rather than its true causes—lack of suitable habitat on adjacent public lands and pressure from predators. The Oregon House of Representatives would do well to address these problems before considering this statutory landowner damage pilot program,” his remarks stated.

The numerous territories of wolves in the mountains above La Grande and Elgin were featured in Union County Commissioner Paul Anderes’s slideshow.

But it also showed apparent elk damage, including teetering haystacks that had been eaten on at the bottom, and elk tracks and trails through muddy or planted fields.

Besides passing the bill, Anderes said other solutions were removing wapiti from the floor of the valley and “night-time shooting.”

Under the bill, the pilot program would include Clatsop, Lincoln, Morrow, Tillamook, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa Counties, and livestock producers and farmers from some of those voiced support for it during the hearing, saying that lowland elk herds have been growing in size in recent years.

Some said they had no intention of making any money off of selling tags through the proposed program.

Committee Chair Brad Witt was pretty emphatic that something needed to be done.

“We’re not going to let Oregonians be eaten out of house and home,” the Clatskanie Democrat said. “We’re going to protect hunters’ interests as well.”

He had asked representatives of the hunting groups in attendance — OHA, RMEF along with Oregon Bowhunters — what it would take to get closer to an agreement about how to move forward.

“I’m looking at how we get to a yes,” Witt said, indicating his desire to move the bill.

ODFW’s Shannon Hurn said that the most effective solution so far has been working collaboratively with legislators, landowners and hunters, which was echoed by OHA’s Al Elkins.

He said it wasn’t a one-size-fits-all issue, and that his conclusion after working for 20 years on it is that regional discussions about specific problems areas works best.

Near the end of the meeting, OHA’s Ken McCall rose and echoed sentiments from Henning’s RMEF statement.

“We’re leaving the federal lands out of this conversation and we shouldn’t,” he said.

McCall said his organization has been working for the Forest Service to improve habitat on low-elevation lands adjacent to agricultural operations.

Chair Witt asked the hunter groups to provide a contact name to him and the bill’s prime sponsor, Rep. Greg Baretto, a Cove Republican, to be available to work on the issue.

Two more hearings on Oregon elk bills are scheduled for this afternoon.

Registration Open For ODFW’s Kids, First-ever Adult Turkey Hunting Workshop

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Get ready for spring turkey hunting season before the season opens statewide on April 15! Register now for one of the three spring turkey hunting workshops ODFW is hosting in early April—two for kids and the first-ever ODFW turkey hunting workshop for adults on April 7 at the White River Wildlife Area in Tygh Valley.

ODFW AND OHA SPONSOR A POPULAR TURKEY HUNTING CLINIC FOR YOUTH AGE 8 TO 17 EVERY YEAR AT THE WHITE RIVER WILDLIFE AREA, SO KIDS CAN BE READY FOR SPRING TURKEY HUNTING SEASON OPENING LATER IN APRIL. (ODFW)

Each workshop will cover turkey hunting skills such as scouting, turkey biology, using a turkey call, and gear. Participants will also get the chance to practice shotgun skills, with all necessary gear (including shotguns and shells) provided by ODFW and partners.

Workshop dates and locations follow; click the event link for more information. Register online at ODFW’s Licensing Page (go to Purchase from Catalog / Class Workshop / Outdoor Skills to see the turkey hunting workshops) or at an ODFW office that sells licenses. Workshop registration is not available at license sale agents. Note that youth or parent must be registering from the youth’s online account to register for the youth-only workshops online at ODFW’s Licensing Page.


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  • Youth turkey hunting clinic (age 17 and under), April 6, Denman Wildlife Area (Central Point), 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Cost: free, but hunter education certification is required to participate. Hosted by ODFW and Rogue Valley Chapter of the Oregon Hunters Association. Register by April 1. Email albrechtdg@aol.com with questions.

“Calling in a tom during spring turkey season can be as exciting as calling in an elk,” said Catherine Sander-Korte, ODFW outdoor skills. “These workshops will leave you ready to get outdoors for this spring turkey season.”

Spring turkey season runs April 15-May 31 statewide in Oregon, with a special youth-only hunt April 13-14.

Op-Ed: More Intensive Cougar Management Tools Needed In Oregon — OHA

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OP ED FROM THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION

By Jim Akenson

The fatal cougar attack on a hiker in the Mount Hood National Forest last year was a tragic thing. Evidence evaluation indicated the cougar was a female in good health. Is this a surprise? Not really.

