Tag Archives: chinook

NMFS Highlights How White R. Levee Fix Helps Homeowners, Salmon, Habitat

THE FOLLOWING IS A NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE STORY

Puget Sound salmon got a boost this summer from a redesigned levee in Pacific, WA. While local leaders were determined to reduce frequent flooding of neighborhoods and businesses, NOAA and partners provided expertise in habitat restoration, as well as a portion of the funding. The results? King County improved resilience to flooding along the unpredictable river, and restored much-needed salmon habitat in the process.

AN ENGINEERED LOGJAM, PART OF A “BIO-REVETMENT” LEVEE ALONG THE WHITE RIVER IN PACIFIC, IN SOUTHWEST KING COUNTY. (NMFS)

The White River Chinook are among the local fish listed as Threatened. Decades of degraded habitat and overfishing have diminished wild salmon numbers. Since salmon need specific conditions for successful reproduction, habitat restoration is a critical priority. More off-channel habitat means the young fish are bigger and stronger when they head out to sea, thus more likely to make it home to their river for spawning.

The old White River levee, built in 1914, ran along the narrow channel of the river, cutting off the floodplain. With today’s knowledge of nature-based infrastructure, project engineers are able to reduce flooding and benefit salmon. Young fish gained an additional 121 acres off-channel habitat, more than a mile of natural shoreline, and thousands of sheltered places to eat, rest and grow. Eighteen acres replanted with native flora reinforces a protective riparian border.

NOAA Fisheries is committed to conserving and protecting listed species like the Chinook. This is one of multiple projects funded under the Commencement Bay Natural Resources Damage Assessment settlement that resulted from NOAA’s joint effort cleaning up after a nearby hazardous waste release.

“NOAA and partners provided $4.8 million dollars toward protecting the community,” said NOAA technical monitor Jason Lehto. “But salmon and other wildlife get substantial benefit, too.”

THE WHITE RIVER OVERTOPS AN OLD LEVEE FOLLOWING AN OCTOBER 2017 AND SURGING INTO A RESTORED FLOODPLAIN THAT HAD BEEN DRY FOR A CENTURY. (NMFS)

In October, a sudden storm pushed the river up and over the old levee, which breached as planned. The excess water spread over reconnected lowlands without flooding any nearby property. With more unpredictable sea levels and weather ahead, communities are turning to nature -based infrastructure solutions to find solutions like the White River/Countyline levee. The neighborhood is safer, and the White River Chinook have one more edge against extinction.

Puget Sound Salmon Anglers Called On To Voice Concerns Over Chinook Plan

Alarms are blaring ever louder in the Puget Sound salmon fishing world.

A proposed 10-year Chinook harvest plan revealed less than two weeks ago could be “a lot tighter noose” for sport fisheries, and state and tribal managers may try to implement it as early as this spring.

THE NEW PROPOSED PUGET SOUND CHINOOK HARVEST PLAN COULD BE “A LOT TIGHTER NOOSE” FOR ANGLERS, ACCORDING TO A SPORTFISHING ADVOCATE. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

“It will very seriously reduce the very limited opportunities we’ve had in the past few years,” warned Pat Patillo in a 17-minute segment on a Seattle-based outdoor radio show last Saturday morning.

WDFW fish bosses, already the subject of displeasure from the Fish and Wildlife Commission about the plan they’ve sent to federal overseers, may publicly talk more next month about it, but Patillo is not shooting from the hip.

He’s a retired salmon policy advisor for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, where he worked for over three decades, and is now a sportfishing advisor to the agency.

After the resource management plan for Puget Sound Chinook emerged from confidential, federal-judge-mediated negotiations between WDFW and area treaty tribes, he ran this year’s run forecasts through it to get a feel for what it might portend in the near term, as expectations aren’t too bright.

Speaking on 710 ESPN Seattle’s The Outdoor Line, Patillo explained that fishing impacts on Stillaguamish wild Chinook in, essentially, Puget Sound would be halved.

But he said that even more constraining might be a new limit on that river’s mass marked fin-clipped hatchery kings.

That’s because with the basin’s Chinook being federally listed, mass-marking has provided an option for anglers to release wild kings so they can continue on the way to the gravel while culling out generally abundant production fish missing their adipose fins.

That approach could face significant challenges under the new plan.

