Tag Archives: olympic peninsula

Olympic Mountain Goats To Be Moved To North Cascades, Under EIS Out For Final Review

Mountain goats are meant for the mountains, just not the Olympics, where the nonnative species will likely soon begin to be captured and relocated to the North Cascades, or shot on sight.

A TRIO OF MOUNTAIN GOATS CLING TO ROCKS ON THE RIDGE ABOVE THE ROAD TO HURRICANE RIDGE. (OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK)

Federal and state wildlife managers today announced that they want to remove billies, nannies and kids to reduce damage in the heights of the peninsula’s Olympic National Park.

A final environmental impact statement released this week will undergo a final 30-day comment period before the decision is final.

If no last objections are raised, efforts will begin this summer to move as many of the Olympics’ 725 goats as possible to the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie and Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forests, supplementing scattered herds there.

A LARGE HERD OF MOUNTAIN GOATS GATHERED ON THE FLANKS OF MT. BAKER, IN WASHINGTON’S NORTH CASCADES, IN 2016. (FENNER YARBOROUGH, WDFW)

Special permit hunting opportunities in the region have been declining over time.

“Federal and state agencies are poised to begin the effort that will help grow a depleted population of mountain goats in the Cascades; and eliminate their impact on the Olympic Peninsula,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum in a press release.

The alpine wanderers were apparently brought to the Olympics in the 1920s for hunting before the mountains became a national park. It was a time when critters were moved around to replenish animal herds diminished by overhunting and settlement, or to provide new opportunities.

But with the peninsula’s goat population forecast to hit 1,000 in several years unless nothing is done, and with the fatal goring of a hiker in 2010, the time to act to halt impacts to mountain vegetation appears to be now.

After two years of capture and translocation operations, lethal removals would begin, though animals in unapproachable areas could be killed after the first year, according to the EIS.

Federal, state and “skilled public volunteers” would be tasked with taking out the last goats with nontoxic ammo.

To view the plan, go to https://parkplanning.nps.gov/OLYMgoat.

ShadyNook Cottage on the Olympic Peninsula

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For a relaxing vacation, visit the beautiful Olympic Peninsula with its rugged Washington Coast. Where the mighty Pacific Ocean rolls in like liquid thunder. On your hikes, witness some of nature’s most spectacular scenery.

While you are there stay at ShadyNook Cottage.  Innkeeper Deannie Hoien warmly welcomes you to a world of hospitality; dedicated to the enjoyment of your stay on the Olympic Peninsula. Enjoy the beauty of Olympic National Park with nearby Rialto Beach and the Hoh Rain Forest.

Boating on Lake Crescent contributed by iseff from FlickrThree vacation rental cottages with separate entrances await your stay in this garden setting. Each has a living room, kitchen, bedroom and bath. Ideal for couples, though small families can be accommodated. A very private location, located minutes from downtown Forks, Washington.

Shadynook Cottage vacation rental is centrally located to all major attractions, making it a good base camp as you explore the area.

Many people stay three or four days as they visit area attractions like the Hoh Rain Forest, Ocean Beaches or Lake Crescent.

This 2,000 square mile region is bordered on the north and west by over 100 miles of saltwater shores and to the south and east by alpine meadows and rain forest valleys.Cape Flattery sea foam contributed by wiseleyb from Flickr

Fishing is one of the Olympic Peninsula’s most popular attractions.  Over 200 miles of wild rivers furrow the region with vibrant runs of native salmon and steelhead.  We think fishermen traveling to the Forks area will find our vacation rentals suit their needs perfectly.

Year round temperatures range from the mid-40’s to upper 60’s, snowfalls are infrequent as are temperatures over 80 degrees.