Tag Archives: columbia river

Lower Columbia, Buoy 10, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (8-16-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

Eight hundred twenty-six Oregon boats were counted at Buoy 10 this past weekend.  Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 2.24 Chinook and 0.19 coho caught per boat.  In Troutdale, boat anglers averaged 0.07 steelhead caught per boat, while anglers fishing in the Portland to Tongue Point area averaged 0.47 Chinook and 0.28 steelhead caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.13 Chinook caught per angler.

A MULKEY SPINNER TROLLED BEHIND A FISH FLASH DURING THE FLOOD TIDE ABOVE THE BRIDGE YIELDED THIS FINE FALL CHINOOK FOR BUZZ RAMSEY. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed two Chinook adults kept for 16 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for two boats (five anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed one steelhead released for 15 boats (28 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for 14 bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed 34 Chinook adults and three Chinook jacks kept, plus one Chinook adult, one Chinook jack and 21 steelhead released for 75 boats (178 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 535 Chinook adults and 29 coho adults kept, plus 129 Chinook, 27 coho and one steelhead released for 297 boats (1,013 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for one bank angler; and one steelhead released for five boats (10 anglers); and no shad catch for two bank anglers.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed eight Chinook adults kept for one boat (five anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed two shad kept, plus 20 shad released for three boats (eight anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed four sublegal and three legal white sturgeon released for two boats (three anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for six bank anglers; and seven sublegal, two legal and three oversize white sturgeon released for two boats (four anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed four oversize sturgeon released for one boat (three anglers).

John Day Pool: No report.

WALLEYE

Gorge:  No report.

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed one walleye kept, plus one walleye released for seven boats (14 anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point:  Weekend checking showed four walleye kept for three boats (five anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 36 walleye kept for eight boats (14 anglers).

John Day Pool: No report.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools, SW WA Fishing Report (8-8-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (8/5) flight, 105 salmonid boats and 23 Oregon bank anglers were counted from Tongue Point to Bonneville Dam; and 641 Oregon boats at Buoy 10.  Anglers at Buoy 10 averaged 0.52 Chinook and 0.06 coho caught per boat.  In the Portland to Tongue Point area, boat anglers averaged 0.16 Chinook and 0.03 steelhead caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.17 steelhead caught per angler.

A HERRING BEHIND A FISH FLASH SERVED UP SUPPER FOR SALT LAKE CITY’S RAMONA PAULSON NEAR BUOY 10. SHE WAS FISHING WITH GUIDE MIKE KELLY. (VIA BUZZ RAMSEY)

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed three steelhead released for 18 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (three anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for 10 boats (16 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for seven bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekend checking showed five Chinook adults kept, plus one Chinook adult and one steelhead released for 37 boats (86 anglers).

Estuary Boats (Tongue Point to Buoy 10): Weekend checking showed 138 Chinook adults and 12 coho adults kept, plus 28 Chinook and six coho released for 318 boats (972 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for six bank anglers; and two steelhead released for one boat (two anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (one angler).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekly checking showed four sublegal, one legal and one oversize white sturgeon released for four boats (nine anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed one oversize sturgeon released for one boat (three anglers).

The Dalles Pool: No report.

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 28 sublegal, 13 legal and three oversize sturgeon released for five boats (14 anglers).

WALLEYE

Gorge:  Weekend checking showed no catch for one boat (two anglers).

Troutdale: Weekend checking showed five walleye kept, plus two walleye released for six boats (11 anglers).

Portland to Tongue Point:  Weekend checking showed four walleye kept for three boats (five anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 43 walleye kept, plus six walleye released for four boats (eight anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 20 walleye kept, plus one walleye released for seven bank anglers; and 155 walleye kept, plus 52 walleye released for 25 boats (54 anglers).

……………………………………………………

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – Above the I-5 Bridge – 26 boats/75 rods kept 26 steelhead and released 26 cutthroats.  84 bank rods kept 19 adult spring Chinook and 6 steelhead and released 3 adult and 3 jack spring Chinook and 1 cutthroat.  I-5 Bridge downstream – 3 bank and 2 boats/6 rods had no catch.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 224 spring Chinook adults, eight spring Chinook jacks, 12 mini-jacks , 105 summer-run steelhead adults, one fall Chinook adult and two fall Chinook jacks in five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 78 spring Chinook adults and two spring Chinook jacks into the Cispus River near the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek and they released 128 spring Chinook adults and six spring Chinook jacks at Franklin Bridge in Packwood.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,160 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, August 7. Water visibility is 12 feet and water temperature is 58.3 degrees F.
Drano Lake – 4 boats/8 anglers kept 3 adult and 2 jack fall Chinook and released 2 steelhead.  27 boats trolling were observed here last Saturday morning.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam During the first 6 days of the fall sport season on the lower Columbia below Bonneville Dam, we sampled 400 salmonid anglers (including 90 boats) with 4 adult and 2 jack fall Chinook, 11 steelhead, and no coho.

