Tag Archives: fall chinook

Plan To Boost Duwamish Fall Chinook Production By 2 Million Going Out For Comment

Federal fishery overseers are laying out how much orcas and fishermen would benefit under a proposal to boost hatchery Chinook production in the Green-Duwamish River by 2 million smolts.

FEDERAL OVERSEERS WILL CONSIDER A PLAN TO BOOST PRODUCTION OF DUWAMISH-GREEN FALL CHINOOK BY 2 MILLION. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

According to a NOAA draft supplemental environmental statement that will soon go out for public comment, the increase would provide an additional 8,750 adult salmon for the starving Washington whales to snack on, recreational and tribal fishermen to catch, and for broodstock purposes.

That and other hatchery salmon and steelhead programs already approved for the King County river system “would have a moderate positive effect on the diet, survival, distribution, and listing status of Southern Resident killer whales,” the DEIS states.

It’s the second time this particular set of Chinook, coho, chum and winter- and summer-run steelhead programs is being scrutinized in recent years.

Earlier, four alternatives proposed by WDFW and two local tribes were analyzed, but with this year’s major focus on ailing orcas, it was resubmitted with an “Alternative 5.”

Green-Duwamish Chinook were identified as among the most important current feedstocks for orcas.

NOAA’s new DEIS says the additional smolts would yield nearly 3,300 more sport fishing trips and around $580,000 in expenditures, mostly in the region the agency is calling the South Puget Sound subregion, but also in the North Sound and Straits.

And it would yield around 2,300 more Chinook for mostly local tribal fishermen.

The extra salmon would be reared at WDFW’s Soos Creek Hatchery and released upstream at Palmer Ponds.

“Alternative 5 would not affect the overall trend in cumulative effects on salmon and steelhead, although it may increase the adverse cumulative effect on the genetics of natural-origin fall-run Chinook salmon. However, this cumulative impact would not substantially add to the cumulative impacts compared to the other alternatives because the increase in production would represent a small component of the total abundance of fall-run Chinook salmon in the cumulative effects analysis area,” the DEIS states.

Overall hatchery Chinook production  in the watershed would be 6.2 million smolts.

The comment period begins Dec. 7 and runs for 45 days through Jan. 22. You can send your thoughts three ways:

Email:
GreenHatcheriesEIS.wcr@noaa.gov

Mail:
Allyson Purcell, Comment Coordinator
NMFS, West Coast Region
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
1201 Northeast Lloyd Boulevard, Suite 1100
Portland, OR 97232

Fax:
(503) 231-6893

As South Coast Rivers Rise, ODFW Lifts Chinook Gear Restrictions On Chetco, Winchuck

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Angling gear restrictions are now lifted for the Chetco and Winchuck rivers due to significant rainfall eliminating snagging risk to fall chinook. ODFW had extended the restrictions to December 31 or until rainfall raised water levels.

A U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GAUGE SHOWS RISING LEVELS ON THE CHETCO RIVER, WHICH THIS MORNING WAS FLOWING AT 2,580 CUBIC FEET PER SECOND, THE MEDIAN FLOW FOR THIS TIME OF YEAR. (USGS)

“We are back on track with water flows in the Chetco and Winchuck and fall chinook are now moving upriver,” said Steve Mazur, district fish biologist.

Effective immediately, the restriction to fly fishing or bobber fishing in both rivers is lifted. The rivers are open for winter steelhead and fall chinook for the remainder of the year according to general, statewide and southwest zone regulations. Bag limit is one per day, five per year as part of the daily or annual salmon/steelhead bag limit.

Elk R. Anglers Reminded To Release Chinook That Have Antennas Sticking Out Mouth

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

Elk River anglers are reminded to release unharmed any radio-tagged fall chinook salmon caught. ODFW is conducting a research project tagging up to 100 hatchery and wild fall chinook below Elk River Hatchery.

THE RADIO-TAGGED CHINOOK IN THE ELK RIVER STUDY WILL HAVE ANTENNAS STICKING OUT OF THEIR MOUTH LIKE THIS ONE. (AUSTIN HUFF VIA ODFW)

Radio tags can often be mistaken for leaders as only the antenna is visible protruding from the fish’s mouth. ODFW encourages anglers to check carefully as it is illegal to harvest these fish.

