Tag Archives: HATCHERY CHINOOK

Mixed Results For Central Sound Chinook Anglers On Late Opener

Some anglers found Chinook, others mostly dogfish (er, guilty as charged) on today’s delayed Marine Area 9-10 hatchery Chinook opener on Puget Sound.

“Possession was decent,” reported Tom Nelson of The Outdoor Line on Seattle’s 710 ESPN early this afternoon. “Tin Shed, West Bar, East Bar.”

HAPPY CLIENTS OF ALL STAR CHARTERS SHOW OFF A PAIR OF KINGS CAUGHT ON TODAY’S CENTRAL PUGET SOUND HATCHERY OPENER. (ALLSTARFISHING.COM)

“No Point was pretty quiet,” he added.

So too was Midchannel Bank — usually a quota crusher for the Area 9 fishery — when Nelson was there very early in the morning.

SCENES FROM TODAY’S SALMON OPENER ON AREA 9: RIGS BACK DOWN THE RAMP AT EVERETT’S 10TH STREET LAUNCH IN THE DARK. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

He ran all the way to the famed Port Townsend salmon hole, despite advising other anglers on his show last Saturday that the tide wasn’t favorable there today.

“I couldn’t stand it,” he admitted. “It sucked, dude. I know of maybe five taken there.”

SNOHOMISH COUNTY’S WHITEHORSE, THREE FINGERS, PILCHUCK AND OTHER MOUNTAINS STAND OUT ON THE EASTERN HORIZON AS DAWN NEARS OVER EVERETT AND PORT GARDINER. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Ryley Fee reported going two for four on MCB fish to 10 pounds by 9 a.m.

Was definitely slower, and no bait around,” he said.

MOOCHERS WORK OFF POINT NO POINT AS MT. RAINIER BEGINS TO PINK UP IN THE DAWN LIGHT. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

That “no bait around” extended to Point No Point and Possession Bar, and that must’ve had the doggies starving for just about anything that jiggled past.

I was out on Area 9 with Mark Yuasa and Karsten McIntosh of the Northwest Marine Trade Association in the Northwest Salmon Derby Series grand raffle prize Weldcraft Rebel 202 Hardtop and we caught dogfish on cutplug herring, dogfish on whole herring, dogfish on fat spoons and dogfish on skinny spoons; found dogfish on bottom and caught suspended dogfish; and we brought ’em in straight and we reeled ’em in sideways.

CHINOOK ANGLERS HOPE FOR A BIT AT NO POINT AS THE SUN JUST BEGINS TO EDGE OVER WHITEHORSE’S NORTHERN SHOULDER. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“There was a lot of dogfish on Possession,” confirmed Nelson. “Run anything that smelled of bait, you caught one …”

For skipper Gary Krein of All Star Charters, the lack of bait all came down to the tidal movement, or relative lack of it, to help keep herring, etc., pinned against ledges or in eddies, which in turn draw Chinook, which draw anglers.

BANK ANGLERS HUCK BUZZ BOMBS AND OTHER FLUTTERING JIGS OFF POINT NO POINT IN HOPES A CHINOOK OR RESIDENT COHO BITES. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“You need at least a foot an hour” of movement, he says.

Today’s tides at Edmonds were a 2.61 low at 6:02 a.m. rising to a 7.31 high at 12:33 p.m. dropping barely to 5.36 at 5:20 p.m. — “My most displeasant tide there is to fish, just not enough movement,” said Krein.

THE EXPERT HANDS OF MARK YUASA PREPARES HERRING FOR MOOCHING, ONE OF HIS FAVORITE TACTICS FOR SALMON. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Tomorrow’s tides don’t do much for him, but Saturday’s look “quite a bit better.”

Krein did note there was bait at Jeff Head, but where all the schools that were hanging out in the Tin Shed yesterday that Nelson screenshot is anybody’s guess.

We tried mooching at Point No Point and then trolling spoons and other gear on the edges of the bar, while others found Chinook success on plugs.

AN ANGLER REACHES THE NET FOR A FISHING PARTNER’S CHINOOK OFF POINT NO POINT. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

We heard of 10- and 20-pounders caught on Tomics, and John Martinis of John’s Sporting Goods in Everett posted that after starting the morning running flashers and spoons, he and his buddies switched out to 5-inchers in mother of pearl color combos (602 and 603) and nailed their limits.

Krein reported his operation’s four charter boats ran “mostly plugs and flashers and spoons to” put 21 kings in the box in both Area 9 and 10 this morning.

NELLY TINKERS WITH GEAR ON HIS BIG DUCKWORTH. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“Nice fish, nice fish,” he said, with the six caught aboard the boat he was on all running 13 to 17 pounds.

After the NMTAs boys kicked me out of the boat around 11:30 back at 10th Street, I headed over to the WDFW fish checker for an update.