OREGON WILDLIFE MANAGERS IDENTIFIED THIS COUGAR AS THE ONE THAT KILLED HIKER DIANA BOBER IN LATE SUMMER NEAR MT. HOOD. THE ANIMAL WAS TRACKED DOWN AND LETHALLY REMOVED. (ODFW)

Cougar numbers are at all-time highs for our state, and the distribution of these cats encompasses the entire state. What has accounted for this cougar population expansion from an estimation of less than 3,000 in the mid-1990s to well over 6,000 today? Some of the answer is biological, some is social, and much is connected to management capabilities and practices. We need to find a way to return to this socio-biological balance, and looking to the recent past might just be the best bet – back to a time when hound hunting was a legal and effective management tool in Oregon.

What are the consequences of there being double the number of cougars in Oregon? These effects are best described as alarming and pattern changing. One such pattern is for prey animals, specifically deer, relocating to human development areas to avoid a higher predation risk. This relocation is also drawing in cougars that will go where the next meal can be found. Many hunters and state wildlife managers report that deer are now less abundant in the wilder mountain, high desert, and canyon regions of our state. Meanwhile, Oregon cities are wrestling with the number of deer inhabiting city limits, and cougars are showing up in backyards and schoolyards.

As cougars become more comfortable in human-altered landscapes, the probability of negative encounters with humans, as well as pets and livestock, increases.

JIM AKENSON. (OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION)

So, what is the solution? Biologically, it is plain and simple – more intensive cougar management through various hunting techniques. With an estimated population of 6,400 cougars, and roughly 14,000 people hunting cougars and harvesting from 250 to 300 cats per year, this only equals a harvest rate of 4 percent, which is not enough to even flatten the ever-rising cougar population curve.

Reducing human threat, increasing deer and elk survival, and bringing a cougar population back in balance with other interests in our state will require increased management action and efficiency. According to the 2017 Oregon Cougar Management Plan, the success rate for 2016 cougar hunters was 1.9 percent, with 13,879 people reporting that they did hunt cougars. Contrast that with 1994 data, the last year that dogs were allowed in conservatively controlled, limited-entry cougar hunting, showing 358 people hunted cougars and harvested 144 for a success rate of 40.2 percent. Bottom line: hunting efficiency with dogs is dramatically higher, and provides wildlife managers a reliable tool for maintaining the cougar population within its management objectives.

Oregon’s cougar management and record keeping are divided into six zones, each of which is assigned a desired harvest quota to keep the population in balance with the varied activities of all Oregonians. Employing the current limited management methods, only one of the six zones has met the harvest quota in recent years. A criterion for quota establishment is complaint frequency. By far the most cougar complaints are recorded on the west side of the Cascades, including the coastal region, in Zones A and B. This is also where the bulk of the human population lives. More than 350 cougar complaints per year were received during the last decade in these two zones. Unfortunately, this recording system was not initiated until 2001, so we don’t have data for the time before the dog ban of 1994. We do have records for administrative actions connected to human safety and pet conflicts before and after the dog ban of 1994. For eight years before the ban, they averaged only four per year, and then seven years after the dog ban these complaints increased to 27 per year – nearly a seven-fold increase.

Oregon does have a legislatively authorized agent program wherein highly vetted houndsmen are permitted to lethally remove cats to reduce human conflict and bolster deer and elk survival. These agents work closely with ODFW district biologists. Even with this program in place, cougars are steadily increasing in Oregon, where hunting them is very impractical without the aid of dogs. At present, the law authorizing the use of agents is up for renewal, and hopefully it will receive legislative support and then be applied more broadly for both reaching zone harvest quotas and to help curb the upward statewide population trajectory.

Editor’s note: Jim Akenson is a wildlife biologist, book author and Conservation Director for the Oregon Hunters Association (oregonhunters.org). He invested much of his career in researching the Northwest’s predators.

‘Great Victory … For Elk And Elk Habitat’: OHA On US Judge’s Ochoco NF Trail Decision

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION PRESS RELEASE

A U.S. District Court Judge in Portland today upheld the August findings of a Pendleton Magistrate Judge, siding with the Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) and other groups who filed suit to stop the U.S. Forest Service from building an additional 137 miles of off highway vehicle (OHV) trails in critical elk habitat on the Ochoco National Forest.

