Tag Archives: columbia river

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools, SW WA Fishing Report (6-18-18)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORTS ORIGINATED WITH ODFW AND WDFW AND WERE TRANSMITTED BY TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Columbia River Angling Report

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On Saturday’s (6/16) flight, 113 salmonid boats and 52 Oregon bank anglers were counted from the Astoria-Megler Bridge to Bonneville Dam.  Boat anglers fishing in the Goble to Beaver area, averaged 2.40 steelhead and 0.60 sockeye caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing the Portland to Westport area, averaged 0.04 Chinook and 0.13 steelhead caught per angler.

STURGEON RETENTION ON THE LOWER COLUMBIA ENDED EARLIER THIS MONTH, BUT NOT BEFORE ELISE PASSMORE CAUGHT THIS ONE ON THE SECOND TO LAST DAY OF THE SEASON BELOW CATHLAMET. CATCH-AND-RELEASE REMAINS OPEN. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for six salmonid bank anglers; and 1,844 shad kept, plus 92 shad released for 176 shad anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed 220 shad kept, plus 50 shad released for five boats (18 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for three salmonid boats (four anglers); and two shad kept for one boat (three anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed four steelhead kept, plus two adult Chinook and two steelhead released for 46 bank anglers.

Portland to St. Helens Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for three salmonid boats (nine anglers); and one shad kept for one boat (two anglers).

Goble to Beaver (Clatskanie) Boats: Weekend checking showed eight steelhead kept, plus four steelhead and three sockeye released for five boats (20 anglers).

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank: No report.

Westport to Buoy 10 Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for five boats (16 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for 10 salmonid bank anglers; and no catch for two salmonid boats (five anglers).  Shad anglers caught 98 shad for 53 bank anglers, and 12 shad for one boat (three anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for two salmonid bank anglers; and no catch for 10 salmonid boats (16 anglers).  Shad anglers caught 28 shad for six bank anglers, and 54 shad for two boats (10 anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for two salmonid bank anglers; and three adult Chinook kept, plus one coho released for 12 salmonid boats (25 anglers).  Shad anglers caught 2,065 shad for 61 boats (200 anglers).

STURGEON

Gorge Boats:  Closed for retention. No report.

Troutdale Boats:  Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed one sublegal sturgeon released for one boat (three anglers).

Portland to Wauna Powerlines Boats:  Closed for retention. No report.

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank:  Closed for retention. No report.

Buoy 10 to Wauna Powerlines Boats:  Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed 15 sublegal and 15 oversize sturgeon released for one boat (four anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Closed for retention.  Weekend checking showed six legal white sturgeon kept, plus 20 sublegal and six oversize sturgeon released for 42 bank anglers; and 99 legal white sturgeon kept, plus 796 sublegal, nine legal and 22 oversize sturgeon released for 94 boats (253 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Closed for retention.  Weekend checking showed three legal white sturgeon kept, plus 12 sublegal sturgeon released for 14 bank anglers; and 24 legal white sturgeon kept, plus 228 sublegal, five legal and 14 oversize sturgeon released for 21 boats (67 anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Closed for retention.  Weekend checking showed four sublegal, eight legal and nine oversize sturgeon released for six boats (21 anglers).

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (three anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 43 walleye kept, plus three walleye released for 11 boats (25 anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 109 walleye kept, plus 19 walleye released for 30 boats (91 anglers).

Washington Columbia River mainstem and its tributaries sport sampling summaries for June 11-17

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br. downstream:  6 bank anglers had no catch.  Above the I-5 Br:  17 bank anglers released 2 cutts.  25 boat anglers kept 2 adult spring Chinook and 11 steelhead.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 83 spring Chinook adults, 40 summer-run steelhead,  and one winter-run steelhead during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

Tacoma Power also released ten spring Chinook adults into Lake Scanewa near Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 5,100 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, June 18. Water visibility is 15 feet and the water temperature is 49.9 degrees F.

