Tag Archives: lowland lakes

Yuasa: Fishing Hits ‘Full Throttle’ In May; Planning Guide For Summer Salmon

Editor’s note: The following is Mark Yuasa’s monthly fishing newsletter, Get Hooked on Reel Times With Mark, and is run with permission.

By Mark Yuasa, Director of Grow Boating Programs, Northwest Marine Trade Association

May 2019

The month of May is a pleasant time. Flowers are in full bloom. The weather is improving. Days are getting longer. But, it’s also a time when fishing hits full throttle for a wide variety of fish and anglers can start making plans for summer salmon fisheries.

First off there’s nothing better than a batch of steamed spot shrimp on the dinner table and the season for these denizens of the deep gets underway on May 11 for most areas of Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca and Hood Canal.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

“It will likely be an average spot shrimp season,” said Don Velasquez, a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) shellfish biologist. “In general, last year was a fair to good season.”

Spot shrimp are the largest – averaging 8 to 12 inches long – of more than 80 shrimp species in local marine waterways, but only seven are commonly caught by anglers. Most are lurking at depths of 30 to 300 feet.

The western Strait (Area 5) is open daily beginning May 11; and eastern Strait (6) is open Thursdays to Sundays of each week beginning May 11. Each area will close once the catch quota is achieved. The Discovery Bay Shrimp District (within 6) will be open May 11, 15 and 29 and June 1 from 7 a.m.-3 p.m. each day.

The San Juan Islands in Area 7 South is open May 11-12, May 16-19 and May 23-24; Area 7 East is open daily May 11-12, May 16-19, May 23-26 and May 30-June 2; and Area 7 West is open Thursdays to Sundays each week beginning May 11 and closes once the catch quota is achieved.

The east side of Whidbey Island (8-1 and 8-2) is open May 11 and May 15 from 7 a.m.-1 p.m. each day. Northern Puget Sound (9) is open May 11 and May 15 from 7 a.m.-11 a.m. each day.

Elliott Bay (within 10) is open May 11 from 7 a.m.-1 p.m.; central Puget Sound (10) is open May 11 from 7 a.m.-11 a.m.; and south-central Puget Sound (11) is open May 11 from 7 a.m.-1 p.m.

Hood Canal (12) is open May 11, 15 and 29 and June from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. each day. Southern Puget Sound (13) is closed for the 2019 season due to low abundance levels of spot shrimp.

In all Puget Sound areas, the daily limit is 80 spot shrimp per person during the month of May. Additional dates and times will be announced if quotas aren’t achieved.

Velasquez points out traps can be set one hour before official sunrise during any open period in Marine Catch Areas 4, 5, 6 (except for the Discovery Bay Shrimp District), 7 East, 7 South, and 7 West only. As an example, one hour before sunrise is approximately 4:40 a.m. on May 11.

WDFW conducted test fishing for spot shrimp and the northern section of Hood Canal around Seabeck showed an increase but was weak in the Hood’s central section.

“Area 7 West saw a slight increase in pounds per trap from last year,” Velasquez said. “Marine Areas 8-1, 8-2, 9 and 10 is pretty average compared to what we’ve seen in past years.”

Last year, the total sport harvest of spot shrimp was 194,863 pounds and the non-tribal commercial take was 97,578 pounds for a total of 292,441 pounds. Sport and non-tribal commercial fishermen split a 300,000-pound spot shrimp yearly catch quota with 70 percent going to the sport fishery. The tribal fishery has a 300,000-pound catch quota.

Bottom-fishing also takes centerstage with lingcod opening May 1 in most areas of Puget Sound and Strait; and halibut on May 2 off the coast and Marine Catch Areas 5 to 10. The coastal lingcod and rockfish fishing season have been going strong since it reopened back in March.

The statewide halibut quota of 277,100 pounds is up from 225,366 in 2018 (237,762 in 2017, and 214,110 in 2016, 2015 and 2014). Anglers should go to https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/halibut for more information on additional dates and regulations.
For those who still want to get their fix on hatchery chinook then head to southern Puget Sound south of the Narrows Bridge where fishing is open year-round.

Cutbacks to some 2019-2020 salmon fisheries

The salmon seasons on the coast for coho are the shining beacon of light compared to 2018 but major cutbacks were numerous to Puget Sound fisheries.

State, federal and tribal fishery managers met last month at Rohnert Park, California, to set fisheries and those cuts occurred after WDFW became more focused on the Puget Sound chum issue instead of focusing on important chinook and coho opportunities and wild chinook stocks of concern.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

The delay virtually slammed the door of a normal public involvement during the North of Falcon meeting in Lynnwood on April 3 when only two hours was devoted to the Puget Sound sport salmon fisheries discussion.

