Tag Archives: kittitas county

‘Nobody Likes To Live With Guilt’: 8×7 Bull Elk’s Killer Sought

The search for whomever poached a massive Kittitas County bull during last weekend’s rifle deer opener is getting widespread attention.

A suspect description and images of the elk he “accidentally” shot out of season are making the rounds on social and regional media, upping the odds of a resolution.

WDFW OFFICER COURTENY NASSET LOOKS OVER THE CARCASS OF THE 8X7 BULL ELK KILLED IN NORTHERN KITTITAS COUNTY OCT. 12, 2019. (WDFW)

“I’m hoping someone recognizes them or the person sees this and does the right thing,” said WDFW Sgt. Carlo Pace this morning. “Nobody likes to live with guilt.”

The 8×7 was shot Saturday near First Creek and FS Road 3506, which are north of Thorp and east of Highway 97.

Pace and Officer Courtney Nasset responded to the scene after a witness said the alleged shooter asked them to help hide the carcass.

“The witness did the right thing and declined, left, and called 911 immediately with the location and description of the suspect,” WDFW Police posted on social media. “When the officers arrived on scene, they found the large bull was left intact and had been completely covered up with stumps and cut trees.”

The witness described the suspect as a man in his 30s who stood about 5-foot-7 and had a trimmed goatee.

“He was wearing hunter camo top and bottom, an orange beanie, Cabela’s backpack, and black/brown rifle,” wardens stated on Facebook.

There’s a pretty big size, color and antler difference between mule deer bucks and bull elk, and Pace sounded skeptical that it was an accident.

“I’ve seen a lot of big bulls. This is one of the biggest ones I’ve seen. The base of the antlers is huge,” he said.

ANOTHER IMAGE OF THE BULL AFTER ITS MEAT WAS LARGELY SALVAGED FOR DONATION TO A LOCAL FOOD BANK. ITS BROW TINES EACH CARRY AN EXTRA POINT, WITH EIGHT POINTS ON ITS RIGHT BEAM, SEVEN ON ITS LEFT. (WDFW)

The general rifle elk season in this area doesn’t begin until late October and only open for true spike bulls.

Fortunately, the quick response allowed the officers to salvage the animal. The quarters and backstraps were donated to the FISH Community Food Bank in nearby Ellensburg, according to Pace.

Tipsters are being asked to call WDFW at (360) 902-2936 and then choose option 1. You can also submit info through the agency’s violations page, or text WDFWTIP to 847411.

$25 Million In Grants Aim To Ease Washington Fish Passage In 20 Counties

THE FOLLOWING IS A JOINT PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE AND THE WASHINGTON RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE

Migrating fish will soon have access to more than 82 miles of streams in Washington, thanks to $25 million in grants from the Brian Abbott Fish Barrier Removal Board.

THERE’S A LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL FOR FISH PASSAGE, THANKS TO THE AWARDING OF $25 MILLION TO COUNTIES, TRIBES AND OTHER ENTITIES TO REMEDY OLD CULVERTS AND OTHER STREAM CROSSINGS THROUGHOUT WASHINGTON. THIS IS A SKAGIT COUNTY PROJECT THAT’S IN THE DESIGN PHASE AND WILL OPEN 6.31 MILES OF HABITAT FOR E.S.A.-LISTED CHINOOK AND STEELHEAD. (RCO)

The board will fund more than 50 projects in 20 counties to remove fish passage barriers that block salmon and steelhead from swimming upstream to their spawning areas. The most common barriers to fish passage are culverts, which are large pipes or other structures that carry streams under roads. Culverts can be too high for fish to reach, too small to handle high water flows, or too steep for fish to navigate.

“These projects build on previous fish passage investments by the Washington State Department of Transportation, forest land owners, and local governments,” said Tom Jameson, WDFW fish passage manager and chair of the Brian Abbott Fish Barrier Removal Board. “We’re excited that several projects will focus on watersheds that are particularly good habitat for chinook salmon, which are the main food source for southern resident killer whales (orcas). We appreciate the Legislature’s support so we can continue contributing to salmon and orca recovery.”

A LOW-FLOW FISH BARRIER IN LEWIS COUNTY’S SCAMMON CREEK. (RCO)

Created by the Legislature in 2014, the Brian Abbott Fish Barrier Removal Board coordinates the removal of fish passage barriers on state, local, tribal, and private land that block salmon and steelhead access to prime spawning and rearing habitat. Funding comes from the sale of state bonds.

“This board represents an incredible partnership that ultimately helps us open entire watersheds where we can make the biggest impact for fish,” said Kaleen Cottingham, director of the Recreation and Conservation Office, which administers the grants. “A coordinated approach is key to helping fish reach the ocean, return home to spawn, and get to healthy habitats to feed, grow, and transition from saltwater to freshwater.”

