Tag Archives: deschutes river

Columbia At Deschutes Mouth, Lower Half Mile Of Trib Closing To All Fishing

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Columbia River around the mouth of the Deschutes River will close to all fishing, including catch-and-release, beginning at 12:01 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 9 in order to protect summer steelhead that may be utilizing the cooler water provided by this tributary.

THE COOL PLUME OF THE DESCHUTES RIVER WHERE IT ENTERS THE COLUMBIA IS A PRODUCTIVE PLACE TO FISH FOR FALL CHINOOK AS WELL AS STEELHEAD. GENARO RAMOS HOOKED THIS UPRIVER BRIGHT THERE IN 2016’S FISHERY. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

At their Aug. 3 meeting, the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission directed ODFW staff to amend fishing regulations for the Columbia River near the Deschutes and in the lower Deschutes from the mouth upstream to Moody Rapids. The direction included closing this area to all fishing until river temperatures have stabilized below 68 F. ODFW staff will continue to monitor river temperatures and run sizes throughout the fall to determine when the area can be reopened. This is unlikely to occur prior to late-September.

The closed areas will be:

  1. All waters south of a straight line projecting from the flashing red USCG light #2 upstream to the lower South Channel Range B marker located approximately 3/4-mile upstream of the mouth of the Deschutes;
  2. The lower Deschutes River from the mouth upstream to markers placed on the downstream end of Moody Rapids.

ODFW MARKINGS ON A NOAA CHART SHOW THE CLOSURE AREA. (ODFW/NOAA)

Concerns about the vulnerability of fish to fishing pressure in the mouths of some tributaries of the Columbia River were sparked by the historically low returns of Snake River-bound summer steelhead in 2017. At that time the states of Oregon and Washington adopted unprecedented restrictions to several fisheries to reduce mortality on these fish.

In June 2018, ODFW staff outlined for the Commission a plan to take a comprehensive look at potential thermal sanctuaries throughout the Columbia River. That review process will include a series of public meetings in the fall of 2018 followed by rulemaking in early 2019.

Spring Chinook Seasons Set On Deschutes, Hood Rivers; 7,600, 1,500 Clipped Kings Expected

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW has set regulations for the popular spring Chinook fisheries on the Deschutes and Hood rivers, with both fisheries set to open on April 15.

MILES (LAST NAME UNKNOWN) HOLDS A SPRING CHINOOK HE CAUGHT ON THE HOOD RIVER. (RON REAGAN VIA ODFW)

Deschutes River:

·       Open for adipose fin-clipped Chinook from April 15 through June 30 from the mouth of the I-84 bridge upstream to Sherars Falls.
·        The catch limit is one adult adipose fin-clipped salmon per day, and five adipose fin-clipped jack salmon per day.
·        All non-adipose fin-clipped Chinook salmon must be released unharmed.
·        It is unlawful to continue to fish from Sherars Falls downstream to the upper railroad trestle after taking a daily bag limit of one adult Chinook salmon.

 Hood River:

·        Open for adipose fin-clipped Chinook from April 15 through June 30 from the mouth to mainstem confluence with the East Fork, and the West Fork from the confluence with the mainstem upstream to the angling deadline 200 feet downstream of Punchbowl Falls.
·        The catch limit is two adult adipose fin-clipped salmon per day, and five adipose fin-clipped jack salmon per day.
·        All non-adipose fin-clipped Chinook salmon must be released unharmed.

Last year, there was no season on the Deschutes due to poor returns of both hatchery and wild fish. This year, fish managers are predicting as many as 7,600 hatchery fish will return to the Deschutes, which is substantially larger than last year. But with numbers of wild fish returning predicted to remain extremely low, a reduced bag limit and conservative regulations will be in place to protect their numbers.   

“If the run comes back as predicted, hatchery Chinook salmon fishing on the Deschutes should be good,” said Rod French, ODFW district fish biologist in The Dalles. “The Deschutes River fishery below Sherars Falls is extremely popular because it offers a great chance to catch a Columbia River spring Chinook from the bank.” In recent years, as many as 10,000 anglers a year have participated in the fishery. 

On the Hood River, managers are also predicting a fairly strong return of spring Chinook. A return of over 1,500 hatchery fish is predicted for the Hood River, which is slightly better than last year’s predicted return.

According to French, the Hood River offers another good opportunity to catch a spring Chinook from the bank but in conditions that are much less crowded than on the Deschutes. 

For the latest regulations and recreation report for the Central Fishing Zone visit https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/central-zone