Effort is relatively light with just over 100 boats and 141 bank anglers counted during last Saturday’s flight.

3 (75%) of the adult fall Chinook were kept though anglers may retain any fish.  All of the steelhead were released as required.  6 of the fish were wild, 4 hatchery, and 1 unknown origin.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Marker 82 line downstream – We sampled 30 sturgeon anglers (including 7 boats) with 26 legals released.

Walleye

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – 2 walleye anglers (1 boat) had no catch.   Quite a bit of effort in the Camas/Washougal area last Saturday were 18 boats were counted.

Trout

Tacoma Power released 3,700 rainbow trout into Mayfield Lake this past week.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (8-3-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA WATTS, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

SALMON, STEELHEAD AND SHAD

On Saturday’s (7/29) flight, 122 salmonid boats and 66 Oregon bank anglers were counted from the Astoria-Megler Bridge to Bonneville Dam.  Boat anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.89 summer Chinook and 0.89 steelhead caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.14 summer Chinook and 0.08 steelhead caught per boat.  In the Portland to Westport area, boat anglers averaged 0.22 summer Chinook and 0.25 steelhead caught per boat, while anglers fishing in the estuary averaged 0.90 summer Chinook caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.01 summer Chinook and 0.23 steelhead caught per angler, while anglers fishing the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.05 steelhead caught per angler.

FUN FISHING OUT AT BUOY 1, ROB BIGNALL OF IT’S ALL GOOD GUIDE SERVICE SHOWS OFF THE GRADE OF CHINOOK COMING INTO THE LOWER COLUMBIA. THIS ONE BIT A HERRING BEHIND A BIG AL’S FISH FLASH IN THE MONEY PATTERN. (VIA JARROD HIGGINBOTHAM, YAKIMA BAIT)

Gorge Bank: Weekly checking showed four steelhead kept, plus one Chinook and 12 steelhead released for 70 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekly checking showed four Chinook adults and four steelhead kept, plus four Chinook and four steelhead released for nine boats (35 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekly checking showed two Chinook adults, one Chinook jack and one steelhead kept, plus three Chinook adults and two steelhead released for 36 boats (75 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekly checking showed one steelhead kept, plus one steelhead released for 37 bank anglers.

Portland to Westport Boats: Weekly checking showed six Chinook adults, and six steelhead kept, plus one Chinook adult and two steelhead released for 32 boats (73 anglers); and one shad kept for one boat (two anglers).

Estuary Bank (Astoria-Megler Bridge to Wauna Powerlines): No report.

Estuary Boats (Astoria-Megler Bridge to Wauna Powerlines): Weekly checking showed three Chinook adults kept, plus six Chinook adults released for 10 boats (22 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed one steelhead released for 10 bank anglers; and no catch for two shad anglers.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed two shad kept, plus 20 shad released for three boats (eight anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. Weekly checking showed 67 sublegals, 34 legals and 213 oversize sturgeon released for 10 boats (42 anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed one sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for one boat (three anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed two sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for two bank anglers; and 11 sublegal sturgeon released for one boat (two anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 10 sublegal, two legal and six oversize sturgeon released for five boats (18 anglers).

WALLEYE

Gorge:  Weekly checking showed six walleye kept for one boat (four anglers).

Troutdale: Weekly checking showed 13 walleye kept for eight boats (20 anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 19 walleye released for one boat (three anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one bank angler; and 327 walleye kept, plus 176 walleye released for 54 boats (138 anglers).

Snake’s Boyer Park Tops Again For Pikeminnow Removers

Boyer Park on the Snake below Lower Granite Dam maintained its grip as the most productive midsummer spot for pikeminnow for the fourth week in a row with a haul of 1,345 qualifying fish last week.

Though the July 24-30 catch is also down from the previous week, it’s still nearly 575 more than the second best station, Greenbelt, also on the Snake, where 774 were brought in for the sport reward program.

