Tag Archives: lower columbia river

Lower, Middle Columbia Fishing Report (3-1-18)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORTS ORIGINATED WITH ODFW AND WDFW STAFF AND WERE TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Lower Columbia mainstem sport sampling summary for Feb. 19-25

Sec. 5 (Woodland) bank – 7 salmonid anglers had no catch.
Sec. 5 (Woodland) boat- 1 boat/ 1 salmonid angler had no catch.
Sec. 8 (Longview) bank – 2 salmonid anglers had no catch

KYLE CARLSON SHOWS OFF A 14-POUND WALLEYE HE CAUGHT AND RELEASED ON THE UPPER DALLES POOL WHILE FISHING WITH GUIDE ALAN “TOUCHE” CLARK AND HIS BUDDY SETH NICKELL RECENTLY. THEY WERE PULLING WORMS ON BOTTOM. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

Salmonid angling is slow in the lower Columbia River but should begin to pick up in the coming weeks.

Gorge Bank: No report.

Gorge Boats (below Beacon Rock): No report.

Troutdale Boats: No report.

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekly checking showed no catch for 55 bank anglers.

Portland to Westport Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for 23 boats (46 anglers).

Estuary Bank (Clatsop Spit to Wauna Powerlines): No report.

Estuary Boats (Buoy 10 to Wauna Powerlines): No report.

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): No report.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): No report.

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. No report.

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Closed for retention. No report.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Closed for retention. No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Closed for retention. No report.

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool: No report.

The Dalles Pool: No report.

John Day Pool: No report.

Hanford Reach Steelhead Sport Fishery (Hwy 395 – Hanford)

Effort was light for steelhead fishing in the Hanford Reach but the catch and harvest improved, at least for the boat anglers.  WDFW staff interviewed 54 anglers in February.  Bank anglers averaged a steelhead for 55 hours of fishing but the boat anglers averaged a steelhead every 4 hours. An estimated 232 steelhead were caught in February and 122 were harvested. Since the fishery opened on October 1,  434 steelhead have harvested plus an additional 282 steelhead were caught & released from 2,440 angler trips.

The steelhead fishery in the Hanford Reach will close at the end of March except for the bank fishery. A small section of shoreline at the Ringold access area will continue to be open for “bank angling only” through April 15.

McNary Reservoir Steelhead Sport Fishery: February

Angler effort was very low in February but catch improved, harvest did not. An estimated 31 steelhead were caught in February and 6 were harvested. Catch per hour decreased from 19 hours per steelhead to 9.5 hours per fish. There were 131 angler trips for steelhead in February, down from 529 in January. Bank anglers averaged a steelhead for 7.3 hours of fishing.  Boat anglers 15.5 hours per fish. For the fishery (August 1 – February 28) 141 steelhead have been harvested and 469 wild steelhead have been caught and released from 4,439 angler trips.

Effective January 1 the daily limit is two hatchery steelhead per day. This area will close to the retention of steelhead on March 31.

Yuasa: Tons Of Blackmouth Fishing, Razor Clam Digging Ops In March

Editor’s note: The following is Mark Yuasa’s monthly fishing newsletter, Get Hooked on Reel Times With Mark, and is run with permission.

By Mark Yuasa, Director of Grow Boating Programs, Northwest Marine Trade Association

The feeling of excitement started to build in the middle of last month when the days were getting a little longer, spring felt just that much closer, and most of all more fishing options are now coming into play throughout the Pacific Northwest.

It was back during the Seattle Boat Show – our most successful in attendance and boat sales – after logging 90-plus miles on my sneakers and putting in 12- to 15-hour days where people came up to chat with me on all things fishing. But, in particular it was one man who said, “Hey you’re Mark Yuasa and I just loved your columns, but miss you not being in the newspaper.”