IF YOU’RE NOT GOING TO CATCH ANY FISH, YOU MIGHT AS WELL TRY AND TAKE SOME DECENT PHOTOS, I GUESS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“Pretty much everyone’s gotten their fish so far,” she told me and pointed to an eraser board with a score of 66 Chinook and eight coho to that point.

Maybe so, but the feeling is a bit different with others.

“We didn’t catch as many Chinook on this July 25 opener as (past years’) July 16 openers,” The Outdoor Line‘s Nelson noted.

KARSTEN MCINTOSH HOLDS UP A SPOON-SMACKING SMOLT THAT APPEARS TO HAVE HAD A BITE TAKEN OUT OF IT ON THE WAY UP. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

So the questions become, how much damage did we actually do to the relatively low 3,500-fish Area 9 quota that led to the delayed start, and are we gonna get more time on the water after the four-day opener wraps up on SUNday?

Even with his boats’ success, Krein says “There are lots of people who didn’t get any,” and he expects there to be room after the numbers are crunched.

THE 67 BILLIONTH DOGFISH OF THE DAY STRUGGLES BESIDE THE BOAT. NEXT TIME, NO BAIT, NO MOJO, NO NOTHING THAT SMELLS LIKE FISH ON THE LURES. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“My read is we’re going to get additional days,” Nelson also forecast.

Meanwhile, Area 10 is scheduled to stay open until its 3,057-king quota is caught, or Aug. 31. Anglers there may benefit from salmon that moved through Area 9 unmolested where in past years under the July 16 opener those fish might have been caught beforehand.

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this said that the Area 9 fishery wrapped up on Monday but in fact it ends after Sunday. Somebody can’t do math after being awake for so long.

Cookie Cutters? Maybe Not Entirely, OSU Research On Hatchery Chinook Suggests

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Hatchery-raised chinook salmon sort themselves into surface- and bottom-oriented groups in their rearing tanks. This behavior might be due in part to the fish’s genes, according to an Oregon State University study.

YOUNG HATCHERY CHINOOK STRATIFY INTO SOME FISH THAT HANG OUT ON THE SURFACE AND SOME THAT LIKE THE BOTTOM. THAT GENETIC BEHAVIOR IS SIMILAR TO THE DIFFERENCE IN WHERE YOUNG WILD WILLAMETTE AND MCKENZIE RIVER CHINOOK OCCUR, ACCORDING TO OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY. (OSU)

The finding, published in the journal Environmental Biology of Fishes, could change a commonly held view that hatchery-raised fish are generally expected to behave in the same manner, said Julia Unrein, who led the study as a master’s degree student in the Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit in OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

“What we found is hatchery juvenile chinook salmon are not made from the same mold,” Unrein said. “Perhaps by trying to force them to fit our model of what a ‘hatchery fish’ is and constrain them to specific release times, we may be overlooking the variation among individuals that we know is important for the survival of their wild counterparts.”

Carl Schreck, professor in OSU’s Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, said, “The implications relative to Endangered Species Act-listed fish may be profound if they serve to allow the creation of test fish for researchers to use when studying how to successfully get juvenile chinook to safely migrate through Willamette system reservoirs and dams. There are fish culture and habitat restoration implications, as well.”

The researchers first recognized this vertical self-sorting behavior, just as the young fish have used up their yolk and are feeding for the first time, at OSU’s Fish Performance and Genetics Laboratory. They observed that some chinook orient themselves near the surface and the remainder swam along the bottom of the tank.

When the researchers separated the surface- and bottom-fish into different tanks, the fish maintained their preferred vertical distribution for at least a year, Unrein said. The fish that fed at the surface continued to stay near the top and the ones that preferred the bottom remained deeper in the tank, even with the surface fish no longer competing for food that was provided at the surface.

They compared body size between the two groups two months after the first feeding began and then six months later. While initially the same size, by the end of the experiment the surface fish were significantly larger than the bottom fish, Unrein said.

“There were also consistent body shape differences, detected after two months of rearing and again six months later,” she said. “The surface fish had a deeper, shorter head and deeper body than the bottom fish, which was more streamlined. For the next four brood years, we looked at these variations and found they were consistent from year to year. For the fourth brood year, we held families separate to determine if the proportion of the two types of fish varied among families and they did, which suggests genetics plays a role.”

Unrein compared the body types of the surface and bottom fish to wild chinook juveniles collected in the Willamette River Basin by Eric Billman, when he was part of OSU’s research team. She found that surface fish are similar to the wild juveniles that rear in the Willamette River and leave their first fall, while the bottom fish resemble those rearing in the McKenzie River, an upper tributary of the Willamette, that leave as yearling spring smolts.

Unrein’s research was directed by Schreck and David Noakes, professor and senior scientist in the Oregon Hatchery Research Center in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

“It is surprising that such behavioral sorting hadn’t been noticed before given that we’ve seen it at two different facilities, in different stocks of chinook salmon, and over numerous years,” Schreck said. “It is also present, although not as obvious, in steelhead trout.”

The study resulted from observations made during research funded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District; the U.S. Geological Survey, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Oregon Hatchery Research Center.