Tag Archives: ODFW

ODFW Biologists Spotlighting Deer For Douglas County Survey

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists are conducting nighttime spotlight surveys of deer populations around Douglas County. All state trucks in the survey are clearly marked with large ODFW placards and flashing amber strobe lights.

(ODFW)

District spotlight surveys include county roads along the Umpqua Valley floor and remote locations throughout Douglas County foothills. Both black-tailed and Columbian white-tailed deer are counted along established roots. This data helps biologists monitor deer population trends and herd health through time.

Nighttime spotlighting in fall gives biologists an estimate of buck to doe and fawn to doe ratios. Spring spotlight surveys that begin in early March provide an indication of winter survival for fawns and yearlings.

Citizens witnessing spotlighting activity from unmarked vehicles are asked to call Oregon State Police’s TIP line at *OSP (677) or 1-800-452-7888

Lower Siletz To Reopen For Chinook Retention

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Emergency regulations restricting Chinook fishing have helped put Siletz River fall Chinook on a path toward achieving spawning escapement objectives for the basin.

THE SILETZ RIVER TO JUST ABOVE THE OJALLA BRIDGE BELOW THE TOWN OF SILETZ WILL REOPEN FOR FALL CHINOOK STARTING THIS SATURDAY, NOV. 10, GIVING ANGLERS LIKE MATT LITTLE SOMETHING TO SMILE ABOUT IN AN OTHERWISE DOWN YEAR FOR NORTH COAST KINGS. HE CAUGHT THIS PAIR OUT OF ONE HOLE A COUPLE SEASONS BACK. NOTE THAT THE DAILY LIMIT IS JUST ONE KING BETWEEN NOV. 1 AND DEC. 31. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Effective Saturday, Nov. 10, the section of the Siletz River from the mouth upstream to the ODFW marker located 1,200 feet above the Ojalla Bridge is open to Chinook angling through Dec. 31. The river upstream of the ODFW marker will remain closed to Chinook angling per emergency regulations.

The Chinook bag limit for all waterbodies in the NW Zone, including the Siletz River,  remains 1 chinook per day and 3 for the season between Nov. 1 and Dec. 31.

“Numbers of spawning fall Chinook have increased over the last week in the Siletz Basin to a point where we are comfortable with reducing the Chinook salmon closure area to provide additional fishing opportunity,” said John Spangler, ODFW Fish Biologist in Newport. “The remaining closure area will continue to provide protection for fish in key spawning areas.”

Counts of adult Chinook in spawning areas continue to lag behind in other coastal basins, so the emergency regulations remain in effect for other NW Zone basins.

“ODFW will continue to monitor fish numbers and look for opportunities to ease restrictions in other basins if sufficient numbers of Chinook enter key spawning areas,” said Spangler.

See the Northwest Zone Fishing Report in the Recreation Report for the latest information on regulations and opportunities https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/northwest-zone

Idaho Fish And Game Boss To Retire After 8 Years At Helm, 42 In Wildlife Management

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME

Idaho Fish and Game Director Virgil Moore on Nov. 6 announced he will retire from the department in Jan. 2019 after a 42-year career in fish and wildlife management. Moore has served as director since 2011, and intends to remain until his replacement has been selected by the Fish and Game Commission and is in place.

RETIRING IDFG DIRECTOR VIRGIL MOORE DURING A 2015 UPLAND BIRD HUNTING TRIP. (IDFG)

“It has been an honor to serve Idahoans, the governor and the Fish and Game commission as director the last eight years, and as a state employee for over 42 years,” Moore said. “Working together, Fish and Game and our wildlife resources are in excellent shape and ready to be handed off to new leadership.”

During his tenure as director, Moore oversaw the federal delisting and state management of wolves, and development of several new species management plans, including for elk and wolverine.  He also  played a key role in development of Governor Otter’s sage grouse plan that helped prevent federal listing, and Moore recently inked an important access agreement with Idaho Department of Lands to ensure continued sportsmen’s access while meeting the fiduciary responsibilities of endowment lands.

