Tag Archives: ODFW

With Another Depredation, ODFW To Remove 2 More Harl Butte Wolves

THE FOLLOWING IS A NEWS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Today, ODFW confirmed another depredation by the Harl Butte wolf pack. ODFW intends to remove an additional two uncollared wolves (not pups) from this pack to limit further livestock losses.

AN ODFW MAP SHOWS THE AREA OF NORTHEAST OREGON WHERE THE HARL BUTTE PACK RESIDES. (ODFW)

Note the Harl Butte wolf pack is larger than originally estimated. ODFW has found evidence of at least eight wolves remaining in this pack, not including three pups.

Two weeks have passed since ODFW first announced plans to lethally remove wolves from the Harl Butte wolf pack due to chronic depredation. ODFW removed two non-breeding members of the Harl Butte wolf pack last week.  (One 33-pound wolf pup of the year was unintentionally captured and released.)

During the past two weeks, the radio-collared wolf in the pack, the breeding male, has been monitored closely to determine if he and other members of the pack altered their behavior and location. Removal of the two wolves, increased human presence in this area and continued use of non-lethal deterrents by livestock producers did not result in a significant change in the pack’s behavior.

ODFW will continue to monitor the effectiveness of this next removal and  livestock producers will continue non-lethal deterrents including daily human presence, removal of any potential attractants, and hazing.

Lower Columbia, Buoy 10, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (8-16-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

Eight hundred twenty-six Oregon boats were counted at Buoy 10 this past weekend.  Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 2.24 Chinook and 0.19 coho caught per boat.  In Troutdale, boat anglers averaged 0.07 steelhead caught per boat, while anglers fishing in the Portland to Tongue Point area averaged 0.47 Chinook and 0.28 steelhead caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.13 Chinook caught per angler.

A MULKEY SPINNER TROLLED BEHIND A FISH FLASH DURING THE FLOOD TIDE ABOVE THE BRIDGE YIELDED THIS FINE FALL CHINOOK FOR BUZZ RAMSEY. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed two Chinook adults kept for 16 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for two boats (five anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed one steelhead released for 15 boats (28 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for 14 bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed 34 Chinook adults and three Chinook jacks kept, plus one Chinook adult, one Chinook jack and 21 steelhead released for 75 boats (178 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 535 Chinook adults and 29 coho adults kept, plus 129 Chinook, 27 coho and one steelhead released for 297 boats (1,013 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for one bank angler; and one steelhead released for five boats (10 anglers); and no shad catch for two bank anglers.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed eight Chinook adults kept for one boat (five anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed two shad kept, plus 20 shad released for three boats (eight anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed four sublegal and three legal white sturgeon released for two boats (three anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for six bank anglers; and seven sublegal, two legal and three oversize white sturgeon released for two boats (four anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed four oversize sturgeon released for one boat (three anglers).

John Day Pool: No report.

WALLEYE

Gorge:  No report.

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed one walleye kept, plus one walleye released for seven boats (14 anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point:  Weekend checking showed four walleye kept for three boats (five anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 36 walleye kept for eight boats (14 anglers).

John Day Pool: No report.

ODFW Opens 2 New Ranges For PDX, Junction City-area Archers

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

It’s even easier to practice the ancient sport of archery in Oregon. ODFW recently opened two new public archery ranges: one in Hillsboro at the Portland Community College Rock Creek Campus and another in Junction City next to ODFW’s fishing pond.

AN ELEVATED STAND AT THE EE WILSON ARCHERY PARK WILL HELP BOWMEN PRACTICE TAKE SHOTS FROM TREESTANDS. (SHAWN WOODS)

The department also recently added an elevated shooting platform at its EE Wilson Wildlife Area range near Corvallis.

The range in Hillsboro was developed in partnership with the Tualatin Hills Parks & Recreation District with help from the Black Rose Traditional Archers. It’s located at 17705 NW Springville Road (at PCC’s Rock Creek campus complex) and includes 10 targets from 10 yards to 60 yards. The range is free to use and open to everyone, though people need to bring their own archery equipment. Parking may be limited without a PCC parking pass.

