Tag Archives: depredation

Enviros Lose Washington Bear Battle

A highly litigious out-of-state environmental group lost another court bid to insert itself into Washington predator management issues today.

A PEELED TREE IN THE TIGER MOUNTAIN STATE FOREST LAST SPRING. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The Center for Biological Diversity had sued WDFW over its black bear timber depredation program in spring 2018, but a Thurston County Superior Court judge this afternoon ruled against the Arizona-based organization.

The case stemmed from 1996’s voter-passed I-655 and to a lesser degree 2000’s I-713, which while banning hunting bears with bait or dogs and body-gripping traps, provided exemptions for problem wildlife.

In initial court filings CBD said WDFW’s program that was subsequently created to address bears that in spring gnaw on the bark of young Douglas firs, hemlocks and other species to get at a sugary sap underneath, often killing the commercially valuable trees, “does not fall within these narrow exceptions.”

It claimed the state agency was running “a program that illegally issues permits for the hunting of black bears using bait, dogs, and traps, in violation of both the spirit and the letter of initiatives passed by Washington voters banning such cruel and inhumane hunting practices.”

But Judge Carol Murphy did not see it that way and ruled that the program, which has been on pause since June 2018, can now continue.

“After reviewing the entire record, there may be additional input that would have been helpful, including data and opinions, but that is not the test in this court,” the judge said, according to a Courthouse News Service article tonight. “The court does not determine the best policy or reweigh the interests. The court considered whether the rules complied with and did not go beyond the agency’s statutory authority. They did not.”

Murphy’s decision followed a CBD attempt to introduce more than 130 documents in court this morning.

“The judge found that there was statutory authority for the rules, and denied the Center for Biological Diversity’s claim otherwise. The judge found that the rules were not arbitrary or capricious and met the legal standard,” WDFW said in a statement this evening.

“The judge determined that the guidance documents used by the WDFW to process the permits did not meet the definition of rules, and therefore the department did not need to go through the rule making notice and comment procedures,” the statement continued.

CBD has also attempted to insert itself into wolf management issues, challenging WDFW’s hard-won lethal removal protocols last summer.

After a short court stay last August, Murphy allowed the state to move forward and take out a wolf from a pack that continues to depredate on livestock, though an eight-hour court-challenge window now occurs before any removals began.

As for black bear damage issues, they probably wouldn’t be so bad if tree farmers didn’t establish monocultures of Doug firs while wiping out most competing native as well as invasive nonnative plants.

Meanwhile, CBD and others are sure to continue pressure campaigns against WDFW.

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OPT Pack Continues To Attack Cattle; WDFW Decision Likely Weds.

With still more Old Profanity Territory Pack depredations reported, a decision is likely tomorrow from WDFW on what’s next for the northern Ferry County wolves now blamed for 27 dead and injured cattle in less than 11 months.

ATTACKS ON CALVES GRAZING FEDERAL LANDS IN NORTHEAST WASHINGTON CONTINUE. THIS ANIMAL WAS WOUNDED SEVERAL YEARS AGO. (WDFW)

Following this afternoon’s news that three wounded calves were found Friday, July 26 by a rancher gathering and moving cattle, an announcement could come as early as 8 a.m. Wednesday to work through the required eight-hour court challenge window before operations commence if the state chooses to lethally remove more members, which it can under the wolf-livestock protocol.

WDFW Spokeswoman Staci Lehman said that regional managers forwarded Director Kelly Susewind, who was out sick on Monday, their recommendation today for review with the state Attorney General’s office.

“We’re waiting for the director to make his decision,” she said. “He’s very, very thorough.”

After six months without a confirmed depredation, the OPT wolves struck in early July, killing a cow on a federal grazing allotment.

That led Susewind to authorize incremental removals to try and head off more attacks and change the pack’s behavior, an OK that wasn’t challenged in court.

The pack’s breeding male was killed July 13 and WDFW began evaluating the remaining four adults’ and four juveniles’ response.

They struck again injuring and killing three more calves, likely killing a fourth, all of which were investigated around July 18-20.

At that point last Tuesday, Susewind was “assessing this situation and considering next steps.”

The latest three injured calves were investigated by WDFW, which confirmed a wolf attack based on bite marks, hemorrhaging, and GPS data of a young male pack member.

The calves were able to be treated and released.