A MAP ON PIKEMINNOW.ORG SHOWS HOT SPOTS AROUND BOYER PARK, WHICH IS BELOW LOWER GRANITE DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER. (PIKEMINNOW.ORG)

Coming in third and fourth were two Lower Columbia stations: Cathlamet, with 701, and Kalama, with 510, according to the latest figures from program manager Eric Winther.

Winther also reported that this year’s fishery will now run all the way through Sept. 30. There had been some question whether funding would be available after Aug. 31.

The week’s overall catch was 6,468, down from 7,148.

Lyons Ferry had the highest catch per angler, with 20.2 for the six participants, followed by 17.3 at Giles French and 14.2 at Beacon Rock.

The overall average per angler was 6.3 pikeminnows for 1,024 participants, up about half a fish a fisherman over the previous week.

Six specially tagged pikeminnow were turned in last week, with two at Cathlamet, and one each at Gleason, Chinook Landing, Giles French and Greenbelt.

All totaled, 127,482 qualifying pikeminnow have been removed from the Columbia and Snake since the start of season May 1.

The Dalles has been most productive, with 43,847, followed by Boyer Park at 15,399 and Columbia Point at 14,933.

Average catch is 6.9, with a range from 10.7 at The Dalles to 1.5 at Umatilla.

Just under 210 tagged fish have been turned in.

Effort is 18,548 on the season.

The sport reward program pays anglers from $5 to $8 per pikeminnow, with tagged ones worth $500. The idea is to remove the native species that preys on young salmon and steelhead in the Columbia hydropower system.

For more details, including fishing maps, check out pikeminnow.org.

Tony Floor On Buoy 10 Salmon, Retirement, End Of Column

Editor’s note: The following is Tony Floor’s monthly newsletter and is run with permission.

By Tony Floor, Fishing Affairs Director, Northwest Marine Trade Association

One of the beauties of writing this monthly column is being able to pick and choose the content and let ‘er rip.

In the 13 years I’ve locked myself into my office for this monthly assignment here at Chateau Floor, staring at the computer screen, I allow my thoughts to produce words which ultimately, I hope, resonate with readers who might share the passion I breathe about the natural world.

TAHSIS B.C. IS KNOWN FOR WONDERFUL KING SALMON FISHING IN JULY AND AUGUST AS LONGTIME FISHING BUDDY AND COLLEAGUE PAT PATTILLO JOINED ME TO WELCOME THIS 28-POUND SLAB ABOARD. (TONY FLOOR)

Over the span of forty years working the fishing scene, which requires inhaling and exhaling saltwater fishing here in the Pacific Northwest, along with other fantastic places on this planet, it has been my professional and personal life. Do you think it’s a result of the way I’m living or what I’m stepping in? Bet heavy on the latter.

If I’m sounding a little melancholy in this writing, it’s because I am. Next month’s column will be a wrap on this endeavor as I prepare to enter the next chapter of my life – retirement.

It’s a little challenging for this cat to think about that change, starting with facing the reality of having to pay for my fishing addiction! Was that thud the sound of you dropping to your knees, babbling the words of mercy for poor Tony? I hope not. Or, might it have been the sound of jumping up and down, shouting elations that finally, The Truth is silenced? Regardless, beginning Oct. 1 you won’t find my columns in public restrooms anymore! Makes me think of Aretha Franklin belting out her famous song R-E-S-P-E-C-T!

Tahsis B.C. is known for wonderful king salmon fishing in July and August as longtime fishing buddy and colleague Pat Pattillo joined me to welcome this 28-pound slab aboard.

Summers are too short in the Northwest. Many of us who have this addiction for chasing migrating Washington adult salmon live for every opportunity to get on the water, from Puget Sound to the mouth of the Columbia River, during what I call “show time”.

I’m burning up a cell phone about every week during the summer, making and receiving phone calls, learning about what’s hot and what’s not. Ever seen a cell phone melted in a pool of black and silver plastic? Now that’s a “hot bite” report that spins my wheels.

From July into August, Chinook salmon seem to be everywhere and clearly, some level of luck is involved in choosing the right heading to find the fish. Over time, I tend to stick with what works based on success or lack of success. That’s exactly why I pounded Ediz Hook in early July, followed by my annual trip to Tahsis, B.C. in the second week of the month, attempting to flush out big gorgeous king salmon from the kelp beds. Got a visual?

From Tahsis a few weeks ago, it was on to Neah Bay, fishing one of the most beautiful places in our state, Cape Flattery. King salmon southbound from Alaska and British Columbia are required to clear U.S. Customs at Cape Flattery as they make individual decisions to take a left, eastbound down the Strait of Juan de Fuca, or continue their southbound course along the Washington coast. A majority of these Chinook stocks are destined for the Columbia River, scheduled to arrive during the third week of August. Guess who will be there to meet them? Yo! Over here! Come to your daddy, sweetheart!