TWO ARCHERS PRACTICE AT THE TUALATIN PARKS AND RECREATION DISTRICT’S NEW RANGE IN HILLSBORO, AT THE PORTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE’S ROCK CREEK COMPLEX. (CHRIS WILLARD)

The second range is the Junction City Archery Park located at 92430 Hwy 99N, right next to ODFW’s popular fishing pond. This is a family-friendly range which includes a youth range with eight targets and another general target range with 16 targets. All shooting lines are covered, so practice in rain or shine. There is also a large covered area to accommodate groups. The range is free to use and open to everyone, though people need to bring their own archery equipment.

Finally, ODFW recently completed an elevated shooting platform at its EE Wilson Archery Park to help bowhunters practice simulated treestand shots. Archers who want to use the platform need to bring their own appropriate safety harness and can clip to one of three straps/cables available. Thanks to Oregon Wildlife, Oregon Bowhunters, Traditional Archers of Oregon, Oregon Hunters Association and Archer’s Afield for help developing this new feature.

Good News For Early Season NW Duck Hunters In Annual Survey

Silver lining to all of last winter and spring’s rain? Plenty of water for waterfowl to do their thing — and boy howdy did they ever.

Nearly twice as many ducks were counted in Washington compared to last year, according to a federal survey released today.

WATERFOWLERS LIKE LES CUMMINGS AND LES LOGSDON SHOULD SEE MORE MALLARDS AND WOODS DUCKS THIS FALL, THANKS TO STELLAR PRODUCTION IN WASHINGTON AND LIKELY GOOD PRODUCTION IN OREGON. THE DUO LIMITED AT THE BARKER RANCH NEAR RICHLAND EARLY LAST FALL WHILE PARTICIPATING IN A DISABLED VETERANS HUNT PUT ON THERE EACH OCTOBER. (BROWNING PHOTO CONTEST)

That’s good news for hunting in the early season, which is typically fueled by local production until migrating northern birds arrive.

“In Washington the total duck estimate was 99% higher than the 2016 estimate, and 44% above the long-term average (2010–2016),” reports the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

They may not have the bright-orange legs of their Alberta brethren, but Evergreen State mallards did well, up 72 percent over last year and 29 percent above the 1978-2016 average, USFWS adds.

To the south, Oregon’s 2017 total duck and mallard estimates were similar to 2016 and the long-term average, though greenheads were down 21 percent over the long haul.

But there may not really be any reason for Beaver State waterfowlers to get their waders in a bunch over that.

For our September issue’s fall flight forecast, MD Johnson interviewed ODFW’s duck boss Brandon Rieshus.

“Normally, we count the best of the best – the Willamette Valley and the wetlands in Eastern Oregon – as examples. Maybe the birds were scattered across the basin in places we don’t count. But from a habitat standpoint, it looked very good. The best it’s been in four or five years. (My guess is) production will be pretty good,” Rieshus told Johnson.

The USFWS report backs that notion.

“Habitat conditions in Oregon were much improved relative to the past several years and were good to excellent in all surveyed areas. Some areas of southcentral and southeastern Oregon had basins and playas with water for the first time in a decade or more. Many playas and dugout ponds throughout the High Desert were flooded as well,” the agency stated.

It was even wetter to the north.

“In Washington, overall water availability was the among wettest seen in 20 years according to state wildlife area staff and others, particularly through the Potholes and Channeled Scablands region, where potholes and ponds were plentiful. Reservoirs throughout east­ern Washington were at or above 100% capacity with associated flooding of fields and pastures. In early May, significant snowmelt runoff was still occurring throughout the Okanogan and Northeast Highlands,” USFWS reported.

A U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY MAP FOR WASHINGTON STREAM FLOWS SHOWS THAT CREEKS AND RIVERS IN EASTERN WASHINGTON STILL RUNNING AT ABOVE NORMAL LEVELS, INCLUDING CRAB CREEK, AND THE PALOUSE AND WALLA WALLA RIVERS. (USGS)

In terms of hard numbers, Washington’s mallard population was estimated at 103,400, well above 2016’s 60,000 (overall ducks: 242,000 vs. 121,500.

Oregon’s duck population was 239,900, up from last year’s 213,600.

Looking across the rest of North America, Ducks Unlimited reports that the overall estimate of 47.3 million breeding ducks in traditional survey zones is less than a million birds below 2016’s count, but still 34 percent above the 60-year average.

While mallards are down 11.3 percent, DU points to dry conditions in the Canadians “Parklands” of southern Alberta and Saskatchewan.