Kalama River – 6 bank anglers had no catch. 6 boat anglers kept 3 steelhead.

Lewis River (North Fork) – 15 bank anglers had no catch.

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Megler-Astoria Bridge upstream to Bonneville Dam – Up to 2 hatchery steelhead may be retained.  Release all sockeye.  Fishing at night is permitted in Washington waters.  Release all adult Chinook through June 21 and July 5-31.

Sturgeon

Bonneville and The Dalles pools – During the one-day retention fishery last Friday, boat anglers averaged just over a legal kept per boat from each pool..   Bank anglers averaged a legal kept per every 7 rods in Bonneville Pool and one for every 4 rods in The Dalles Pool.

Trout

Tacoma Power released 5,200 rainbow trout into Mayfield Lake.  No report on angling success.

Shad

Bank anglers just below Bonneville Dam averaged 4 shad per rod based on mainly incomplete trips while boat anglers averaged just over 8 fish per rod based on completed trips this past weekend.

Nearly 2.6 million shad had been counted at Bonneville Dam through June 17.  .

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (6-12-18)

THE FOLLOWING FISHING REPORT ORIGINATED WITH ODFW AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Current & Upcoming Fishing Opportunities:

*         Spring Chinook angling is open through Friday June 15 to both boat and bank anglers from Tongue Point upstream to Bonneville Dam; and from Tower Island Power Lines upstream to the Oregon/Washington border above McNary Dam, plus the banks only between Bonneville Dam and Tower Island Power Lines.  The bag limit is two adult salmonids.

*         Angling for shad is open from Buoy 10 upstream to Bonneville Dam.

CONNOR THUN SHOWS OFF A LOWER COLUMBIA STURGEON HE CAUGHT ON — GET THIS — PEANUT BUTTER AND SAND SHRIMP. (VIA BUZZ RAMSEY)

*         White sturgeon retention is closed from Buoy 10 upstream to McNary Dam but remains an option for catch and released fishing.  Anglers are reminded that spawning sanctuaries are in effect (see special regulations for details).

*         On Friday June 15, Bonneville and The Dalles pools will be open to the retention of white sturgeon (see special regulations for details).

*         The McNary Pool is open to the retention of legal white sturgeon through July 31.  Anglers are reminded that spawning sanctuaries are in effect (see special regulations details).

*         Walleye angling is good in The Dalles and John Day pools.

Columbia River regulation updates for salmon, steelhead, shad and sturgeon can be found above.

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

Salmonid angling effort was low this past weekend, most likely due to the poor weather conditions.   Boat anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.33 Chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing the Westport to Buoy 10 area averaged 0.09 steelhead caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the Portland to Westport area averaged 0.06 Chinook and 0.10 steelhead caught per angler.

Gorge Bank: Weekly checking showed five adult Chinook kept for 22 bank anglers; and weekend checking of shad anglers showed 2,564 shad kept, plus 51 shad released for 191 shad anglers.

Gorge Boats (below Beacon Rock): Weekend checking showed one adult Chinook kept for three salmonid boats (11 anglers); and 685 shad kept for 11 shad boats (33 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for one salmonid boat (three anglers); and no catch for one shad boat (two anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekend checking showed three adult Chinook and five steelhead kept for 52 bank anglers.

Portland to St. Helens Boats: Weekend checking showed no catch for four salmonid boats (nine anglers).

Goble to Beaver (Clatskanie) Boats: No report.

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank: No report.

Westport to Buoy 10 Boats: Weekend checking showed one steelhead released for four boats (11 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for five bank anglers.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed one adult Chinook kept for 11 bank anglers.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed one adult Chinook released for six bank anglers; and four adult Chinook kept for eight boats (21 anglers).

STURGEON

Gorge Boats:  Closed for retention. No report.

Troutdale Boats:  Closed for retention. No report.

Portland to Wauna Powerlines:  Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed eight sublegal sturgeon released for one boat (four anglers).