“While it’s often a frustrating process, I have never seen a year that involved the public less than this cycle,” Carl Nyman, a WDFW Puget Sound recreational fishing advisor and President of the Charter Boat Association of Puget Sound said in an NMTA news release. “For the first time since I have attended, there were no initial set of proposed fisheries modeled for public comment.”

The news release went on to say all the vital public input during this complicated process on salmon fishing season preferences that reflect social and economic consequences of WDFW’s decisions was moved out of reach for most constituents to California. Hopefully it was a “lesson learned” and the WDFW staff and their nine-member commission will look at this differently in the immediate future before we head into a Black Hole of no return.

Lost fishing opportunity ranges from weeks to months closed but represents about half of the 2018 season for the most popular summer and winter chinook fisheries in the Strait, San Juan Island, and northern, central south-central Puget Sound (Marine Catch Areas 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 11).

Cuts include closing all salmon fishing in the San Juan Islands (Area 7) in August and January; closing western Strait (5) for hatchery chinook for two weeks in February; closing eastern Strait (6) in February; closing east side of Whidbey Island (8-1 and 8-2) in December and January; delaying the northern Puget Sound (9) summer hatchery chinook fishery until July 25 (last year it began on July 16) plus a smaller quota of 3,491 compared to 5,400 in 2018 and closing fishing in January; central Puget Sound (10) summer hatchery chinook fishery opens July 25 (last year it opened July 16) and will likely be reduced by two to three weeks under a smaller quota of 3,057 compared to 4,473 in 2018; and south-central Puget Sound (11) closed June 1-30 with a reduced quota of 2,805 hatchery chinook (5,030 in 2018) and closed October through December.

Moving past the dire situation will be some great salmon opportunities off the coast and a few other inner-marine and freshwater locations.

“We came up with a plan for the mark coho fishery in Area 9 to flip it and make it non-select in October to expand more time on the water if the in-season numbers show it’s a possibility,” said Mark Baltzell, the WDFW Puget Sound recreational salmon manager.

Baltzell also says the Snohomish, Skykomish and Snoqualmie rivers are open Sept. 1-30 with a one coho daily limit. If the run is larger than predicted they could liberalize the season around the first week of October. This will be done through data collected in a test fishery.

WDFW and PFMC also developed a more liberal ocean salmon fishery for hatchery coho due to an expected higher return of Columbia River-bound fish while chinook is still in a recovery mode.

“We are very optimistic for coho and you have to go back to 2015 since we’ve had any good coho fishing,” said Wendy Beeghley, the WDFW head coastal salmon policy manager.

The total allowable sport and non-tribal commercial catch is 190,000 hatchery coho up considerably from 47,600 last year; and 52,500 chinook down slightly from 55,000. The Columbia River coho forecast is 1,009,600 compared to 349,000 in 2018.

Ilwaco has a 79,800 hatchery coho quota (21,000 in 2018) and a 7,150-chinook quota (8,000 in 2018); Westport is 59,050 (15,540) and 12,700 (13,100); La Push is 4,050 (1,090) and 1,100 (1,500); and Neah Bay is 16,600 (5,370) and 5,200 (3,024).

Salmon fishing opportunities:

(Here is a glimpse of what anglers will find in 2019-20 and for more refer to the WDFW regulation pamphlet or go to https://wdfw.wa.gov/)

• All four coastal ports – Neah Bay, La Push, Westport and Ilwaco – will be open daily from June 22-Sept. 30 or close once each area’s catch quota is achieved. Daily limit at Ilwaco and Westport is two salmon and no more than one may be a chinook. Daily limit is two salmon at La Push and Neah Bay. The La Push bubble fishery will be open Oct. 1-13.

South-central Puget Sound (Area 11) closed June 1-30 but open July 1-Sept. 30. Salmon fishing closed Thursdays and Fridays. Once quota is met fishing will be open daily with a two coho daily limit and non-retention of all chinook.

Inner-Elliott Bay opens for chinook on Aug. 2 to Aug. 5 at 12 p.m. Additional weekend openings are possible if in season data shows a stronger return.

East side of Whidbey Island (Area 8-2) opens Aug. 16-Sept. 15 for hatchery coho from Mukilteo/Clinton to Area 9 northern boundary. Area 8-1 is open for coho in October.