 

ODFW Stocking Wallowa High Lakes, Studying Which Size Trout Works Best

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Thousands of juvenile trout were airlifted to the Wallowa Mountains last week by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to supplement the fish populations of lakes within the 361,000-acre Eagle Cap Wilderness in Northeast Oregon.

JUVENILE TROUT FALL TOWARD HOBO LAKE IN THE EAGLE CAP WILDERNESS DURING A HELICOPTER FISH-STOCKING OPERATION MONDAY. (KYLE BRATCHER, ODFW)

The Eagle Cap Wilderness has some of Oregon’s most beautiful mountain lakes, including the state’s highest lake, Legore Lake, perched above the Wallowa Valley at an altitude of 8,950 feet. More than 40 lakes in the Eagle Cap are above 7,000 feet.

“The extreme conditions involved in maintaining healthy fish populations in a landscape above 7,000 feet has its own challenges,” said Jeff Yanke, ODFW district fish biologist in Enterprise, adding, “but anglers have consistently told us that fishing is one of the recreational experiences they expect when they go to the wilderness.”

ODFW stocks Eagle Cap Wilderness lakes by helicopter every two years. The stocking program is paid for with federal Sportfish Restoration Program dollars, which is funded by a 10 percent excise tax on the sale of fishing equipment. In this way, ODFW seeds off-the-beaten-track lakes with rainbow trout that will hopefully grow to become the eight inchers that anglers can legally retain.

WITH MORE THAN 40 LAKES OVER 7,000 FEET UP, THE WALLOWAS PUT THE HIGH IN HIGH LAKES FISHING. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The challenges juvenile trout face in the high mountains are considerable. First there is the long fall from the aerial stocking device (ASD) or “shuttle” underneath the helicopter to the cold waters of the high lake. In some of those lakes, the rainbows may encounter eastern brook trout, which were stocked in the high lakes decades ago and are a voracious predator. Freezing cold water is another factor in the high lakes that can take a toll on fish.

One way to improve survival rates is to start with larger fish. Fish biologists have long known larger fish are better able to withstand the forces of nature than smaller fish. However, larger fish also take up more space, which means fewer of them will fit into the two-gallon containers on the helicopter shuttle that ODFW uses to transport fish to the high lakes.

This year ODFW’s Enterprise office began testing three sizes of rainbow trout to see which one may fare better with the presence of brook trout in Oregon’s highest lakes. The control group, raised to a target size of 2.5 inches, is similar to what ODFW has released into the high lakes in the past and most commonly used for aerial stocking in other locations. This year two larger sizes: 3- and 4-inch rainbows – were also tested to see if there is any improvement in survival rates as the result of using larger trout. This part of the study will be completed in three to four years.

“Our study was initiated to see if we could increase rainbow survival in our lakes enough by raising a larger fish to overcome predation and competition by naturally producing brook trout,” said Kyle Bratcher, ODFW assistant district fish biologist in Enterprise.

One of the concerns was that larger fish might suffer more severe injuries when they hit the water after a 70-foot free fall because their bodies have more surface area to injure. Finding little or no documented evidence of this, the biologists simulated an air stocking event by dropping these different groups from varying heights into a small reservoir in advance.

Preliminary results indicate that all three size groups have high post-drop survival rates, according to Bratcher, who noted that samples were sent to ODFW’s fish lab in La Grande where they will be assessed for bruising, injuries and other signs of trauma.

In addition, ODFW crews will sample survey the stocked lakes two years from now, with captured fish identified as to species, length, weight, and other criteria that will lead to estimates of population abundance, growth, and condition.

ODFW: Willamette Steelhead At ‘High Risk’ Of Extinction Due To Sea Lions At Falls

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

One of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest’s iconic fish, native steelhead trout, have been migrating over Willamette Falls in Portland to spawn in Cascade Mountain rivers for millennia. They are now at high risk of going extinct, based on a new analysis by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

A CALIFORNIA SEA LION THROWS A SALMONID IN SPRING 2016 AT WILLAMETTE FALLS. (ODFW)

Listed for protection under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1999 due primarily to the impacts of federal dams and habitat loss, wild native Willamette steelhead have now slipped to high risk of extinction. Willamette steelhead now face a new and growing threat from male sea lions that have learned to exploit the fish as they congregate below Willamette Falls before navigating upriver to spawn.