Wauna Powerlines to Clatsop Spit Bank:  Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed one legal white sturgeon kept for 17 bank anglers.

Buoy 10 to Wauna Powerlines Boats:  Closed for retention. Weekend checking showed 139 legal white sturgeon kept, plus 244 sublegal, 253 oversize and two green sturgeon released for 121 boats (401 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Closed for retention.  No report.

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Closed for retention.  No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Closed for retention.  No report.

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool: No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 53 walleye kept for 11 boats (23 anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one bank angler; and 152 walleye kept, plus seven walleye released for 16 boats (43 anglers).

States Add Columbia Springer, Sturgeon Days

THE FOLLOWING IS ODFW PR

Fishery managers from Oregon and Washington extended the ongoing recreational spring Chinook fishing season on the lower Columbia River, set a one-day white sturgeon season  in the estuary, and approved a two-fish bag limit on Chinook above Bonneville Dam today during a joint state hearing.

Andy Schneider holds a Columbia Estuary Sturgeon caught on a recent retention day. (ANDY SCHNEIDER)

 Downstream of Bonneville Dam, the states approved a nine-day extension to the ongoing spring Chinook season starting June 7 and continuing through June 15. The effective area is from the Tongue Point/Rocky Point line up to the boat and bank deadlines near Bonneville Dam. The bag limit is up to two adult salmonids (Chinook, coho, or steelhead) per day, and only hatchery fish may be kept.

From Bonneville Dam upstream to the OR/WA border, the ongoing spring Chinook season was modified to allow fishermen to keep two adult hatchery Chinook per day instead of one beginning June 7.

The spring Chinook seasons were approved in light of catch and fish passage information that affirmed a previous forecast of 116,500 upriver spring Chinook returning to the river mouth, leaving additional fish for harvest.

Fishery managers from the two states also set a one-day white sturgeon retention season for Saturday, June 9, ending at 2 p.m. on that day. The open area is the mainstem Columbia River from Wauna powerlines downstream to the river mouth at Buoy 10, including Youngs Bay and all adjacent Washington tributaries.

The legal size slot for this fishery is 44-inch minimum and 50-inch maximum fork length, with a daily bag limit of one fish and an annual limit of two fish.  Anglers are reminded that green sturgeon may not be retained.  Identification signs have been posted at local launching ramps.

For more information about upcoming Columbia River seasons, including regulation updates, visit ODFW’s online fishing reports atwww.myodfw.com.

High Waters Make For Slow Start To Pikeminnow Reward Fishery

The big spring runoff that’s flooding valleys and alfalfa fields in the upper Inland Northwest has also affected the start of the pikeminnow sport reward fishery downstream on the Lower and Mid-Columbia and Snake Rivers, but catches are expected to improve in the coming weeks.

THE PIKEMINNOW SPORT REWARD FISHERY PAYS ANGLERS TO REMOVE THE NATIVE SPECIES THAT PREYS ON SALMON AND STEELHEAD SMOLTS THAT HAVE BECOME EASIER FOR THE PISCOVORES TO CHASE DOWN IN THE COLUMBIA AND SNAKE HYDROPOWER SYSTEM’S RESERVOIRS. (WDFW)

Through June 3, anglers have caught 34,725, less than half of 2016’s start and the fewest of the past five springs to this point of the season.

“High water really hurts our catch rates, although eventually our experienced pikeminnow anglers kind of figure it out and then catch rates pick up,” notes WDFW’s Eric Winther.

He heads up the program that pays participating fishermen on the Columbia between Cathlamet and Tri-Cities, as well as the Snake below Clarkston for removing the native species that preys on salmon and steelhead smolts migrating through the hydropower system.

“The high water really messes with newer anglers trying to learn how to target pikeminnow,” he notes. “It’s hard enough to learn when conditions are good, but when you have nearly twice the flows, it can be downright discouraging.”