• The Skagit River from Memorial Highway Bridge in Mount Vernon to Gilligan Creek) is open for spring chinook from May 1-31; Stillaguamish is open Sept. 16-Nov. 15 for coho; Skykomish is open for hatchery chinook the Saturday before Memorial Day through July 31; and Minter Creek is open for salmon Sept. 15-Dec. 31.

Baker Lake opens for sockeye starting July 6 and a sockeye fishery on the Skagit River opens June 16. The Baker Lake sockeye forecast is 33,737.

Buoy 10 near the Lower Columbia River mouth opens Aug. 1-20 for adult chinook and hatchery coho retention; and is open from Aug. 21-Dec. 31 for a hatchery coho directed fishery (release all chinook and wild coho).

San Juan Islands (Area 7) is open July 1-31 for hatchery kings and has been an early-season hotspot the past several years so put in as much time before the August closure. The preseason prediction of legal-size chinook encounters in Area 7 is 3,622 and WDFW manages this fishery as a season from beginning to end. Coho become fair game Sept. 1-30.

Tulalip Bubble Terminal Fishery within Area 8-2 is a hatchery salmon directed fishery and the season remains status quo from last year. If forecasts hit the bullseye action could be decent when it opens June 1 (closed on June 15 for a tribal ceremonial fishery) through Sept. 2. Fishing is allowed from 12:01 a.m. Fridays through 11:59 a.m. Mondays only. Then it switches to a Saturday and Sunday only of each week from Sept. 7-29.

Strait of Juan de Fuca (Areas 5 and 6) from Sekiu to Port Angeles opens July 1-Aug. 15 for a hatchery-marked king fishery. For the past several years, the eastern Strait has been a worthwhile journey on the opener with areas from Sekiu to Freshwater Bay coming on by mid-July. Look for coho and pink action to ramp up from Aug. 16-Sept. 30. The preseason legal-mark encounter for chinook in Area 5 is 8,294 and WDFW ensures it doesn’t exceed 9,953. In Area 6, WDFW will manage the fishery as a season from beginning to end.

Statewide opening day of trout fishing was a success with plenty still to catch

While the weather was somewhat windy for the statewide lowland lakes trout opener on Saturday that didn’t stop thousands from trying their luck at catching fish.

“Everyone I talked to said that fishing was really good, but the winds were pretty blustery across the state late (Saturday) morning, which probably shortened some people’s trips somewhat,” said Steve Caromile, a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) fish program manager. “Many places, there seemed to be an early morning bite.”

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

The windy weather Saturday afternoon many have been a hinderance but those who fished Sunday found a much different picture with warmer temperatures, sunny skies and a few extra snappy trout.

In general, it appears success rates were decent overall, and popular lakes on west- and east-sides were crowded with anglers tossing just about everything from Power Bait, worms, salmon eggs, marshmallows, flies, spoons, gang-flashers and spinners.

Caromile said catch rates and harvest numbers per angler were right on par with last year’s opening day.

Top Puget Sound region lakes where anglers averaged good catches were: Langlois (one derby fish and largest was 12.4 inches); Cottage (boats more successful than bank anglers and largest was 15.5 inches); Margaret (one derby fish and many five-fish limits); Pine; Erie (largest was 17.5 inches); Bosworth; Echo (Maltby); Howard (11 holdover trout caught and largest was 17.5 inches); Ki (largest was 17 inches); Storm; Wagner; Silver, Whatcom County (many limits, excellent pancake feast by Ferndale Kiwanis); McIntosh; Carney; Silver, Pierce, (lots of 15- to 17-inch carryovers), Aberdeen; Horseshoe; Sandy; Panther; Haven; and Wooten.

In eastern Washington, many reports indicated windy weather put a damper on fishing, but some trout were the larger carryovers ranging from 16 to 21 inches long.

Even better news is that anglers who missed out or overslept on the opener will be happy to know that with 15 million-plus trout planted in more than 500 statewide lakes and ponds there should be plenty of fishing love to spread around for months to com.

“There will be plenty of fish left, and fishing will be good for another few months until the water warms up,” Caromile said. “Some lakes will continue to get small amounts of fish for a few more weeks.”

WDFW TROUT CHECKS

King County: Cottage, 44 anglers with 55 trout kept for 1.3 fish kept per rod average and 90 total fish released for 3.3; Langlois, 45 with 107 for 2.4 and 440 for 12.2; Margaret, 22 with 57 for 2.6 and 100 for 7.1; Pine, 15 with 27 for and 52 for 5.3.

San Juan County: Cascade, 33 with 20 for 1.5 and 48 for 2.1.