“With that limit on hatchery fish, it effectively eliminates selective fishing as a management tool for providing opportunity to catch all Puget Sound hatchery Chinook,” Patillo told hosts of Tom Nelson and Rob Endsley.

In danger, northern summer king and winter blackmouth fisheries.

“These fish, hatchery fish and wild fish, are mixed with all the others in Puget Sound,” Patillo explained. “So if you’ve got a constraint on your hatchery fish that are mass-marked — you can’t tell a mass-marked Stilly fish from a Green River fish, for example — so you’re, what’s the term? You pick it.”

Washington managers are screwed because many Stillaguamish Chinook get picked off in fisheries to the north, in southeast Alaska and along the west coast of Vancouver Island.

Puget Sound is the only place they have any power to reduce impacts on the stock to try and rebuild it, though there are doubts that that’s possible.

In the meanwhile, anglers face a very bitter pill.

Patillo estimated that even if we’d had a total closure of Puget Sound sportfishing in 2017, it would have yielded all of “10 or 11” more wild Stillaguamish Chinook on the gravel.

Nelson, who labeled the overall approach “a harvest solution to a habitat problem,” urged listeners to contact Director Jim Unsworth and the Fish and Wildlife commission with their concerns.

Patillo echoed that, and pointing to Stilly kings, summarized an argument to make — that the plan’s constraints go “beyond the level necessary to enable rebuilding … and will not provide fishing opportunity for surplus hatchery Chinook salmon throughout Puget Sound or other healthy salmon like pink salmon, coho salmon — you’re not going to have those fisheries.”

As it stands, the plan will be reviewed by the National Marine Fisheries Service for compliance with ESA and it may be approved in early 2019 for 2019-20 to 2028-29 fisheries.

Lower Columbia Fishery Biologist’s Good, Bad, Ugly From 2017 Fisheries

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ORIGINATED WITH JOE HYMER, PSMFC SUPERVISING FISHERY BIOLOGIST

2017 Lower Columbia mainstem from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam sport totals – The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly

Note: Does not include Buoy 10.

A BIG RUN OF SHAD YIELDED WHAT’S BELIEVED TO BE THE SECOND HIGHEST SPORT CATCH SINCE 1969. (ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS)

The Good

Summer and Fall Chinook – The 3,516 summer and 26,138 fall Chinook adults caught this year were the 4th and 6th highest, respectively, since at least 1969. The record are the over 5,900 adult summer Chinook and 41,500 adult fall Chinook, both records which were set in 2015.

Coho – Over 3,100 adult coho were kept this year, the 4th highest since at least 1969. The record are the nearly 5,800 fish caught in 2014.

Shad – Even without estimates for this May, the nearly 170,000 shad kept in 2017 are the 2nd highest since at least 1969. The record are the nearly 195,000 fish caught during all of 2013.

White Sturgeon – The 430 fish estimated caught from the Wauna powerlines upstream to Bonneville Dam were the first since 2013.

The Bad

Salmonid Effort – Lowest in nearly a decade and almost 100,000 angler trips less than the recent 10 year average.

The Ugly

Summer Steelhead – The less than 1,700 fish kept this year are the lowest since the complete closures in the mid-1970’s.

White Sturgeon – The 430 fish estimated caught from the Wauna powerlines upstream to Bonneville Dam are but a fraction of the 62,450 fish estimated kept in 1987.

Sea-Run Cutthroats – This is the 4th consecutive year with no estimated fish kept.

Competition For Chinook By Seals, Sea Lions Limiting Salish Sea Orca Recovery, Study Says

Despite decreasing Chinook catches over recent decades, runs haven’t increased overall and more new research is pointing the finger at the bellies of growing West Coast marine mammal populations, a hunger that may be “masking” salmon recovery efforts.

A study out today says that between 1975 and 2015, sea lion, harbor seal and killer whale appetites for the nutrient-rich salmon more than doubled, growing from 6,100 metric tons annually to 15,200 metric tons, or 33,510,264 pounds.

HUGH ALLEN SNAPPED THIS HARBOR SEAL STEALING A SAN JUANS SALMON LITERALLY OFF AN ANGLER’S LINE. (HUGH ALLEN)

That’s the equivalent of 31.5 million kings, up from 5 million 40 years ago.