AUTHOR MARK YUASA REPORTS THAT FAMED POSSESSION BAR HAS BEEN PRODUCING BLACKMOUTH SINCE IT REOPENED FEB. 16. (NMTA)

I replied, “Well thank you for the kind words, but no need to miss out on my column.”

That drew a rather perplexed look, which in turn I told him you can still find me in places like the Reel News and other outdoor publications. His response was “Wow that is great and I’m stoked! So where should I go fishing in the next couple of months?”

That last comment got his head swirling faster than a jig fluttering to the bottom of Puget Sound as I spoon fed him with plenty of fishing choices.

Even if you could stay “Sleepless in Seattle” there wouldn’t be enough time to hit every spring-time fishery on the must do list, but there’s no doubt with a little homework that an angler who uses their free time wisely can score an A+ in the fishing gradebook.
In order to keep everyone’s grade above the standards here are the possibilities for success.

After months of delays, the northern Puget Sound and east side of Whidbey Island (Marine Catch Areas 9, 8-1 and 8-2) finally reopened for hatchery chinook.

It appears hitting the pause button did work to some extent as the catch of sub-legal chinook – those under the 22-inch minimum “keeper” size limit – were less abundant as they had been way back before the Christmas holidays.

The first few days of the fishing season – which began on Feb. 16 – saw nasty weather with winds 10 to 30 knots blowing, but by President’s Day (Feb. 20) the situation calmed down enough that anglers managed to dial-in on success.

Hit the usual spots like Possession Bar, Midchannel Bank off Port Townsend, Point No Point, Marrowstone Island; Double Bluff off south west side of Whidbey Island; Hat Island at the “racetrack”; Columbia Beach; Onamac Point; and Elger Bay.

Still on top of list, but not quite as grand as it had been in January are the San Juan Islands (Area 7) where catches of nice-sized fish were still coming from places like Thatcher Pass; Peavine Pass; Speiden Island; Spring Pass; Obstruction Island; Clark and Barnes Islands; Parker Reef; Point Thompson; Peavine Pass; Doughty Point; Obstruction Pass; Waldron Island; Lopez Pass; and Presidents Channel.

Even more exciting is the fact that the Strait of Juan de Fuca comes into play for hatchery chinook this month.

Sekiu in the western Strait harkens me back to the “good old days” of salmon fishing, and it’s open March 16 through April 30. The good news here is that don’t expect any premature closure with hungry chinook from the Caves to Eagle Point, and west from Slip Point-Mussolini Rock area to Pillar Point. The eastern Strait off Port Angeles to Freshwater Bay is another stop off for chinook through April 15.

Closer to Seattle, the doors to salmon fishing in central Puget Sound (Area 10) have closed, but south-central Puget Sound (Area 11) and Hood Canal (Area 12) are open through April 30, and southern Puget Sound is open year-round.

This month also marks a special time for coastal communities who come out of a winter slumber as the bottom-fishing season kicks into high gear.

Ilwaco, Westport and La Push for opens lingcod and other bottom-fish on March 10. Bottom-fish fishing west of the Bonilla Tatoosh Island line off Neah Bay also opens on March 10, and east of the line is currently open year-round. The lingcod fishery on northern coast opens April 16.

Many will begin to make regular trips to the Lower Columbia River in pursuit of spring chinook. The 2018 forecast is 166,700 upriver spring chinook, which is 90 percent of recent 10-year average return. That is compared to 160,400 forecasted in 2017 and an actual return of 115,822, but somewhat down from 2016’s 188,800 and 187,816.

Spring coastal razor clam digs will be down somewhat from previous years, but mark your calendars for tentative dates set through April.

Final approval will depend on further marine toxin testing, which will likely be announced a week before each scheduled dig series. Digs in March occur during evening low tides after 12 p.m. while those in April are during morning low tides until 12 p.m. or until times noted below.

Dates are: March 2-3 at Mocrocks; March 16 at Copalis and Mocrocks; March 17 at Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks; April 19-20 at Mocrocks; April 21 at Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Mocrocks, digging hours will be extended to 1 p.m.; and April 22 at Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Mocrocks, digging hours will be extended to 2 p.m.