Skagit County: Erie, 29 with 19 for 3.3 and 97 for 4.0; McMurray, 51 with 16 for 1.9 and 99 for 2.3; and Sixteen, 51 with 12 for 1.8 and 91 for 2.0.

Snohomish County: Bosworth, 47 with 78 for 1.7 and 110 for 4.0; Echo (Maltby), 20 with 59 for 3.0 and 30 for 4.5; Howard, 21 with 53 for 2.5 and 53 for 4.2; Ki, 34 with 77 for 2.3 and 58 for 4.0; Martha (Alderwood Manor), 26 with 47 for 1.8 and 29 for 2.9; Serene, 16 with 22 for 1.4 and 15 for 2.3; Stickney, 18 with 37 for 2.1 and 15 for 2.3; Storm, 38 with 76 for 2.0 and 70 for 3.8; and Wagner, 14 with 34 for 2.4 and 59 for 6.6.

Whatcom County: Cain, 34 with 117 for 3.4; Silver, 143 with 417 for 2.9 and 284 for 4.9; and Toad, 43 with 67 for 1.6 and 44 for 2.6.

Klickitat County: Horsethief, 15 with 30 for 2.0 and four for 2.3; Rowland, 37 with 108 for 2.9 and 68 for 4.8; and Spearfish, eight with 22 for 2.8 and three for 3.1.

Lewis County: Carlisle, 55 with 34 for 0.6 and 224 for 4.7; and Mineral, 80 with 189 for 2.4 and 239 for 5.4.

Thurston County: Clear, 51 with 131 for 2.6 and 41 for 3.4; Deep, six with nine for 1.5 and four for 2.2; Hicks, 23 with 42 for 1.8 and eight for 2.2; McIntosh, one with one for 1.0 and five for 6.0; Pattison, seven with 12 for 1.7; Summit, six with 11 for 1.8 and 10 for 3.5; and Ward, nine with 18 for 2.0.

Pierce County: Bay, eight with 14 for 1.8 and three for 2.1; Carney, two with seven for 2.0 and seven for 5.5; Clear, 31 with 84 for 2.7 and 14 for 3.4; Jackson, one with three for 3.0 and two for 5.0; Crescent, 14 with 30 for 2.1; Rapjohn, 10 with 20 for 2.0 and four for 2.4; Ohop, six with 14 for 2.3 and six for 3.3; Silver, 16 with 42 for 2.6 and 36 for 4.9; and Tanwax, 12 with 22 for 1.8 and 17 for 3.3.

Grays Harbor County: Aberdeen, 59 with 95 for 1.6 and 208 for 5.1; Inez, 36 with 22 for 0.6 and 19 for 1.1; Sylvia, 23 with 44 for 1.9 and eight for 2.3; Bowers, 27 with 27 for 1.0 and four for 1.1; and Failor, 52 with 144 for 2.8 and 58 for 3.9.

Pacific County: Black, 43 with 33 for 0.8 and 18 for 1.2.

Jefferson County: Sandy Shore, 35 with 92 for 2.6 and 106 for 5.7; Silent, seven with 21 for 3.0 and 12 for 4.7; and Tarboo, 47 with 98 for 2.1 and 89 for 4.0.

Kitsap County: Bucks, 25 with 40 for 1.6 and 27 for 2.7; Horseshoe, 23 with 81 for 3.5 and 51 for 5.7; Mission, 30 with 94 for 3.1 and 80 for 5.8; Panther, 14 with 49 for 3.5 and 36 for 6.1; Wildcat, 20 with 83 for 4.2 and 20 for 5.2; and Wye, three with four for 1.3 and one for 1.7.

Mason County: Benson, 21 with 48 for 2.3 and six for 2.6; Don (Clara), 19 with 77 for 4.1 and five for 4.3; Devereaux, 23 with 33 for 1.4 and 102 for 5.9; Haven, five with 25 for 5.0 and 34 for 11.8; Howell, five with 16 for 3.2; Limerick, 33 with 39 for 1.2 and 86 for 3.8; Magee, 18 with 32 for 1.8 and eight for 2.2; Phillips, four with three for 0.8 and 12 for 3.8; Robbins, 18 with 61 for 3.4 and eight for 3.8; Tiger, 20 with 76 for 3.8 and five for 4.1; and Wooten, 24 with 49 for 2.0 and 150 for 8.3.

Ferry County: Ellen, 14 with 11 for 0.8 and 19 for 2.1.

Pend Oreille County: Diamond, 26 with 25 for 1.0 and 16 for 1.6.