 

The study was published by researchers from Oregon State University, NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center and WDFW and tribal biologists, among others, in the journal Physical Reports under the headline “Competing tradeoffs between increasing marine mammal predation and fisheries harvest of Chinook salmon.”

The rub is that the fish and finned mammals are both protected by federal laws.

While killer whales account for the lion’s share of Chinook poundage consumed — especially those packs that haunt the waters from the west coast of Vancouver Island north to the Gulf of Alaska — the study suggests that the increasing numbers of pinnipeds are impacting the ability of Puget Sound’s orcas to recover more so than our fishing seasons targeting kings.

“Our results suggest that at least in recent years competition with other marine mammals is a more important factor limiting the growth of this endangered population than competition with human fisheries,” researchers state.

Pinnipeds are infamous for stealing Chinook off anglers’ lines, but much of what they eat are actually juvenile fish — harbor seals in particular.

Those in the Salish Sea, which includes Puget Sound and the Straits of Juan de Fuca and Georgia, consume 86.4 percent of all those smolts eaten by marine mammals, “due to large increases in the harbor seal abundance in this region between 1975 and 2015 (8,600 to 77,800).”

“For Salish Sea Chinook salmon, strong increases in predation greatly exceed harvest; this is driven largely by local increases in pinniped abundance in the Salish Sea,” researchers write.

Overall, West Coast recreational and commercial catches have declined from 3.6 million to 2.1 million kings, while marine mammal consumption of adult salmon has risen from 1.3 million to 3.1 million.

Hatchery production peaked around 1985 at 350 million but has since declined to around 225 million a year. Overall hatchery and wild production is running between 400 million and 475 million in recent years, according to the study.

“… (L)ong term reductions in the salmon available for commercial and recreational fisheries may not reflect lower abundance of salmon, but rather a reallocation from human harvest to marine mammal consumption,” the authors write. “Because many populations of Chinook salmon in the Northeast Pacific are of conservation concern, substantial resources have been invested to improve salmon passage through hydropower dams, restore salmon habitat, reduce fishing, and otherwise improve conditions in rivers and streams to improve productivity. Collectively, these recovery efforts may have increased Chinook salmon survival or recovery, but these increases in salmon populations may be offset by salmon consumption by more-rapidly increasing populations of marine mammals and other predators.”

Columbia Basin fishery managers and others are pushing to increase lethal removals of sea lions, including most recently at Willamette Falls.

The new study, which looks at ocean impacts, found that for Chinook stocks from the Columbia south, “predation impacts have increased strongly over time and exceeded harvest in recent years.”

Southwest Washington Fishing Report (11-8-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM WDFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br. downstream: 30 bank rods kept 3 adult coho and released 3 fish. 2 boat anglers had no catch. Upstream from the I-5 Br: 77 bank rods kept 34 adult and 1 jack coho and released 11 adult Chinook and 26 adult coho. 6 boat rods kept 6 adult coho and released 6 fish.

COHO ARE PROVIDING THE SEASON’S BEST FISHING OPPORTUNITIES AT THE MOMENT IN WASHINGTON’S SOUTHWESTERN QUARTER. BARRY DUBNOW CAUGHT THIS ONE ON THE HUMPTULIPS WHILE TWITCHING JIGS WITH GUIDE JARED CADY. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 1,989 coho adults, 333 coho jacks, 98 fall Chinook adults, two fall Chinook jacks, 43 cutthroat trout, and 16 summer-run steelhead during seven days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 106 coho adults and 24 coho jacks into the Cispus River near the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek, and they released 217 coho adults, 34 coho jacks and one cutthroat trout at Franklin Bridge in Packwood.

Tacoma Power released 838 coho adults, 182 coho jacks, six fall Chinook adults, one fall Chinook jack and nine cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton and they released 579 coho adults, 76 coho jacks and two cutthroat trout into Lake Scanewa near Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 5,900 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, November 6. Water visibility is four feet and water temperature is 51.1 degrees F.

Mainstem Lewis River – 12 bank and 3 boat rods had no catch.

North Fork Lewis River – 72 bank rods kept 1 adult coho and released 1 adult Chinook and 3 adult coho. 40 boat rods kept 4 adult Chinook and 1 jack and 24 adult coho and released 4 adult Chinook and 5 jack and 8 adult coho.