Moore’s career in wildlife management start after he earned a bachelor’s degree in biology and education in 1973 from Northwest Missouri State University and a master’s degree in zoology from Idaho State University in 1977.

During his career in wildlife management, he also served as director of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, deputy director for Idaho Fish and Game, fisheries bureau chief for Idaho Fish and Game, and numerous other positions for the department’s fisheries and information and education bureaus. Moore also recently ended a one-year term as President of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

Moore intends to remain in Idaho and spend time with his wife of 47 years, Becky Moore, and continue hunting, fishing and camping with their two adult children, five grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Moore’s position is open for applications, and information about the position can be found here. 

New Improved Boat Launch, Facilities In Reedsport Shown Off

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Boaters and anglers now have improved access to the lower Umpqua River in Reedsport, now that the Rainbow Plaza boat ramp is complete.  Rainbow Plaza is a popular and heavily used boat launch facility with an estimated 10,000 boat launches per year.

(CITY OF REEDSPORT VIA ODFW)

This project was needed as the facility had not had major improvements since the early 90’s.  As part of this project, a new piece of land was purchased and an old building removed, along with expanding the parking lot at the site.  Old derelict pilings were removed and the boat launch was widened to improve navigability and congestion.  Additionally, a new ADA flush restroom was installed, debris deflectors and boarding docks were installed, and parking lot was reconfigured with new curbs, islands, sidewalks and a storm water treatment system.  A new fish cleaning station with grinder was also added across the street from the facility on City-owned property adjacent to the overflow gravel parking along with boat wash-down station.

(CITY OF REEDSPORT VIA ODFW)

According to ODFW STEP Biologist Evan Leonetti, this site provides improved boating access to a great angling opportunity for fall Chinook, coho, surf perch and sturgeon, all within a mile or two from the ramp.  This project added a new fish cleaning station right at Rainbow Plaza, when previously anglers had to drive down to Salmon Harbor to the nearest fish cleaning station.  The facility is attractive to boat anglers, because it offers a two-lane boat ramp with lots of boarding docks and 36 vehicle with boat trailer and 11 single car parking spots; all factors that reduce launch delays and long lines.

Other recreational uses include sea kayaking and canoeing.  According to Jonathan Wright, City Manager of Reedsport, “Each boat, each trailer that you see here – many of them have purchased gas here, purchased materials and have gone to a restaurant or two during their stay here. All those things serve to benefit the local economy.”

Cost of the project was approximately $2M, which was paid by several partners, including the Oregon State Marine Board, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) thru a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fish Restoration grant, ODFW R&E board, Port of Umpqua, Reedsport Winchester Bay Chamber of Commerce, Oregon State Parks, USDA, Reedsport Urban Renewal District and City of Reedsport.

For more information about boating access and boating regulations, visit www.boatoregon.com.

Clatsop Co. Razor Clamming A No-go Till Next March To Let Bivalves Grow

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The popular razor clam season on Clatsop County beaches will remain closed until March 1, 2019.

ODFW SAYS PUBLIC COMMENT FAVORED ALLOWING CLATSOP COUNTY RAZOR CLAMS TO GROW LARGER BEFORE REOPENING DIGGING. (ODFW)

Extension of the annual conservation closure only applies to Clatsop County beaches, and prohibits all harvest of razor clams (both recreational and commercial) along the 18 mile stretch of beach from Tillamook Head (Seaside) to the mouth of the Columbia River. 

The closure is in place to protect undersize clams and provide better clamming opportunities on Clatsop beaches next year. ODFW’s annual stock assessment survey for razor clams earlier this year found that most clams were too small to be harvested by commercial clammers or desired by recreational clammers. The population was dominated by small clams with shell lengths between 2-3 inches.

ODFW hosted a public meeting Oct. 22 in Seaside to ask for feedback on potential management actions, including closure of the season until spring. Members of the public who attended the meeting and sent in comments supported ODFW’s proposal to delay opening of the season and give clams a chance to grow into a size suitable for harvest.

“We had great feedback from those who attended the meeting and those who could not. The consensus was to give the small clams a chance to grow and delay until the spring to provide a quality razor clamming experience,” stated Matt Hunter, ODFW Shellfish Project Leader. “During the closure, ODFW shellfish staff will continue to monitor the growth of razor clams to ensure they are growing adequately.” 