I’ve enjoyed great success fishing the entrance to the Columbia River in mid-August since my baptism to the fishery back in ’86. While ’86 established the all-time record of coho salmon returning to the Columbia of over 1.6 million fish, it was 1987 that really did me in. The Chinook salmon return back then was nearly 800,000 fish which represented the largest return since Bonneville Dam fish counts began in 1938. Good ‘ol 1938, huh?

In the last five years, the returns have blown ’38 out of the water, hovering around 900,000 to 1.2 million. There is no better show in town than the mouth of the Columbia in mid-August. Just like shooting ducks in a 55-gallon barrel – but not different.

My favorite spot is north of the mouth of the Columbia, about 3-5 miles in front of the town called Long Beach, trolling north and south in 25 to 50 feet of water through massive schools of anchovy. The technique is beyond simple. Tie your mainline to a diver, trailing 6-7 feet of 25 pound leader with tandem hooks, and thread on a fresh anchovy, available live in the Ilwaco boat basin, or a frozen herring. It all works!

I’m applying a fast troll speed at 3 to 3.5 miles per hour to get that bait spinning extremely fast, a tight drag to ensure the hook set on the grab with 13-15 pulls of mainline from your reel (two feet per pull). The results will be a takedown as if you’ve hooked an Amtrak. Big crushing bite, baby!

In the Columbia, I like fishing the “wing walls” on the Washington side of the river beginning early in the flood tide an hour or two after low slack. Green navigational markers are attached to pilings numbered 1 through 7, trolling into the current with 15-17 pulls. Some anglers prefer to hold their position with a downstream heading. I believe most of the king salmon entering the river are at mid-depth as they migrate upstream.

Once the incoming tide has completed about half its cycle, I’ll run upstream to Desdemona flats, immediately below the Megler-Astoria Bridge on the Washington side of the river, or continue above the bridge into Blind Channel. Blind Channel is simply a name applied to several underwater channels where Chinook salmon frequently hang on their journey upstream. In both areas, I’m zeroing in on 20-30 feet of water.

For these two areas, most anglers are using heavy sliding drop sinkers, anywhere from eight to 16 ounces, maintaining contact with the bottom or within a foot of the bottom. Get the net!

I am locked and loaded for major salmon fishing trips in August to the Washington coast. Salmon fishing won’t get any better following this month until next summer, so giddy up and time to make hay.

See you on the water!

Truth

SW WA, Lower Columbia, Hanford Reach Fishing Report (7-31-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED WITH WDFW, INCLUDING PAUL HOFFARTH, AND JOE HYMER, PSMFC, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY HYMER

FACTOID

A few summer run chum have been found in the Cowlitz and Kalama rivers.

CHUM SALMON ARE NATIVE TO THE LOWER COLUMBIA, AND WHILE FEW RETURN ANNUALLY THESE DAYS, THOSE THAT DO MOSTLY HEAD FOR A CREEK NEAR BONNEVILLE OR THE GRAYS RIVER NEAR THE MOUTH. (JOE HYMER)

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – Above the I-5 Br:  61 bank rods kept 7 adult spring Chinook and 2 steelhead and released 1 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook.  52 boats/157 rods kept 48 steelhead and released 1 jack spring Chinook and 10 cutthroats

Below the I-5 Br:  1 boat/2 rods and 1 bank angler had no catch.

Mainstem Lewis River – 2 boat anglers kept 1 steelhead.

Drano Lake – 22 boat anglers kept 2 adult Chinook and 6 steelhead and released 13 steelhead and 1 adult Chinook.  ~12 boats here on weekdays and ~25 boats here last Saturday morning.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Last week we sampled 1,042 salmonid anglers (165 boats) with 23 adult and 2 jack summer Chinook, 85 steelhead, and no sockeye.  8 (35%) of the adult summer Chinook and 45 (53%) of the steelhead were kept.

Any Chinook (adipose fin clipped or not) may be retained beginning tomorrow (August 1).  All steelhead must be released during the month of August.

Hanford Reach Summer Chinook/Sockeye Fishery- From Paul A. Hoffarth District 4 Fish Biologist WA Dept. of Fish & Wildlife in Pasco WA –

Effort has been slow but did pick up slightly this past week.  There were an estimated 37 boats fishing for summer chinook salmon in the Columbia River between Highway 395 and Priest Rapids Dam during the week.  WDFW staff interviewed 9 anglers from 7 boats with 1 hatchery jack chinook harvested and 4 wild adult chinook caught and released.

