Tag Archives: columbia river

Disease Kills Large Number Of Ringold Steelhead Smolts

A disease outbreak killed roughly 75 percent of the summer steelhead smolts being reared at a Hanford Reach hatchery, a blow to a fishery and program that have had a tough few years.

THE REYES BROTHERS — ISSAC, LEVI AND IVAN — SHOW OFF A SUMMER-RUN STEELHEAD CAUGHT IN THE HANFORD REACH IN MARCH 2015. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

WDFW reports that it was able to release somewhere around 50,000 of the juvenile fish from Ringold Springs into the cooler waters of the Columbia River to give them “a fighting chance,” but couldn’t find backup stock for the other 150,000 or so that were lost.

“We actively tried to find replacements, but it was too late in the rearing cycle,” said Brian Lyon, the state hatchery complex manager, this morning. “We would’ve replaced them if we could have, believe me.”

The news was first reported on WDFW’s Medium blog Jan. 13.

Crews first detected what is known as “Ich,” or Ichthyophthirius multifilis, in December and treated a 2.5-acre pond used to rear nearly 200,000 steelhead, but were unable to stop the outbreak, so after a week and a half released the survivors.

The disease, which is spread by a parasite and affects the gills and skin of fish, was also found in other ponds at Ringold that hold coho and rainbow trout, but treatments were successful and few of those fish were lost, according to WDFW.

AN IMAGE POSTED BY WDFW SHOWS WHAT THE FISH DISEASE KNOWN AS ICH LOOKS LIKE THROUGH A MICROSCOPE. (WDFW)

It wasn’t clear how the steelhead came to be infected.

Ich exists in the Columbia and could have been carried into hatchery waters by predators — Lyon says that if a bird ate an infected fish then pooped as it flew over the ponds, it could transmit the disease that way.

Otters might have also been to blame. WDFW says there are deterrents at the hatchery but sometimes hungry critters can worm their way in.

The last Ich outbreak at Ringold was 10 years ago, WDFW reported, but the 60-degree spring waters that feed the ponds are ideal growing conditions for the disease, according to Lyon.

Releasing the surviving steelhead into the cooler waters of the Columbia should have given them a “better” chance of survival, his agency reported. In December the big river was running in the upper 40s and it is now in the upper 30s below Priest Rapids Dam, at the head of the Hanford Reach.

Lyon said the smolts were about a year old at the time of the outbreak but unfortunately no surplus fish were available at other hatcheries, including Wells further up the Columbia.

The steelhead were being reared for return in 2021’s lower Hanford Reach fishery. Angling for summer-runs there has been poor in recent seasons, with the waters closed to retention this past fall and shut down early in 2018 to try and ensure that broodstock goals were reached.

Ich was blamed for the loss of about 6,100 wild and hatchery adult Chinook in Willapa Basin streams in 2015, while this past fall another naturally occurring disease, cryptobia, hit fall kings in rivers on Oregon’s North Coast.

WDFW said it is reviewing the Ich outbreak at Ringold “to determine whether measures can be put in place to prevent a re-occurrence.”

SW WA, Columbia Gorge Pools Fishing Report (1-22-20)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Washington Columbia River and Tributary Fishing Report Jan 13-19, 2019

Mainstem Columbia River

Salmon/Steelhead:

John Day Pool – 4 bank anglers released two steelhead.

Sturgeon:

Bonneville Pool – Two bank anglers had no catch.  20 boats/59 rods kept six legal sturgeon and released 87 sublegal and one oversize sturgeon.

JACOB CULVER SHOWS OFF A BONNEVILLE POOL STURGEON CAUGHT SEVERAL SEASONS BACK. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

The Dalles Pool – Seven bank anglers released one sublegal sturgeon.  10 boats/25 rods kept four legal sturgeon and released 12 sublegal sturgeon.

John Day Pool – 20 bank anglers had no catch.  14 boats/31 rods released one sublegal sturgeon.

Walleye:

Bonneville Pool – 1 boat/1 rod had no catch.

The Dalles Pool – 1 bank angler had no catch.

John Day Pool – 1 bank angler had no catch.  2 boats/3 rods kept three walleye.

Bass:

John Day Pool – One bank angler had no catch.

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Grays River – Two bank anglers had no catch.

Elochoman River – 39 bank anglers kept 20 steelhead.  1 boat/2 rods kept two steelhead.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – One bank angler had no catch.