ANOTHER FISH BARRIER IN LEWIS COUNTY THAT WILL BE CORRECTED, OPENING UP HABITAT ON THE MIDDLE FORK NEWAUKUM RIVER. (RCO)

Selected projects went through a technical review committee, which evaluated project proposals based on their coordination with nearby fish passage projects, benefit to salmon and steelhead populations listed as threatened or endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act, and cost-effectiveness. The committee also evaluated projects based on the severity of the barrier and its location in the watershed, prioritizing downstream barriers first.

The grant program is administered as a partnership between the board, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. The board is named after Brian Abbott, who was a life-long fisherman, avid salmon recovery leader, and spearheaded creation of the board while serving as executive coordinator of the Governor’s Salmon Recovery Office.

WALLA WALLA’S TRI-STATE STEELHEADERS SECURED ONE OF THE LARGEST GRANTS AWARDED, NEARLY $1.7 MILLION TO IMPROVE FISH ACCESS ON MILL CREEK. (RCO)

Other board members include representatives from the Washington Departments of Transportation and Natural Resources, Washington State Association of Counties, Association of Washington Cities, the Governor’s Salmon Recovery Office, the Confederated Tribe and Bands of the Yakama Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and Council of Regions.

Below is a list of fish passage projects funded in each county. For project details, visit https://rco.wa.gov/documents/press/2019/FBRBGrantsDescriptions2019.pdf.

Asotin County……………………. $445,300
Chelan County…………………… $982,885
Clallam County………………….. $699,859
Clark County……………………… $155,200
Cowlitz County………………… $1,095,293
Grays Harbor County………….. $590,408
Island County…………………….. $544,718
Jefferson County………………… $397,163
King County……………………. $4,053,264
Kitsap County…………………. $2,561,337
Kittitas County…………………. $2,652,910
Lewis County………………….. $1,606,571
Mason County…………………. $1,180,395
Okanogan County……………. $2,265,251
Pierce County……………………… $90,000
Skagit County……………………. $378,500
Snohomish County……………… $653,483
Thurston County……………… $1,700,000
Walla Walla County………….. $1,785,641
Whatcom County……………….. $889,768

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RMEF Awards $310,000 For Washington Elk Projects

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION

The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation awarded $309,735 in grant funding to benefit elk and elk habitat in Washington.

“Noxious weeds and overly dense forests continue to choke out quality forage for elk and other wildlife. The majority of these 2019 habitat stewardship projects tackle these issues head-on,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “We also designated funding for scientific research to monitor the potential impact habitat modification has on predator-prey interactions.”

SUN BLAZES OVER WASHINGTON ELK COUNTRY. (RMEF)

Seventeen projects positively impact more than 4,000 acres of wildlife habitat in Asotin, Columbia, Cowlitz, Ferry, Garfield, Kittitas, Lewis, Okanogan, Pend Oreille, Skamania, Stevens and Yakima Counties.

Washington is home to more than 15,000 RMEF members and 25 chapters.

“We can’t say enough about our dedicated volunteers,” said Kyle Weaver, RMEF president and CEO. “They generate revenue by hosting banquets, membership drives and other events that goes back on the ground in Washington and around the country to benefit our conservation mission.”

Since 1985, RMEF and its partners completed 661 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Washington with a combined value of more than $122.6 million. These projects protected or enhanced 479,785 acres of habitat and opened or improved public access to 125,245 acres.

Below is a listing of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation’s 2019 grants for the state of Washington.

Asotin County

  • Apply noxious weed treatment across 225 acres of public and private land to prevent the spread of rush skeletonweed, whitetop, spotted knapweed, hawkweeds and sulfur cinquefoil. RMEF supported the Asotin County weed control program since 2007.
  • Apply noxious weed treatment across 300 acres of Bureau of Land Management and private lands within the Lower Grande Ronde River drainages. The area provides prime habitat for fish, big game and native wildlife.
  • Apply noxious weed treatment across 500 acres within the Chief Joseph and W. T. Wooten Wildlife Areas where invasive weeds are a significant issue (also benefits Garfield and Columbia Counties).

Cowlitz County

  • Plant a variety of species within patches 3 to 10 acres in size, covering 60 total acres, to diversify elk and other wildlife habitat on the Mount St. Helens Wildlife Area.
  • Apply lime and fertilizer followed by planting trees, shrubs and a grass seed mix across 200 acres in the Toutle River Valley, home to the highest winter concentration of elk near Mount Saint Helen’s.
  • Treat noxious weeds across 150 acres within the Mount St. Helens Wildlife Area and Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument (also benefits Skamania County).