This telemetry study will help determine the spawning migration pattern of returning Elk River fall chinook. Researchers want to establish whether hatchery origin fish return to the hatchery and fall back before spawning or spawn selectively below the hatchery.

Research leader Shannon Richardson says this is important to better understand potential interactions on spawning grounds between hatchery origin and wild fish.

“The wild Elk River fall chinook were identified in our Coastal Multispecies Management Plan as a population of concern,” Richardson said. “We need to attract hatchery fish that escape the fishery back to the hatchery to reduce the amount of interaction they may have with wild chinook.

Anglers may encounter radio-tagged fall chinook into February. Staff installed fixed-station receivers to track the fish weekly and will conduct spawning ground surveys to recover tags.

This study is part of a larger effort ODFW is engaged in with partners including the Oregon Hatchery Research Center, Oregon State University, University of Washington, and the U.S. Geological Survey.

Study Finds Side Channel Restoration One Key For Puget Sound Chinook Recovery

THE FOLLOWING IS A NEWS STORY FROM THE NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

Teasing apart the elements of Puget Sound rivers that matter most to fish, researchers have found that one of the best ways to recover threatened Chinook salmon may be to restore the winding side channels that once gave young fish essential rearing habitat and refuge from high winter flows.

Models were based on fine-scale river mapping and tracking salmon populations across Puget Sound. They showed that habitat restoration projects in the Cedar River southeast of Seattle could boost the number of young Chinook salmon produced by each spawning adult by adding side channel habitat.

BRAIDS OF THE SAUK RIVER BETWEEN DARRINGTON AND ROCKPORT. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Additional side channels and other habitat improvements also appear to help stabilize salmon numbers, making them less vulnerable to flooding or other extreme conditions that may come more often with climate change.

“The risk of those extreme catastrophes is lessened because the water can spread out and slow down, with less impact to the fish,” said Correigh Greene, a research biologist at NOAA Fisheries’ Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle and coauthor of the The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site new research published last week in PLOS ONE. The team of scientists from NOAA Fisheries, Cramer Fish Sciences, and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife used aerial photographs to chart and measure each twist and turn of 10 of Puget Sound’s largest rivers, from the Skagit to the Dungeness, and relate them to Chinook salmon populations.

Restoring Habitat Key To Salmon Recovery

The findings also provide important confirmation that restoring Chinook salmon habitat, a key recovery strategy for Puget Sound populations, can deliver real improvements in their survival and productivity.

“We now know that there is a detectable response to habitat restoration that can inform our decisions about how to pursue recovery and dedicate funding where it will do the most good for fish,” said Elizabeth Babcock, Northern Puget Sound Branch Chief in NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region, who helps carry out recovery plans for threatened Puget Sound Chinook salmon.

River Complexity Leads to Better Salmon Habitat

Biologists view the braided networks of side channels that are common in natural rivers in the Northwest as evidence of a river’s “complexity,” which also includes deep pools, outcrops, and log jams, all of which provide important habitat for juvenile and adult fish. Generally, the more complexity a river displays, the better habitat it will provide for fish, because they can more easily find refuge and rearing habitat when they need it.

Many Puget Sound rivers have suffered reduced complexity through years of development as dikes, roads, and riprap have hemmed them into straight, narrow channels with far less room. That leaves less refuge for juvenile fish to grow before migrating into the Salish Sea.

A SCREENGRAB FROM GOOGLE MAPS SHOWS A STRAIGHT, DREDGED STRETCH OF THE SAMMAMISH RIVER BETWEEN WOODINVILLE AND REDMOND. (GOOGLE MAPS)

Of all the factors that contribute to a river’s complexity, the researchers found that side channels and the number of junctions among them, and to a lesser extent woody material such as log jams, are most important to Chinook salmon. More complex rivers are generally slower than narrow rivers with impervious banks, so the juvenile salmon aren’t swept downstream faster than they’re ready to go. The more habitat complexity, the researchers found, the higher the productivity of Chinook salmon populations.