“The producer is continuing to remove or secure livestock carcasses (when discovered) to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd, and remove sick and injured livestock (when discovered) from the grazing area until they are healed,” the agency reported. “WDFW and county staff are continuing to coordinate patrols of the grazing area to increase human presence and use Fox lights at salting and watering locations to deter wolves. Other livestock producers with cattle on federal grazing allotments in the OPT pack territory have deployed range riders.”

WDFW also reports that the rancher, Len McIrvin and the Diamond M per previous stories, has declined to use WDFW-contracted range riders to “work with their cattle at this time.”

This part of Northeast Washington has seen wolf-livestock conflicts since at least 2016 and the original Profanity Peak Pack, which WDFW took out.

The OPT wolves began depredating last September and two members were lethally removed by WDFW. Unless I’m mistaken, the pack is responsible for the most cattle attacks on record in Washington.

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Wolf Depredation Reported On Asotin Co. Wildlife Area

Washington wildlife managers are confirming another wolf depredation this week, this one in the southeastern Blue Mountains.

They say the Grouse Flats Pack of southern Asotin County killed a 400-plus-pound calf in a fenced 160-acre pasture of the 4-O Ranch Unit of the Chief Joseph Wildlife Area.

THE DEPREDATION OCCURRED ON THE 10,000-PLUS-ACRE 4-0 UNIT OF THE CHIEF JOSEPH WILDLIFE AREA ALONG AND ABOVE THE GRANDE RONDE.  (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Its carcass was found Monday by state staffers working on the site. An investigation found classic hallmarks of a wolf kill, and telemetry from a radio-collared member of the pack put it in the area when it’s believed the calf was taken down.

“The livestock producer who owns the affected livestock monitors the herd by range riding at least every other day, maintains regular human presence in the area, removes or secures livestock carcasses to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd, and avoids known wolf high activity areas,” WDFW reported. “Since the depredation occurred, the producer deployed Fox lights in the grazing area and will increase the frequency of range riding until cattle can be moved to a different pasture.”

The Grouse Flats Pack struck three times in 2018, injuring one calf in August, killing another in early September and injuring a cow in late October.

The three head all belonged to different ranchers grazing cattle on private lands and federal grazing allotments.

Meanwhile, far to the north in Ferry County, WDFW had no update to its announced incremental removal of wolves from the Old Profanity Territory Pack, according to spokeswoman Sam Mongomery.

Director Kelly Susewind greenlighted that operation on July 10.

Outside environmental groups reportedly did not want to challenge it in court during an eight-hour window.

The OPT Pack is blamed for 20 depredations, including 15 in a rolling 10-month window. Under WDFW’s protocols, lethal removals are considered for three depredations in a 30-day window or four in 10 months.

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OPT Wolves Involved In 20th Livestock Depredation, WDFW Says

Washington wolf managers are reporting a fresh cattle depredation in a troublesome part of the state.

A TRAIL CAM SHOT CAPTURED A MEMBER OF A NORTHERN FERRY COUNTY WOLF PACK SEVERAL YEARS AGO. (WDFW)

WDFW says that the OPT wolves are responsible for the death of a cow discovered this past Saturday in northern Ferry County, bringing the number of livestock killed or injured by the pack since early September 2018 to 20.

“Director (Kelly) Susewind is now assessing this situation and considering next steps,” the agency stated in an update to its wolf pages.

The livestock producer wasn’t identified, but WDFW said it is the same one who was hit by a string of depredations last summer and fall, meaning the Diamond M Ranch.

They turned out cattle onto Forest Service allotments two weeks later than allowed under their permit, according to the agency, which added that for the past three weeks, there have been “near-daily patrols” of the herds by its staffers, ranchhands, and Jeff Flood, the Ferry-Stevens County wildlife specialist.

WDFW’s report includes more details about proactive, nonlethal measures being taken, along with details on how the cattle have been using the area.

On June 23, fox lights were also deployed to try and keep wolves away from the livestock.

Following last September’s attacks by the OPTs, which occupy the old territory of the Profanity Pack, Susewind authorized  incrementally removing members, taking out two of the four known wolves, paused the operation, restarted it again after late October depredations, then it paused again in November.

In January three more depredations occurred, though those don’t count towards considering lethal removal.

A monthly wolf report WDFW sent out yesterday shows that 13 and now 14 depredations with this latest have occurred within the 10-month rolling window for consideration through Saturday, July 6.

Thirteen of the 20 attacks resulted in injured calves or cows, the other seven deaths.