Lower, Middle Columbia Fishing Report (11-6-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

The salmonid creel program on the lower Columbia has ended for the year and will resume February of 2018.

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed 26 coho adults kept, plus one coho adult released for 20 boats (41 anglers).

CASEY NELSON SHOWS OFF A COLUMBIA RIVER COHO CAUGHT ON A MAG LIP. (VIA JAROD HIGGINBOTHAM, YAKIMA BAIT)

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): No report.

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed four Chinook adults, four Chinook jacks and 12 coho adults kept for five boats (11 anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam):  Closed for retention.  No report.

Bonneville Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

John Day Pool: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed 17 sublegal, three legal and one oversize sturgeon released for five boats (11 anglers).

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool:  No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for three boats (five anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 77 walleye kept, plus 83 walleye released for 14 boats (36 anglers).

Quillayute System Reopening Nov. 4, But Chinook Must Be Released

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Anglers can make plans to go fishing on the Olympic Peninsula, where much of the Quillayute River system will re-open beginning Sunday, Nov. 4.

QUILLAYUTE SYSTEM SALMON ANGLERS CAN GET BACK ON THE WATERS NOW, BUT WILL HAVE TO RELEASE FALL CHINOOK. PAUL ISHII CAUGHT THIS ONE DURING 2011’S RUN. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

The Quillayute River, as well as sections of the Sol Duc, Bogachiel, Calawah and Dickey rivers will re-open for fishing Nov. 4, but anglers must release all chinook salmon, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced today.

WDFW previously closed these rivers to fishing when low river flows were impeding the migration of salmon upstream. The department wanted to ensure that a sufficient number of salmon return to spawning grounds. The Quileute Tribe also closed its fisheries.

“With river levels on the rise, most chinook have moved upstream to the spawning areas, allowing us to re-open these areas to fishing,” said Annette Hoffmann, regional fish program manager for WDFW. “However, we want to protect chinook that may still be in these areas, so we’re requiring anglers to release any chinook they catch.”

Rivers that will re-open to fishing Nov. 4 include:

• Quillayute River.

• Sol Duc River downstream of the concrete pump station at the Sol Duc Hatchery.

• Bogachiel River downstream of the Highway 101 bridge.

• Calawah River downstream of the Highway 101 bridge.

• Dickey River from the Olympic National Park boundary upstream to the confluences of the East and West forks.

Lower, Middle Columbia Fishing Report (10-30-17)

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL ORIGINATED FROM TANNA TAKATA, ODFW, AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

Salmonid angling is winding down, with the majority of the salmonids being caught at the mouths of tributaries.  Anglers fishing in the John Day Pool averaged 0.80 Chinook and 2.40 coho caught per boat, while anglers fishing in The Dalles Pool averaged 1.00 Chinook caught per boat.  In the Bonneville Pool, boat anglers averaged 0.15 Chinook and 1.81 coho caught per boat, while anglers fishing in the gorge below the dam averaged 0.54 Chinook and 0.15 coho caught per boat.  In Troutdale, boat anglers averaged 0.04 Chinook and 0.07 coho caught per boat.

CHAD ZOLLER WAS AMONG THE ANGLERS WHO GOT OUT ON LAST WEEK’S TWO STURGEON KEEPER DAYS, THOUGH THIS DIAMONDSIDE HAD A LITTLE GROWING TO DO, SO IT WENT BACK INTO THE COLUMBIA. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Gorge Bank: Weekly checking showed no catch for three bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekly checking showed four Chinook adults, one Chinook jack and two coho adults kept, plus three Chinook adults released for 13 boats (37 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekly checking showed two Chinook adults and three coho adults kept for 46 boats (84 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekly checking showed no catch for eight bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekly checking showed no catch for 14 boats (26 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed eight Chinook adults, three Chinook jacks, 172 coho adults and three coho jacks kept, plus six Chinook adults released for 95 boats (229 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed one Chinook adult kept for one boat (two anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed one coho adult kept for five bank anglers; and four Chinook adults, four Chinook jacks and 12 coho adults kept for five boats (11 anglers).

STURGEON

 On Saturday’s (10/28) flight, there were 381 sturgeon boats and 121 Oregon bank anglers counted from Bonneville Dam downstream to Wauna power lines.  In the gorge, boat anglers averaged 0.17 legal white sturgeon caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.06 legal white sturgeon caught per boat.  In the Portland to Wauna power lines area, boat anglers averaged 0.12 legal white sturgeon caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.07 legal white sturgeon caught per angler.

