Tag Archives: klamath river

Oregon Fishing Report Highlights (1-29-20)

THE FOLLOWING IS FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE RECREATION REPORT FOR JAN. 23, 2020

Highlights from this week’s Recreation Report:

Register your new hunter for a hunter education class/course

Hunters 17 years old and younger need to complete a hunter education course and field day before they hunt this fall. Traditional classes and field days are available now, and online courses can be taken anytime. Taking care of hunter education now will be one less thing to worry about as hunting season approaches.f

HIGH WATERS HAVE MADE IT TOUGHER TO DO MUCH MORE THAN PLUNK ON SOME WESTERN OREGON RIVERS, BUT BETWEEN STORMS BUZZ RAMSEY HAS ENJOYED SUCCESS ON ONE NORTH COAST RIVER. HE CAUGHT THIS ONE AT MIDMONTH, BUT TWO LAST SUNDAY AS WELL. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

Best bets for fishing

  • Ana Reservoir offers a unique fishing experience for hybrid bass throughout the winter. Fishing has been fair. See 12 tips for catching wipers.
  • Fishing for native redband trout has been fair to good in the Klamath River between the Powerhouse and CA state line.
  • Fishing conditions on the Umatilla are good. Water levels increased this week and over 40 steelhead have been counted at Threemile Dam in the past three days.
  • Vernonia Lake, Lost Lake and Coffenbury lakes continue to get periodic stockings of surplus winter steelhead.
  • The trout bite continues to be good in the Holy Water, the stretch of the upper Rogue between the hatchery and the Lost Creek Lake spillway.

And if you’re after winter steelhead…

  • Almost all west side locations are reporting high flows [Editor’s note: click here to check realtime flows and flow forecasts] in popular steelhead rivers thanks to recent rains. These flows will put fish on the move, but can make fishing challenging. However, many of our biologists report some rivers might be in shape for the weekend – depending on how much rain we get.
  • Best bets on the north coast may be the Kilchis and Necanicum rivers, which green up quickly and should be fishable this weekend.
  • The best steelhead fishing on the mid-coast continues to be the bank fishery on the North Fork Alsea.
  • In the Coos and Coquille basins, there are steelhead in the systems and some locations could be fishable by the weekend.
  • Before the last week’s bump in river flow, anglers were starting to run into winter steelhead in the Galice area of the middle Rogue. Water color will be the limiting factor, so as the water drops into condition later this week and weekend, expect steelhead numbers to increase.
  • The South Umpqua and Smith rivers have been running high, but should be falling back in shape for some weekend steelhead fishing.

Deadline to apply for a spring bear tag is Feb. 10

 The controlled spring black bear season opens April 1.

Ways to apply for a tag

NOAA Sharpening Its Eye On West Coast Chinook Fisheries

Federal overseers could press for new Chinook fishing restrictions for select stocks at sea in the coming years to provide more salmon for orcas.

In a guidance letter earlier this week to the Pacific Fishery Management Council, which manages fisheries off the West Coast, NOAA made known that it wants to reengage with the panel on season setting.

AN ANGLER SHOWS OFF A 28-POUND FALL CHINOOK CAUGHT OFF WESTPORT ABOARD THE CHARTER BOAT SLAMMER IN A RECENT SEASON. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

The agency last did that in 2009 and found that the council’s commercial and recreational fisheries in Washington’s, Oregon’s and California’s ocean waters, didn’t jeopardize southern resident killer whales at the time, but the salmon-eating J, K and L Pods have declined since then and last year an analysis identified important king stocks for the hungry marine mammals.

“Several of the high priority Chinook salmon stocks currently identified in the framework contribute substantially to Council fisheries, including lower Columbia River, Sacramento River, and Klamath River fall-run Chinook salmon stocks [bolding in the original]. Identifying high priority Chinook salmon stocks for SRKW is an important step to assess impacts and prioritize management and recovery actions that will benefit the whales,” the March 6 letter from NOAA Regional Administrator Barry Thom to PFMC Chair Phil Anderson states.


Concerned about closures in your area? Book the world’s best salmon and halibut fishing in Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands), Canada. Click HERE to learn more.

Lower Columbia stocks are key to Washington Coast salmon fisheries, while the other two runs are important off Oregon and California.

Puget Sound fall Chinook were found to be even more important to orcas, according to NOAA’s and WDFW’s joint review last year, but are not mentioned in the letter. Still, the state agency is developing seasons with an eye towards the species’ “dietary needs.”

The letter does say that the feds are developing a “risk assessment” for analyzing salmon fisheries past, present and future in terms of overlap with SRKWs, and how they impact orca prey availability.

“If adjustments are needed, this framework could guide fisheries actions to limit impacts to prey availability in specific areas and times that are believed to create the greatest benefit to the whales. We believe adaptive frameworks like this, or other equally protective tools, provide confidence that fisheries can respond to the highest risk conditions and help improve conditions for SRKW in the future,” the letter states.

While it says that the new tool won’t likely be available to apply to 2019 fisheries, NOAA still wants to get with PFMC about this year’s proposed seasons and their impacts on the aforementioned stocks.

Lurking in the background is the threat of a lawsuit against NOAA to look into fishery effects on orcas.

According to The Seattle Times, which broke the story yesterday afternoon, fishing interests involved in the process say fisheries aren’t to blame for the downfall of the “blackfish,” but seasons are an easy “knob” to try and turn, and that habitat issues in the spawning and rearing waters are the real problem for low Chinook numbers.

The letter goes on to say that efforts are also being made to reduce disturbance from boats in orca foraging areas.

A bill passed out of Washington’s House yesterday on a 78-20 vote expands the don’t-go distance around orcas from 200 to 300 yards, prohibits approaching closer than 400 yards from behind, and requires vessels to slow to 7 knots within a half-mile bubble around them. It now goes over the Senate.