Tag Archives: flooding

Flooding Closes WDFW Campgrounds, Roads, River Accesses in Okanogan Co.

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Flooding has forced local officials and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to close several roads and campgrounds at three wildlife areas and numerous water access sites in Okanogan County.

WDFW’S DRISCOLL ISLAND UNIT, WHERE THE SIMILKAMEEN AND OKANOGAN RIVERS CONVERGE, HAS BEEN INUNDATED BY FLOODWATERS CAUSED BY RAPID MELTOFF OF MOUNTAIN SNOWPACK. (JUSTIN HAUG, WDFW)

The closures are intended to protect the public and prevent property damage, said Justin Haug, WDFW Okanogan Lands Operations Manager. Runoff due to snowmelt is causing significant flooding in the area, where water levels are anticipated to remain high for several more weeks. Areas will reopen when conditions improve, he said.

THE SINLAHEKIN ROAD HAS BEEN WASHED OUT NEAR BLUE LAKE. (JUSTIN HAUG, WDFW)

Closures or access restrictions are in effect as of May 17 at the following locations in the Sinlahekin, Methow, and Scotch Creek wildlife areas:

Sinlahekin:

  • Sinlahekin Road from Reflection Pond to Blue Lake.
  • Fish Lake East, West and Southwest Campground.
  • Sinlahekin Creek Campground.
  • Southeast Forde Lake Campground.
  • Reflection Pond Campground.
  • Conners Lake Campground.
  • Driscoll-Eyhott Island Unit (underwater).

FLOODWATERS SURGE AGAINST AN ADA FOOTBRIDGE ON THE DAVE BRITTELL TRAIL, IN THE SINLAHEKIN WILDLIFE AREA. (JUSTIN HAUG, WDFW)

Methow:

  • Bear Creek Campground No. 2 (also known as Lower Bear Creek).
  • Cougar Lake Campground.

Scotch Creek:

  • Hess Lake Road.
  • Similkameen-Chopaka Unit (mostly underwater)

WDFW Water Access Sites along the Okanogan, Methow and Chewuch rivers are also closed.

EYHOTT ISLAND, BELOW DRISCOLL ISLAND, HAS ALSO BEEN FLOODED. (JUSTIN HAUG, WDFW)

NMFS Highlights How White R. Levee Fix Helps Homeowners, Salmon, Habitat

THE FOLLOWING IS A NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE STORY

Puget Sound salmon got a boost this summer from a redesigned levee in Pacific, WA. While local leaders were determined to reduce frequent flooding of neighborhoods and businesses, NOAA and partners provided expertise in habitat restoration, as well as a portion of the funding. The results? King County improved resilience to flooding along the unpredictable river, and restored much-needed salmon habitat in the process.

AN ENGINEERED LOGJAM, PART OF A “BIO-REVETMENT” LEVEE ALONG THE WHITE RIVER IN PACIFIC, IN SOUTHWEST KING COUNTY. (NMFS)

The White River Chinook are among the local fish listed as Threatened. Decades of degraded habitat and overfishing have diminished wild salmon numbers. Since salmon need specific conditions for successful reproduction, habitat restoration is a critical priority. More off-channel habitat means the young fish are bigger and stronger when they head out to sea, thus more likely to make it home to their river for spawning.

The old White River levee, built in 1914, ran along the narrow channel of the river, cutting off the floodplain. With today’s knowledge of nature-based infrastructure, project engineers are able to reduce flooding and benefit salmon. Young fish gained an additional 121 acres off-channel habitat, more than a mile of natural shoreline, and thousands of sheltered places to eat, rest and grow. Eighteen acres replanted with native flora reinforces a protective riparian border.

NOAA Fisheries is committed to conserving and protecting listed species like the Chinook. This is one of multiple projects funded under the Commencement Bay Natural Resources Damage Assessment settlement that resulted from NOAA’s joint effort cleaning up after a nearby hazardous waste release.

“NOAA and partners provided $4.8 million dollars toward protecting the community,” said NOAA technical monitor Jason Lehto. “But salmon and other wildlife get substantial benefit, too.”

THE WHITE RIVER OVERTOPS AN OLD LEVEE FOLLOWING AN OCTOBER 2017 AND SURGING INTO A RESTORED FLOODPLAIN THAT HAD BEEN DRY FOR A CENTURY. (NMFS)

In October, a sudden storm pushed the river up and over the old levee, which breached as planned. The excess water spread over reconnected lowlands without flooding any nearby property. With more unpredictable sea levels and weather ahead, communities are turning to nature -based infrastructure solutions to find solutions like the White River/Countyline levee. The neighborhood is safer, and the White River Chinook have one more edge against extinction.

Some State Lands In Okanogan Closed Due To Flooding

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Several roads and campgrounds on Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) wildlife areas in Okanogan County are closed due to flooding.

Areas closed to motor vehicles to protect public safety and prevent further damage are posted with signs and will remain closed until conditions improve, said Justin Haug, WDFW Sinlahekin Wildlife Area manager. More rain is expected in the area this week, he said, so the closures are in effect indefinitely.

FLOODING ON SINLAHEKIN CREEK. (WDFW)

Closed areas on the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area are:

  • Sinlahekin Road from Reflection Pond to Blue Lake
  • Fish Lake West and Southwest Campground
  • Sinlahekin Creek Campground
  • Southeast Forde Lake Campground
  • Reflection Pond Campground
  • Conners Lake Campground

On the Methow Wildlife Area, access to Beaver Creek Campground and Campbell Lake is limited to the route via Lester Road. Brandon Troyer, WDFW Methow Wildlife Area manager, said recreationists should watch for posted signs about motor vehicle closures at:

  • Bear Creek #2 (also known as Lower Bear Creek) Campground
  • Cougar Lake Campground

ACCORDING TO WDFW, THIS AMOUNT OF WATERS HASN’T BEEN SEEN ON THIS PART OF THE SCOTCH CREEK WILDLIFE AREA SINCE THE 1990S. (WDFW)

Closed areas on the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area are:

  • Hess Lake Road
  • Parking lot for the Coulee Creek Trailhead