For the season there have been 2,366 angler trips for summer chinook/sockeye with 115 adult hatchery chinook, 42 chinook jacks, and 885 sockeye harvested. Area fisheries will continue to be open to fishing for hatchery summer chinook through August 15. On August 16, the fall fishery will open.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – We sampled 39 sturgeon anglers (including 12 boats) with 30 legals released.

Hanford Reach – 6 boats, 16 anglers, 76 hours, 4 caught, 1 harvested, 1 legal + 2 shakers released (19 hours/fish)

Bass and Walleye

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Last week we sampled 9 walleye anglers (6 boats) in the Camas/Washougal area with 3 fish released.

Hanford Reach – Smallmouth bass: 6 boats, 10 anglers, 30 hours, 31 caught, 4 harvested (1 hour/fish)

Walleye: 11 boats, 18 anglers, 61 hours, 34 caught, 19 harvested (1.8 hours/fish)

Cowlitz Steelhead Limit Dropping To Two Due To Low Returns

It’s not just the Columbia River that’s seeing a low return of summer steelhead.

Fewer than expected are coming back to the Cowlitz, so state managers are reducing the daily limit from three to two, as well as dropping the requirement to keep any hatchery steelhead caught.

THE DAILY STEELHEAD LIMIT ON THE COWLITZ RIVER IS BEING DROPPED BY ONE STARTING NEXT MONDAY, JULY 31. ANNA RUNYARD CAUGHT THIS NICE SUMMER-RUN A COUPLE SEASONS AGO FISHING AT BARRIER DAM WITH A CORKY AND YARN. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

The change is effective next Monday, July 31, and affects anglers fishing from the Sparks Road/Lexington Bridge upstream to Barrier Dam.

“Low returns of summer steelhead to the Cowlitz Hatchery thus far this season make it necessary to reduce the daily limit as a precautionary measure to ensure enough fish can be collected to meet the hatchery broodstock needs,” says an emergency rule-change notice out from WDFW this afternoon.

According to escapement reports, 381 have returned so far to the Cowlitz Trout Hatchery, 307 to the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery.

At roughly the same point in 2016, those figures were 372 and 3,302; in 2015 they were 372 and 2,474; and in 2014 they were 460 and 4,503. In 2013, 2,009 had come back.

The daily limit on the Cowlitz below the Lexington Bridge has already been reduced to one because of this year’s low Columbia forecast, and for the month of August, none can be kept in those waters.

A fact sheet out from fishery managers today states that the A-run so far is just 10,418 at Bonneville Dam, “much less than expected” through July 25, which should have been 20,800 based on the forecast.

Pikeminnow Catches Dipping On Columbia, Snake

Pikeminnow catches dropped by more than 1,700 last week over the previous one, with 7,148 brought to stations on the Columbia and Snake Rivers July 17-23.

That figure is also less than half of what it was a month ago but reflective of the typical seasonal lull in the fishery that pays anglers to remove the native species that preys on young salmon and steelhead in the Columbia hydropower system.

THE PIKEMINNOW SPORT REWARD PROGRAM OFFERS INCENTIVES TO CATCH THE SPECIES FROM THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA UP TO TRI-CITIES, AND IN THE SNAKE FROM TRI-CITIES UP TO CLARKSTON. (PIKEMINNOW.ORG)

For the third straight week, Boyer Park on the Snake below Lower Granite Dam retained its spot as most productive, with a haul of 1,771 qualifying fish,

That’s nearly 1,000 more than the second best station, Greenbelt, also on the Snake, where 787 were brought in, according to the latest figures from program manager Eric Winther.

Coming in third was The Dalles, with 675, then Cathlamet, on the Lower Columbia, with 622.

Giles French had the highest catch per angler, with 15.2 for the 38 participants, followed by 9.3 at Cascade Locks and 8.9 at Boyer Park.

The overall average per angler was 5.8 pikeminnow for 1,235 participants, down about a fish a fisherman over the previous week.

Eight specially tagged pikeminnow were turned in last week, up from five the week before, with three at Columbia Point, and one each at Cathlamet, Gleason, Washougal, The Dalles and Greenbelt.

All totaled, 121,014 qualifying pikeminnow have been removed from the Columbia and Snake since the start of season May 1.

The Dalles has been most productive, with 43,613, followed by Columbia Point at 14,681 and Boyer Park 14,054.