Models Can Help Plan and Track Habitat Restoration

“Once we link habitat metrics to meaningful productivity metrics, we can start to answer some of the big questions, such as, “How much restoration achieves recovery, and what qualities do you most want to focus on,” said Jason Hall, a senior scientist at Cramer Fish Sciences and lead author of the new study. He noted that the answers may differ from species to species and river to river. Habitat complexity also appeared to reduce fluctuations in salmon numbers from year to year, “supporting the idea that habitat complexity buffers populations from annual variation in environmental conditions,” the scientists wrote.

Habitat protection and restoration along the Cedar River, which provides much of Seattle’s municipal water, is an example of the kind of restoration that can help recover Puget Sound Chinook salmon in the long run, Greene said. Understanding the habitat qualities most important to fish helps estimate “how much we have to do to move the needle over the whole life cycle.” The same mapping and modeling approach that was demonstrated by the research can help plan and track the benefits of other restoration occurring in estuaries and along Puget Sound’s shorelines, the authors said.

IN A RELATED STORY OUT TODAY, SEATTLE PUBLIC UTILITIES SAYS THAT A  PAIR OF CHINOOK WERE SPOTTED IN A SECTION OF THORNTON CREEK THAT WAS RESTORED IN 2014 TO BE BETTER SPAWNING HABITAT AND THAT THE TWO WERE THE FIRST OF THEIR SPECIES SEEN IN THE URBAN STREAM IN EIGHT YEARS. (SPU)

“If you have funding for restoration, where can you spend it to deliver the best benefit for fish?” Babcock asked. “We’re finally starting to have better answers to that question.”

SW Washington Fishing Report (11-13-18)

THE FOLLOWING WDFW FISHING REPORT WAS TRANSMITTED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Grays River – 6 bank anglers had no catch.

Skamokawa Creek – No anglers sampled.

Elochoman River – 7 bank anglers kept 1 steelhead and released 15 coho.

JASON RESSER HOLDS A HATCHERY COHO CAUGHT ON THE KALAMA SEVERAL SEASONS BACK. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Abernathy Creek – No anglers sampled.

Mill Creek – No anglers sampled.

Germany Creek – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 12 bank rods had no catch.  1 boat/1 rod released 2 coho jacks.

Above the I-5 Br:  87 bank rods kept 2 coho jacks, 1 steelhead, 5 cutthroat and released 28 chinook, 2 coho, 1 coho jack and  1 steelhead. 11 boats/24 rods kept 4 coho, 11 coho jacks, 2 steelhead and released 5 chinook jacks, 1 coho jack and 3 cutthroat.

Kalama River – 31 bank anglers kept 4 coho, 2 steelhead and released 2 coho.  3 boats/6 rods released 1 chinook.

Lewis River – 12 bank rods kept 2 chinook and released 1 coho.  17 boats/33 rods kept 1 chinook, 3 coho and 1 coho jack.

East Fork Lewis River – 4 bank anglers released 1 coho and 2 steelhead.

Salmon Creek – No anglers sampled.

Wind River – No anglers sampled.

Klickitat River – 73 bank anglers kept 8 chinook, 1 chinook jack, 10 coho , 3 coho jacks and released 1 chinook and 1 coho jack.

Lower Siletz To Reopen For Chinook Retention

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Emergency regulations restricting Chinook fishing have helped put Siletz River fall Chinook on a path toward achieving spawning escapement objectives for the basin.

THE SILETZ RIVER TO JUST ABOVE THE OJALLA BRIDGE BELOW THE TOWN OF SILETZ WILL REOPEN FOR FALL CHINOOK STARTING THIS SATURDAY, NOV. 10, GIVING ANGLERS LIKE MATT LITTLE SOMETHING TO SMILE ABOUT IN AN OTHERWISE DOWN YEAR FOR NORTH COAST KINGS. HE CAUGHT THIS PAIR OUT OF ONE HOLE A COUPLE SEASONS BACK. NOTE THAT THE DAILY LIMIT IS JUST ONE KING BETWEEN NOV. 1 AND DEC. 31. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Effective Saturday, Nov. 10, the section of the Siletz River from the mouth upstream to the ODFW marker located 1,200 feet above the Ojalla Bridge is open to Chinook angling through Dec. 31. The river upstream of the ODFW marker will remain closed to Chinook angling per emergency regulations.

The Chinook bag limit for all waterbodies in the NW Zone, including the Siletz River,  remains 1 chinook per day and 3 for the season between Nov. 1 and Dec. 31.

