Tag Archives: Coquille Valley Wildlife Area

24 Free Youth Pheasant Hunts Coming Up In Oregon; Sign-ups Open

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Youth hunters (age 17 and under) can sign up now for ODFW’s free pheasant hunts happening around the state in September.

MEAGAN JANSEN OF TIGARD WITH A PHEASANT SHE BAGGED AT AN E.E. WILSON WILDLIFE AREA YOUTH PHEASANT HUNT PUT ON BY ODFW. (ODFW)

The events are being held in Central Point, Corvallis, Eugene, Irrigon/Umatilla, John Day, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Ontario, Portland/Sauvie Island and The Dalles (Tygh Valley). New this year, ODFW has also added a youth pheasant hunt at the new Coquille Valley Wildlife Area in Coquille.

See dates below and register online (see Register for a Class/Youth Upland Hunts) or at an ODFW office that sells licenses. (Registration is not available at license sale agents.) The youth hunter or their parent will need to be logged in to the youth’s account to register online. The deadline to register is the Thursday before the hunt.

ODFW and partners stock pheasants at these special hunts that give youth a head start on regular pheasant seasons, which don’t begin until October. Quail and dove also can be hunted. Volunteers often bring their trained hunting dogs to some events and hunt with participants. Some events begin with a shotgun skills clinic, so participants can practice clay target shooting before hunting.

These events are open only to youth who have passed hunter education. (ODFW has hunter education classes and field days available before the events.) An adult 21 years of age or older must accompany the youth to supervise but may not hunt.

“Youth pheasant hunts are a great chance for young hunters to find early success and put the lessons learned in hunter education classes to work in the field,” says Brandon Harper, ODFW hunter education coordinator.

ODFW stresses safety during the hunts. Both hunter and supervisor must wear a hunter orange hat, eye protection and a hunter orange vest—equipment provided at the clinics by ODFW to anyone who doesn’t have it. Hunters also need to check in and out of the hunt.

RINGNECK PHEASANTS ARE STOCKED BY ODFW AND OTHERS TO ENSURE THE KIDDOS HAVE A CHANCE AT BAGGING A BIRD DURING THE FREE EVENTS. (ODFW)

The hunts are free, though participants need a valid hunting license ($10 for youth 12 and older, free for age 11 and under) to hunt. Youth hunters age 12-17 also need an upland game bird validation ($4). Purchase online  or at a license sales agent or ODFW office that sells licenses. Licenses and validations will not be sold at the events.

While most areas have a hunt both Saturday and Sunday, youth hunters may sign up for only one hunt. They are welcome to hunt stand by on the other day.

See page 26-27 of the Oregon Game Bird Regulations for more information, or see myodfw.com/workshops-and-events for the local contact for each hunt. For help signing up, contact Myrna Britton, (503) 947-6028, Myrna.B.Britton@state.or.us

·       Central Point, Denman Wildlife Area, Sept. 14 and Sept. 15.

·       Coquille, Coquille Valley Wildlife Area, Sept. 7 and Sept. 8.

·        Corvallis (near Camp Adair), EE Wilson Wildlife Area, Sept. 21 and Sept. 22.

·        Eugene, Fern Ridge Wildlife Area, Sept. 7 and Sept. 8. Registration not necessary but appreciated.

·        Irrigon Wildlife Area (between Irrigon and Umatilla), Sept. 21 and Sept. 22. Sign up for morning or evening hunt (morning only on Sunday).

·        Klamath Falls, Klamath Wildlife Area, Sept. 14 and Sept. 15. Additional hunt on Oct. 19 when Miller Island Unit open to youth hunters only on a first-come, first-serve basis beginning at 10 a.m. Call 541-883-5732 from more information.

·        John Day Valley, Sept. 14 and Sept. 15.

·        La Grande, Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, Sept. 14 and Sept. 15. Registration not necessary but appreciated.

·        Madras, private lands, Sept. 14 and Sept. 15.

·        Ontario, Oct. 12 and Oct. 13

·        Portland, Sauvie Island Wildlife Area, Sept. 14 and Sept. 15.

·        Tygh Valley/The Dalles, White River Wildlife Area, Sept. 14 and Sept. 15.

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Coquille Valley W.A. Reopening In Stages In Time For Waterfowl Season

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Coquille Valley Wildlife Area reopens in stages to public use in time for waterfowl season.

AN AERIAL IMAGE SHOWS NEW CHANNELS FOR FISH HABITAT CREATED AT WINTER LAKE, PART OF THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE’S COQUILLE VALLEY WILDLIFE AREA. (CBI CONTRACTING VIA NMFS)

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will reopen the Beaver Slough tract October 13 and the Winter Lake tract October 20. Both tracts make up the 660-acre wildlife area and have been closed since June 1 for habitat restoration activities including tidal channel construction.

“Waterfowl season begins October 13, so we’re pleased we can reopen the Beaver Slough tract for duck and goose hunters,” said Stuart Love, Charleston District Wildlife Biologist. “The Winter Lake tract opens a week later so we can make sure the new tide gate system that will start flooding that portion of the wildlife area is functioning properly.”