Average catch is 6.9, with a range from 11.0 at The Dalles to 1.5 at Willow Grove and Umatilla.

Just over 200 tagged fish have been turned in.

Effort is 17,524 on the season.

The sport reward program pays anglers from $5 to $8 per pikeminnow, with tagged ones worth $500.

For more details, including fishing maps, check out pikeminnow.org.

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (7-19-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM JIMMY WATTS, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (7/15) flight, 162 salmonid boats and 49 Oregon bank anglers were counted from the Astoria-Megler Bridge to Bonneville Dam.

Gorge Bank: Weekly checking showed one adult Chinook kept, and two adult Chinook and four summer steelhead released for 61 salmon anglers; and 153 shad kept for 29 shad anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekly checking showed seven adult Chinook and one Chinook jack kept, plus six adult Chinook, one Chinook jack and eight steelhead released for 18 salmon boats (61 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekly checking showed two adult Chinook kept and three adult Chinook released for 57 salmon boats (99 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekly checking showed one adult Chinook and three summer steelhead kept, plus one steelhead released for 96 bank anglers.

Portland to Westport Boats: Weekly checking showed four adult Chinook, one sockeye and nine summer steelhead kept, plus two adult Chinook and six steelhead released for 69 boats (150 anglers).

Estuary Bank (Astoria-Megler Bridge to Wauna Power lines): Weekly checking showed no catch for one angler.

Estuary Boats (Astoria-Megler Bridge to Wauna Power lines): Weekly checking showed no catch for two salmon boats (four anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for four bank anglers.

The Dalles Pool: No report.

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for two bank anglers.

STURGEON

Gorge boats: Catch and release only. No report.

Troutdale boats: Catch and release only.  Weekly checking showed two sublegal and eight legal white sturgeon released for one boat (three anglers).

Portland to Wauna Power lines boats: Catch and release only. Weekly checking showed 11 sublegal and 10 legal white sturgeon released for two boats (four anglers).

Portland to Wauna Power lines bank: Catch and release only.  Weekly checking showed one legal white sturgeon released for one bank angler.

Estuary Boats (Buoy 10 to Wauna Power lines): Catch and release only. Weekly checking showed one green sturgeon, and 39 sublegal, 50 legal and 73 oversize white sturgeon released for eight boats (27 anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Catch and release only. Weekly checking showed no catch for two bank anglers.

The Dalles Pool: Catch and release only. No report.

John Day Pool: Catch and release only. Weekly checking showed one sublegal sturgeon released for two boats (five anglers).

WALLEYE

Troutdale boats: Weekly checking showed 18 walleye kept and eight walleye released for nine boats (18 anglers).

Bonneville Pool: No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed four walleye kept for two boats (six anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 167 walleye kept and 47 walleye released for 29 boats (57 anglers).

Snake’s Boyer Park Again Tops Among Pikeminnow Stations

Pikeminnow catches dipped below five figures for the first week since mid-May, with 8,867 brought to stations on the Columbia and Snake last week.

For the second straight week, Boyer Park retained its spot as most productive, with a July 10-16 haul of 2,762 qualifying fish, more than twice as many as The Dalles, where 1,140 were brought in, according to the latest figures from program manager Eric Winther

A MAP ON PIKEMINNOW.ORG SHOWS HOT SPOTS AROUND BOYER PARK, WHICH IS BELOW LOWER GRANITE DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER. (PIKEMINNOW.ORG)

Coming in third was Cathlamet, on the Lower Columbia, with 785, then Greenbelt, outside Clarkston, with 710.

Both the rise of Boyer and downtrending of the overall catch are typical for this time of year.

Boyer Park again had the highest catch per angler, with 11.7 for the 236 participants, down from an even 16.0 the previous week, followed by 10.2 at both Ridgefield and Washougal.

The overall average per angler was 6.9 pikeminnow for 1,279 participants.

All totaled, 113,866 qualifying pikeminnow that have been removed from the Columbia and Snake since the start of season May 1. The Dalles has been most productive, with 42,991, followed by Columbia Point at 14,329 and Boyer Park 12,288.

Five specially tagged pikeminnow were caught last week, down from 15 the week before, but with two at Washougal, and one each at Rainier, Ridgefield and Boyer Park.

The sport reward program pays anglers from $5 to $8 per pikeminnow, with tagged ones worth $500. The idea is to reduce the numbers of the native species that prey on young salmon and steelhead in the Columbia hydropower system.

For more details, including fishing maps, check out pikeminnow.org.