Continuing a decade-long downward trend, the number of wild steelhead returning to the upper Willamette this year was the lowest on record, with only 512 fish passing above the Willamette Falls. ODFW scientists found that sea lions consumed at least one quarter of the wild steelhead run and warned that if sea lion predation continues at these levels, there is an up to 90 percent probability that at least one wild steelhead population will go extinct as a direct result of the predation. The near-term risk of wild steelhead extinction can be significantly reduced or avoided by limiting sea lion access to Willamette Falls.

“We know what the problem is and have seen this coming for about a decade, we just couldn’t take action to prevent it,” said Dr. Shaun Clements from ODFW.

California sea lions have expanded along the West Coast over the past four decades to a population of nearly 300,000 animals coast-wide today. As numbers increased, a small proportion of sea lions – all males – have expanded their range into freshwater areas where migrating salmon and steelhead are especially vulnerable, including in places such as Ballard Locks in Washington, Bonneville Dam, and at the Willamette Falls, where fish tend to congregate before moving upstream. At these locations, predation by sea lions is especially high and adversely impacts salmon, steelhead, and sturgeon. In the 1980s, sea lion predation on winter steelhead at Ballard Locks in Seattle effectively destroyed the Lake Washington stock.

“Removal of a few problem individuals will have no impact on the overall sea lion population but can significantly benefit ESA-listed fish,” said Robin Brown, lead scientist for ODFW’s marine mammal program.

Any solution to address the threats to wild fish populations will have to strike a balance between the recovery of imperiled salmon and steelhead populations and the ongoing conservation of sea lions. Also at stake are significant regional investments in recovery efforts, such as improvements in fish passage at dams, restoration of fish habitat, and implementation of fishing regulations that prohibit anglers from harvesting wild fish. ODFW scientists have determined that curtailing the immediate impact created by sea lion predation is essential to saving the steelhead from extinction to support the success of long-term recovery efforts.

Sea lions are protected under the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). The MMPA, unlike the ESA, has fewer tools for managers to use to balance the conservation of predators and prey and prevent these situations in locations where fish are most vulnerable. Sections of the MMPA were revised in 1994 to allow limited management of sea lions for the purpose of protecting ESA-listed salmon and steelhead. Unfortunately, the revisions do not allow for proactive management and cannot address emergencies like that occurring at Willamette Falls.

“We are in on-going discussions with state and tribal fishery managers and several stakeholder groups,” said Dr. Clements, “Given the situation at Willamette Falls, everyone is united in their call for swift action, and ODFW stands ready to provide expertise to the Northwest congressional delegation on a bipartisan, compromise bill to revise the MMPA to address these emergency situations without undermining the strength and importance of this law.” Bills in the House and Senate; H.R. 2083, sponsored by Rep. Jamie Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) and Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.), and S 1702, sponsored by Sen. James Risch (R-Idaho), represent the first steps toward that goal.

“We are at a point where any more delays in the Willamette may condemn this run to extinction,” Clements said. “We need to act now or extinction may be our legacy.”

Upper Willamette wild steelhead have been listed as “threatened” under the federal ESA since March 1999. ODFW has not allowed harvest of these fish for more than 20 years. California sea lion populations are robust, and the animals are not listed under the Endangered Species Act, but are protected under the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act.

ODFW To Remove 2 Harl Butte Wolves To Head Off Chronic Depredations

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW wildlife managers intend to remove some of the adult wolves in northeast Oregon’s Harl Butte pack to limit further livestock losses as non-lethal measures and hazing have not been successful in limiting wolf depredations.

On July 28, ODFW received a lethal removal request from several affected livestock producers from a local grazing association after two depredations were confirmed in a five-day period. They asked that the entire Harl Butte pack be removed due to chronic livestock depredation. ODFW has decided to deny the request and will take an incremental approach instead, removing two members of the pack and then evaluating the situation. “In this chronic situation, lethal control measures are warranted,” said Roblyn Brown, ODFW Acting Wolf Coordinator. “We will use incremental removal to give the remaining wolves the opportunity to change their behavior or move out of the area.”

AN ODFW MAP SHOWS THE AREA OF NORTHEAST OREGON WHERE THE HARL BUTTE PACK RESIDES. (ODFW)

In the past 13 months, ODFW has confirmed seven depredations by the Harl Butte Pack in Wallowa County, which killed three and injured four calves. Six of the depredations have occurred in an area that supports dispersed livestock grazing in large forested pastures on private and public lands.  ODFW believes that depredations may continue or escalate despite non-lethal deterrent measures in place due to the history of depredation by this pack.