Above the I-5 Br – Six bank anglers had no catch.

Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

SW WA, Columbia Gorge Pools Fishing Report (1-14-20)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Washington Columbia River and Tributary Fishing Report Jan 6-12, 2019

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River

John Day Pool – 12 bank anglers kept one steelhead and released four steelhead.

Sturgeon:

Bonneville Pool – Seven bank anglers had no catch.  13 boats/39 rods kept 10 legal sturgeon, released 64 sublegal and two oversize sturgeon.

KATIE CRAIG CAUGHT THIS DALLES POOL STURGEON IN FEBRUARY 2016. SHE WAS FISHING THE COLUMBIA RESERVOIR WITH HUBSTER NATHAN. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

The Dalles Pool – Six bank anglers released one sublegal sturgeon.

John Day Pool – 15 bank anglers had no catch.  17 boats/36 rods kept one legal sturgeon and released one oversize sturgeon.

Reservoir Estimated
Total Harvest
% of Guideline Guideline
Bonneville 146 29 500
The Dalles 74 55 135
John Day 18 17 105

Walleye:

John Day Pool – 1 boat/3 rods had no catch.

Bass:

John Day Pool – Two bank anglers had no catch.

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries 

Elochoman River – 11 bank anglers kept 12 steelhead.

(Cowlitz) Above the I-5 Br – One bank angler had no catch.

  • Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

SW WA Tribs, Columbia Gorge Pools Fishing Report (1-8-20)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Fishery Reports:

Salmon/Steelhead:

John Day Pool – 15 bank anglers released 15 steelhead.  1 boat/1 rod had no catch.

Sturgeon:

Walleye:

Bonneville Pool- 1 boat/2 rods had no catch.

The Dalles Pool- 2 boats/3 rods released two walleye.

John Day Pool- 1 bank angler had no catch.  6 boats/12 rods kept 13 walleye.

COLUMBIA WALLEYE ANGLERS LIKE JIM DEATHERAGE ARE BEGINNING TO TARGET TROPHIES AND EATERS IN THE POOLS AND TAILRACES OF THE BIG RIVER. DEATHERAGE CAUGHT THIS ONE LAST JANUARY WHILE FISHING WITH JERRY HAN IN THE TRI-CITIES AREA. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Bass:

John Day Pool- 1 boat/3 rods kept six bass.

 Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Grays River – 2 bank anglers had no catch.

Elochoman River – 22 bank anglers kept 12 steelhead.  3 boats/4 rods kept one steelhead and released one steelhead and one coho.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 9 bank rods had no catch.

Above the I-5 Br:  11 bank rods had no catch.  1 boat/3 rods had no catch.

Remembering Fishing Guide Bob Toman

By Buzz Ramsey (with help from Bill Monroe)

Bob Toman, an iconic Pacific Northwest fishing guide, fisheries advocate and my longtime friend, passed away in early December of 2019, just shy of his 71st birthday.

BOB TOMAN, 2011. (VIA BUZZ RAMSEY)

Born Robert Norris Toman, Bob grew up near Oregon’s Clackamas River where his father instilled in him a passion for fish and fishing. After his graduation from high school, Bob attended a year of college and guided in British Columbia before being drafted into the U.S. Army and deployed to Vietnam. Stationed at a forward fire base near the demilitarized zone, Bob earned two Purple Hearts before his honorable discharge.

Upon his return home, Bob worked many years for the old Wigwam Store and Larry’s Sports Center (now Fisherman’s Marine & Outdoor) in Oregon City, Oregon. It was during this time, in the mid-1970s, that I met Bob and when he began guiding on the Willamette, Clackamas, Columbia and Deschutes Rivers and Tillamook Bay.

BUZZ RAMSEY AND TOMAN WITH A WILLAMETTE SPRINGER, 1980. (VIA BUZZ RAMSEY)

He was tireless in his effort to find a way to catch more and bigger fish. I remember him tracking every conceivable factor in a log book whenever he and/or a client landed a fish. That book had columns for every conceivable aspect: air and water temperature, turbidity, water level, time of day, overcast, cloudy, sunny, rainy, barometric pressure, humidity and other variables I can’t remember. After a few years he had some computer expert (remember this was back in the 1980s) enter all the data in an effort to discover what environmental factors triggered fish to bite.