Gorge Bank: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed no catch for 69 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed five legal white sturgeon kept, plus one sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for 30 boats (78 anglers).

Troutdale Bank: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed one legal white sturgeon kept, plus four sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for 15 bank anglers.

Troutdale Boats: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking six legal white sturgeon kept, plus one legal, 75 sublegal and eight oversize sturgeon released for 103 boats (229 anglers).

Portland to Wauna power lines Bank: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed one legal white sturgeon kept, plus 10 sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for 225 bank anglers.

Portland to Wauna power lines Boats: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed 49 legal white sturgeon kept, plus 291 sublegal and 22 oversize sturgeon released for 396 boats (959 anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed two legal and 20 sublegal sturgeon released for one boat (three anglers).

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

John Day Pool: Closed for retention.  Weekly checking showed 15 legal, 33 sublegal and five oversize sturgeon released for five boats (15 anglers).

WALLEYE

Gorge:  No report.

Troutdale: Weekly checking showed no catch for two boats (five anglers).

Bonneville Pool:  No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed one walleye released for three boats (five anglers).

John Day Pool: Weekly checking showed 30 walleye kept, plus 14 walleye released for 26 boats (54 anglers).

Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Fishing Report (10-25-17)

THE FOLLOWING IS THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE’S WEEKLY RECREATION REPORT

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

On the lower Columbia this past weekend (mainly Saturday), the majority of the angling effort was focused on sturgeon, therefore this week’s salmonid report is based on the entire weekly catch and effort instead of the weekend.  Anglers fishing in The Dalles Pool averaged 1.00 Chinook and 0.50 coho caught per boat, while anglers fishing in the Bonneville Pool averaged 0.10 Chinook and 0.74 coho caught per boat.  In the gorge, boat anglers averaged 1.89 Chinook and 0.29 coho caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale averaged 0.31 Chinook and 0.17 coho caught per boat.  In the Portland to Westport area, boat anglers averaged 0.35 Chinook and 0.17 coho caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.50 Chinook caught per angler.

CARTER HOTCHKISS HAD A GREAT OUTING WITH GUIDE BOB TOMAN ON THE COLUMBIA, LANDING A HATCHERY STEELHEAD AND THIS COHO. THEY WERE TROLLING FAT WIGGLERS. (VIA JAROD HIGGINBOTHAM, YAKIMA BAIT)

Gorge Bank: Weekly checking showed one Chinook adult kept for two bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekly checking showed 51 Chinook adults, seven Chinook jacks and five coho adults kept, plus two Chinook adults and three coho adults released for 28 boats (84 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekly checking showed 15 Chinook adults, one Chinook jack and three coho adults kept, plus two Chinook adults, six coho adults and one coho jack released for 54 boats (86 anglers).

Portland to Westport Bank: Weekly checking showed no catch for seven bank anglers.

Portland to Tongue Point Boats: Weekly checking showed seven Chinook adults, two coho adults and one coho jack kept, plus one Chinook adult and two coho adults released for 23 boats (40 anglers).

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for two bank anglers; and two Chinook adults and 23 coho adults kept, plus one Chinook adult released for 31 boats (67 anglers).

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): Weekly checking showed one Chinook adult and one coho adult kept, plus one Chinook adult and one Chinook jack released for two boats (three anglers).

John Day Pool (John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam): Weekly checking showed no catch for two bank anglers; and no catch for one boat (one angler).

STURGEON

Despite the wind and rain, there were several thousand sturgeon anglers out in the elements trying their best to fill their daily bag limit during the one day weekend opener.  On Saturday’s (10/21) count, 948 sturgeon boats and 349 Oregon bank anglers were counted from Bonneville Dam downstream to Longview.  In Troutdale, boat anglers averaged 0.06 legal white sturgeon caught per boat, while anglers fishing the Portland to Wauna power lines area averaged 0.15 legal white sturgeon caught per boat.  Bank anglers fishing the Portland to Wauna power lines area averaged 0.01 legal white sturgeon caught per angler.

Gorge Bank: Weekend checking showed no catch for 77 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats: Weekend checking showed one sublegal sturgeon released for 40 boats (117 anglers).