Flows at Bonneville Dam have ranged from 350,000 to nearly 500,000 cubic feet per second since the fishery began May 1. Average over the past 10 years is 250,000 to 325,000 cfs.

At this same point in 2017, anglers had caught 47,250 pikeminnow; in 2016, 70,691; in 2015, 63,787; and 2014, 38,745.

Still, the tally is higher than 2013 (29,970) and 2012 (26,882).

Most notably down is catch turned in at The Dalles, which last year yielded 44,667 overall but so far has only given up 9,337 through its traditionally most productive weeks of season.

“The Dalles catch is definitely off from last year,” confirms Winther. “What happened was that lots of anglers went there at the start of the season, conditions were tough, so they spread out and started looking in other areas.”

Catches at Cathlamet, Willow Grove, Rainier Kalama and Ridgefield were all up this May compared to last spring.

“Just when some people are giving up on The Dalles, the water finally starts dropping and catch rates have jumped up. Should she increasing catches for the next three to four weeks as we move into their peak spawn time and river conditions improve,” he says.

The sport reward program pays anglers from $5 to $8 per pikeminnow, with tagged ones worth $500.

So far this season, the top angler has earned $9,617 from 1,057 fish turned in.

The season runs through Sept. 30.

For more details, including fishing maps and info on three free fishing clinics coming up — including one tomorrow in Longview — check out pikeminnow.org.

Week On The Water Yields Sturgeon, Halibut, Ling, Rockfish Fillets, Lots Of Fun

Editor’s note: The following blog was written and submitted by Dave Anderson

by Captain Dave Anderson

The 20th of May was the beginning of a fishing-packed week for not only myself but also family and friends. My father-in-law Maury and I rolled down to Astoria to go sturgeon fishing with Bret Dickerson, owner of Columbia River Sport Fishing.

We met up and left the dock by 5:00 a.m. on Monday the 21st. After a short run out of Astoria we were setting lines just as the sun was starting to rise above the trees. It wasn’t even five minutes and we had sturgeon hammering baits!

GUIDE BRET DICKERSON HOLDS MAURY KINCANNON’S FIRST STURGEON, CAUGHT IN MID-MAY IN THE COLUMBIA ESTUARY. (DAVE ANDERSON)

First fish we brought to the boat was just short of the slot limit. A few minutes later we had another dandy sturgeon on the end of the line. This fish ended up being Maury’s first sturgeon and it was a keeper!

For another hour or so this went on with great action. We hit a bit of a lull as the tide was turning, but it quickly turned around about an hour and a half before the 2:00 p.m. closure.

At 2:00 pm, the closure hit and lines were in just as the wind machine turned on. We ended up with a handful of keepers and our group couldn’t have been happier!

THERE’S MORE TO ASTORIA THAN BUOY 10 SALMON, AS DAVE ANDERSON WILL ATTEST. THE WATERS HERE ARE GOOD IN LATE SPRING FOR STURGEON FISHING, AND THIS YEAR’S RETENTION SEASON CONTINUES WITH TWO MORE OPENERS, JUNE 2 AND 4. (DAVE ANDERSON)

Jump forward a few days to Thursday afternoon. I headed out to one of my favorite places on the coast of Washington – La Push. This is where I met my friend Captain Kerry of Offshore Northwest to take a group of my friends fishing. This has become an annual trip in which we typically fish the second week of the La Push halibut season.

THE SUN SETS OVER JAMES AND LITTLE JAMES ISLANDS, AT LA PUSH, A GOOD LAUNCH POINT FOR MORE REMOTE WATERS ON WASHINGTON’S NORTH COAST. (DAVE ANDERSON)

Friday morning we ran out in a fairly lumpy ocean to make our 30-mile run to the grounds. We hit pay dirt immediately and had great action with lingcod and filled the boat quickly with limits of quality fish.

After moving around a bit we found a good patch of aggressive halibut. We ended up with early limits on both lingcod and halibut. Captain Kerry and I had a good chuckle when we looked at our watches and said to each other, “It’s only 8:45!”