When I later asked him what all the data revealed he laughed and said, “When they bite, they bite; and when they don’t, they don’t.”

It was his constant tinkering with lures that did make a difference, though. He was the only salmon and steelhead angler I knew who experimented with plug design. Back when I worked at Luhr Jensen we often relied on Bob for his input on lure design or modifications to improve existing ones.

But it wasn’t just plugs, Bob understood spinners and had dissected them to the point he had discovered that the right number of blade revolutions per minute appealed to fish more than a blade revolving outside the desirable range. His designs proved so effective that Yakima Bait began marketing a series of Bob Toman-branded spinners.

One spinner blade that he called Thumper was designed to drag more so that he could get it out and away from the boat when trolling shallow-water estuaries on the coast — all while maintaining the right number of revolutions per minute, of course.

TOMAN WITH A STEELHEAD CAUGHT ON THE DESCHUTES, 2010. (VIA BUZZ RAMSEY)

It was Bob’s influence that inspired me to take the lead on plug and lure design. Given my belief that two heads are better than one, I’d often send lures to Bob for his evaluation before committing to the final tooling.

He was always experimenting with lure color. After all, as most fishermen know, there are days when having the right color has everything to do with success. Working for a company that makes fishing lures we were/are always in need of high-quality photos. Bob would often send me images of fish he’d caught but in a color Yakima Bait didn’t offer. I finally said, “Can’t you catch one on a color the company actually makes?” He did send me a few images, but never quit experimenting by painting his own.

Bob tirelessly supported conservation, restoration and both wild and hatchery fish, and worked with many state, federal and private biologists to better understand fish and improve runs. His endless curiosity and expertise on fish and fishing were frequently tapped by his many friends, fellow fishing guides, and me.

More 2020 Columbia Salmon Forecasts, Outlooks Posted; Sockeye A Brighter Spot

Columbia salmon managers are rolling out more 2020 forecasts and sockeye might be a bright spot next year.

Nearly a quarter million sockeye are expected to return to the big river, with just under 202,000 of those headed for the relatively cool Brewster Pool before departing up the Okanogan/Okanagan.

TYLER FLETCHER SHOWS OFF A PAIR OF SOCKEYE CAUGHT AT WELLS DAM DURING 2014’S FISHERY. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

While forecasters are still dialing in their sockeye prognostication skills, it would be a significant uptick over 2019’s return of 63,222 against a forecast of 94,400. It would also be the eighth largest run since 1980, though still only a third of 2014’s record year.

Lake Wenatchee sockeye anglers could also see a significant bump from this year’s actual return of just 7,900; the prediction calls for 39,400.

As for all-important Columbia spring Chinook, the 2020 forecasts leave as much to be desired as last week’s news of very low predictions for the Cowlitz, Kalama, Wind, Drano, etc.

Managers expect 81,700 upper Columbia and Snake springers, which is about 10,000 more than actually returned in 2019 but also 17,600 less than were forecast.

Along with the annual 30 percent buffer to protect against overforecasting, this spring’s mainstem fishery was constrained by very low returns to the Cowlitz and Lewis, which led to a closure of the Columbia below Warrior Rock to protect springers headed to those two tributaries. Returns to both are again expected to be low.

The Willamette spring Chinook forecast is for 40,800, up a bit from this year’s forecast which didn’t pan out, with only 27,292 back.

The overall forecast of 135,800 springers to the mouth of the Columbia is the fewest back to 1999.

The Columbia summer Chinook forecast is slightly better than last year, with 38,300 expected, roughly 2,000 more than were forecast in 2019 but which also led to no opportunities to target them until later in the season and only in the upper river above Wenatchee.

Anglers are increasingly skeptical of the forecasts, but managers continue to point to very poor ocean conditions as having a strong influence on numbers of returning salmon.  The Blob is back in the North Pacific, maybe not as strong as 2014 and 2015, but still likely impacting prey and marine habitat of kings, sockeye, coho and other stocks.

Managers also put out preliminary word on fall Chinook and coho expectations, and how 2019 shaped up:

2019 Preliminary Returns
• Adult fall Chinook return was predicted to be 349,600 fish.
• Preliminary return is slightly above the forecast.
• Bright jack return appears to be improved over 2018. Tule jack return appears to be slightly improved over 2018.