When non-lethal deterrence measures are not sufficient, the state’s Wolf Management and Conservation Plan allows for lethal control as a tool to address continuing depredation. At the request of a producer or permittee, ODFW can consider lethal control of wolves under these circumstances: if it confirms at least two depredations of livestock; if the requester documents unsuccessful attempts to solve the situation thru non-lethal means; if no identified circumstance exists that attracts wolf-livestock conflict; and if the requester has complied with applicable laws and the conditions of any harassment or take permit.

In this situation, the livestock producers have maintained a significant human presence in the area of the depredations. Human presence is recognized as one of the best non-lethal methods to limit wolf-livestock conflict in dispersed grazing situations because wolves tend to avoid people. The producers coordinate between themselves, their employees, a county-employed range rider and a volunteer to ensure daily human presence coverage of the area. They increase human activity in areas when they see wolf sign, learn (through telemetry of a radio-collared wolf) that wolf activity is in close proximity to livestock, or when livestock show behavior that could indicate wolf presence.

The increased human presence has given the livestock producers and the range rider multiple opportunities to haze wolves that were chasing or in close proximity to livestock.  On seven different occasions in June and July 2017, wolves have been hazed away from cattle by yelling, firing a pistol, shooting at, walking towards, and riding horseback towards the wolves.

Producers or their employees have also been spending nights near their cattle. Several producers are keeping their stock dogs inside horse trailers at night (as wolves are territorial and may attack dogs). Other producers are changing their typical grazing management practices including bunching cow/calf pairs in a herd (which enables cows to better protect themselves) or delaying pasture rotation to avoid putting cattle in an area where wolves have been.

While investigating reported livestock depredations, ODFW looks for attractants to wolves such as a bone pile or carcass that may contribute to the conflict. Livestock producers have also been watching for vulnerable livestock and carcasses in order to keep them from becoming wolf attractants and have been quick to remove them. Three injured or sick livestock were moved to home ranches for treatment and to protect them from predators. One dead domestic bull was removed from an area of concentrated cattle use (a pond). ODFW has not identified any circumstances or attractants that could promote wolf-livestock conflict in this area.

All these methods used by livestock producers have complied with Oregon’s applicable laws.

The Harl Butte Pack’s first depredation of livestock was confirmed in July of last year. ODFW received a request for lethal control in October 2016, after the fourth confirmed depredation. The department denied this request because most cattle were being removed from the large dispersed grazing pastures and out of the depredation area, so future depredation was unlikely.

The situation is different now because cattle will be grazing in the area on public lands until October and private lands into November, so ODFW expects the depredation will continue.

“Based on the level of non-lethal measures already being used and the fact that wolves are likely to be in the presence of cattle in this area for several more months, there is a substantial risk that depredation will continue or escalate,” said Brown.

ODFW intends to remove up to two adult uncollared wolves from the Harl Butte Pack by trapping or shooting from the ground or air. Once two wolves have been removed, the removal operation will stop. If two wolves have not been killed after two weeks, ODFW will assess whether removal efforts will continue another two weeks. If a new depredation occurs after the removal of two wolves, lethal control may resume.

About the Harl Butte Wolf Pack

The Harl Butte wolf pack may have formed and bred as early as 2015 though they were not documented until 2016. ODFW counted 10 wolves at the end of last year and observed seven wolves in the pack in March.  One wolf in the pack, OR50, was collared in February 2017 and is believed to be the breeding male of the pack.

The pack is expected to have bred this year, and their weaned pups would now be about four months old, though the exact number of pups is unknown.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (8-3-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA WATTS, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

SALMON, STEELHEAD AND SHAD

On Saturday’s (7/29) flight, 122 salmonid boats and 66 Oregon bank anglers were counted from the Astoria-Megler Bridge to Bonneville Dam.  Boat anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.89 summer Chinook and 0.89 steelhead caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.14 summer Chinook and 0.08 steelhead caught per boat.  In the Portland to Westport area, boat anglers averaged 0.22 summer Chinook and 0.25 steelhead caught per boat, while anglers fishing in the estuary averaged 0.90 summer Chinook caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.01 summer Chinook and 0.23 steelhead caught per angler, while anglers fishing the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.05 steelhead caught per angler.