Diamond M operators suffered depredations from the Profanity Peak Pack in 2016 and Wedge Pack in 2012.

There are at least four and possibly five adults in the OPT Pack, along with four juveniles, the agency reports.

Things are otherwise generally quiet with Washington’s wolves, at least according to WDFW’s June report.

It states that six wolves, including two females in the Beaver Creek Pack, an adult female in the Dirty Shirt Pack, a yearling female in the Huckleberry Pack, an adult male in the Lookout Pack, and an adult male in the OPT Pack were all captured and collared last month.

The agency also stated that a collared Teanaway female that dispersed out of Central Washington was legally killed near Douglas Lake in British Columbia, and that members of its pack were also involved in “an interaction” with cattle.

Away from the woods, get ready for more wolf talk later this summer and fall.

“WDFW will begin a public engagement process in August that will propose the development of a post-recovery wolf conservation and management plan,” state managers posted in their monthly update. “The evaluation of wolf translocation will be incorporated into this process. Wolves are currently listed as a state endangered species in Washington. The post-recovery planning process is being initiated proactively because WDFW anticipates it will likely take two to three years to complete. The post-recovery plan will guide WDFW in long-term wolf conservation and management, and will evaluate various wolf management tools, including translocation. WDFW will announce the public scoping for the post-recovery plan and associated public meetings in August.”

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ODFW Reports ‘Probable’ Wolf Attack On Sheep Not Far From Pacific

Oregon wolf managers are reporting a “probable depredation” within miles of the Pacific Ocean.

They say that over a two week period between late February and earlier this week, the carcasses of 23 sheep — nearly all lambs — were found by a producer and USDA Wildlife Services in a “partially fenced” private pasture in Curry County’s White Mountain area, which by the gazetteer is just east of Denmark and Langlois along a lonely stretch of Highway 101 by Cape Blanco.

Examinations of several carcasses “were consistent with a wolf attack, but lack diagnostic evidence to clearly differentiate between wolf and domestic dog,” leading to the probable determination.

If a wolf, it is likely to be a disperser.


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The incident occurred in that part of Oregon where wolves still are federally listed and thus where the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the lead agency.

Neither federal nor state managers are currently monitoring any known wolves in Curry County, though tracks on the Pistol River, to the south between Gold Beach and Brookings, were investigated last year and were determined to be “consistent with a wolf” by an ODFW biologist.

A trail cam photo from last fall taken near a “possible/unknown” sheep depredation nearby in Coos County, to the north, captured a “blurry” picture of an animal “that could have been a wolf or dog.”

Cameras have been set up near the site of the attack on the White Mountain flock to see if anything returns.

The public can report wolves in Oregon on this ODFW webpage.

The news comes as today USFWS announced it proposed to delist gray wolves in the western two-thirds of Oregon and Washington as well as elsewhere in the Lower 48.

New Report Details Teanaway Wolf Depredations

Wolves in Central Washington killed one sheep, injured another as well as a calf, and probably killed a lamb earlier this summer.

The separate incidents involving the Teanaway Pack and two different livestock producers’ animals occurred a month ago or more but details didn’t emerge until this afternoon with WDFW’s August monthly gray wolf update.

A WDFW MAP SHOWS THE RANGE OF THE TEANAWAY PACK OF NORTHERN KITTITAS, SOUTHWEST CHELAN AND NORTHEAST KING COUNTIES. (WDFW)

According to the agency, the injured calf was reported July 31 and recovered the next day by the producer.

An exam determined its injuries had come from one or more wolves, and it led the rancher to move his cattle to another part of his grazing allotment on the Teanaway Community Forest.

Then, a week and a half later, a WDFW range rider alerted wolf managers to a possible depredation on Forest Service land.

Lacerations and puncture wounds on an injured and a dead sheep, along with telemetry data that put the Teanaway wolves nearby, led to the attack being classified as a confirmed wolf depredation.

A lamb from the flock was also determined to be missing.

WDFW reports that the shepherd moved the sheep to another part of the allotment and that many different conflict prevention tactics had been taken to minimize conflicts.

“(The producer) delayed entry onto the allotment until July, after wild ungulates are born. A sheepherder stays with the sheep at all times, accompanied by five herding dogs and three guarding dogs. The sheep are gathered tightly together each night and guarded by the dogs, the sheepherder, two Foxlights, and a Radio Activated Guard (RAG) programmed to trigger when a collared wolf approaches the sheep. Additionally, sick and injured sheep are removed from the allotment. The sheepherder, range rider, and WDFW actively haze wolves with human presence, air horns, and gunfire when they are detected near the sheep,” the agency stated.