Typically, razor clamming reopens Oct. 1 each year after an annual July 14-Sept. 30 conservation closure. Check the latest regulations at ODFW’s Clamming and Crabbing Report, https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/crabbing-clamming-report/marine-zone

Nez Perce Report First Coho Return To Lostine River In 4 Decades

A Nez Perce Fisheries official is reporting that the first adult coho in more than 40 years arrived on a Northeast Oregon river earlier this week.

“I think we’ll see at least a few hundred Coho this fall at our weir on the Lostine,” predicted Jim Harbeck, according to a blog post by the Allen M. and Betty Josephy Library of Western History and Culture in Joseph.

ADULT COHO ARE RETURNING TO THE LOSTINE RIVER FOR THE FIRST TIME IN FOUR DECADES, THANKS TO A JOINT STATE-TRIBAL PROJECT THAT SAW 500,000 SMOLTS RELEASED IN MARCH 2017. (CRITFC)

Half a million smolts were let loose into the Grande Ronde River tributary in March 2017 through a joint Nez Perce-Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife reintroduction project.

Spokane angler Rick Itami attended that release and wrote afterwards that the species was believed to have been “pretty much gone” from the watershed by 1986.

The young coho came from ODFW’s Cascade Hatchery, the same source that was used for the tribe’s reintroduction into the Clearwater Basin, according to Itami.

This year’s smolts had an interesting journey. The Eagle Creek Fire forced their evacuation to Leaburg Hatchery on the McKenzie River before they were released into the Lostine in March.

The goal of the program is to eventually provide harvest opportunities for all fishermen and reseed coho in the Grande Ronde basin as a whole, according to the Columbia River Inter Tribal Fish Commission.

This year’s coho return up the Columbia has been below expectations, with 33,210 counted at Bonneville and 1,237 at Lower Granite on the Snake, the last dam before the Ronde.

Here Are Oregon’s Rules For Salvaging Roadkilled Deer, Elk

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Fish and Wildlife Commission adopted administrative rules for the salvage of roadkilled deer and elk during its meeting in Klamath Falls today. The new rules are due to the passage of SB 372 by the 2017 Oregon State Legislature and take effect on Jan. 1, 2019.

ELK STEAKS FROM ONE OF THE FIRST ROADKILLED ELK SALVAGED WHEN WASHINGTON’S PROGRAM BEGAN SEVERAL YEARS AGO. (RANDY HART JR.)

Highlights of the new rules include:

·        Deer and elk accidentally stuck by a vehicle may be salvaged for consumption only. Intentionally hitting a deer or elk in order to salvage it remains unlawful.

·        Anyone who salvages a roadkilled deer or elk must complete a free online permit within 24 hours of salvaging the animal and provide information including their name, contact info, where and when salvage occurred, species and gender of animal salvaged, and if they were driver that struck animal.

·        Antlers and head of all salvaged animals will need to be surrendered to an ODFW office within 5 business days of taking possession of the carcass. This rule will meet the requirements of SB 372 and will contribute to ODFW’s surveillance program for Chronic Wasting Disease.

·        The entire carcass of the animal including gut piles must be removed from the road and road right of way during the salvage.

·        In cases where a deer or elk is struck, injured and then put down to alleviate suffering, only the driver of the vehicle that struck the animal may salvage the carcass and law enforcement must be immediately notified. (This is a requirement per Oregon Revised Statute 498.016 and SB 372.)

·        Any person who salvages a deer or elk will consume the meat at their own risk. ODFW/OSP will not perform game meat inspections for any deer or elk salvaged under these rules.

·        Sale of any part of the salvaged animal is prohibited, but transfer to another person will be allowed with a written record similar to transferring game meat. 

·        The state of Oregon is not liable for any loss or damage arising from the recovery, possession, use, transport or consumption of deer or elk salvaged.

 

The Commission also approved the purchase of 214 acres of property adjacent to the Klamath Wildlife Area and the 560-acre Edmunds Well property near the Summer Lake Wildlife Area.