(JIM WARD, OHA)

District Judge Marco Hernandez adopted the findings of Magistrate Judge Patricia Sullivan, who on Aug. 27, ruled for OHA on four of the five claims made against the project. Finding that the Forest Service made an “arbitrary and capricious” decision to approve the project, she recommended that the Record of Decision be set aside. The judge’s decision essentially kills the project unless the Forest Service goes back to the drawing board.

OHA, a nonprofit group of more than 10,000 hunters, filed a lawsuit in 2017 challenging the Forest Service’s Record of Decision to implement the project. OHA’s claims that the project violated road density standards in the Ochoco National Forest Plan and didn’t adequately address protection for elk during calving and rutting seasons prevailed.

“It’s a great victory for OHA and for elk and elk habitat on the forest,” said OHA attorney Scott Jerger. “Judge Hernandez adopted and agreed with all of the Magistrate Judge’s rulings on OHA’s legal claims. The project is now officially dead, and the Forest Service must return to the drawing board to address the numerous legal deficiencies in its analysis.”

Jim Akenson, OHA’s conservation director, was pleased with the decision.

“It’s a good day for elk, hunters, and conservation,” said Akenson. “OHA is not opposed to responsible OHV use, we are just opposed to the disturbance and displacement of elk in critical habitat that would move them off public land onto nearby private land, where they would get themselves into trouble. We filed this lawsuit as a last resort.”

The Ochoco Mountains have historically been some of the best habitat for deer and elk in Oregon. Information published on ODFW’s website reveals that hunting contributes more than $14 million to central Oregon’s tourism economy and more than $104 million to the statewide tourism economy on an annual basis.

OHA’s successful suit was funded by OHA’s Hunter’s Victory Fund and Wildlife SuperFund, with major contributions from OHA’s Bend Chapter and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

OHA (oregonhunters.org) is the state’s largest Oregon-based pro-hunting organization, with 10,000 members and 26 chapters statewide. Its mission is “Protecting Oregon’s wildlife, habitat and hunting heritage.”

$7,500 Reward, Guided Hunt Now Offered For Info On Oregon Moose Poaching

Editor’s note: The following post has been updated (12-12-18, 8:50 a.m.) with a press release (at top) from the Oregon Hunters Association.

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRESS RELEASES FROM THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION AND OREGON STATE POLICE

The Oregon Hunters Association’s Union-Wallowa Chapter has pledged $500 toward the reward for information leading to an arrest in the case of a bull moose poached in Wallowa County, bringing the total reward offered to $7,500. Area landowners are offering a Landowner Preference bull elk tag as part of the reward.

(ODFW)

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers are asking for the public’s assistance in locating and apprehending whoever is responsible for shooting a bull moose sometime between Nov. 8 and Nov. 11 (the last couple of days of the second Bull Elk Season) in Wallowa County.

OHA offers a $1,000 reward from the Turn In Poachers fund, and 11 OHA chapters (Union/Wallowa, Emerald Valley, Yamhill, Clatsop, Josephine County, Capitol, Ochoco, Bend, Columbia County, Umpqua, Rogue Valley, Tualatin Valley and Hoodview) pledged $500 each.

“The poaching of a moose is a tragic thing,” said OHA Conservation Director Jim Akenson, who resides in Wallowa County. “Especially because our moose population is low – fewer than 70 in Oregon. For perspective, gray wolves already number more than twice that many in Oregon, so moose should deserve at least equal management protection.”

Also offered as part of the reward for information leading to an arrest is a Landowner Preference bull elk tag for the Krebs Ranch in the Chesnimnus Unit for the second bull season in 2019. The tag, arranged by Wallowa County resident Jim Zacharias, must be purchased from ODFW by the recipient.

The moose was shot and partially cut up off of the USFS 46 Road between Teepee Pond and mile marker 35 in the Chesnimnus Unit. The suspect(s) accessed the moose carcass from a campsite on the north side of the USFS 46 Road. Additionally, a side-by-side UTV was used to haul the moose meat and parts from the kill site back to the campsite.

Anyone with information that will help identify the suspect(s), is asked to call the TIP line at (800) 452-7888, *OSP (677) or Senior Trooper Mark Knapp at (541) 426-3049.

Informants providing information leading to an arrest in the case could be eligible for 5 big game preference points in lieu of the standard $1,000 TIP reward for a moose case. Callers may remain anonymous and still collect a reward.

In 2017, OHA (www.oregonhunters.org) increased the TIP reward amounts and paid a record $24,200 to informants in fish and wildlife violation cases.

……………………………………….