2020 Outlook
• Bright stocks should be similar to the 2019 preliminary return.
• Tule stocks should be similar to the 2019 preliminary return.
• Ocean conditions between 2015 and 2019 were among the worst observed during the last 21 years and are likely continuing to have a strong influence on the fall Chinook return in 2020.

Columbia River Coho
• 2019 preliminary return is about 30% of the preseason forecast of 611,300.
• Coho jack return to the Columbia River is less than 50% of the recent three-year average.

Tule Chinook power ocean seasons, upriver brights the inriver fisheries. In the Columbia’s Hanford Reach, 30,678 angler trips yielded a catch of 11,820 adult kings, an improvement of more then 3,100 fish over 2018, according to biologist Paul Hoffarth.

The release of the 2020 forecasts and outlooks mark the start of determining how many, if any, fish are available for harvest in the ocean and rivers and setting seasons at North of Falcon later in winter.

Yuasa Looks Back At 2019 Salmon Seasons, Towards 2020’s

Editor’s note: The following is Mark Yuasa’s monthly fishing newsletter, Get Hooked on Reel Times With Mark, and is run with permission.

By Mark Yuasa, Director of Grow Boating Programs, Northwest Marine Trade Association

The holiday “to do” list has pretty much taken priority over getting out on the water, but if you’re like me that also means it’s time to reassess salmon fisheries in 2019 and start thinking about what lies ahead in 2020.

I had a chance to chat with Mark Baltzell, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Puget Sound salmon manager, and Wendy Beeghly, the head WDFW coastal salmon manager, who provided insight about the future and a somewhat forgetful past.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

“I believe the best way to describe Puget Sound salmon fisheries overall in 2019 is a mixed bag,” said Baltzell. “We had some unexpected good salmon fishing and returns while others were as poor as the preseason forecasts had predicted.”

“Summer chinook fisheries were for the most part better than we expected despite the reduced seasons,” Baltzell said. “Early on we saw some really good chinook fishing in May and June in southern Puget Sound (Marine Catch Area 13 south of the Narrows Bridge).”

It wasn’t uncommon for Area 13 anglers during those months to hook into a limit of early summer hatchery kings, 10 to 18 pounds with a few larger, off Point Fosdick and Fox Island’s east side at Gibson Point, Fox Point in Hale Passage, northwest corner at the Sand Spit, Toy Point and Concrete Dock “Fox Island Fishing Pier.”
In the past few years, central Puget Sound (Area 10) starting in June has become a hot bed for resident coho – 2- to 4-pounds – and this past summer was no exception to the norm. On certain days you’d find hundreds of boats from Jefferson Head to Kingston and in the shipping lane.

“We had a coho fishery in Area 10 from June through August that was really good and has turned into a successful early summer salmon fishery,” Baltzell said.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

The Tulalip Bubble Terminal Fishery within Area 8-2 opened in June and was another location that proved to be fairly decent for early summer kings in the 10- to 15-pound range.

When July rolled around the Strait of Juan de Fuca (Areas 5 and 6) opened for hatchery kings and was off and on for much of the summer.

The San Juan Islands (Area 7) had a brief hatchery king fishery from July 1-31, which saw plenty of fishing pressure and a much higher than expected success rate.

Preliminary WDFW data during the July Area 7 fishery showed 5,310 boats with 11,739 anglers kept 3,019 hatchery kings (10 wild fish were illegally retained) along with 451 hatchery and 982 wild chinook released. The best fishing period occurred from July 1-14. WDFW test fishing showed the Area 7 legal-size chinook mark rate was 84.6 percent and overall mark rate was 78.6.

The summer hatchery king fishery in northern and central Puget Sound (Areas 9 and 10), started off poorly from July 25-28 due to extreme low tides. Once the tidal fluctuation improved as more dates were tacked onto the fishery catch rates picked up rapidly.
During an 11-day fishing period from July 25 to Aug. 4, the success rate in Area 9 was a 0.23 fish per rod average with a total of 7,779 boats with 17,147 anglers keeping 3,446 hatchery chinook (six unmarked were illegally retained) and released 1,124 hatchery and 756 wild chinook plus 697 coho kept and 747 released. WDFW test fishing showed the legal-size chinook mark rate was around 88.0 percent.

The Area 10 hatchery chinook fishery was open daily July 25 through Aug. 16 and a total of 7,606 boats with 15,900 anglers kept 3,200 hatchery chinook (17 wild were illegally retained) and released 994 hatchery and 1,579 wild chinook plus 2,013 coho kept and 463 released. WDFW test fishing showed the legal-size chinook mark rate was around 50.0 percent.

