Tag Archives: hunter ed

Still Time For Prospective WA Spring Gobbler Gunners To Take Hunter Ed

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

With the spring turkey season set to begin April 15, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) urges prospective hunters to sign up now for hunter education courses to avoid missing out on any hunting opportunities in 2018.

KELTON FENRICH, THEN 13, BAGGED HIS FIRST TURKEY NEAR LAKE ROOSEVELT DURING 2016’S SPRING HUNT. (BROWNING PHOTO CONTEST)

“While other major hunting seasons don’t open until September, now is the time to enroll in hunter education to ensure you can participate in the exciting spring turkey seasons,” said David Whipple, hunter education division manager for WDFW. Spring turkey hunters enjoy a high success rate, with 52 percent of hunters harvesting a turkey statewide in 2016. In northeast Washington, that figure rose to 62 percent.

The turkey season is an excellent opportunity to introduce someone new to the hunting tradition, especially with a youth-only turkey hunt scheduled for April 7-8, Whipple said.

“Completing a hunter education course now will also help hunters who want to hunt this fall, since summer and fall courses fill quickly,” Whipple said.

All hunters born after Jan. 1, 1972 must complete a hunter education course to purchase a hunting license.

If you are unable to make it to a hunter education course before the spring turkey season ends on May 31, new hunters may qualify to participate in the hunter education deferral. For more information on the deferral, please see https://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/huntered/he_deferral.html.

To find a course and learn about hunter education requirements, new hunters should visit the WDFW hunter education webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/huntered/classes/basic.php.

WDFW offers both traditional and online options to complete the hunter education requirement. The traditional classroom experience includes direct instruction from certified volunteer instructors, which can be important for younger students, Whipple said. The online course offers the same content, but on the student’s schedule. Those who take the online course are still required to complete an in-person field skills evaluation led by certified instructors, added Whipple.

Bills That Aim To Increase Washington Fishing, Hunting Participation Face Tight Deadline

Time is running out in Olympia to move a pair of bills meant to increase fishing and hunting participation in Washington.

Today’s the cutoff to get legislation out of one chamber and over to the other, but it’s unclear whether HB 2505 and SB 6198 will get any love from state representatives and senators before the 5 p.m. deadline.

A MAN AND BOY FISH OFF OF RICHMOND BEACH THIS PAST SUMMER. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“It’s a full-court press today,” Raquel Crosier, legislative liaison for WDFW, which requested the bills, said this morning.

She says CCA and the Hunters Heritage Council are helping lobby lawmakers to move the bills.

In a nutshell, they would raise the age that kids first start having to buy a fishing license from 15 to 16; give new hunter ed grads a $20 coupon good towards their first hunting license; and allow anglers to buy a temporary license to fish the popular lowland lakes opener instead of requiring them to buy a year-round one.

Both bills made it out of their initial committee assignments, and the House version passed Appropriations, but they’ve since been mired in rules committees.

Crosier says they’ve received a “ton of support” from hunters, but are competing with a huge volume of bills introduced during the short session.

WDFW Offering Free Bird Hunting Clinics, Mentored Hunts

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Hunter Education program is offering free hunting clinics geared towards teaching participants the basics of hunting turkey, waterfowl and upland game birds in southcentral and southwest Washington.

THE CHAMPOUX FAMILY OF THE YAKIMA VALLEY SHOW OFF THEIR HARVEST FOLLOWING A LATE 2015 UPLAND BIRD HUNTING CLINIC AND MENTORED HUNT PUT ON BY WDFW. (WDFW)

The clinics, which run on various dates through Oct. 31, will last two to four hours and cover the basics of hunting. In addition to classroom time, the clinics may include range time for patterning shotguns, said Aaron Garcia, WDFW Hunter Education coordinator.

Some clinics provide opportunities for beginning hunters to learn under the guidance of volunteer hunter education instructors, Master Hunters, and local hunting organizations. Participants in these mentored hunts must have valid hunting licenses.

Classes can fill fast and registration is first come, first served online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/huntered/clinics.

The schedule is as follows:

Aug.12, 2 p.m. – Fall Turkey Clinic at Cabelas in Union Gap, Yakima County in partnership with the National Wild Turkey Federation.

Aug. 13, 2 p.m.  – Fall Turkey Clinic at Cabelas in Union Gap, Yakima County in partnership with the National Wild Turkey Federation.

Aug. 27, 12-noon – Waterfowl Hunting Clinic at the Vancouver Trap Club in Clark County.

Sept. 2, 6 a.m. – Mentored Dove Hunting at the Sunnyside Wildlife Area Headquarters Unit in southeast Yakima County.

Sept. 23, 6 a.m. – Mentored Upland Bird Hunting for youth only (15 and under). Mentors with dogs will be at the Sunnyside Wildlife Area pheasant release sites in southeast Yakima County.

Sept. 23, 6 a.m. – Mentored Upland Bird Hunting for youth only (15 and under). Mentors with dogs will be at the Cottonwoods pheasant release site on the Wenas Wildlife Area in Kittitas County.

Sept. 23 – Oct. 31, Mentored Early Fall Turkey Hunts on multiple days at multiple locations across the state. WDFW is matching registrants with First Hunt Foundation (http://www.firsthuntfoundation.com/) mentors.

Sept. 30, 7 a.m. – Mentored Pheasant Hunt for youth only (15 and under), followed by Upland Bird Hunting Clinic, at Reds Fly Shop/Canyon River Ranch in Ellensburg, Kittitas County.  The clinic after the youth hunt is open to all age registrants.

Garcia notes that youth hunters who attend with adult guardians and their own bird dogs, and do not require help from WDFW mentors can register for the Sept. 23 pheasant hunts at Sunnyside and Cottonwoods release sites.