Tag Archives: NSIA

$50,000 Raised For Sportfishing Advocacy At 18th Buoy 10 Challenge

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE NORTHWEST SPORTFISHING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

Anglers from all over the Northwest came together Friday, August 18th, to compete for the most and biggest salmon at the Buoy 10 on the Columbia River, the biggest salmon fishery in the lower 48 states.  They were competing in the Northwest’s most popular derby –NSIA’s Buoy 10 Salmon Challenge. This was the 18th year of the derby and it was quite a success! The Challenge raised close to $50,000 to support NSIA’s mission of preserving, restoring and enhancing Northwest sportfisheries and the businesses that depend on them.

The first place team of RJ Bennett, Cody Clark, Adam Sturdevant and Dave Lewis. (NSIA)

Close to 200 anglers took to the waters off Buoy 10 on Friday. The chinook and coho were definitely biting, with participants weighing in more than 70 fish. Among some stiff competition, the Bob’s Sporting Goods team, captained by RJ Bennett, won First Place Team prize, with an average team weight of 17.75 pounds, winning a prize package that featured G. Loomis trolling rods and Shimano Tekota reels. Tanner Morton’s team captured Second Place Team prize, with 14.99 lb. average weight. The Second Place prize package included Tica Rods and reels for each team member. The Third Place Team was tight on their heels with a 14.39 lb. average per person weight for Jason Berg’s Team North American Hunting Competition, winning Berkley Buzz Ramsey rods and Penn Warfare reels.

Troy Bloom and his nephew Joey McGraw hoist Joey’s first B10 salmon catch – you can tell he’s really proud! (NSIA)

This year the Biggest Fish winner was Tanner Morton, who brought in a 20.90 pound chinook. He was awarded a $1000 check from the Big Fish sponsor, North River Boats. 2017 also saw the introduction of a new award – a $1000 Mystery Fish prize, sponsored by Weldcraft/Duckworth. Any weighed-in fish was eligible to win the prize, (1/72 odds!) which went to Deborh LeBer of the North American Hunting Competition team.

Greg and Don show off a nice Chinook that helped Team Northwest Sportsman make a strong showing at NSIA’s Buoy 10 challenge.

Even though anglers enjoyed such a great day on the water, the excitement was far from over as tournament anglers then got a shot at the more than $10,000 worth of auction items and door prizes. No one left empty-handed

NSIA Executive Director, Liz Hamilton says of the tournament, “The Buoy 10 Salmon Challenge is not only the most exciting fishing tournament on the lower Columbia this summer, but it is also our most important fundraiser. Monies raised will go towards protecting and restoring healthy river systems, defending hatcheries and the millions of smolts they release each year as well as working to increase angler access to fisheries across the Northwest.”

NSIA would also like to thank their sponsors for making this event a success. Their support allows NSIA to have a strong voice in local, state, and federal governments, advocating for policies that keep the sportfishing industry thriving in the Northwest. Please remember these companies and brands when you’re stocking up for your next trip: Atlas Mike’s, Berkley, BS Fish Tales/Brad’s Lures, Cabela’s, Fisherman’s Marine & Outdoors, Salmon Trout Steelheader Magazine, Fred Meyer, Freshwater News, G. Loomis, Grundens, Lowrance, Luhr Jensen, Maxima, North River Boats, NW Sportmans Magazine, Okuma, Penn, Raymarine, Shimano, Steven’s Marine, Tica, Weldcraft/ Duckworth. We hope to see you on the waters at next year’s Buoy 10 derby!

NSIA’s ‘Fore The Fish’ Fundraiser Coming To Olympia June 29

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE NORTHWEST SPORTFISHING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association, in cooperation with Sportco/Outdoor Emporium, and Cabela’s, is pleased to present the 7th Annual Golf Tournament ‘Fore the Fish!’.  This year’s event will take place on Thursday, June 29th at the beautiful Olympia Country & Golf Club, in Olympia, WA.  The tournament will be a best ball scramble format, making golf easier for even the occasional golfer.

THE NORTHWEST SPORTFISHING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION SAYS THAT DIRECT BENEFITS OF FUNDRAISERS LIKE ITS GOLF TOURNAMENT ARE FISHERY OPENERS, INCREASED ANGLING OPPORTUNITIES AND A VOICE FOR THE INDUSTRY. (NSIA)

Proceeds from the NSIA Golf Tournament help support the important work NSIA is doing to ensure both healthy fisheries and a vibrant Sportfishing industry in the Pacific Northwest. As a direct result of contributions from events like this one, NSIA has been successful in opening new fisheries, growing existing fisheries, and representing the voice of the Sportfishing industry in government.