A cursory search suggests the depredations are the first for the Teanaway Pack since two in 2015.

Wolves in this portion of Washington are still federally listed and WDFW only considers lethal removals in the delisted eastern third of the state.

The news follows recent confirmed and probable depredations by two different packs in northern Ferry County — the Togos and “the Unnamed pack using the old Profanity territory” — and the removal of the Togo’s breeding male.

WDFW’s monthly update also details August nonlethal work around Northeast Washington packs including Carpenter Ridge, Dirty Shirt, Goodman, Huckleberry, Leadpoint and Smackout.

Also, WDFW appears to have posted a new map for the Teanaway wolves as well. It shows an expanded territory that stretches from the Teanaway Valley north to nearly Stevens Pass.

WDFW Reports 4 Confirmed, Probable Calf Attacks By Wolves In Ferry Co.

Washington wolf managers are confirming a report of a series of livestock depredations in Ferry County in recent days.

A TRAIL CAM SHOT CAPTURED A PROFANITY PEAK PACK WOLF IN 2015. THE LATEST DEPREDATIONS OCCURRED IN THE FORMER PACK’S TERRITORY. (WDFW)

They say that one calf was killed and three others were injured during two confirmed and two probable attacks.

The incidents were reported overnight by Rep. Joel Kretz (R) of nearby Wauconda.

They occurred to the south of the Togo Pack range, in the former territory of the Profanity Peak Pack.

Seven wolves in that 12-member pack were lethally removed in 2016 for a series of depredations and another died of presumed natural causes.

A WDFW spokesman said that staffers are in the field and more information would be available tomorrow afternoon.

State Timeline Details Togo Pack’s Livestock Attacks, Ranchers’ Preventative Measures

THE FOLLOWING IS INFORMATION FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

On August 18, 2018, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) documented the third wolf depredation by the Togo pack within the last 30 days, which is also the sixth wolf depredation by the pack within the last 10 months. For the most recent depredation, WDFW officials confirmed that one or more wolves were responsible for injuring a calf on a U.S. Forest Service grazing allotment in Ferry County. The recent depredation has prompted Director Kelly Susewind to initiate the lethal removal provisions of the Wolf Conservation and Management plan (Wolf Plan) and wolf-livestock interactions protocol (Protocol).

 (WDFW)

The six depredations by the Togo pack include:

Depredation #1 – November 2, 2017

On November 2, 2017 WDFW was contacted by a livestock producer (herein Producer 1; note Producer 1 is a family operation with multiple owners) in Ferry County about an injured calf that was discovered less than three miles from where the unmarked female wolf was killed under caught-in-the-act authority on October 27, 2017 (see November 9, 2017 public update at https://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/gray_wolf/updates.php?year=2017). A WDFW contracted range rider heard that there was a possible injured calf a day prior, but the calf could not be located at that time. Once the calf was found, it was taken to a holding pen for the investigation. The Ferry County Sheriff and WDFW management staff were notified and on November 3, department staff investigated a reported livestock depredation.  A Ferry County Officer was also in attendance for the depredation investigation.

The calf had injuries to both rear flanks and on both rear legs between the pin and hocks. Injuries on the rear flanks included bite lacerations and puncture wounds. Hemorrhaging was noted near bite lacerations in all four locations. After the wound was cleaned and dead tissue was removed, significant hemorrhaging was noted inside the wound, specifically around the wound margins. After a field examination of the injuries to the calf, it was determined to be a Confirmed Wolf Depredation. The determination was based on evidence and recent wolf activity in the area. Repeated reports from Producer 1 and WDFW contracted range rider included recent wolf howls, tracks, scat, and cattle grouping behavior in the pasture where the injured calf was located.

Proactive non-lethal deterrence measures – In this incident, Producer 1 met the expectation of deploying at least two proactive deterrence measures suitable for the operation, which were best suited for the operation and for a sufficient amount of time for the measures to be effective.  Those included:

  • Producer 1’s cattle were on private fenced lands,
  • Producer 1 checks on the cattle multiple times every day during feedings,
  • Producer 1 removes sick or injured cattle from the area,
  • Producer 1 also used range riders periodically in 2017 (as well as 2016), and
  • Producer 1 also received locations of nearby collared wolves via WDFW’s Sensitive Wildlife Data Sharing Agreement.