Stevens County: Cedar, 49 with 95 for 1.9 and 36 for 2.7; Mudgett, 22 with 23 for 1.0 and 17 for 1.8; Rocky, 19 with 24 for 1.3 and 13 for 1.9; Starvation, 38 with 93 for 2.4 and nine for 2.7; and Waitts, 23 with 37 for 1.6 and 21 for 2.5.

Spokane County: Badger, 39 with 76 for 1.9 and 33 for 2.8; Clear, 35 with 25 for 0.7 and five for 0.9; Fishtrap, 45 with 67 for 1.5 and 15 for 1.8; Williams, 48 with 109 for 2.3 and 276 for 8.0; West Medical, 36 with 29 for 0.8 and 10 for 1.1; Fish, 66 with 68 for 1.0 and 46 for 1.7.

Grant County: Vic Meyers, 12 with nine for 0.8; Warden, 60 with 86 for 1.4 and 11 for 1.6; Blue, 34 with 91 for 2.7 and three for 2.8; Park, 48 with 141 for 2.9 and five for 3.0; and Deep, 46 with 83 for 1.8 and seven for 2.0.

Chelan County: Wapato, 64 with 204 for 3.2 and 85 for 4.5.

Douglas County: Jameson, 40 with 111 for 2.8 and 21 for 3.4.

Okanogan County: Pearrygin, 26 with 37 for 1.4 and five for 1.6.

Word on NW Salmon Derby Series

We’ve hit the pause button in the derby series although the boat has been making its rounds to various seminars and other fishing promotions.

The grand prize $75,000 Weldcraft 202 Rebel Hardtop boat from Renaissance Marine Group in Clarkston. The boat is powered with a Yamaha 200hp and 9.9hp trolling motor on an EZ-loader galvanized trailer and fully-rigged with Burnewiin accessories; Scotty downriggers; Raymarine Electronics; a custom WhoDat Tower; and a Dual Electronics stereo. Other sponsors include Silver Horde Lures; Master Marine and Tom-n-Jerry’s; Harbor Marine; Salmon, Steelhead Journal; NW Sportsman Magazine; The Reel News; Sportco and Outdoor Emporium; and Prism Graphics. It is trailered with a 2019 Chevrolet Silverado – not part of the grand prize giveaway – courtesy of Northwest Chevrolet and Burien Chevrolet.
Next up is the Bellingham Salmon Derby on July 12-14; and Lake Coeur d’ Alene Big One Fishing Derby on July 24-28.

There are 15 derbies in Washington, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada, and drawing for the grand prize boat will take place at the conclusion of the Everett Coho Derby on Sept. 21-22. Details: http://www.nwsalmonderbyseries.com/.

I’m filled with spring fishing excitement and will see you on the water!

Despite April Showers, Washington Trout Opener ‘Another Statewide Success’

A 29-inch rainbow trout, 20-minute limit and high catch rates at several lakes in the greater Seattle area were among the highlights of the start of Washington’s lowland lakes season.

THE SPOKANE AREA’S WILLIAMS LAKE WAS AMONG SEVERAL THAT YIELDED 20-PLUS-INCH TROUT, AS WELL AS WDFW DERBY WINNERS, LIKE THIS TAGGED FISH. (WDFW)

“Opening Day 2018 was another statewide success story, although one of the common themes statewide was the weather,” reported WDFW’s Bruce Bolding. “It was gray and rainy off and on, which seemed to keep some anglers indoors, however the other common theme was lots of happy anglers because fishing, for the most part was very good.”

That whopper was caught at Grays Harbor County’s Inez lake while the fast fishing occurred at Skagit County’s Heart Lake.

State biologists say they saw catch rates of 9.8 fish per angler at King County’s Lake Langlois, 8.5 at Snohomish County’s Storm Lake and 8.2 at Lake Ki, 8.1 at Mason County’s Panther, 6.7 at King’s Pine Lake and 6.6 at Whatcom County’s Toad Lake, indicating anglers were able to catch and release fish as they worked towards their five-trout limit.

“The other common theme, which seemed more pronounced than last year, was the number of tagged derby fish that were caught, all across the state,” says Bolding. “This was really great news. There were tagged fish caught in each district throughout the state (with the exception of Region 3, where we have no creel data because there are no Opening Day lakes. There are however, tagged fish in Region 3).”