More digging dates could occur later this spring if sufficient clams remain available to harvest.

The Puget Sound salmon forecasts were released on Feb. 27, and those who’d like to get involved with this rather arduous process should take a seat at some of the upcoming meetings.

Early word on the street is that fishing seasons could resemble last season, but it’s still too early in the game to know exactly how things will pan out. For a list of other meeting dates, go to https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/.

First three events in Salmon Derby Series start off with decent action

Thousands of anglers converged to San Juan Islands for three salmon derbies – part of the NMTA’s NW Salmon Derby Series – since the New Year with good catches and decent weather conditions.

The Friday Harbor Salmon Classic on Feb. 8-10 had 100 boats with 329 anglers that weighed-in 122 fish (winning fish was 19.15 pounds).

In Roche Harbor Salmon Classic on Jan. 18-20 had 100 boats with 357 anglers weighing in 179 chinook (winning fish was 17 pounds, 11 ounces). The Resurrection Derby on Jan. 5-7 saw 102 boats with 334 anglers reeling-in 50 hatchery chinook (winning fish was 18.28 pounds).

There are 15 derbies in Washington, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada. Next up is Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby on March 9-11, and Everett Blackmouth Derby on March 17-18.

(NMTA)

Check out the grand prize $65,000 KingFisher 2025 Falcon Series boat powered with a Honda 150hp and 9.9hp trolling motors on an EZ-loader trailer. It is fully-rigged with Scotty downriggers; Raymarine Electronics; custom WhoDat Tower; and Dual Electronic stereo. Drawing for the boat will take place at conclusion of derby series. For details, go to http://www.nwsalmonderbyseries.com/.

Lastly, it was super great meeting everyone at the Seattle Boat Show where our combined net attendance for all three locations was 52,928, up 2.1 percent over last year. Indoor attendance at CenturyLink Field Event Center over all nine days of the show was 46,938, up 0.8 percent compared to last year.

On that note, I’ll see you on the water very soon!

WDFW Reviewing Lower Columbia Rec-Comm Salmon Management Policy, Briefing Advisory Panels

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will provide an initial briefing to two advisory committees as it begins a review of the 5-year-old policy that guides the management of commercial and recreational salmon fisheries in the lower Columbia River.

COLUMBIA RIVER SALMON ANGLERS FISH AT BUOY 10 DURING THE 2015 SEASON. (NWFISHINGGUIDES.NET)

Members of Washington’s Fish and Wildlife Commission last week directed the WDFW staff to conduct a thorough and transparent review of the policy, which was originally adopted in 2013 in collaboration with the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission.

Bill Tweit, a WDFW special assistant, said the Washington commission members want to ensure the policy review includes multiple opportunities for the public to participate.

The policy, adjusted by both states in 2017, is designed to promote conservation of salmon and steelhead, prioritize recreational salmon fishing in the lower Columbia River, and shift gillnet fisheries away from the river’s main channel. The current Washington policy also calls for increasing hatchery releases in the lower Columbia, expanding the use of alternative fishing gear by commercial fishers, and implementing strategies to reduce the number of Columbia River gillnet permits.

The first opportunities for public engagement will take place March 14 at the WDFW southwest Washington regional office, 5525 South 11th St., Ridgefield. The department’s Columbia River Commercial Fishing Advisory Group will meet from 1 p.m. -3 p.m., and the Columbia River Recreational Fishing Advisory Group will meet from 3 p.m.-5 p.m.

The advisory committee meetings will take place one day before the Washington commission’s March 15-17 meeting in Wenatchee. All three meetings will be open to the public and will provide information on the results of Columbia River fisheries since 2013.

The commission plans to consider the policy at two other meetings later this year. Members tentatively plan to have a joint meeting with the Oregon commission in September, with the goal of concluding the review and possibly revising the policy in November. Again, these meetings will be open to the public.

