Tag Archives: governor kate brown

Oregon Ocean Acidification-Hypoxia Council To Hold First Meeting

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Oregon’s new Coordinating Council on Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia (OAH) will host its first meeting on Thursday, Jan. 25 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. in Newport at the Hatfield Marine Science Center’s Guin Library, 2030 Marine Science Drive. A full agenda for the meeting is available online, along with supporting materials.

BEACHGOERS NEAR NEWPORT IN LATE 2017. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Oregon lawmakers created the OAH Council through the passage of Senate Bill 1039 last year to look for ways to better understand, adapt to and mitigate the effects of changing ocean conditions. The state has already seen the effects of ocean acidification on its prized shellfish industry after annual die-offs of juvenile oysters at the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery started in 2007.  Oregon has also seen the effects of intensifying hypoxia events, which have been implicated in die-offs of crabs and other marine life over the past two decades.

“Ocean acidification already has affected Oregon’s shellfish mariculture industry, and we know it is worsening,” says Senator Arnie Roblan. “It’s time to start finding ways to adapt to these new conditions and mitigate them, while we still have time. Our children and businesses depend on it.”

The meeting agenda includes opening remarks from Governor Brown’s Representative and carbon policy advisor Dr. Kristen Sheeran, an analysis of SB 1039, and presentations on recent science and policy developments from Council members including Co-Chairs Dr. Caren Braby (ODFW) and Dr. Jack Barth (Executive Director of Oregon State University’s Marine Studies Initiative). Following the meeting, from 3:30-4:30, the Hatfield Marine Science Center is hosting a seminar with brief presentations by Council members and discussion with the audience.

The public is welcome at the meeting. Attend in person, or by WebEx (use phone number 415-655-0002).

Increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean and fuels ocean acidification. “Ocean acidification is a global problem that is having a disproportionate impact on productive West Coast ecosystems,” says Dr. Francis Chan, Oregon State University. “These changing ocean conditions threaten Oregon’s productive wild ocean fisheries, rich coastal traditions and renowned healthy ecosystem.”

Oregon has been an international leader in policy development related to ocean acidification by promoting and facilitating regional and global coalition-building to develop solutions and mitigate carbon dioxide through international climate agreements. Governor Kate Brown has asked the new OAH Council to build Oregon’s Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia Action Plan, as part of Oregon’s ongoing demonstration of leadership.

In addition to the Co-Chairs from ODFW and Oregon State University, the Council includes representatives from the Governor’s office, Oregon Tribes, Oregon DEQOregon Department of Agriculture, Department of Land Conservation and Development, Ocean Science Trust, Oregon Sea Grant and representatives from the fishing, shellfish and research communities. The OAH Council will make its first report to the Legislature by September 2018.

Brown Reported ‘Confident’ In Investigation Of Oregon Elk Hunter’s Wolf Shooting

Oregon Governor Kate Brown is reported as “confident” in investigators’ work looking into an elk hunter’s killing of a wolf in Union County.

The late October shooting was determined to be self-defense, according to the Oregon State Police, and the Capital Press says that the governor “will apparently not ask state agencies” to reopen the case after a dozen and a half advocacy groups had petitioned her to.

OREGON WOLF TRACKS IN MUD. (ODFW)

Brown responded in a Dec. 1 letter, which is just coming to light today. The Press reports she consulted with OSP, ODFW and county prosecutors before making her decision.

Wolf advocates had pointed to the trajectory of a bullet through the animal as suggesting it wasn’t self-defense.

The hunter, Brian Scott, 38, said he’d had three wolves in his vicinity that morning in the Starkey Wildlife Management Unit.

One “meant to make contact,” he told Oregonian reporter Bill Monroe in an in-person interview. “I was terrified. I screamed and raised my rifle. All I saw (in a scope) was hair so I shot.”

After confirming the animal was a wolf with his hunting partners, Scott immediately contacted OSP and ODFW officials, who responded to the scene with investigative equipment.

The Press reports that advocates “will continue to put pressure on the governor and agencies regarding wolf poaching investigations, and ensure those protections are taken seriously.”

There have been a number of illegal wolf kills in Oregon (as well as Washington), but this doesn’t appear to be one, if Governor Brown’s letter is any indication.

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this blog misstated when the wolf was shot; it was in late October (Oct. 27), not mid-November. Our apologies for the error.

Oregon’s Elliott State Forest Remains Public

The Elliott State Forest was officially kept public in a ceremony near Reedsport this morning, a victory by and for hunters, anglers and others and ending the potential threat of lost recreational access.

A CREEK FLOWS THROUGH A PORTION OF THE ELLIOTT STATE FOREST AT THE SITE OF A STREAM IMPROVEMENT PROJECT. THE 82,500 ACRES OF OREGON’S OLDEST FOREST ARE HOME TO COHO, ELK, DEER, GROUSE AND OTHER CRITTERS. (OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY)

Gov. Kate Brown has signed into law a local lawmaker’s bill that moves the 82,500-acre parcel between the Umpqua and Coos Rivers out of the Common School Fund and its obligations to produce revenue, which had led to its near-sale to a private timber company and a local tribe.

“Oregonians overwhelmingly made it clear that the Elliott’s lands should remain in public hands. Now more than ever, it’s imperative that we not scale back any of Oregon’s public lands or national monuments,” Brown said, crediting fellow members of the state Land Board Tobias Read and Dennis Richardson, as well as bill sponsor Sen. Arnie Roblan and the state legislature for their work.

SB 847 passed the Senate 21-6 and the House 47-12. It raises $100 million in bonds to partially offset the transfer out of the school fund.

Among those on hand at the Dean Creek Elk Viewing Area was Ken McCall, resource director for the Oregon Hunters Association, and speaking on behalf of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, Trout Unlimited and the Wild Salmon Center.

“Our public lands are highly valued among the groups involved in our coalition,” McCall said. “We see many benefits and opportunities to improve and share the Elliott’s public-land habitats that support our outdoor interests. The Elliott shines as an opportunity to continue a multiple-use forest model in Oregon’s Coast Range … We can envision a strategy that includes research, education, habitat management and recreation among the many benefits of our public lands.”

“Finding creative ways to keep public lands in public hands is paramount in our fight against losing access to the lands and waters that we as sportsmen and women love,” said Backcountry Hunters and Anglers Oregon Chair Ian Isaacson in a press release. “Just as important is engagement by the public. We must be active participants in the entire process, no matter how difficult, tiring and frustrating as it may be.”