Troutdale Boats: Weekend checking showed seven legal white sturgeon kept, plus 66 sublegal and five oversize sturgeon released for 111 boats (305 anglers).

Portland to Wauna power lines Bank: Weekend checking showed one legal white sturgeon kept, plus five sublegal sturgeon released for 138 bank anglers.

Portland to Wauna power lines Boats: Weekend checking showed 53 legal white sturgeon kept, plus 211 sublegal and 28 oversize sturgeon released for 355 boats (1,002 anglers).

Bonneville Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

John Day Pool: Closed for retention.  No report.

WALLEYE

Gorge:  No report.

Troutdale: No report.

Bonneville Pool:  No report.

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed 43 walleye kept, plus 11 walleye released for 10 boats (18 anglers).

John Day Pool: No report.

SW WA, Columbia Fishing Report (10-24-17)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ORIGINATED WITH WDFW AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon/Steelhead

Lower portions of Abernathy, Cedar (North Fork Lewis tributary), Coal, Germany, Goble, Mill (Cowlitz Co.), Mulholland, Skamokawa creeks and the Coweeman and Elochoman rivers – Re-open to fishing for hatchery steelhead and hatchery salmon beginning November 1.

Cowlitz River – From the I-5 Br. downstream:  19 bank rods kept 2 adult coho and released 3.  16 boat rods kept 4 adult coho and released 2 adult Chinook and 3 adult coho.  Above the I-5 Br:  98 bank rods kept 2 jack and 28 adult coho and released 1 jack and 43 adult Chinook, 10 jack and 15 adult coho, 3 steelhead, and 1 cutthroat trout.

CARTER HOTCHKISS NABBED THIS STEELHEAD AND A COHO NEAR THE MOUTH OF THE DESCHUTES WHILE TROLLING ½-OUNCE FAT WIGGLERS IN WATERMELON AND BENGAL PATTERNS DURING A GUIDED TRIP WITH BOB TOMAN. (VIA JAROD HIGGINBOTHAM)

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 2,564 coho adults, 636 coho jacks, 292 fall Chinook adults, nine fall Chinook jacks, 53 cutthroat trout, 12 summer-run steelhead and one winter-run steelhead during seven days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 646 coho adults and 152 coho jacks into the Cispus River near the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek, and they released 522 coho adults, 141 coho jacks and two cutthroat trout at Franklin Bridge in Packwood.

Tacoma Power released 1,264 coho adults, 302 coho jacks, 26 fall Chinook adults, one fall Chinook jack and five cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 7,910 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, Oct. 23. Water visibility is 12 feet and water temperature is 51.8 degrees F.

North Fork Lewis River – 44 bank rods kept 1 jack and 2 adult coho.  4 boat rods kept 2 adult Chinook.  Colvin Creek to the overhead powerlines below Merwin Dam remains open to fishing through October 31. It will re-open for salmon and hatchery steelhead Dec. 16.

Lower Wind River – No report on angling success. Oct. 31 is the last day to fish for salmon.

Drano Lake- 4 bank anglers kept 1 adult coho.  6 boat anglers kept 5 adult Chinook.  Beginning November 1, open to fishing for 7 days per week.

White Salmon River – No report on angling success. Oct. 31 is the last day to fish from the county road below the former location of the powerhouse upstream.

Klickitat River – 26 bank anglers kept 1 adult Chinook and 3 adult coho and released 1 adult Chinook.

Lower Columbia mainstem below Bonneville Dam – Last week we sampled 240 anglers (including 68 boats) with 1 jack and 40 adult Chinook, 43 adult coho but no steelhead.  Under permanent rules, closed to fishing for salmon and steelhead from Beacon Rock to Bonneville Dam effective November 1.

Oct. 31 is the last day of the 2017 creel census program. The program will resume in February 2018.

Bonneville Pool – 3 boat anglers had no catch.

Sturgeon

Lower Columbia mainstem from the Wauna powerlines upstream to Bonneville Dam –  Sturgeon fishing was about as lousy as the weather last Saturday.  We sampled 688 anglers (including 129 boats) with 11 legals kept.  There were 155 vehicles from the sturgeon deadline just below Bonneville Dam downstream to Hamilton Is.  There was a mass exodus there by late morning.