“Numbers of spawning fall Chinook have increased over the last week in the Siletz Basin to a point where we are comfortable with reducing the Chinook salmon closure area to provide additional fishing opportunity,” said John Spangler, ODFW Fish Biologist in Newport. “The remaining closure area will continue to provide protection for fish in key spawning areas.”

Counts of adult Chinook in spawning areas continue to lag behind in other coastal basins, so the emergency regulations remain in effect for other NW Zone basins.

“ODFW will continue to monitor fish numbers and look for opportunities to ease restrictions in other basins if sufficient numbers of Chinook enter key spawning areas,” said Spangler.

See the Northwest Zone Fishing Report in the Recreation Report for the latest information on regulations and opportunities https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/northwest-zone

Big Catch, Turnout At 6th King Of The Reach Derby

It took five years for King of the Reach live-capture derby anglers to tally 10 million fertilized salmon eggs collected for a fall Chinook broodstock hatchery program on the mid-Columbia.

A HELPER AT KING OF THE REACH HOLDS A NICE WILD FALL CHINOOK BUCK BROUGHT IN BY ANGLERS DURING THE LIVE-CAPTURE DERBY. (VIA PAUL HOFFARTH, WDFW)

The sixth edition could yield that many and change alone, thanks to the “biggest turnout ever for volunteers and fish.”

WDFW fisheries biologist Paul Hoffarth says the 648 bucks and 562 hens caught on the Hanford Reach by 277 fishermen in 77 boats and delivered to Grant County’s Priest Rapids Hatchery have the potential to produce 12,616,000 fertilized eggs, if all the male and female fish mixing is done just right.

AN ANGLER HANDS OFF A CHINOOK TO A SHORE ATTENDANT. MORE THAN 1,200 FALL SALMON WERE COLLECTED THIS YEAR, THE MOST EVER. (VIA PAUL HOFFARTH, WDFW)

“Basically 100 percent of the Priest Rapids and Ringold Springs Hatchery production for next year’s release would have a wild parent,” Hoffarth says. “Real life, with holding mortality and other factors WDFW might be able to reach 70 percent of production, which is huge.”

He says that not too long ago, just 10 percent of the hatchery kings had at least one wild parent.

THE DERBY SAW GREAT FISHING THE FIRST DAY, WITH SLOWER ACTION THE FOLLOWING TWO DAYS. (VIA PAUL HOFFARTH, WDFW)

The derby is a joint state-utility-Coastal Conservation Association of Washington project that uses anglers and guides to collect wild upriver brights in the Reach to improve the stock’s fitness and ensure that hatchery fish remain genetically similar to the natives in the free-flowing stretch of the Columbia.

It occurs after the fall fishing season is closed. Participants are required to register as volunteers, and boat captains need fish transporting permits and a way to haul the salmon to collection points, either in a livewell or a big cooler with a pump.

The previous five derbies saw a total of 2,111 fall kings brought in. Before this year, the most brought in was in 2015 when 510 were taken to the hatchery, according to Hoffarth.

As for the King of the Reach, that’s guide Tyler Stahl who brought in 76 kings.

Fellow guides TJ Hester and John Plugoff turned over 66 and 59, respectively.

On Facebook, CCA-Washington called the derby “nothing short of extraordinary. Loads of fish, tons of people, and fun all around.”

Rob Phillips, a columnist for the Yakima Herald, participated and shared his thoughts.

Southwest Washington Fishing Report (10-30-18)

THE FOLLOWING WDFW FISHING REPORT WAS TRANSMITTED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Mainstem from the mouth upstream to McNary Dam

  • From the Buoy 10 line upstream to the Highway 395 Bridge at Pasco:
    • Closed to angling for and retention of salmon and steelhead.

WHILE STEELHEAD REMAIN CLOSED IN THE COLUMBIA, FISHING IS GOOD FOR THE SPECIES IN THE SNAKE, REPORTS TRI-CITIES ANGLER TROY BRODERS, WHO SHARED THIS IMAGE OF A RECENT CATCH. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 51 bank rods kept 15 coho jacks and released 1 chinook jack.  11 boats/23 rods kept 4 coho, 3 coho jacks and released 1 chinook, 1 coho and 1 coho jack.