Kittitas County

  • Restore 732 acres within the 2018 Milepost 22 Wildfire burn zone that charred the L. T. Murray Wildlife Area, home to year-round winter habitat for elk and other wildlife. Crews will use both an aerial and ground-based approach to treat a potential noxious weed outbreak.

Lewis County

  • Provide funding for research on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest to monitor how and where elk seek and find forage in areas where timber production takes place. Results will inform managers of the potential role for variable density thinning in providing elk foraging habitat on the west slope of the Washington Cascades.

Okanogan County

  • Provide funding for the Mid Valley Archers Memorial Day Shoot, a family-friendly event focused on providing instruction and fun for archers of all ages.
  • Provide funding for the annual Bonaparte Lake Kid’s Fishing Day (also benefits Ferry County).

Pend Oreille County

  • Thin seedlings and small pole-sized trees from 33 acres of dense conifer stands in the Indian Creek watershed on the Colville National Forest. The area is winter and year-long range for the Selkirk elk herd.

Skamania County

  • Treat 1,215 acres of meadows and adjacent roads/right-of-ways on the south end of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. These meadows provide vital forage for the Mount St. Helens elk herd.
  • Transform six acres of mid-successional forest within the Upper Lewis River watershed into a grassy meadow to provide forage for big game species.

Stevens County

  • Provide funding for scientific research to conduct vegetation surveys across elk habitat that intersects with wolf range. Scientists will pair that information with elk movement and survivorship data to determine how human modifications of the landscape influence elk (also benefits Pend Oreille County).

Yakima County

  • Thin 426 acres on the Oak Creek Wildlife Area to promote high quality habitat for elk and other wildlife.
  • Restore native grasses and forbs to an estimated 350 acres on the Wenas Wildlife Area that was affected by the 2018 Buffalo Wildfire. Crews will apply noxious weed treatment followed by seeding.
  • Provide funding for the Kamiakin Roving Archers, a youth archery development league participant, to purchase archery supplies for the upcoming season. The program provides shooting instruction and training on archery equipment with an emphasis on safety and responsibility.

New Report Details Teanaway Wolf Depredations

Wolves in Central Washington killed one sheep, injured another as well as a calf, and probably killed a lamb earlier this summer.

The separate incidents involving the Teanaway Pack and two different livestock producers’ animals occurred a month ago or more but details didn’t emerge until this afternoon with WDFW’s August monthly gray wolf update.

A WDFW MAP SHOWS THE RANGE OF THE TEANAWAY PACK OF NORTHERN KITTITAS, SOUTHWEST CHELAN AND NORTHEAST KING COUNTIES. (WDFW)

According to the agency, the injured calf was reported July 31 and recovered the next day by the producer.

An exam determined its injuries had come from one or more wolves, and it led the rancher to move his cattle to another part of his grazing allotment on the Teanaway Community Forest.

Then, a week and a half later, a WDFW range rider alerted wolf managers to a possible depredation on Forest Service land.

Lacerations and puncture wounds on an injured and a dead sheep, along with telemetry data that put the Teanaway wolves nearby, led to the attack being classified as a confirmed wolf depredation.

A lamb from the flock was also determined to be missing.

WDFW reports that the shepherd moved the sheep to another part of the allotment and that many different conflict prevention tactics had been taken to minimize conflicts.

“(The producer) delayed entry onto the allotment until July, after wild ungulates are born. A sheepherder stays with the sheep at all times, accompanied by five herding dogs and three guarding dogs. The sheep are gathered tightly together each night and guarded by the dogs, the sheepherder, two Foxlights, and a Radio Activated Guard (RAG) programmed to trigger when a collared wolf approaches the sheep. Additionally, sick and injured sheep are removed from the allotment. The sheepherder, range rider, and WDFW actively haze wolves with human presence, air horns, and gunfire when they are detected near the sheep,” the agency stated.

A cursory search suggests the depredations are the first for the Teanaway Pack since two in 2015.

Wolves in this portion of Washington are still federally listed and WDFW only considers lethal removals in the delisted eastern third of the state.

The news follows recent confirmed and probable depredations by two different packs in northern Ferry County — the Togos and “the Unnamed pack using the old Profanity territory” — and the removal of the Togo’s breeding male.

WDFW’s monthly update also details August nonlethal work around Northeast Washington packs including Carpenter Ridge, Dirty Shirt, Goodman, Huckleberry, Leadpoint and Smackout.

Also, WDFW appears to have posted a new map for the Teanaway wolves as well. It shows an expanded territory that stretches from the Teanaway Valley north to nearly Stevens Pass.