Responsive non-lethal deterrence measures – After the investigation on November 3, WDFW staff and Producer 1 considered potential responsive deterrent measures consisting of fladry, fox lights and increased range riding activity. The producer decided to move cattle to a different private large fenced grazing pasture, utilize fox lights and agreed to increase range rider activity.

Depredation #2 – November 8, 2017

On November 8, WDFW was contacted by Producer 1 and he reported a calf carcass that was discovered while moving cattle in a different private large fenced grazing pasture. The calf was tarped by Producer 1, a hired hand, and range rider for the pending investigation. Wolf tracks were reported at the scene. The Ferry County Sherrif and WDFW management staff were notified that field staff were responding to conduct a depredation investigation per the 2017 Wolf-Livestock Interaction Protocol On November 9, WDFW conducted an investigation, accompanied by a Ferry County Deputy and WDFW Contracted Range Rider. After a field investigation and necropsy of the calf carcass, it was determined to be a Confirmed Wolf Depredation. The determination was based on bite lacerations with associated hemorrhaging, signs of a struggle near the calf carcass, large canid tracks near the calf carcass, recent wolf activity in the area, and the confirmed wolf depredation on November 2 in the area.

Proactive non-lethal deterrence measures – In this incident, Producer 1 met the expectation of deploying at least two proactive deterrence measures suitable for the operation, that were best suited for the operation and for a sufficient amount of time for the measures to be effective.  Producer 1 continued using the following non-lethal deterrence measures:

  • Cattle on private fenced lands,
  • Checked on the cattle multiple times every day during feedings,
  • Removed sick or injured cattle from the area,
  • Utilize fox lights ,
  • Used range riders periodically in 2018, and
  • Receiving locations of nearby collared wolves via WDFW’s Sensitive Wildlife Data Sharing Agreement.

Depredation #3 – May 20, 2018

A woodcutter reported the incident to the producer (herein Producer 2), who had seen the calf alive earlier in the day and who then found the carcass and reported the incident to WDFW.  The incident was on a federal grazing allotment in northern Ferry County, in the same vicinity as the November 2 and 8, 2017 wolf depredations.  A woodcutter working in the area said he approached a gate that separates U.S. Forest Service land from private property, where he heard a cow bawling and saw a black wolf running from the area where the calf was found. A WDFW official arrived later on May 20 and conducted an investigation with help from a wildlife specialist employed by Stevens and Ferry counties.

The investigators found that the calf had bite lacerations and puncture wounds to both rear quarters, upper rear legs, neck and sternum, consistent with predation by a wolf. Hemorrhaging, indicating the calf was initially alive during the encounter, was visible near the bite wounds and was also found in the left front armpit, where no lacerations or punctures were visible. Based on all available evidence, WDFW classified the event as a confirmed wolf depredation by one or more members of the Togo pack (note, the area was confirmed as the Togo wolf pack territory from surveys conducted in February 2018).

Proactive non-lethal deterrence measures – In this incident, Producer 2 did not met the expectation of deploying at least two proactive deterrence measures that were best suited for the operation. Producer 2 deployed one proactive deterrence measure, which was checking on his cattle daily.

Responsive non-lethal deterrence measures – Department staff and Producer 2 discussed additional responsive deterrent strategies (including the use of fladry and Foxlights) but agreed the use of range riders would be the most effective additional deterrent, given that the cow-calf operation takes place in an unfenced allotment in rugged terrain. Later on May 20, Producer 2 deployed a range rider and made plans to rotate several riders from the Northeast Washington Wolf-Cattle Collaborative and WDFW to provide ongoing daily or near-daily coverage.

Depredation #4 – August 8, 2018

On August 8, 2018, WDFW was contacted by a wildlife specialist employed by the Stevens and Ferry County Sheriff’s Offices about a potential wolf depredation on a U.S. Forest Service grazing allotment in the Togo pack wolf territory in Northern Ferry County, near Danville.  Later that day, WDFW staff documented a deceased adult cow.  The owner of the livestock is Producer 1.  During the investigation, staff documented bite lacerations with associated hemorrhaging, signs of a struggle down a steep hill and around the cow carcass, and recent wolf activity in the area.  Based on that evidence, they confirmed that the death was a depredation by one or more wolves from the Togo pack.