Here are more details from WDFW on catches, information that can also be found here: https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/creel/lowland/

Chelan County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Wapato Lake 53 72 1.36 1.4 17-inch Rainbow Trout The overcast and rainy conditions off and on all morning (and heavy at times) could have been a factor in how poor the fishing was.
Douglas County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Jameson Lake 40 143 3 3.65 3.6 14-inch Rainbow Trout Cloudy, cool weather. On average, the fish were smaller than last year, but overall, anglers were happy just to be out fishing.
Ferry County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Lake Ellen 14 63 8 5.1 4.5 17-inch Rainbow Trout Rainy weather, but fishing was good. Lots of happy anglers!
Grant County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Blue Lake 42 137 3.3 3.3 15-inch Rainbow Trout Anglers were happy with both the size and catchability of the trout in Blue Lake.
Deep Lake 51 147 43 3.8 2.9 13-inch Rainbow Trout Lots of effort once the weather got better, but anglers were not especially happy about the size of the fish.
Park Lake 62 289 11 4.8 4.6 15-inch Rainbow Trout The number of people increased once the rains stopped and the wind died down. Most fish were 2017 fingerlings. Fat and good fighters. Shore anglers had good success, especially from the dock.
Warden Lake 31 40 10 1.6 1.3 13-inch Rainbow Trout
Grays Harbor County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Failor Lake 42 108 61 4 2.6 22-inch Rainbow Trout The anglers here were happy and there was one Derby-tagged fish caught.
Lake Aberdeen 36 70 91 4.5 1.9 24-inch Rainbow Trout Weather limited participation and length of time fished.
Lake Bowers 26 32 38 2.7 1.2 24-inch, 7lb. Rainbow Trout Kid’s derby brought anglers early, but rainy weather limited their stay.
Lake Inez 34 49 16 1.9 1.4 29-inch Rainbow Trout The catch rate was low but two Derby-tagged fish were caught.
Lake Silvia 5 1 7 1.6 0.2 18-inch Rainbow Trout The wather was rainy and there were very few anglers, with many fishing for only an hour.
Jefferson County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Sandy Shore 28 27 35 2.2 1 25-inch Rainbow Trout Fairly slow fishing and most fish were smaller than 12 inches., however, there were several large Rainbow Trout in the 20-25 inch range. All fish looked very healthy with good fins.
Silent Lake 2 10 5 5 12-inch Rainbow Trout All the fish looked very healthy.
Tarboo 13 13 31 3.4 1 22-inch Rainbow Trout It rained all morning and most of the afternoon, but fishing success was good.
King County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Cottage Lake 57 159 29 3.3 2.8 14-inch Rainbow Trout 1 Derby-tagged fish caught.
Geneva Lake 14 60 5 4.6 4.3 13-inch Rainbow Trout
Langlois Lake 43 176 247 9.8 4.1 16-inch Rainbow Trout 1 Derby-tagged fish caught. Anglers were happy in spite of the rain because almost all of them limited
Margaret Lake 28 81 52 4.8 2.9 12-inch Rainbow Trout
North Lake 13 34 34 5.2 2.6 16-inch Rainbow Trout The surface bite was good for trolling.
Pine Lake 63 182 241 6.7 2.9 17-inch Rainbow Trout 1 Derby-tagged fish caught.
Steel Lake 13 42 3.2 3.2 13-inch Rainbow Trout
Walker Lake 9 40 14 6 4.4 13-inch Rainbow Trout
Wilderness Lake 46 117 92 4.5 2.5 18-inch Rainbow Trout
Kitsap County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Horseshoe (Kit) 15 39 12 3.4 2.6 24-inch Rainbow Trout There was heavy rain from 7:00-10:00 and lighter for remainder of day. One Derby-tagged fish caught.
Mission 24 59 76 5.6 2.5 there was rain for most of the morning, but anglers very satisfied and the fishing was good.
Panther 19 64 89 8.1 3.4 12-inch Rainbow Trout Rain at 7 am, stopped about 10:30. Most anglers were very happy. There was pretty even flow of boats leaving and entering the lake all day. There seemed to be much better succes by boaters than shore/dock anglers. Boat anglers said the fish were easy to catch on hardware (Vibrax spinners, Triple Teasers, Rooster tails, and wedding ring rigs). Very few used bait of any kind. All boaters said they had a very successful day.