“Columbia River salmon fisheries are part of Washington’s economic, cultural, and recreational lifeblood, so we want to keep the public informed and involved as we review and revise this important policy,” said Commission Chairman Brad Smith.

The policy, as revised by the Washington commission in January 2017, is available at https://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/policies/c3620.pdf.

Lower Columbia Fishery Biologist’s Good, Bad, Ugly From 2017 Fisheries

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ORIGINATED WITH JOE HYMER, PSMFC SUPERVISING FISHERY BIOLOGIST

2017 Lower Columbia mainstem from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam sport totals – The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly

Note: Does not include Buoy 10.

A BIG RUN OF SHAD YIELDED WHAT’S BELIEVED TO BE THE SECOND HIGHEST SPORT CATCH SINCE 1969. (ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS)

The Good

Summer and Fall Chinook – The 3,516 summer and 26,138 fall Chinook adults caught this year were the 4th and 6th highest, respectively, since at least 1969. The record are the over 5,900 adult summer Chinook and 41,500 adult fall Chinook, both records which were set in 2015.

Coho – Over 3,100 adult coho were kept this year, the 4th highest since at least 1969. The record are the nearly 5,800 fish caught in 2014.

Shad – Even without estimates for this May, the nearly 170,000 shad kept in 2017 are the 2nd highest since at least 1969. The record are the nearly 195,000 fish caught during all of 2013.

White Sturgeon – The 430 fish estimated caught from the Wauna powerlines upstream to Bonneville Dam were the first since 2013.

The Bad

Salmonid Effort – Lowest in nearly a decade and almost 100,000 angler trips less than the recent 10 year average.

The Ugly

Summer Steelhead – The less than 1,700 fish kept this year are the lowest since the complete closures in the mid-1970’s.

White Sturgeon – The 430 fish estimated caught from the Wauna powerlines upstream to Bonneville Dam are but a fraction of the 62,450 fish estimated kept in 1987.

Sea-Run Cutthroats – This is the 4th consecutive year with no estimated fish kept.

Southwest Washington Fishing Report (9-20-17)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS COLLECTED BY ODFW AND WDFW STAFF AND TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Lower Columbia mainstem sport update

Last week on the lower Columbia, anglers made 15,120 trips and caught 6,350 adult Chinook (5,765 kept and 585 released) 358 adult coho (188 kept and 170 released) and 165 summer steelhead (123 kept and 42 released)..

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – From the I-5 Bridge downstream:  12 boats/42 rods kept 13 adult and 2 jack Chinook and released 42 adult and 4 jack Chinook.  5 bank anglers had no catch.  No anglers were sampled upstream from the bridge.

ANOTHER GREAT OUTING OFF DRANO LAKE FOR WILLIAM AND HIS DAD, CLAY HULL. THEY WERE AGAIN FISHING WITH JOE MCCARL AND REPORT GOING TWO FOR FOUR. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 188 fall Chinook adults, 20 fall Chinook jacks, 18 summer-run steelhead, 62 spring Chinook adults, two spring Chinook jacks, 65 coho adults, two coho jacks, and 14 cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 40 spring Chinook adults, one spring Chinook jack, five coho adults and one cutthroat trout into the Cispus River near the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek and they released 16 spring Chinook adults, one coho adult and one cutthroat trout at Franklin Bridge in Packwood.

Tacoma Power released 137 fall Chinook adults, 19 fall Chinook jacks, four coho adults, one coho jack and nine cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 2,720 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, September 18. Water visibility is 13 feet and water temperature is 54.9 degrees F. River

Lewis River – No report on angling success.  On the mainstem and North Fork Lewis rivers, any Chinook, adipose fin clipped or not, may be retained effective September 23.

Drano Lake – 33 boats/75 anglers kept 33 adult Chinook and adult coho and released 3 steelhead.  There were 65 boats were here last Saturday morning.