OREGON STATE POLICE PRESS RELEASE

Pledges from OHA chapters across the state have poured in thus increasing the cash reward amount to $7,500 for information leading to the issuance of a citation or arrest for the bull moose unlawfully killed in the Chesnimnus unit.

In addition to the cash reward the Krebs Ranch, located near the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve in the Chesnimnus unit, notified the Oregon Hunters Association, that they are also offering a guided bull elk hunt valued at $3,500, to the person that provides the information.

“The poaching of a moose is a tragic thing,” said OHA Conservation Director Jim Akenson, who resides in Wallowa County. “Especially because our moose population is low with fewer than 70 in Oregon.”

‘We Fought For Elk, And Won’–OHA On Judge’s Recommendation Against Ochoco OHV Expansion Plan

Unlike the other end of the wildlife spectrum, sportsmen conservationists don’t often go to court, but hunters are heralding a federal judge’s recent preliminary decision against a plan to build 137 miles of new offroad trails in a Central Oregon national forest.

THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION AND OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE HAVE BEEN OPPOSED TO THE PROPOSED NEW OFF-HIGHWAY TRAILS THROUGH THE OCHOCO NATIONAL FOREST BECAUSE OF IMPACTS TO ELK HABITAT. DARREN ASHLEY HARVESTED THIS BULL IN THE OCHOCO UNIT A COUPLE SEASONS AGO. (BROWNING PHOTO CONTEST)

“We fought for elk, and won,” said Jim Akenson, conservation director for the Oregon Hunters Association, in a press release.

OHA was among several parties that filed a lawsuit to halt a U.S. Forest Service bid to put in the off-highway vehicle trails through critical habitat in the Ochoco National Forest east of Prineville.

They argued that the forest plan violated road density standards and didn’t adequately consider how it would affect calving and rutting elk, according to a press release.

US District Court Magistrate Judge Patricia Sullivan in Pendleton recommended that the Forest Service’s record of decision on the project be set aside.

A local TV report termed it “preliminary” as Sullivan’s ruling must be reviewed by another federal arbiter, Judge Marco Hernandez in Portland, with both sides able to submit more arguments. But according to an attorney quoted by the station, it is rare for magistrate’s decisions to be overturned.

No doubt that OHVs are a good way to get around the woods and haul out big game, but according to a Northwest big game biologist’s 2013 paper summarizing the impacts of roads and traffic on elk, the vehicles cause the most disturbance for the species, leading bulls, cows and calves to react “negatively” to them at distances of even two-thirds of a mile away.

“OHA did everything they could to participate in the Forest Service planning process and raise their concerns about impacts on elk security and habitat,” said OHA Legislative Director Paul Donheffner in a press release. “We filed this lawsuit as a last resort. This was a very good day for OHA, other conservation groups that value the Ochocos, and for elk. Prevailing against the federal government is no easy match. This is a great victory for OHA and our mission.”

The main lawsuit was filed by Central Oregon Land Watch, with OHA filing a companion case. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has also opposed the new trails. We covered the issue in our September 2013 issue.

ODFW, OSP Team To Remove Arrows From 2 Shady Cove Does; Search Still On For Poacher

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Two deer, illegally shot with arrows in the Shady Cove area, were successfully tranquilized yesterday and the arrows removed.

(OSP)

ODFW wildlife biologists and Oregon State Police fish and wildlife officers worked together to track and tranquilize the deer, remove the arrows and treat the wounds. The deer, an adult doe and a yearling doe, were successfully released in good health with no visible infection.

(OSP)

“Pictures of these deer stuck with arrows have been circulating widely in the media and social media, and understandably, it’s upsetting to see. We are happy to say the arrows were removed and these deer have a very good chance of survival,” said Steve Niemela, Rogue District Wildlife Biologist.

Last week, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon State police began receiving calls from landowners in Shady Cove who saw these deer on their properties. Niemela said this is the second time in two years deer were illegally shot with arrows.

“This is not ethical hunting, it’s a twisted act of poaching,” said Zach Lycett, board member of the Rogue Valley Chapter of Oregon Hunter’s Association. “True ethical hunters respect the animals they hunt and are grateful for the opportunities to hunt. We do not stand for these kinds of criminal acts.”

OSP Sergeant Jim Collom said OSP is investigating and encourages anyone with information to call the TIP line at 1-800-452-7888.

The Rogue Valley OHA contributed $1,500, Ashland Archers contributed $100 and Dewclaw Archery contributed $500 to add on to the Oregon Hunter’s Association’s standard $500 reward for information leading t