ANDERSON WITH A TASTY LINGCOD. (DAVE ANDERSON)

Saturday we were able to sleep in before heading out to grab limits of sea bass. Not too far out of La Push we found a good patch and we were reeling in doubles after doubles of feisty sea bass! These fish are so fun to catch you can’t help but giggle like a little kid while reeling them in over and over.

Sunday morning we were greeted with a beautiful ocean! It was probably one of the best halibut ocean conditions a person could ask for. Cruising at 34 knots it took us under an hour to get to the grounds. Once we got there we started picking away at our fish. It wasn’t nearly as fast and furious as Friday, but we ended up reeling in a good grade of halibut and lingcod and headed back to the barn by 11:30 a.m.

A GOOD GRADE OF HALIBUT FOR THE CREW. (DAVE ANDERSON)

The best action this past weekend came off the good ol’ Montana Dave-built 13-inch-by-3/4-inch pipe jig with a 12/0 Mustad treble hook. Bait also worked, but the pipe jig definitely outproduced the bait!

All in all it was a fantastic week of fishing! I love being able to take advantage of the great resources the Pacific Northwest has to offer! Being able to spend time on the water and have fun with friends and family, I can’t ask for anything better! Life is good!

DAVE ANDERSON’S PIPE JIGS, THE MAKING OF WHICH WAS FEATURED IN THE MAY 2016 NORTHWEST SPORTSMAN RIG OF THE MONTH. (DAVE ANDERSON)

SW WA Fishing Report (5-29-18)

THE FOLLOWING ARE ODFW AND WDFW REPORTS FORWARDED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Estuary WSG Update

From: Jimmy Watts <Jimmy.W.Watts@state.or.us>
Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 2:49 PM
Subject: Estuary WSG Update

Over the Memorial Day Weekend, sturgeon anglers in the estuary made 3,609 trips and kept 466 white sturgeon

DAVE ANDERSON CAUGHT THIS STURGEON IN THE COLUMBIA ESTUARY OVER THE HOLIDAY WEEKEND. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Columbia River Estuary White Sturgeon Sport Update

https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html

TAC meeting – 29 May 2018

The Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) met this morning and after reviewing available information it was agreed that there was insufficient reason to change the run update from last week. So the spring Chinook forecast of upriver Spring Chinook at the Columbia River mouth remains 116,500. TAC expects that LCR harvest estimates from the sport fishery and SAFE fisheries later today, as well as additional information from fish passage at Bonneville will provide a clearer picture at next weeks TAC meeting for consideration of run size.

River flows continue to be very high and preliminary reports indicate river conditions have been suboptimal.

Washington Columbia River mainstem and its tributaries sport sampling summaries for May 21-28

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – (I-5 Br downstream) – 7 bank rods and 1 boat rod had no catch.  Above the I-5 Br. – 64 bank rods kept 12 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook.  12 boat rods kept 2 adult spring Chinook and 1 steelhead.

Last week Tacoma Power employees recovered 34 winter-run steelhead, 134 spring Chinook adults, six spring Chinook jacks, and nine summer-run steelhead during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released one winter-run steelhead into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton and they released three winter-run steelhead into the Cispus River near Yellow Jacket Creek.

Tacoma Power also released five spring Chinook adults and one spring Chinook jack into Lake Scanewa near Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 6,320 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Tuesday, May 29. Water visibility is 14 feet and the water temperature is 48.7 degrees F.

From the Lexington (Sparks) Road Bridge upstream to 400 feet or boundary markers below the barrier dam – From June 1 through July 31, barbed hooks will be allowed for salmon, steelhead, and cutthroats.

Starting June 1, the area that is closed to fishing below the Cowlitz River barrier dam will expand from 100 feet to 400 feet to help increase the number of spring Chinook arriving at the salmon hatchery. We had projected that 5,000 spring Chinook would return to the river this year, but they’re tracking well below that now. Expanding the area that’s closed to fishing will help ensure we can meet hatchery broodstock goals and continue to move fish to the upper Cowlitz watershed for fishing opportunities and reintroduction efforts. The no-fishing zone will be posted with signs until further notice.