Bonneville Pool – 18 boats/43 anglers kept 22 adult Chinook.  Last Saturday morning there were 75 boats off the Klickitat, 40 off the White Salmon, and 30 off Drano Lake.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (9-13-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Weekend Fishing Opportunities:

*         The fall salmon season is open from Buoy 10 upstream to the Oregon/Washington Border above McNary Dam (see Sport Fishing Regulation Updates page for retention details).  An estimated 613,800 fall Chinook and 319,300 coho are expected to return to the Columbia River this fall.

*         White sturgeon retention is closed from Buoy 10 upstream to the Oregon/Washington Border above McNary Dam, but remains an option for catch and release fishing.

ALEXCIS HIGGINBOTHAM IS ALL SMILES AFTER CATCHING HER FIRST STURGEON, A 50-INCHER HELD BY HER DAD, JAROD HIGGINBOTHAM OF YAKIMA BAIT. (JAROD HIGGINBOTHAM)

*         Walleye angling is good in the John Day pool.

Current Columbia River regulations for salmon, steelhead, shad and sturgeon can be found at the Sport Fishing Regulation Update<http://www.dfw.state.or.us/resources/fishing/reg_changes/index.asp> page.

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (9/9) flight, 991 salmonid boats and nine Oregon bank anglers were counted from Tongue Point to Bonneville Dam; and 221 Oregon boats were counted at Buoy 10.  Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 5.24 coho and 0.45 Chinook caught per boat.  In the gorge, boat anglers averaged 2.33 Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.32 Chinook caught per boat.  In the Portland to Tongue Point area, boat anglers averaged 0.85 Chinook and 0.01 coho caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.07 Chinook caught per angler.

Gorge Bank: No report.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed seven Chinook adults and two Chinook jacks kept for three boats (nine anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed 30 Chinook adults and two Chinook jacks kept for 93 boats (215 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed one Chinook adult and one Chinook jack released for 15 bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed 89 Chinook adults, three Chinook jacks and one coho adult kept, plus 57 Chinook adults, two Chinook jacks and one coho adult released for 172 boats (430 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Above Tongue Point): Weekend checking showed six coho kept for six boats (18 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 510 coho kept, plus 381 coho, 77 Chinook and one steelhead released for 170 boats (498 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed 25 Chinook adults, six Chinook jacks and one steelhead kept, plus eight Chinook adults released for 57 boats (130 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed 14 Chinook adults and one Chinook jack kept for 25 boats (53 anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for seven boats (18 anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed one sublegal sturgeon released for two boats (five anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

John Day Pool: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed 30 sublegal and six legal white sturgeon released for three boats (eight anglers).

WALLEYE

Gorge:  No report.

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed 13 walleye kept, plus one walleye released for eight boats (15 anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point:  No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (one angler).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for five bank anglers; and 31 walleye kept, plus 35 walleye released for 19 boats (42 anglers).

SW WA, Lower Columbia Fishing Report (8-14-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL WAS GATHERED BY WDFW AND TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Cowlitz River – I-5 Bridge downstream:  12 bank rods released 1 adult Chinook.  2 boats/6 rods had no catch.  Above the I-5 Bridge:  71 bank rods kept 6 adult Chinook and 5 steelhead and released 4 adult Chinook.  23 boats/65 boat rods kept 24 steelhead and 1 cutthroat and released 1 jack Chinook, 4 steelhead, and 2 cutthroats.

A HERRING BEHIND A FISH FLASH WORKED OUT WELL FOR CHRIS SESSIONS WHILE FISHING AT BUOY 10 RECENTLY. (VIA BUZZ RAMSEY)

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 140 spring Chinook adults, seven spring Chinook jacks, three spring Chinook mini-jacks, 104 summer-run steelhead, five fall Chinook adults and one cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 26 spring Chinook adults and one spring Chinook jack into the Cispus River near the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek and they released 107 spring Chinook adults and five spring Chinook jacks at Franklin Bridge in Packwood.