Above the I-5 Br:  82 bank rods kept 1 coho jack, 3 steelhead and released 40 chinook, 1 chinook jack, 1 coho and 2 coho jacks.  9 boats/22 rods kept 1 coho, 9 coho jacks, 1 steelhead and released 1 chinook and 10 coho jacks.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 935 coho adults, 2,717 coho jacks, 110 fall Chinook adults, 32 fall Chinook jacks, 73 cutthroat trout and 11 summer-run steelhead adults during seven days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power released 181 coho adults and 428 coho jacks into the Cispus River near Randle and they released 77 coho adults and 214 coho jacks at the Franklin Bridge release site in Packwood.

Tacoma Power released 242 coho adults, 1,212 coho jacks, 33 fall Chinook adults, 22 fall Chinook jacks and six cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton, and they released 227 coho adults and 879 coho jacks into Lake Scanewa in Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,540 cubic feet per second on Monday, Oct. 29. Water visibility is 11 feet and the water temperature is 54.14 degrees F. River flows could change at any time so boaters and anglers should remain alert for this possibility

Kalama River – 9 bank anglers kept 1 coho, 1 steelhead and released 1 chinook and 8 coho.

Lewis River – 109 bank anglers kept 1 chinook, 2 coho, 2 coho jacks and released 2 chinook, 1 chinook jack, 2 coho and 2 coho jacks.  10 boats/24 rods kept 3 chinook jacks, 3 coho, 3 coho jacks and released 3 chinook.

Klickitat River – 38 bank anglers kept 1 chinook, 1 chinook jack, 1 coho jack and released 2 chinook and 1 chinook jack.

Fishing Rule Changes:

  • Grays River:  effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream to the mouth of the South Fork:  release all Coho
  • West Fork Grays River:  effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream:  release all Coho.
  • Cowlitz River:  Until further notice closed for Chinook retention from the mouth to the Barrier Dam including all lower Cowlitz tributaries, except the Toutle River.  Until further notice, the closed waters section below the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery Barrier Dam is 400’, at the posted markers.
  • Washougal River, including Camas Slough:  Until further notice closed for Chinook retention from the mouth to the bridge at Salmon Falls.
  • Toutle River:  effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream to the forks:  release all Chinook.
  • North Fork Toutle River:  effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream to the posted markers below the fish collection facility:  release all Chinook.
  • Wind River:  from the mouth to 400’ below Shepherd Falls, closed for steelhead retention and closed to night fishing for salmon and steelhead.
  • Drano Lake: Effective Oct. 17, 2018 until further notice. Closed to all fishing in the waters downstream of markers on a point of land downstream and across from Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery and upstream of the Highway 14 Bridge.
  • White Salmon River:  from the mouth to the county road bridge below the former location of the powerhouse, closed for steelhead retention and closed to night fishing for salmon and steelhead

STURGEON

From the mouth of the Columbia River upstream to McNary Dam including adjacent tributaries – Until further notice, white sturgeon open for catch and release fishing only. Fishing for sturgeon at night is closed.

Fall King Production In Green-Duwamish Could Be Increased By 2 Million

With the plight of starving orcas front and center in the region, federal fishery overseers will consider a proposal to raise an additional 2 million fall Chinook smolts in the Green-Duwamish.

FEDERAL OVERSEERS WILL CONSIDER A PLAN TO BOOST PRODUCTION OF DUWAMISH-GREEN FALL CHINOOK BY 2 MILLION. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The National Marine Fisheries Service put out a notice late last week that it will prepare a supplemental environmental impact statement for whether to boost releases in the King County river system above the level originally proposed by state and tribal managers.

“The alternative to be analyzed in the DSEIS is informed by the applicant’s interest in increasing hatchery production of juvenile Chinook salmon, and NMFS’ analysis of the status of endangered Southern Resident Killer Whales and the importance of Chinook salmon prey to their food base,” a notice published in the Federal Register reads.

Green-Duwamish Chinook were identified as among the most important current feedstocks for orcas, and they also provide sport and tribal fisheries.

The original EIS for the system called for release of as many as 5.1 million fall kings, mostly by WDFW and with 600,000 of those part of a new Muckleshoot “Fish Restoration Facility ” to be built below Howard Hansen Dam on the upper Green.