East Fork Lewis River from the mouth to 400 feet below Horseshoe Falls (except closures around various falls) and the Washougal River from the mouth to Salmon Falls Bridge – Under permanent rules these areas will be open to fishing with bait for hatchery steelhead beginning the first Saturday in June.

Kalama River – 9 bank and 3 boat anglers had no catch.

Lewis River (mainstem) – 5 bank rods had no catch.  11 boat rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook.

Lewis River (North Fork) – 33 bank rods kept 7 adult spring Chinook and 1 steelhead.  8 boat rods had no catch.

Wind River (mouth) – 3 bank rods kept 1 adult spring Chinook.  96 boat rods kept 32 adult and 2 jack spring Chinook and released 1 adult spring Chinook.

Drano Lake – 145 boat rods kept 53 adult and 2 jack spring Chinook and released 7 adult spring Chinook.

Klickitat River from the mouth (Burlington Northern Railroad Bridge) upstream to the Fisher Hill Bridge and from 400 feet upstream from #5 fishway upstream to the boundary markers below the salmon hatchery – Effective June 1, the salmon daily limit is 6 hatchery Chinook of which no more than two may be adults. In addition, up to 3 hatchery steelhead may be retained. Wild chinook must be released. Open 7 days per week.

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam –  Last week we sampled 495 anglers, including 74 boats, with 32 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook and 16 steelhead.  23 (72%) of the adult Chinook and 14 (88%) of the steelhead were kept.

Fish were caught throughout the river.

Trout

Recent plants of rainbows and cutthroats into SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish per Pound
Hatchery
Notes

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 21, 2018
Cutthroat
3,259
1.88
SKAMANIA HATCHERY

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 21, 2018
Rainbow
1,500
1.3
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Cutthroat
3,237
2.26
SKAMANIA HATCHERY

GOOSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=GOOSE+LK+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
1,700
1.3
VANCOUVER HATCHERY

HORSETHIEF LK (KLIC)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=HORSETHIEF+LK+%28KLIC%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
4,000
2.5
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

LITTL WHITE SALMON R<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LITTL+WHITE+SALMON+R&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
3,022
2.25
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

SPRING CR 30.0106<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SPRING+CR++++30.0106&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Klickitat County – Region 5
May 22, 2018
Rainbow
3,030
2.27
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

BATTLE GROUND LK (CLAR)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=BATTLE+GROUND+LK+%28CLAR%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Clark County – Region 5
May 23, 2018
Rainbow
1,835
2.26
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

LEWIS CO PRK PD-S (LEWI)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LEWIS+CO+PRK+PD-S+%28LEWI%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Lewis County – Region 5
May 24, 2018
Rainbow
720
1.8
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

SWIFT POWER CANAL (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SWIFT+POWER+CANAL+%28SKAM%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Skamania County – Region 5
May 24, 2018
Rainbow
2,670
2.67
SPEELYAI HATCHERY

SWOFFORD PD (LEWI)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SWOFFORD+PD+%28LEWI%29&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Lewis County – Region 5
May 24, 2018
Rainbow
3,600
1.8
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

Swift Reservoir – Expected to be planted with 45,000 catchable size rainbows before the June 2nd opener.

Shad

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – 60 shad anglers (including 10 boats) kept 289 and released 191 fish, an average of 6 fish per person.  A check of bank anglers just below Bonneville Dam today averaged 11.6 fish kept/released per person based on mainly incomplete trips.  Some anglers had up to 50 fish!

Columbia Springer Managers Discuss Reopener

Columbia spring Chinook managers are today discussing potentially reopening portions of the big river starting as early as this Friday.

A fact sheet out ahead of an 11 a.m. hearing says that even with this week’s downgraded runsize, there are still 2,565 of the salmon available for fisheries below Bonneville, 503 from the dam to the Washington-Oregon border.