FUN FISHING OUT AT BUOY 1, ROB BIGNALL OF IT’S ALL GOOD GUIDE SERVICE SHOWS OFF THE GRADE OF CHINOOK COMING INTO THE LOWER COLUMBIA. THIS ONE BIT A HERRING BEHIND A BIG AL’S FISH FLASH IN THE MONEY PATTERN. (VIA JARROD HIGGINBOTHAM, YAKIMA BAIT)

Gorge Bank: Weekly checking showed four steelhead kept, plus one Chinook and 12 steelhead released for 70 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekly checking showed four Chinook adults and four steelhead kept, plus four Chinook and four steelhead released for nine boats (35 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekly checking showed two Chinook adults, one Chinook jack and one steelhead kept, plus three Chinook adults and two steelhead released for 36 boats (75 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekly checking showed one steelhead kept, plus one steelhead released for 37 bank anglers.

Portland to Westport Boats: Weekly checking showed six Chinook adults, and six steelhead kept, plus one Chinook adult and two steelhead released for 32 boats (73 anglers); and one shad kept for one boat (two anglers).

Estuary Bank (Astoria-Megler Bridge to Wauna Powerlines): No report.

Estuary Boats (Astoria-Megler Bridge to Wauna Powerlines): Weekly checking showed three Chinook adults kept, plus six Chinook adults released for 10 boats (22 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed one steelhead released for 10 bank anglers; and no catch for two shad anglers.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed two shad kept, plus 20 shad released for three boats (eight anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekly checking showed 67 sublegals, 34 legals and 213 oversize sturgeon released for 10 boats (42 anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed one sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for one boat (three anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed two sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for two bank anglers; and 11 sublegal sturgeon released for one boat (two anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 10 sublegal, two legal and six oversize sturgeon released for five boats (18 anglers).

WALLEYE

Gorge:  Weekly checking showed six walleye kept for one boat (four anglers).

Troutdale: Weekly checking showed 13 walleye kept for eight boats (20 anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 19 walleye released for one boat (three anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one bank angler; and 327 walleye kept, plus 176 walleye released for 54 boats (138 anglers).

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (7-26-17)

THE FOLLOWING ORIGINATED WITH ODFW AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (7/22) flight, 211 salmonid boats and 42 Oregon bank anglers were counted from the Astoria-Megler Bridge to Bonneville Dam.

Gorge Bank: Weekly checking showed one adult Chinook and one steelhead kept, plus one Chinook and three steelhead released for 73 salmonid anglers.

WALLEYE FISHING REMAINS SUPERB IN THE COLUMBIA’S EAST GORGE WATERS, WITH BEST ACTION IN THE JOHN DAY POOL, BUT SOME BITING BELOW THERE TOO, LIKE THIS NICE ONE FOR ROLAND SWOPES, HIS FIRST EVER. HE WAS BOTTOM BOUNCING WITH A ‘CRAWLER WHILE FISHING WITH FRIEND LES LOGSDON. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Gorge Boats:  Weekly checking showed ten adult Chinook and three Chinook jacks kept, plus six adult Chinook and four steelhead released for ten salmonid boats (44 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekly checking showed six adult Chinook and five steelhead kept, plus eight adult Chinook, one Chinook jack and 11 steelhead released for 69 salmonid boats (122 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank:  Weekly checking showed one adult Chinook and two steelhead kept for 37 bank anglers.

Portland to Westport Boats:  Weekly checking showed six adult Chinook, one Chinook jack and four steelhead kept, plus four adult Chinook, one Chinook jack and six steelhead released for 47 boats (106 anglers).

Estuary Bank (Astoria-Megler Bridge to Wauna Power lines):  Weekly checking showed no catch for two salmonid anglers.

Estuary Boats (Astoria-Megler Bridge to Wauna Power lines):  Weekly checking showed no catch for six salmonid boats (19 anglers).

Bonneville Pool:  Weekly checking showed two steelhead kept and five steelhead released for three boats (four anglers)

The Dalles Pool:  No report.

John Day Pool:  Weekly checking showed no catch for two boats (three anglers).

STURGEON

Gorge boats: Catch and release only. No report.

Portland to Wauna Power lines:  Catch and release only.  Weekly checking showed one legal and 12 sublegal sturgeon released for one boat (two anglers).