Summer hatchery chinook action in south-central Puget Sound (Area 11) stumbled out of the gates when it opened July 1 and was peppered with a few glory moments until it closed Aug. 25 for chinook retention. In Area 11, an estimated 12,264 boats with 22,818 anglers from July 1-Aug. 25 retained 212 chinook and released 164 hatchery and 465 wild chinook.

“We saw a lot more legal-size chinook in Puget Sound than the FRAM (Fishery Regulation Assessment Model) had predicted and more legal hatchery fish around than we had seen in past years,” Baltzell said.

In general, the wild chinook stock assessment seemed to be somewhat better in some parts of Puget Sound. Places like the Tumwater Falls Hatchery in deep South Sound even had a few nice 20-pound females return.

Heading into late summer, the Puget Sound pink returns were off the charts good here and there while other pink runs were downright dismal. Salmon anglers chasing pinks managed to find some excellent fishing from mid-August through September.

“In some places it seemed like we had twice the abundance of pinks and others didn’t get as many as we had thought,” Baltzell said. “The Puyallup did really good and a decent number of pinks pass(ed) over the Buckley fish trap and was up into the historical day numbers. But, the Skagit and Stillaguamish weren’t so good for pinks and it was the same for coho too.”

“At this point were going to be OK in places like the Snohomish for coho,” Baltzell said. “Both the tribes and state did all the things necessary to help ensure we’d exceed our hatchery coho broodstock (goals), and that did eventually happen.”

Other locations like the Green River met coho broodstock goals although that didn’t occur until late last month. In Hood Canal, the Quilcene early coho return came back less than half the preseason expectation and the size of jack coho was much smaller.”

“There was a size issue throughout the Puget Sound area and the lower returns had us taking a precautionary move to a one coho daily limit,” Baltzell said. “It was the right move in retrospect and helped us move more coho into the rivers.”

The mid- and southern-Puget Sound and Hood Canal chum forecast of 642,740 doesn’t appear to be materializing and at this point WDFW downgraded the run to almost half the preseason expectation.

“It is really hard for us as fishery managers to pinpoint the cause for all of it,” Baltzell said. “We can point the finger to marine survival and conditions in the ocean like the warm blob that sat off the coast up to Alaska for a while. We also know the Canadian sockeye runs tanked this year and saw it in our own like Lake Washington that virtually got nothing back.”

The ocean salmon fisheries from Neah Bay south to Ilwaco between June 22 through Sept. 30 encountered a mixed bag of success.

“Fishing was pretty much what I expected it to be,” Beeghly said. “The chinook fishery was slow except up north off Neah Bay where it was pretty good this past summer. The majority of chinook we see in ocean fisheries are headed for the Columbia River and their forecasts were down so the poor fishing came as no surprise.”
Close to a million coho were forecasted to flood the Columbia River this past summer and that too was a downer.

“The coho fishing wasn’t quite as good as I had expected, but we saw some decent fishing at Ilwaco and Westport,” Beeghly said. “The Columbia coho forecast didn’t come back like we originally thought but better than the past three or so years. The hatchery coho mark rate was lower than anticipated.”

Coast wide only 51.1 percent of the hatchery coho quota of 159,600 was achieved, and 41.4 percent of the chinook quota of 26,250 was caught.

Areas north of Leadbetter Point saw a coho mark rate of somewhere under 50 percent and Ilwaco where data was still being crunched might come out to be a little higher than that.

Once the fish arrived in the Lower Columbia at Buoy 10 it appeared the catch of hatchery coho fell well short of expectations with a lot of wild fish released although some glory moments occurred early on.

Coastal and Columbia River chinook forecasts should come to light around the Christmas holidays. The Pacific Fishery Management Council preseason meeting will occur in mid-February. That is just ahead of when Oregon Production Index coho forecasts will be released.

As Baltzell rubbed the crystal ball looking into 2020 it still remains pretty foggy at this point but general expectations aren’t rosy.

“It would be fair for me to say that I wouldn’t expect anything much better in 2020 than what we saw in 2019,” Baltzell said. “We have no forecast information at this point but I wouldn’t expect a rosier outlook as far as chinook goes for next year.”