AN ODFW SAMPLER WANDS AN ANGLER’S SPRING CHINOOK DURING 2015’S SEASON. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Biologists are recommending that the lower river be reopened May 25 through June 6, or 13 days of fishing, while the upper section be fished May 25 through June 15, 22 days.

“Staff estimates that the below Bonneville season as recommended would accrue an additional 2,400 upriver Chinook mortalities, bringing the season total to 6,933 fish, or 98% of the allocation at the current run size,” the fact sheet reads.

An estimated 210 would be caught in the gorge pools to the border.

This year’s run has been slow to come in, and earlier this week managers reduced their forecast to 116,500 back to the mouth of the Columbia, down from the 166,700 predicted last December.

During the late winter and early spring fisheries, anglers accounted for 4,332 upriver-bound salmon mortalities, which would be covered under run buffering by as few as 81,800 past Bonneville. It now appears many  more than that will in fact return, with the dam count at 70,000 and change through yesterday.

More as final word comes down.

Salmon Managers Downgrade Columbia Springer Run Expectation

Columbia salmon managers today downgraded this year’s spring Chinook run, though they say there’s still some uncertainty with the new number.

They now predict 116,500 back to the mouth of the big river, down from the 166,700 forecasted last December.

ANTHONY CLEMENTS SHOWS OFF A SPRING CHINOOK CAUGHT IN THE COLUMBIA GORGE EARLIER THIS SEASON. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

“Given daily fluctuations of Chinook passage and the current river flow level at Bonneville Dam, there is some uncertainty in the run size estimate,” a statement from supervising biologist Joe Hymer says.

Through yesterday, May 20, a total of 64,479 springers have been counted at the dam, a bit below half of the 10-year average for the date, 133,655, but nearly 20,000 more than last year at this time.

According to catch estimates from late last month, anglers accounted for 4,332 upriver-bound salmon mortalities through April 14 (4,268 kept, 64 released and estimated died).

Managers said that a return of just 81,800 would cover that impact to the ESA-listed stock.

Flows at Bonneville are around 480,000 cubic feet per second right now, whereas the 10-year average is around 325,000 cfs.

Over the past three weeks, daily counts have been as high as 7,287 to as low as 852.

Today’s runsize update is just slightly more than actually came back in 2017, when managers had initially predicted 160,400. Only 115,882 did.

 

WDFW Holding Public Meetings, Taking Comment On Columbia River Salmon Policies

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is inviting people to share their views at four upcoming meetings in Ridgefield on a draft assessment of a state policy that guides the management of salmon fisheries in the lower Columbia River.

 (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The policy, adopted in 2013 by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission, is designed to promote orderly fisheries, advance the recovery of wild salmon and steelhead, and support the economic well-being of the Columbia River fishing industry.

WDFW has initiated a review of that policy at the request of the commission, a nine-member a citizen panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the department.

“Once completed, this review will provide a foundation for the commission’s assessment of the policy,” said Bill Tweit, a WDFW special assistant. “Commissioners have emphasized that the department’s review must be detailed, comprehensive, and open to public involvement.”

To encourage engagement, the department invites the public to join in discussions with two WDFW advisory groups at any or all of four meetings designed to inform the department’s policy review. All of those meetings will be held at WDFW’s regional office at 5525 S. 11th St. in Ridgefield:

  • The Columbia River Commercial Fishing Advisory Group: Meetings scheduled May 15 and July 31 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • The Columbia River Recreational Fishing Advisory Group: Meetings scheduled May 15 and July 12 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

An initial draft of the Comprehensive Review of the Columbia River Basin Salmon Management Policy is posted on WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/comp_review_columbia_river_basin_salmon-C-3620.pdf.

WDFW staff briefed the commission on an initial draft of its policy review March 17 at a public meeting in Wenatchee. Commissioners will receive regular updates from staff through mid-September, when they will meet to discuss WDFW’s final review of the Columbia River policy.