Wildcat 25 71 6 3.1 2.8 12-inch Rainbow Trout There was moderate to heavy rain most of day but anglers were very happy with the fishing. It was quite successful, with most anglers limiting fairly easily. Best day of creel sampling ever by the sampler on this lake.
Wye 21 30 40 3.3 1.4 20-inch Rainbow Trout The fishing was generally poor and rain for most of day reduced effort. Bait fishing was not as effecive as lure fishing. Most fish were around 12 inches.
Klickitat County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Horsethief Lake 115 12 3 0.1 0.1 Anglers were very happy about the larger fish. The smallest fish caught was 16 inches.
Spearfish Lake 131 13 1 0.1 0.1
Lewis County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Carlisle Lake 78 77 136 2.7 1
Ft. Borst Lake 73 93 43 1.9 1.3 2 Derby-tagged fish were caught.
Mineral Lake 76 217 151 4.8 2.9
Plummer Lake 15 14 52 4.4 0.9 Anglers reported that most fish seemed small (under 9 inches), which was the reason for the high number of fish released. Most anglers fish from boats.
Mason County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Aldrich Lake 18 68 3 3.9 3.8 12-inch Rainbow Trout There were lots of kids fishing with their parents. The camping area was full for the 3 days prior to Opening Day.
Benson 25 31 31 3 1.1 14-inch Rainbow Trout It rained most of morning and fishing was considered only fair, however most anglers were happy with the good quality of the catchables.
Clara 14 44 5 3.5 3.1 14-inch Rainbow Trout It was rainy most of the day and the fishing was a bit slow.
Haven Lake 14 54 63 4.5 3.9 14-inch Rainbow Trout There were many happy anglers with good success rates from both shore and boats, using both bait and lures. There were some complaints about the weather.
Howell Lake 7 13 1.9 1.9 17-inch Rainbow Trout It was rainy and the fishing was slow but there was one 17-inch caryover caught. There was also and eagle and an osprey joining the fishing effort on the lake.
Limerick 21 31 15 2 1.5 25-inch Rainbow Trout It rained most of the day but there were some larger fish present from the local HOA Derby. The anglers were generally happy with the quality of the fishing.
Phillips Lake 7 10 4 2 1.4 18-inch Rainbow Trout The stready rain and wind seemed to reduce the number of anglers
Robbins Lake 13 34 13 3.6 2.6 20-inch Rainbow Trout There was one 20-inch broodfish caught although the size of the catchables were smaller than last year
Tiger Lake 29 61 36 3.3 2.1 14-inch Rainbow Trout The fishing was good but not great. It rained most of morning.
Wooten Lake 25 94 14 4.3 3.8 15-inch Rainbow Trout The fishing was good and the anglers were happy for the most part, in spite of the rain for most of the morning.
Okanogan County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Alta Lake 20 10 1 0.55 0.5 14-inch Rainbow Trout Heavy rains until 11 a.m. put a damper on catch rates, but anglers were in good spirits. The number of anglers targeting Kokanee really increased from last year.
Conconully Lake 42 83 24 2.55 2 17-inch Kokanee Heavy rains slowed trout catch rates, but Kokanee sizes were great! One angler caught 4 Kokanee (all 16- or 17-inches).
Pearrygin Lake 35 105 20 3.57 3 13-inch Rainbow Trout Fishing was slow before 10 a.m, but it really picked up when the weather cleared.
Pacific County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Black Lake 46 55 11 1.4 1.2 21-inch Rainbow Trout there was light angling pressure and a slow bite.
Cases Pond 18 42 40 4.6 2.3 17-inch Rainbow Trout The weather kept the fishing day short for many anglers.
Pend Oreille County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Diamond Lake 28 43 29 2.6 1.5 23-inch Rainbow Trout Rainy and cool. Fishing was fair, but it seemed that the rain kept a lot of anglers away.
Pierce County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Bay Lake 21 73 10 4 3.5
Carney 16 15 7 1.4 0.9
Clear Lake 52 183 28 4.1 3.5 Fantastic fishing and the fish were large.
Crescent 19 60 38 5.2 3.2
Jackson Lake 4 1 0.3 0.3
Ohop 8
Rapjohn 27 106 45 5.6 3.9
Silver Lake 30 30 49 2.6 1
Tanwax 19 8 4 0.6 0.4
Skagit County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Erie Lake 29 64 5 2.4 2.2 16-inch Rainbow Trout The wet and cold weather conditions made for some slow fishing.