State, federal and tribal fishery managers in 2020 will be faced with a lot of same wild chinook stock issues as in recent past years like mid-Hood Canal and Stillaguamish. Add on top of that killer whale orca issues as well as the pending Puget Sound Chinook Harvest Management Plan that has been looming a dark cloud for the past three years with no end in sight just yet.

“If I had to gauge things out my gut reaction is we’ll likely have to take a more cautionary approach again next year,” Baltzell said.

The WDFW general salmon forecast public meeting will occur Feb. 28 at the DSHS Office Building 2 Auditorium, 1115 Washington Street S.E. in Olympia. The first North of Falcon meeting is March 16 at the Lacey Community Center and the second meeting is March 30 at the Lynnwood Embassy Suites. Final seasons will determined April 5-11 at the Hilton Hotel in Vancouver, WA.

Final summer ocean salmon sport fishing catch data

Ilwaco (including Oregon) – 44,297 anglers from June 22 to September 30 caught 4,018 chinook (56% of the area guideline of 7,150) and 53,377 coho (67% of the area sub-quota of 79,800).

Westport – 23,465 anglers from June 22 to September 30 caught 2,336 chinook (18% of the area guideline of 12,700) and 20,221 coho (34% of the area sub-quota of 59,050), plus 700 pinks.

La Push – 2,076 from June 22 to September 30 caught 449 chinook (41% of the area guideline of 1,100) and 1,752 coho (43% of the area sub-quota of 4,050), plus 206 pinks. Late-season fishery October 1-13 saw 240 anglers with 164 chinook (64% over the fishery guideline) and 16 coho (16% of the fishery quota).

Neah Bay – 10,116 anglers from June 22 to September 30 caught 3,895 chinook (75% of the area guideline of 5,200) and 6,223 coho (37% of the area sub-quota of 16,600), plus 869 pinks. Chinook retention closed July 14.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

Dungeness crab fishery reopens in Areas 8-2 and 8-1

The east side of Whidbey Island (Marine Catch Areas 8-1 and 8-2) has reopened daily for Dungeness crab fishing through Dec. 31. WDFW says crab abundance remains good indicating that the quota could be increased in-season. Crab pots must be set or pulled from a vessel and is only allowed from one hour before official sunrise through one hour after official sunset.

Dungeness crab fishing is also open daily through Dec. 31 in the Strait of Juan de Fuca (Areas 4B, 5 and 6); San Juan Islands (Area 7); and northern Puget Sound (Area 9 except waters north of the Hood Canal bridge to a line connecting Olele Point and Foulweather Bluff).

NW Fishing Derby Series hits refresh button in 2020

After 17 wonderful years since the derby series began in 2004, we’ve decided it’s time for a change and rebranded it to the “Northwest Fishing Derby Series.”

Our hope is that anglers will like the direction as we diversify the fish species our events target while boosting the number of derbies to 20 in 2020 up from 14 events in 2019.

New events are the Lake Stevens Kokanee Derby on May 23; For the Love of Cod Derbies in Coos Bay/Charleston areas and Brookings, Oregon March 21-22 and March 28-29 respectively; Father’s Day Big Bass Classic on Tenmile Lake at Lakeside, Oregon on June 21-22; and the Something Catchy Kokanee Derby at Lake Chelan on April 18-19.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

The highlight is a chance to enter and win a $75,000 fully loaded, grand-prize all-white KingFisher 2025 Escape HT boat powered with Yamaha 200hp and 9.9hp trolling motors on an EZ Loader Trailer. One of our newest sponsors of the derby – Shoxs Seats (www.shoxs.com) – has provided a pair of top-of-the-line seats that are engineered for maximum comfort in the roughest of seas.

The good news is anglers who enter any of the 20 derbies don’t need to catch a fish to win this beautiful boat and motor package!

A huge “thank you” to our other 2020 sponsors who make this series such a success are Silver Horde and Gold Star Lures; Scotty Downriggers; Burnewiin Accessories; Raymarine Electronics; WhoDat Tower; Dual Electronics; Tom-n-Jerry’s Marine; Master Marine; NW Sportsman Magazine; The Reel News; Outdoor Emporium and Sportco; Harbor Marine; Prism Graphics; Lamiglas Rods; 710 ESPN The Outdoor Line; Salmon & Steelhead Journal; and Salmon Trout Steelheader Magazine.