The Washington and Oregon commissions may also meet jointly in November to discuss the policy.

All of these meetings are open to the public.

Information about the upcoming meetings can be found on the advisory group websites (https://wdfw.wa.gov/about/advisory/) and the commission website (https://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/).

The Columbia River Basin Salmon Management policy, as revised by the Washington commission in January 2017, is available at https://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/policies/c3620.pdf

U.S. House Vote Against Spill ‘A Hard Pill For Businesses To Swallow’: NSIA

“Unfathomable.” That’s what the head of a regional pro-fishing group is calling yesterday’s vote in the U.S. House of Representatives that in part blocks spill through the Columbia Basin to help young salmon.

All of Oregon’s and Washington’s Congressmen representing the immense watershed voted for HR 3144, which passed 225-189 and would put off a federal judge’s spill order till 2022.

It also leaves it up to lawmakers whether to remove the lower four Snake River dams.

WATER SURGES THROUGH BONNEVILLE DAM IN THIS JUNE 2014 CORPS OF ENGINEERS PHOTO. (ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS)

But Liz Hamilton of the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association in Portland says blocking spill will “accelerate salmon’s demise, affecting every single species that has to travel down this industrial river.”

Just three weeks ago she’d heralded U.S. District Court Judge Michael Simon’s ruling that because the Columbia’s numerous Endangered Species Act-listed stocks “remain in a ‘precarious’ state,” and that with decades worth of studies showing “spill volumes higher than those proposed in the 2014 BiOp will lead to higher survival rates” for young Chinook, coho, steelhead, this year’s program would go ahead starting April 2.

The bill must still pass the Senate and be signed by President Trump, but Hamilton said the House’s action was a direct shot at those benefits.

She called it a “hard pill for businesses to swallow, on the heels of the 2015 drought, the 2016 blob, a bad ocean, and the occasional flood.”

“Climate change, with the frequent, intense environmental changes it brings is hammering the fish and our industry. It is unfathomable that Congress would choose to do less at the exact moment in history when hydropower is needed less than ever. Particularly during the spring when there are over 200 major dams cranking out energy. There’s just no excuse,” Hamilton says.

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, a Spokane Republican who consponsored the legislation, billed it as a way to “protect” the Columbia hydropower system’s dams.

She said the facilities and fish could coexist.

“When the sun doesn’t shine and the wind doesn’t blow, our dams provide critical baseload energy to power homes and businesses all across Eastern Washington and the Pacific Northwest,” McMorris Rodgers said in a press release. “Not only that, they provide transportation and irrigation benefits for our farmers, flood control for our communities, and recreational opportunities that fuel our economy. This isn’t about the merits of protecting salmon, we all agree on that. This is about providing certainty and letting experts and scientists in the region, who know the river best, work collaboratively to meet that goal. I’m proud to usher this legislation through the House.”

Joining her in voting for the bill were fellow Washington Reps. Dan Newhouse, Jaime Herrera Beutler and Dave Reichert, all Republicans, Oregon’s Kurt Schrader (D) and Greg Walden (R), and Idaho’s Mike Simpson (R). The Gem State’s Raul Labrador (R) did not cast a vote as he was reportedly campaigning for governor.

Hamilton says she watched a hearing on the bill and came away “appalled” at what she’d heard bandied about from the other side of the issue.

She adds that walking away from even looking at removing Ice Harbor, Lower Monumental, Little Goose and Lower Granite Dams “could mean extinction for many Snake River stocks in the future.”

According to the Idaho Statesman, the bill faces an uncertain future in the Senate due to opposition from Washington Senator Patty Murray (D).

“There is an ongoing legal process intended to account for all uses of our critical river system and a court-mandated comprehensive review that everyone can participate in, so I oppose this legislation that would cut off and politicize what should be a robust and transparent process,” Murray said in a statement.

 

Editor’s note: Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler’s first name was misspelled in the initial version of this story. Our apologies.