Due to the remote location and rugged terrain, the cow carcass was left on site.  However, Producer 1 and his range rider -moved the cattle to a different area of the allotment.  The cow was turned out as part of a cow-calf pair, but Producer 1 and range rider were not able to locate her calf.

Proactive non-lethal deterrence measures – In this incident, Producer 1 met the expectation of deploying at least two proactive deterrence measures that were best suited for the operation and for a sufficient amount of time for the measures to be effective.  Throughout the 2018 grazing season Producer 1 used a variety of deterrent measures to protect the livestock. Producer 1:

  • Delayed turnout until late June so the calves would be larger,
  • Used Fox lights on his private pasture to deter wolves,
  • Following turnout, he removed sick or injured cattle from the allotment,
  • Deployed one or more range riders each day to help the producer check the cattle, and
  • Moved the cattle when necessary out of areas with higher wolf activity to minimize interactions between wolves and livestock.

Responsive non-lethal deterrence measures – After the investigation on August 8, WDFW staff and Producer 1 considered potential responsive deterrent measures and decided additional range riders would be the best option for their operation.

Depredation #5 – August 9, 2018

On August 9, at about 9:30 p.m., the department was contacted by a WDFW-contracted range rider about another potential wolf depredation in the Togo pack area that injured a 350-pound calf owned by Producer 1. Producer 1 and range rider moved the injured calf, and the cow that accompanied it, from the allotment to a holding pen at their residence.

On August 10, WDFW staff and the two counties’ wildlife specialist examined the cow and calf. The cow did not appear to have any injuries, but they documented bite lacerations to both of the calf’s hamstrings and left flank, and puncture wounds and associated hemorrhaging to the left hindquarter and stomach.  Based on the evidence and related factors, the investigators confirmed that the calf’s injuries were the result of a wolf depredation and classified the event as a confirmed wolf depredation. The cow and injured calf were kept at the holding pen for monitoring.

Proactive non-lethal deterrence measures – In this incident, Producer 1 met the expectation of deploying at least two proactive deterrence measures that were best suited for the operation and for a sufficient amount of time for the measures to be effective.  Producer 1 continued using the following non-lethal deterrence measures:

  • Used Fox lights on his private pasture to deter wolves,
  • Removed sick or injured cattle from the allotment, and
  • Deployed one or more range riders each day to help the producer check the cattle, and
  • Moved the cattle when necessary out of areas with higher wolf activity to minimize interactions between wolves and livestock.

Depredation #6 – August 18, 2018

On August 18, WDFW staff received a call from a wildlife specialist employed by the Stevens and Ferry County Sheriff’s Offices about another potential wolf depredation in the Togo pack area that injured a 450-pound calf owned by Producer 1. Producer 1 and range rider moved the injured calf from the allotment, and the cow that accompanied it, from the allotment to a holding pen at their residence.  USFS District Ranger was notified of the depredation event. WDFW staff conducted a field examination of the injured calf with the help of a squeeze chute. Present during the examination were the producers and counties’ wildlife specialist.

On August 18, WDFW staff and the two counties’ wildlife specialist examined the cow and calf.  The injured calf had bite lacerations and bite puncture wounds to the outside lower left hindquarter, the left hamstring, the inside of the left hock and the groin area. Adjacent to the bite puncture wounds on the hamstring and groin was hemorrhaging to the underlying tissue as indicated by severe swelling. Infection had also set in on two of the bite puncture wounds. The bite lacerations, bite puncture wounds and tissue hemorrhaging adjacent to the puncture wounds are consistent with a signature style wolf attack on cattle. Investigators confirmed that the calf’s injuries were the result of a wolf depredation and classified the event as a confirmed wolf depredation.

Proactive non-lethal deterrence measures – In this incident, Producer 1 met the expectation of deploying at least two proactive deterrence measures that were best suited for the operation and for a sufficient amount of time for the measures to be effective.  Producer 1 continued using the following non-lethal deterrence measures:

  • Used Fox lights on his private pasture to deter wolves,
  • Removed sick or injured cattle from the allotment,
  • Deployed one or more range riders each day to help the producer check the cattle, and
  • Moved the cattle when necessary out of areas with higher wolf activity to minimize interactions between wolves and livestock.

As a result of these events, the guidance provided in the Wolf Plan and Protocol the minimum threshold has been reached for consideration and possible implementation of lethal removal the Togo Pack. WDFW Director Kelly Susewind has authorized lethal removal of wolves from the pack, consistent with the Department’s Wolf Plan and Protocol.