Registration is now open with a cost of $125 per participant or $500 per foursome.  The event includes a putting contest prior to tee off and a variety of hole-in-one prizes on four different par-three holes. There will be a post-tournament barbecue where team prizes are awarded along with a live auction, silent auction and bucket raffles.  Registration opens at 10:30 am, the shotgun start is at 12:00 noon.  Registration can be completed on the NSIA website at www. nsiafishing.org or by calling the NSIA office at 503-631-8859.

(NSIA)

Sponsorship and donation opportunities are still available. Support of this tournament is an excellent way to gain brand recognition with more than a hundred golfers and sportfishermen. Game sponsors have the option to staff their hole, gaining the opportunity to interact with the golfers with contests and activities centered around sponsor products and services.  For more information on sponsorship opportunities, contact Heather Reese at events@nsiafishing.org or 503-631-8859.

‘Long Past Time’ To Act On Sea Lion Predation In Columbia System, NSIA Tells Congress

The Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association is lending its support to a bipartisan sea lion management bill that had a hearing in Washington DC this week.

“It’s long past time for an amendment to the (Marine Mammal Protection Act) to prevent an outcome whereby the protection of one species precipitates the extinction of another,” wrote Liz Hamilton, executive director of the Portland-based organization in a letter to the Water, Power and Ocean Subcommittee of the House Natural Resource Committee.

A SEA LION PREPARES TO EAT A FISH BELOW WILLAMETTE FALLS IN THIS 2011 ODFW IMAGE. (ODFW)

Members were hearing about HR 2083, the Endangered Salmon and Fisheries Predation Prevention Act, introduced by Washington Rep. Jaime Herrera-Beutler (R) with cosponsorship from Oregon Rep. Kurt Schrader (D), among others.

The bill would in part provide four Columbia River tribes with the authority to remove problem California sea lions from more of the lower river, as well its tributaries.

Hamilton addressed pinniped predation in the Willamette in her letter, noting that the area below the falls is not unlike the fish death trap at Bonneville Dam on the Columbia.

“Unable to escape or go elsewhere, they are trapped like sitting ducks for the growing numbers of sea lions congregating below the falls in Oregon City. I fished in this area with my family for over 30 years and watched firsthand the arrival, then growth in numbers of marine mammals and the growing consumption of steelhead, salmon and sturgeon,” she wrote.

IN THIS SCREEN GRAB FROM A TWITTER VIDEO, REP. JAIME HERRERA BEUTLER SHOWS A HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES SUBCOMMITTEE PHOTOS OF SOME OF THE “OFFENDERS” PICKING OFF ESA-LISTED SALMON AND STEELHEAD AND OTHER COLUMBIA WATERSHED STOCKS. HERRERA BEUTLER INTRODUCED A BILL TO EXPAND MANAGEMENT OF CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS.  (TWITTER)

Hamilton says that they’re affecting the near-recovery of ESA-listed Willamette winter steelhead, and that a draft estimate of sea lion consumption rates on this season’s run is 25 percent, up from 2015 and 2016’s 15 percent.

“This 25 percent consumption rate is especially disturbing as the winter steelhead run has collapsed to one-tenth of the 10-year average, down to less than 1,000 fish,” she writes. “We fear the sea lions will consume this race of fish to extinction, much as they did to the steelhead in the mid 1990’s at Ballard Locks, near Seattle Washington, due to ineffective actions that occurred too late to prevent the catastrophe.”

Hamilton’s letter adds to testimony before the Water, Power and Ocean Subcommittee by Leland Bill, chairman of the Columbia River Inter-Tribe Fish Commission. He told members that “data shows a growing predation problem” but “that the current approach is not enough. I’m here to tell you that more needs to be done.”

In another letter of support, Coastal Conservation Association’s Oregon and Washington chapters called the situation “critical.”

“We simply must act before it’s too late,” wrote Chris Cone and Nello Picinich, executive directors of the two chapters.

Added Hamilton:

“Northwest sportfishing for salmon and steelhead is more than an economic engine and a cultural birthright, it is a funding source for conservation. License fees, collected primarily through NSIA retailers, fund much of the conservation mission at the fish and wild life agencies. In addition, our industry pays a federal excise tax on manufactured goods that is returned to the states through the Sport Fish Restoration fund. Even for those who do not fish, salmon are an ever-present icon — seen on our license plates, on buildings and artwork everywhere. For the Native American Tribes in the Northwest, salmon are a sacred part of their culture.”

She said that while industries such as forestry, agriculture and power production are regulated to minimize fish impacts, “the consumption of salmon and steelhead by marine mammals grows, nearly unchecked, at an alarming rate.”