Heart Lake 57 83 110 3.4 1.5 23-inch Rainbow Trout There was one 20-minute limit but there was relatively low effort effort on this lake. The weather could have been a factor.
McMurray Lake 50 38 47 1.7 0.8 17-inch Rainbow Trout In spite of the low effort and catch rate, there were many fish over 12 inches.
Sixteen Lake 28 69 132 7.2 2.5 14-inch Rainbow Trout 1 Derby-tagged fish was caught.
Snohomish County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Bosworth Lake 21 70 27 4.6 3.3 17-inch Rainbow Trout
Echo Lake (Maltby) 12 37 30 5.6 3.1 12-inch Rainbow Trout
Howard Lake 37 82 53 3.6 2.2 17-inch Rainbow Trout
Ki Lake 35 110 178 8.2 3.1 15-inch Rainbow Trout The anglers seemed happy in spite of the rain.
Martha Lake (Alderwood Manor) 31 56 49 3.4 1.8 17-inch Rainbow Trout There were fewer kids than last year, likely due to the poor weather conditions.
Serene Lake 13 27 15 3.2 2.1 14-inch Rainbow Trout
Stickney Lake 18 51 64 6.4 2.8 14-inch Rainbow Trout
Storm Lake 41 111 238 8.5 2.7 14-inch Rainbow Trout
Wagner Lake 12 31 30 5.1 2.6 18-inch Rainbow Trout There were many holdovers caught.
Spokane County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Badger Lake 35 104 24 3.7 3 21-inch Rainbow Trout Participation was good. Fishing was slow due to rainy/windy weather but it improved around 10:00 am. One tagged Derby fish was checked.
Clear Lake 22 18 14 1.5 0.8 20-inch Rainbow Trout A good mix of Rainbows and Browns were caught. There was decent participation but rain and wind were factors. There were also quite a few people fishing from docks.
Fish Lake 32 26 26 1.6 0.8 16-inch Brown Trout Fishing was slow overall. Several 14-15 inch Brook Trout were caught. Low catch/harvest may be due to weather or the dense Yellow Perch population.
West Medical 34 39 3 1.2 1.1 19-inch Rainbow Trout There was a high proportion of larger rainbows in the creel (averaging about 15 inches). A 17-inch Brown Trout and 16-inch Tiger Trout were also checked. Few fry plants were observed. Rainy and windy, but decent number of anglers.
Williams Lake 31 111 58 5.5 3.6 24 & 25-inch Rainbow Trout Lots of happy anglers out enjoying opening day. The 24 and 25-inch Rainbow trout were caught by a mother and son. Busy boat launch despite bad weather.
Spokane/Lincoln County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Fishtrap Lake 50 81 50 2.6 1.6 22-inch Rainbow Trout Pretty good turnout and the anglers were happy the lake has returned to good trout fishing after last year’s rehabilitation.
Stevens County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Cedar Lake 29 59 41 3.5 2 20-inch Rainbow Trout It rained off and on all morning, but fishing was good. Lots of carryovers in the catch. One WDFW Derby tagged fish caught and kept.
Mudgett Lake 25 100 4 4 19-inch Rainbow Trout Good fishing. Most fish larger than 14 inches. Lots of happy anglers.
Rocky Lake 11 32 32 5.8 2.9 21-inch Rainbow Trout Rainy and cool, but pretty good fishing. Everyone was really happy with the size of fish they caught.
Starvation Lake 16 33 5 2.4 2.1 23-inch Rainbow Trout Nice fish, but rain kept a lot of anglers away. One WDFW Fishing Derby tagged fish was caught and harvested.
Waitts Lake 50 123 13 2.7 2.5 19-inch Rainbow Trout Good fishing, but angler turnout was low due to rainy, cool weather. Catch was a pretty even mix of Rainbows and Browns. One WDFW Fishing Derby tagged fish was caught.
Thurston County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Clear Lake 48 123 44 3.5 2.6 Anglers were happy and there were some large trout being caught.
Deep Lake 12 13 18 2.6 1.1
Hicks Lake 43 83 69 3.5 1.9
McIntosh Lake 41 19 19 0.9 0.5
Pattison Lake 26 8 11 0.7 0.3
Summit Lake 29 88 97 6.4 3
Ward Lake 8 5 9 1.8 0.6
Whatcom County
Lake Name # Anglers
Checked
Total #
Fish Kept
Total #
Fish
Released
Avg. # Fish
Caught per
Angler
Avg. # Fish
Kept per
Angler
Largest Fish
(Species/TL)
Highlights
Cain Lake 37 139 119 7 3.8 18-inch Rainbow Trout
Padden Lake 37 84 22 2.9 2.3 14-inch Rainbow Trout The average size of the trout caught today was just over 12 inches.
Silver Lake 194 449 622 5.5 2.3 18-inch Rainbow Trout
Toad Lake 49 172 152 6.6 3.5 16-inch Rainbow Trout