The goal of lethal removal from the Wolf Plan is to manage wolf-livestock conflicts in a way that minimizes livestock losses, while at the same time not negatively impacting the recovery or long-term perpetuation of a sustainable wolf population. Building on that, the purpose of lethal removal in the Togo pack is to change wolf pack behavior to reduce the potential for recurrent wolf depredations on livestock while continuing to promote wolf recovery (see Protocol). Consistent with the terms of the Wolf Plan and Protocol, the rationale for lethal removal in this case is as follows:

  1. WDFW has documented three wolf depredation by the Togo pack within the last 30 days, which is also the sixth wolf depredation by the pack within the last 10 months. All six of the depredation events were confirmed wolf depredations ( resulting in two dead calves, one dead cow, and three injured calves). The three most recent depredations occurred over approximately a 10 day period, AND
  2. At least two (2) proactive deterrence measures, and responsive deterrence measures as deemed appropriate, have been implemented and failed to meet the goal of influencing/changing pack behavior to reduce the potential for recurrent wolf depredations on livestock in 5 of the six events, AND
  3. WDFW expects depredations to continue based of the history of depredations and the appropriate non-lethal measures having been deployed resulting in no change of wolf behavior , AND
  4. The Department has documented the use of appropriate deterrence measures and notified the public of wolf activities in a timely manner as outlined in the Protocol.  WDFW provided updates on November 9, November 15, December 6, 2017 and  May 24, June 1,  2018, August 11, and August 13, 2018 with information on all wolf depredations on livestock in the area, AND
  5. The lethal removal of wolves is not expected to harm the wolf population’s ability to reach recovery objectives statewide or within individual wolf recovery regions. Comparing the actual level of wolf mortality to that modeled in the Wolf Conservation and Management Plan (appendix G and H), actual average wolf mortality is about 8.4 animals or 10% of the estimated population.  This level is well below the 28% baseline annual mortality assumed in the wolf plan model before any simulated wolf removals, which incorporates a 30% lethal removal mortality in addition to the baseline mortality.  The model was conducted assuming the regional wolf population was at the regional recovery objective. The wolf population in the eastern recovery region has more than doubled the regional recovery objective.
  6. As mentioned earlier, Director Susewind has authorized an incremental removal of pack members from the Togo Pack. The last estimate of pack size during August was 2 adult wolves and an unknown number of pups. The Department expects to begin the effort after 8 business hours following this public notice.  The removal effort will likely continue for a two-week period or less.

The Department will use humane lethal removal methods consistent with state and federal laws. The objective of the methodology is to use the best methods available while considering human safety, humaneness to wolves, swift completion of the removal, weather, efficacy, and cost. Likely options include shooting from a helicopter, trapping, and shooting from the ground.

Per the Wolf plan Protocol, WDFW’s approach is incremental removal, which has periods of active removals or attempts to remove wolves, followed by periods of evaluation to see if the goal of changing pack behavior was met. The first incremental removal will follow the provision of the Protocol in section 7.

The Department will keep the public informed about this activity through weekly updates. The Department will provide a final report to the public on any lethal removal action after the operation has concluded.

Togo Pack Attacks More Cattle, WDFW Reports

THE FOLLOWING IS A WDFW STATEMENT

On August 8, 2018, WDFW was contacted by the wildlife specialist employed by the Stevens and Ferry County sheriff’s offices about a potential wolf depredation on a U.S. Forest Service grazing allotment in the Togo pack wolf territory in Northern Ferry County, near Danville.  Later that day, WDFW staff documented a deceased adult cow.  During the investigation, staff documented bite lacerations with associated hemorrhaging, signs of a struggle down a steep hill and around the cow carcass, and recent wolf activity in the area.  Based on that evidence, they confirmed that the death was a depredation by one or more wolves from the Togo pack.

A WDFW MAP SHOWS WHERE THE TOGO PACK IS BELIEVED TO BE CENTERED IN NORTHERN FERRY COUNTY. (WDFW)

Due to the remote location and rugged terrain, the cow carcass was left on site.  Meanwhile, the livestock producer and his range rider pushed the cattle to a different area of the allotment.  The cow had been turned out as part of a cow-calf pair, but the producer and range rider were not immediately able to locate the calf.  They are continuing to search.