The Commission is the policy-making body for fish and wildlife issues in Oregon. Its next meeting is a joint meeting with Washington’s Fish and Wildlife Commission on Nov. 1 in Vancouver, Wash.

ODFW Announces Steelhead, Salmon Rule Changes On Umatilla, Walla Walla

THE FOLLOWING IS AN ODFW PRESS RELEASE

Steelhead fishing on the Umatilla River will be closed from Oct. 15-April 30, 2019 to protect native steelhead.

Also, the bag limit for salmon on the Umatilla River (from the Hwy 730 bridge to the CTUIR reservation boundary approximately 0.7 miles above Hwy 11 bridge) will be lowered from 3 to 1 adult fall Chinook or coho salmon per day and 5 jack salmon per day from Oct. 15-Nov. 30. In addition, 5 mini jack (8-15 inches) coho or fall Chinook salmon can be taken per day in that stretch of the Umatilla River.

Steelhead fishing will also be closed on the Walla Walla River from Dec. 1, 2018-April 30, 2019, again to protect native steelhead.

Estimated returns for both the Umatilla and Walla Walla rivers are expected to be near historic lows, based on returns over Bonneville Dam. The steelhead closure and reduction in the fall Chinook and coho bag limits are needed to ensure enough fish are available for hatchery broodstock escapement to Threemile Dam.

For more information on regulations and fishing opportunities in the Northeast Zone, visit https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/northeast-zone

Registration Open For Steelhead 101 Workshop In Troutdale

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Register by Oct. 25 for a Steelhead 101 fishing workshop Nov. 3 and 10 at Glen Otto Community Park (1106 E Historic Columbia River Hwy, Troutdale).

A JOINT ODFW-STEELHEADERS WORKSHOP INCLUDES CLASSROOM AND ON-THE-WATER INSTRUCTION FOR HOW TO CATCH WINTER-RUNS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The event is co-hosted by ODFW and the Sandy River Chapter, Association of NW Steelheaders. Register online at https://or.outdoorcentral.us/or/license (call Jason at 503-947-6025 if you need help registering). 

The workshop is for beginning anglers to learn the essential elements of steelhead fishing. On Nov. 3, the workshop runs from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and covers selecting the right gear, essential knots, fishing ethics and tips and techniques. Nov. 10’s workshop will be an on-the-water session from 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

The cost is $52 for adults, $22 for youth (minimum age 10). Lunch, equipment and a year-long membership to the Association of NW Steelheaders is included in the price.

ODFW and partners host a variety of workshops teaching people how to hunt, fish, crab and clam. See the Workshops and Events page for more, https://myodfw.com/workshops-and-events

5 Coos Bay-area Lakes To Be Stocked With Nice-sized ‘Bows

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

Anglers looking for large rainbow trout should head to Coos Bay area lakes soon. Next week, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is stocking five lakes with 14 to 16-inch rainbow trout for great fall fishing.

FALL FINDS NORTHWESTERNERS FOLLOWING SALMON RUNS AND HEADING TO HUNTING CAMP, BUT ONE WESTERN OREGON FAMILY MAKES ITS WAY TO COOS COUNTY FOR TROUT FISHING. (ODFW)

Upper Empire Lake is getting 3,200 trout. Lower Empire will not be stocked due to low water, warm temperatures and weeds. Instead, Butterfield Lake, accessed through Riley Ranch County Park will now receive 1,400 rainbows. Butterfield anglers might also hook into a warmouth, an unusual fish that looks like a crappie with a bass head.

Saunders Lake will receive 1,300 trout. This lake is about five miles north of North Bend and is an easily accessed, pleasant place to take the family fishing. Three miles south of Bandon, Bradley Lake is getting 1,600 trout and Powers Pond will receive 1,300.

This is ODFW’s final trout stocking of the year for Coos County and gives anglers a “last chance” opportunity before winter hits and the weather is not conducive to trout fishing. The rainbow trout harvest limit in most lakes is five fish per day, two daily limits in possession.

Check myodfw.com for fishing tips and the latest Recreation Report.