Estuary Boats (Buoy 10 to Wauna Power lines):  Catch and release only.  Weekly checking showed 33 legal, four sublegal and 28 oversize sturgeon released for eight boats (31 anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Catch and release only.  No report

The Dalles Pool: Catch and release only. No report.

John Day Pool: Catch and release only.  Weekly checking showed three legal, 14 sublegal and nine oversize sturgeon released for four boats (10 anglers).

WALLEYE

Troutdale boats:  Weekly checking showed 28 walleye kept, plus one walleye released for 17 boats (40 anglers).

Bonneville Pool: No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed three walleye kept and five released for seven bank anglers; and 76 walleye kept, plus 20 walleye released for 10 boats (25 anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 1,022 walleye kept and 453 released for 110 boats (225 anglers).

22 Free Youth Pheasant Hunts Coming Up Around Oregon; Registration Open

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Youth hunters (age 17 and under) can sign up now for ODFW’s free pheasant hunts happening around the state in September.

The events are being held in Baker City, Central Point, Corvallis, Eugene, Irrigon/Umatilla, John Day, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Portland, The Dalles (Tygh Valley). See dates below and register online (see Register for a Class/Youth Upland Hunts), at a license sales agent or at an ODFW office that sells licenses. Note that the Ladd Marsh and Fern Ridge hunts do not require advance registration.

MEAGAN JANSEN OF TIGARD WITH A PHEASANT SHE BAGGED AT 2011’S EE WILSON WILDLIFE AREA YOUTH PHEASANT HUNT. (odfw)

ODFW and partners stock pheasants at these special hunts that give youth a head start on regular pheasant seasons, which don’t begin until October. Quail and dove can also be hunted. Volunteers often bring their trained hunting dogs to hunt with participants. Some events also begin with a shotgun skills clinic, so participants can practice clay target shooting before hunting.

These events are only open to youth who have passed hunter education. (ODFW has many hunter education classes and field days available before the events.) An adult 21 years of age or older must accompany the youth to supervise but may not hunt.

“If your child made it through hunter education but is still new to the sport, this is a great way to get them started,” says James Reed, ODFW hunter education coordinator. “These events happen before regular pheasant seasons open and are a great opportunity for kids to get out hunting.”

ODFW stresses safety during the hunts. Both hunter and supervisor must wear a hunter orange hat, eye protection and a hunter orange vest—equipment provided by ODFW at the clinics to anyone who doesn’t have it. Hunters also need to check in and out of the hunt.

The hunts are free, though participants need a valid hunting license ($10 for youth 12 and older, free for age 11 and under) to hunt. Youth hunters age 12-17 also need an upland game bird validation ($4). Purchase online, at a license sales agent or ODFW office that sells licenses. Licenses and validations will not be sold at the events.

While most areas have a hunt both Saturday and Sunday, youth hunters may only sign up for one hunt. They are welcome to hunt stand by on the other day.

See the links below (from www.odfwcalendar.com) for more details including who to contact for more information.

  • Baker City area, Sept. 23 and Sept. 24. Note this event is not near the Baldock Slough Wetlands Project (regulations are in error). People who register for the event will be notified of its location via email.
  • Central Point, Denman Wildlife Area, Sept. 16 and Sept. 17.
  • Corvallis (near Camp Adair), EE Wilson Wildlife Area, Sept. 23 and Sept. 24.
  • Eugene, Fern Ridge Wildlife Area, Sept. 9 and Sept. 10. Registration not necessary but appreciated.
  • Irrigon Wildlife Area (between Irrigon and Umatilla), Sept. 23 and Sept. 24, sign up for morning or evening hunt (morning only on Sunday), see event listings at www.odfwcalendar.com
  • Klamath Falls, Klamath Wildlife Area, Sept. 16 and Sept. 17. Additional hunt on Oct. 21 when Miller Island Unit open to youth hunters only from 10 a.m. on a first-come, first-serve basis.
  • John Day Valley, Sept. 16 and Sept. 17
  • La Grande, Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, Sept. 16 and Sept. 17. No advance registration required.
  • Madras, Gateway Canyon Preserve, Sept. 9 and Sept. 10, sign up for one of several three-hour hunting shifts.
  • Portland, Sauvie Island Wildlife Area, Sept. 16 and Sept. 17.
  • Tygh Valley/The Dalles, White River Wildlife Area, Sept. 16 and Sept. 17.