Tag Archives: LAKE TROUT

Lake Chelan, Area Fishing Report (5-23-18)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT WAS WRITTEN AND SUBMITTED BY ANTON JONES OF DARRELL AND DAD’S FAMILY GUIDE SERVICE

What’s hot is trolling for Lake Trout on Chelan early in the morning at Colyar Ledge.   Also hot is trolling between Chelan Shores and Lakeside for Lake Chelan Kokanee.  Finally, Roses Lake is smoking hot for quality Bluegill and Crappie.

PEPE HERNANDEZ SHOWS OFF PART OF A RECENT ROSES LAKE CRAPPIE CATCH. (DARRELL & DAD’S FAMILY GUIDE SERVICE)

When the wind lets you fish the early morning bite at Colyar Ledge, it is very good.  The best depths seem to be between 220 and 270 feet.  As always, fish within 3 to 5 feet of the bottom and keep your speed around 1.2 mph.

The Mack’s Lure Bead and Blade combo our guide, Jeff Witkowski has developed has been very productive.  He uses a bead combo to give the rig about a 4” long profile.  Bait this rig with a chunk of Northern Pikeminnow.  T4 Purple Glow Flatfish and Silver Horde Kingfisher Lite spoons have also been productive.

Trolling between Chelan Shores and Lakeside for Kokanee has been very productive.  Mack’s Kokanee Killer behind Sling Blades baited with shoepeg corn scented with Pro Cures Bloody Tuna or Pautzke’s Fire Corn in Natural is standard fare there.  Most people are having success working suspended fish over depths of 35 to 70 feet.

THE BROTHERS ENDRESEN POSE WITH THE RESULTS OF A FINE DAY OF FISHING FOR LAKE CHELAN KOKANEE. (DARRELL & DAD’S FAMILY GUIDE SERVICE)

Finally, Roses Lake has yielded monster catches of Bluegill and Crappie.  These are 8 to 9 inch bluegill and crappie from 11 to 13 inches.  Slip bobbers with bait or cast and retrieve small jigs will yield as many as you want to fillet…

Your fishing tip of the week is to remember scent.  I use Pautzke’s Kokanee fuel on everything as a cover scent.  Jeff is partial to Pro Cure’s Bloody Tuna.  You don’t want those fish to shy away as they charge your lure.

The kid’s tip of the week is to keep the fishing foray’s short this time of the year.  A couple of hours is plenty.  With the first big hot spell of the summer rolling in you don’t want to make it a survival test out there.  Work the hours of low light and cooler temperatures.  Mid-days this time of the year are good for swimming and staying cool inside.

 Your safety tip of the week is to keep a sharp look out for floating debris.  The lake is filling rapidly and floating loads of woody debris off the shoreline.  You don’t want to hit them!

As we approach the Memorial Day weekend, I want to remember my friends, Terry Gilden who died in the 1983 Beirut embassy bombing and Randy Shughart who died in the 1993 Mogadishu incident made famous by the movie, Blackhawk Down.  Both were members of Delta when they died.  I had the privilege to serve with them in the Rangers when we were young.  I get to do the things I love doing and spend time with my grandkids because of their sacrifice.

Status Quo Management For Priest Lake Fish, IDFG Decides

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Fish and Game will continue managing Priest Lake as primarily a lake trout fishery while also protecting native cutthroat trout and bull trout in Upper Priest Lake.

Over the past several years, F&G fisheries managers have done extensive public outreach to see if a management change was warranted at Priest Lake, but found there was not clear public sentiment that favored it.

JAMIE CARR HOISTS A LARGE PRIEST LAKE MACKINAW. MANY LAKE TROUT IN THE NORTH IDAHO SEA ARE MUCH SMALLER. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

“Simply put, fishing opportunity in the foreseeable future is likely to be about the same as it has been in recent years,” regional fish manager Andy Dux said. “Lake trout will continue to be abundant, kokanee will persist at low densities, but large in size. Cutthroat trout will also be present in moderate densities, and smallmouth bass will remain abundant.”

Fish and Game, with help from the Priest Lake Fishery Advisory Commitee, presented anglers and the public with three management choices: status quo, reducing lake trout populations to boost the kokanee fishery and other game fish species, or slightly reducing the lake trout population in an attempt to get a corresponding increase in other species.

Fish and Game did several surveys and multiple open houses to gauge public interest in changing management for the lake.

  • The random mail survey of anglers showed 52 percent did not want change vs. 48 percent who wanted change.
  • An email survey of anglers showed 45 percent did not want change and 55 percent did want change.

Resident anglers who frequently fish Priest Lake showed the most support for maintaining the existing fishery. Anglers who used to fish Priest Lake, but don’t now, were most likely to support change. In general, resident and nonresident anglers had similar opinions, and so did anglers from all the counties surveyed.

“We were clear from the start that unquestionable support for change was necessary in order for a drastic shift in management to be publicly accepted and successful,” Dux said.

Changing the management of the Priest Lake would require substantial time and resources from the department and patience from the public. Without a clear mandate for change, fisheries managers decided it was best to continue with the current management.

“We had tremendous participation from the public during this process, which gives us confidence that we understand public desires for the Priest Lake fishery,” Dux said. “The Priest Lake fishery is a public resource, so periodically it is important to ask the public how they want to see it managed. We learned there isn’t quite enough support to justify major change, but we didn’t have a good read on that until we asked the question.”

Priest Lake’s fisheries have steadily changed over time. The lake’s native sport fish are cutthroat trout, bull trout and mountain whitefish. Non-native lake trout and kokanee were introduced decades ago, and for many years, kokanee supported the lake’s most popular fishery.

Kokanee were also an important food source for bull trout and lake trout, which attained trophy sizes. That balance between predators and prey fish lasted into the 1970s, then fell apart. Mysis, a small freshwater shrimp, was introduced in the late-1960s to provide more food for kokanee. Unfortunately, young lake trout feed on shrimp until the fish switch their diet to kokanee.

Mysis allowed the lake trout population to grow at the expense of kokanee, which also happened to a lesser extent as lake trout preyed on, or outcompeted, cutthroat and bull trout.

Fish and Game has curbed lake trout population growth in Upper Priest Lake to relieve pressure on those native fish.

Fisheries managers have in the past attempted to boost kokanee numbers by stocking more, but those efforts were thwarted by lake trout predation. Millions of kokanee fry, as well as hundreds of thousands of juvenile cutthroat, were stocked without a noticeable increase in the populations of either species.

While fishing at Priest Lake is different than decades ago, it’s still an attractive place for anglers who enjoy catching lake trout.

“Plenty of fishing opportunities lie ahead for Priest Lake anglers,” Dux said. “Anglers looking for unique fishing opportunities in a scenic location will find them at Priest Lake.”