Throughout the grazing season the producer has used a variety of deterrent measures to protect the livestock. He delayed turnout until late June so the calves would be larger and used Fox lights on his private pasture to deter wolves. Following turnout, he has removed sick or injured cattle from the allotment and deployed one or more range riders each day to help the producer check the cattle. They have moved the cattle when necessary.

On August 9, at about 9:30 p.m., the department was contacted by a WDFW-contracted range rider about another potential wolf depredation in the Togo pack area that injured a 350-pound calf owned by the same producer. The producer and range rider moved the injured calf, and the cow that accompanied it, from the allotment to a holding pen at their residence.

On August 10, WDFW staff and the two counties’ wildlife specialist examined the cow and calf. The cow did not appear to have any injuries, but they documented bite lacerations to both of the calf’s hamstrings and left flank, and puncture wounds and associated hemorrhaging to the left hindquarter and stomach.  Based on the evidence and related factors, the investigators confirmed that the calf’s injuries were the result of a wolf depredation. The cow and injured calf were kept at the holding pen for monitoring.

The latest incidents bring the total number of confirmed depredations by the Togo pack to five in less than 10 months, including two in November 2017 and one in May 2018. Those incidents were reported in earlier WDFW wolf updates. In four of the five incidents, producers had used at least two pro-active preventive strategies to deter wolf predation as called for in the WDFW wolf-livestock interaction protocol.

The Department first suspected the presence of the Togo pack in 2016, and the depredations in November 2017 provided further evidence of a pack in the area.  The pack was confirmed during the department’s 2017-18 winter surveys and was named in March 2018.  The pack’s discovery is discussed in the department’s August 2, 2018, update, available online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/gray_wolf/updates.php.

Based on the winter survey results and recent trapping activities, the department has documented at least two adult wolves in the pack. The pair produced an unknown number of pups this spring.  The Department captured an adult male on June 2, 2018, and fitted it with a GPS collar which provide location data that has been shared with livestock producers and county officials. WDFW has also received reports of a third adult wolf with the pack, but has not confirmed its presence.

Due to uncertainty about the number of adults in the pack, and the importance of receiving ongoing location data from the collared adult male, WDFW Director Kelly Susewind directed the staff to work through the weekend to attempt to confirm the number of adults and learn as much as possible about the pack’s activities before he considers further action.

WDFW will provide another update early next week.

Northern Ferry Co. Wolf Pack Kills Calf

A northern Ferry County wolf or wolves killed a young calf early this week as a new pack appears to have resumed its livestock-chasing ways.

Washington wildlife managers believes the Togo Pack is responsible for this depredation as well as two early last November that resulted in an injured and a dead calf.

Another wolf was shot in the area late last October after being caught by a producer in the act of pursuing cattle.

A WDFW MAP SHOWS WHERE THE TOGO PACK IS BELIEVED TO BE CENTERED IN NORTHERN FERRY COUNTY. (WDFW)

The latest incident occurred north of Orient, a small community along the lower Kettle River, and was discovered by a woodcutter who heard a cow bawling and observed a black-coated wolf running from the scene.

The producer was alerted and told WDFW that the calf had been seen alive earlier that day.

It was described as a week-and-a-half old black Angus owned by Ron Eslick and was found dead on federal ground about a third of a mile from the rancher’s brother’s residence, according to a Capital Press story.

The carcass was necropsied by a state official as well as a local county wildlife specialist.

“The investigators found that the calf had bite lacerations and puncture wounds to both rear quarters, upper rear legs, neck and sternum, consistent with predation by a wolf. Hemorrhaging was visible near the bite wounds and was also found in the left front armpit, where no lacerations or punctures were visible. Evidence indicated the calf was alive during the depredation event,” WDFW reported.

“A lot of the quarters were eaten off,” Eslick told the Press. “If we had come two hours later, it would have been eaten and nobody would have known anything about it.”

According to WDFW, the producer had been using at least one proactive deterrence measure, checking on their animals daily.

The agency’s depredation protocols require at least two to be used and to have failed before lethal removal is considered.

Later on Sunday, a range rider was put on the job of keeping the Togos and cattle apart.

Last November’s two qualifying depredations occurred despite multiple deterrents being employed.

WDFW can go after problem wolves if there are four attacks in a rolling 10-month period or three in 30 days, with various criteria.

The Togo Pack is a new one and local reports last year helped WDFW confirm it.

It had two members at the end of 2017 and is named for a nearby mountain in the northern Kettle Range.