First up are the Resurrection Salmon Derby on Feb. 1-2 (already 50 percent of tickets have been sold as of Nov. 13); Friday Harbor Salmon Classic on Feb. 6-8; and Roche Harbor Salmon Classic on Feb. 13-15. A new website is currently being designed and will be launched sometime in mid-December but for now, go to http://www.nwsalmonderbyseries.com/.

In the meantime, take a break from holiday shopping and hit up a lake or open saltwater areas for a feisty fish tugging on the end of your line.

I’ll see you on the water!

SW WA Fishing Report (11-19-19)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS FORWARDED BY BRYAN SPELLMAN, WDFW

Washington Tributary Fishing Report Nov 11-17, 2019

Salmon/Steelhead:
Columbia River Tributaries

Grays River – 4 bank anglers had no catch

Elochoman River – 2 bank anglers had no catch.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – 8 bank rods had no catch. 9 boats/21 rods kept 13 coho and released 1 Chinook.

Above the I-5 Br – 15 bank rods kept one coho and released two Chinook. 3 boats/7 rods released one Chinook and three coho.

IN THIS IMAGE DREDGED OUT OF THE WAY, WAY, WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY BACK FILE, FALL SALMON ANGLERS FISH THE LOWER COWLITZ ABOVE AND BELOW THE MOUTH OF THE TOUTLE FOR COHO. (CHRIS SPENCER)

Kalama River – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Lewis River – 15 bank anglers released three coho. 5 boats/12 rods released one Chinook and one coho.

Washougal River – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – 31 bank anglers kept 10 Chinook, 12 coho and released three Chinook and one coho. 4 boats/14 rods kept one Chinook and 18 coho.

Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

SW WA Fishing Report (11-12-19)

THE FOLLOWING WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

November 12, 2019

Tributary Fishery Reports

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Grays River – 4 bank anglers had no catch

Elochoman River – 2 bank anglers had no catch.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – 84 bank rods kept five coho and one coho jack. 42 boats/110 rods kept 28 coho, 3 coho jacks and released 4 Chinook and 42 coho.

Above the I-5 Br – 44 bank rods kept three coho and released 37 Chinook. 5 boats/15 rods kept five coho, 3 coho jacks and released one Chinook and four coho.

Kalama River – 10 bank anglers had no catch.

Lewis River – 32 bank anglers kept one coho. 16 boats/43 rods kept four Chinook, 2 Chinook jacks, 10 coho, one coho jack and released five Chinook and three coho.

TRAVIS GOTTSCH SHOWS OFF A NICE LEWIS RIVER FALL CHINOOK CAUGHT A FEW MID-OCTOBERS BACK AND FORWARDED BY HIS PROUD UNCLE PATRICK. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – 39 bank anglers kept 15 Chinook, 13 coho, 2 coho jacks and released 15 Chinook and 11 coho.

Klickitat above #5 Fishway – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

SW WA Fishing Report (11-4-19)

THE FOLLOWING WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Washington Columbia River and Tributary Fishing Report

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Grays River – 6 bank anglers released six coho.

BARRY DUBNOW SHOWS OFF A NICE MIDFALL CHINOOK CAUGHT ON THE LEWIS RIVER SEVERAL SEASONS BACK. HE WAS HOVER FISHING WITH GUIDE RON HOLT. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – 35 bank rods kept one coho and released one coho. 7 boats/20 rods kept 24 coho and released one Chinook and four coho.

Above the I-5 Br – 17 bank rods kept two coho and released 18 Chinook and 1 coho.  1 boat/1 rod had no catch.

Kalama River – 18 bank anglers had no catch.  2 boats/5 rods had no catch.

Lewis River – 19 bank anglers kept two coho and one coho jack.  13 boats/44 rods kept five Chinook, 2 Chinook jacks, 5 coho, 3 coho jacks and released one Chinook and four coho.

Wind River – 1 boat/1 rod had no catch.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – 16 bank anglers kept seven coho and released two Chinook.

 

  • Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

Lower Col mainstem sport Oct 28-31, 2019

Bonneville bank: 26 anglers with 7 coho kept and 6 Chinook released
Camas/Washougal boat: 5 anglers with nothing
I-5 area boat: 3 anglers with nothing
Woodland boat: 1 angler with 1 coho kept
Kalama bank: 2 anglers with nothing
Kalama boat: 5 anglers with nothing
Longview bank: 2 anglers with nothing
Longview boat: 7 anglers with 3 coho kept