Hunters should be aware the new tidal channels constructed on the Winter Lake tract will have varying levels of water according to tidal influence. Steep sides and water could make it difficult to get out of the channels, and ODFW advises hunters to wear a personal flotation around the tidal channels.

Hunters should also know some aspects of the Winter Lake restoration project are continuing into the fall and can expect to see staff planting vegetation and conducting project monitoring. Other recreationists may also be on the wildlife area.

The wildlife area can be accessed from North Bank Lane off Highway 42. An access permit is required and can be obtained at no cost at the information kiosk in the wildlife area’s parking lot on North Bank Lane.

 

Coquille Valley Restoration Work Wraps Up, Win For Fish, Farmers

THE FOLLOWING IS A NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE STORY

Partners representing natural resource, tribal, and agricultural stakeholders recently gathered in the Coquille River Valley in Oregon to celebrate the completion of the Winter Lake restoration project that will help ensure local cattle farmers continue to thrive, while providing almost 8 miles of tidal channels and 1,700 acres of habitat for the threatened Oregon Coast coho salmon, and other fish and wildlife.

AN AERIAL IMAGE SHOWS NEW CHANNELS FOR FISH HABITAT CREATED AT WINTER LAKE, PART OF THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE’S COQUILLE VALLEY WILDLIFE AREA. (CBI CONTRACTING VIA NMFS)

Habitat restoration and agriculture are often considered competing interests. This partnership between natural resource entities and agricultural landowners demonstrates that the two can benefit from a strategically planned project.

Lowlands in and around the Valley’s Beaver Slough Drainage District are rich pasture for cattle, and are in high demand. In the past, levees were built, channels straightened, and acres of wetlands were filled to create agricultural land.

A SIGN PUT UP FOR THE RESTORATION PROJECT DECLARES “WE GROW BEEF IN THE SUMMER AND FISH IN THE WINTER.” ACCORDING TO NMFS, THE LAND WHERE THESE CATTLE GRAZE WILL BECOME FISH HABITAT LATER IN THE YEAR. (NMFS)

But the tidal gates managing water and helping keep the land dry for grazing started failing recently and had to be replaced. The Drainage District saw this opportunity to establish a new partnership to reimagine how water is managed there.

Their vision of ‘working landscapes’ was to improve water control and protect the land from flooding during prime grazing season in the warmer months, and rebuild high-quality habitat for juvenile coho salmon in the winter.

The project’s cornerstone is a set of new state-of-the-art tide gates that can better control flooding, allowing for seasonal use by agriculture, and fish and wildlife. The tide gates, working with reconnected channels and new habitat will provide the best of both worlds.

THE PROJECT INCLUDES NEW TIDE GATES TO IMPROVE THE FLOW OF WATER. (BCI CONTRACTING VIA NMFS)

NOAA helped Beaver Slough Drainage District, the Nature Conservancy, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and nearby land owner China Creek Gun Club develop plans for this comprehensive project, and supported it further with restoration and resilience grants totalling $2.7 million.

It is expected that the project could generate up to $3.4 million and 25 new jobs in the regional economy, and could then contribute an additional $3.2 million due to increased outdoor recreation spending over a twenty year period.

Along the Pacific Northwest coast wild salmon populations continue to decline. Like many northwestern rivers, the Coquille has lost much of its estuary habitat; nearly 95 percent of prime salmon spawning and rearing waters there are gone.

Habitat restoration through innovative public-private partnership projects like this are the key to success, and eventually will assist in the recovery of salmon and other fish species critical to this region’s ecosystems and communities.

Coquille Valley Wildlife Area Reopening To Hunting Nov. 10 After Fish Passage Work

THE FOLLOWING IS APRESS RLEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Coquille Valley Wildlife Area (CVWA) reopens to public use on Friday, November 10. The area has been closed since May for tide gate construction and habitat restoration work.

THE SUN BREAKS THROUGH FOG OVER WINTER LAKE, PART OF THE COQUILE VALLEY WILDLIFE AREA. (PEGGY NELSON, ODOT)

Both hunters and other recreationists must possess a free hunting/access permit available at a self-check station in the parking lot along North Bank Lane. From Highway 42 in Coquille, turn onto North Bank Lane and the parking area is about a half mile on the right.

The 610-acre wildlife area is divided into the Beaver Slough and Winter Lake tracts which are accessed from a single access point at the North Bank Lane parking area. Visitors who want to use the Winter Lake tract can walk south on berms to access that area, and those who want to access Beaver Slough can walk or use a boat (that is not powered with a gasoline engine) to go north into that tract.

The Winter Lake tract is open to public use on Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays and State holidays. Beaver Slough tract is open seven days a week.

CVWA is open to game bird and waterfowl hunting, depending on when seasons are open. Check the Oregon Game Bird Regulations for specific seasons, species and shooting hours.

The wildlife area provides crucial habitat for migrating and nesting waterfowl, Oregon’s native fish, and many Oregon Conservation Strategy Species. Wildlife watchers can hike in or use kayaks or paddle boats but must stay on the wildlife area property.

This past summer, new tide gates were installed in the Coquille Basin as part of the China Camp Creek Project, benefiting both fish passage and agriculture and providing opportunities to improve habitats on CVWA. Berms and canals were reconstructed to meet current fish passage criteria.