Tacoma Power released five fall Chinook adults into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 2,640 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, Aug. 14. Water visibility is 13 feet and water temperature is 54.7 degrees F.

Drano Lake – 48 boat anglers kept 17 adult and 3 jack Chinook and released 8 hatchery and 14 wild steelhead.  Between 4 and 10 boats here last weekday mornings.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Last week we sampled 594 salmonid anglers (including 173 boats) with 22 adult and 4 jack fall Chinook, 18 steelhead but no coho.  All of the adult Chinook were kept. All of the steelhead were released as required.  13 of the fish were wild, 5 hatchery, and 0 unknown origin.

Bonneville Pool – 1 boat/4 anglers kept 2 adult Chinook.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Marker 82 line downstream – Last week we sampled 33 sturgeon anglers (including 12 boats) with 16 legals released.

Walleye

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – In the Camas/Washougal area we sampled 17 walleye anglers (11 boats) kept 7 fish and released 9.

Trout

Recent plant of rainbows (including some 4 pounders) SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish per Pound
Hatchery
Notes

TAKHLAKH LK (SKAM)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=TAKHLAKH+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
Aug 07, 2017
Rainbow
218
0.25
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Also, Tacoma Power released 3,420 rainbow trout into Mayfield Lake this past week.

SW WA Fishing, Trout Release Report (7-25-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – Upstream from the I-5 Bridge:  82 bank rods kept 12 adult spring Chinook and 9 steelhead and released 2 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook and 2 cutthroats.  172 boat rods (56 boats) kept 57 steelhead and released 2 steelhead and 6 cutthroats.   Spring Chinook are being caught at the salmon hatchery and steelhead mainly around the trout hatchery.

ROWLAND LAKE, WHERE LES LOGSDON CAUGHT THIS HOG EARLIER THIS YEAR, WAS RECENTLY STOCKED WITH RAINBOW TROUT. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

From the I-5 Bridge downstream:  12 bank rods and 6 boat rods (3 boats) had no catch.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 293 spring Chinook adults, 10 spring Chinook jacks, 14 mini-jacks and 161 summer-run steelhead adults and one cutthroat trout in five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 130 spring Chinook adults and five spring Chinook jacks into the Cispus River near the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek and they released 49 spring Chinook adults and two spring Chinook jacks at Franklin Bridge in Packwood.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,240 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, July 24. Water visibility is 13 feet and water temperature is 55.9 degrees F.

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Megler-Astoria Bridge upstream to Bonneville Dam – Last week we sampled 957 salmonid anglers (145 boats) with 45 adult and 3 jack summer Chinook, 111 steelhead, and no sockeye.  19 (42%) of the adult summer Chinook and 67 (60%) of the steelhead were kept.

Effort is low right now with <100 boats and <100 bank anglers counted during the Wed. July 19 flight.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Marker 82 line downstream – Last week we sampled 43 sturgeon anglers (including 13 boats) with 35 legals released.

Shad

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – We did not sample any shad anglers last week.

Walleye

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – 9 walleye anglers (7 boats) kept 4 fish kept and released 5.

Trout

Recent plants of catchable size rainbows into SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish per pound
Hatchery
Notes

HORSETHIEF LK (KLIC)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=HORSETHIEF+LK+%28KLIC%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
Jul 19, 2017
Rainbow
3,516
2.44
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

ROWLAND LK (KLIC)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=ROWLAND+LK+%28KLIC%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
Jul 19, 2017
Rainbow
695
2.44
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

ROWLAND LK (KLIC)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=ROWLAND+LK+%28KLIC%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
Jul 19, 2017
Rainbow
3,342
2.74
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

SPEARFISH LK (KLIC)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SPEARFISH+LK+%28KLIC%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
Jul 19, 2017
Rainbow
2,781
2.44
GOLDENDALE HATCHE