The supplementary Chinook would be reared at WDFW’s Soos Creek Hatchery for release at Palmer Ponds.

SW WA Fishing Report (10-24-18)

THE FOLLOWING WDFW FISHING REPORT WAS TRANSMITTED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Mainstem from the mouth upstream to McNary Dam

  • From the Buoy 10 line upstream to the Highway 395 Bridge at Pasco:
    • Closed to angling for and retention of salmon and steelhead.

WELL UPSTREAM OF THE COLUMBIA, BILL STANLEY AND FRIENDS HAVE BEEN FINDING A FEW NICE-SIZED HATCHERY B-RUN STEELHEAD WHILE FISHING ALONG THE SNAKE RIVER. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Elochoman River – No anglers sampled.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 62 bank rods kept 15 coho jacks and released 1 chinook jack and 4 coho jacks.  9 boats/46 rods kept 6 coho, 27 coho jacks and released 1 chinook, 6 chinook jacks, and 2 coho jacks.

Above the I-5 Br:  60 bank rods released 27 chinook and 1 coho jack. 21 boats/30 rods kept 7 coho jacks, 2 steelhead and released 21 chinook, 1 chinook jack and 2 coho.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 1,093 coho adults, 2,210 coho jacks, 162 fall Chinook adults, 34 fall Chinook jacks, 107 cutthroat trout and 19 summer-run steelhead adults during seven days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power released 141 coho adults and 165 coho jacks into the Cispus River near Randle, and they released 191 coho adults and 425 coho jacks at the Franklin Bridge release site in Packwood.

Tacoma Power released 353 coho adults, 1026 coho jacks, 28 fall Chinook adults, 13 fall Chinook jacks and four cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton, and they released 283 coho adults, 597 coho jacks and one cutthroat trout into Lake Scanewa in Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,540 cubic feet per second on Monday, Oct. 22. Water visibility is 14 feet and the water temperature is 53.6 degrees F. River flows could change at any time so boaters and anglers should remain alert for this possibility.

Kalama River – 16 bank anglers kept 1 coho.  1 boat/2 rods had no catch.

Lewis River – 106 bank anglers kept 5 chinook, 9 coho jacks and released 5 chinook, 1 chinook jack and 1 coho jack.  19 boats/37 rods kept 1 chinook, 3 chinook jacks, 3 coho, 9 coho jacks, 1 steelhead and released 3 chinook and 5 coho jacks.

Wind River – No anglers sampled.

Drano Lake – 2 bank anglers had no catch. 3 boats/7 rods kept 1 coho.

Klickitat River – 80 bank anglers kept 24 chinook, 7 chinook jacks, 2 coho, 1 steelhead and released 2 chinook and 1 steelhead.  2 boats/3 rods kept 2 coho.

Fishing Rule Changes:

  • Grays River:  effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream to the mouth of the South Fork:  release all Coho.
  • West Fork Grays River:  effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream:  release all Coho.
  • Cowlitz River:  Until further notice closed for Chinook retention from the mouth to the Barrier Dam including all lower Cowlitz tributaries, except the Toutle River.  Until further notice, the closed waters section below the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery Barrier Dam is 400’, at the posted markers.
  • Washougal River, including Camas Slough:  Until further notice closed for Chinook retention from the mouth to the bridge at Salmon Falls.
  • Toutle River:  effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream to the forks:  release all Chinook.
  • North Fork Toutle River:  effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream to the posted markers below the fish collection facility:  release all Chinook.
  • Wind River:  from the mouth to 400’ below Shepherd Falls, closed for steelhead retention and closed to night fishing for salmon and steelhead.
  • Drano Lake: Effective Oct. 17, 2018 until further notice. Closed to all fishing in the waters downstream of markers on a point of land downstream and across from Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery and upstream of the Highway 14 Bridge.
  • White Salmon River:  from the mouth to the county road bridge below the former location of the powerhouse, closed for steelhead retention and closed to night fishing for salmon and steelhead

STURGEON

From the mouth of the Columbia River upstream to McNary Dam including adjacent tributaries – Until further notice, white sturgeon open for catch and release fishing only. Fishing for sturgeon at night is closed.