Tag Archives: bull elk

ODFW Details Hunt Change Proposals; Legalizing Blacktail Spikes Could Up Harvest

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Last year, ODFW began a multi-year effort to review and improve hunting regulations.

Many of Oregon’s controlled hunts and season structures were put in place decades ago and mostly untouched through the years. “We have undertaken a complete review of our big game hunting regulations with the goal of making them more consistent, in tune with current populations and issues, and simpler,” said Nick Myatt, ODFW Grand Ronde Watershed Manager who is leading the effort.

AN OREGON HUNTING PROPOSAL WOULD REMOVE THE FORKED-ANTLER REQUIREMENT DURING WESTERN OREGON’S GENERAL BLACKTAIL SEASON. (ODFW)

A number of changes took effect in 2019, and now ODFW has new proposals for 2020. One of the major ideas proposed will be a change in the bag limit for the hunt in Oregon with more participation than any other—the Western Oregon general rifle deer season, which more than 61,000 people hunted in 2017. ODFW is proposing to simplify the bag limit from “one buck deer having not less than a forked antler” to “one buck with visible antler.” All 600 series antlerless deer hunts in western Oregon currently with a “one antlerless or spike deer” bag limit would also change to “one antlerless deer.”

The current bag limit is different from the eastern Oregon deer bag limit, creates enforcement issues, and is not biologically relevant. It is a relic of when western Oregon offered a large number of antlerless deer tags in some wildlife management units. The proposed bag limit change is expected to increase harvest opportunities and success for general season rifle deer hunters by allowing the harvest of spike bucks. While it may result in an increase in buck harvest, there are sufficient bucks in the population to support increased harvest. All but one Western Oregon unit has met or exceeded the benchmark for observed post-hunting season buck ratio in at least two of the last three years.

The change may also help the buck deer population by allowing hunters to remove the bucks genetically inclined to remain spikes. Data shows that some yearling bucks have forked antlers while some 2-year-old or older bucks have spike antlers.

Other eastern Oregon hunts in the 600 series that allow for buck harvest will be moved to the 100 series buck hunts for consistency and to more equitably distribute hunting opportunity by giving each hunter one buck hunting opportunity every year.

General season antlerless elk damage tag pilot program

Over the last few decades, elk populations in many areas have increased on private land adjacent to row crop or irrigated agricultural lands, leading to conflict, economic damage, and reduced hunting opportunity in some units.

ODFW and landowners use a variety of tools to address this damage, including hunting through controlled antlerless elk hunting and damage tags. However, controlled hunts can be inconvenient for hunters who must know far in advance (by May 15) that they will have private land access and want this as their elk hunting opportunity. Damage tags can be cumbersome for landowners and staff to implement. In many areas, overall harvest is still inadequate and private land elk populations continue to increase.

OREGON HUNTING MANAGERS HAVE A NEW PLAN FOR ACCESSING ELK CAUSING DAMAGE ON PRIVATE LAND. (RICK SWART, ODFW)

To address these issues, ODFW is proposing a new general season elk damage tag with an antlerless bag limit for the 2020 hunting season. This tag would replace 19 controlled hunts and the need for landowner damage tags during those timeframes (Aug. 1-March 31 for elk de-emphasis areas and western Oregon, and Aug. 1-Nov. 30 in other areas). The tags would be valid in specific chronic elk damage areas mapped annually by ODFW. Hunters considering this new opportunity would still need to think ahead about permission to hunt on private land for this tag and the tag would be their only elk hunting opportunity.

ODFW also proposes changing a few general bull elk rifle seasons in eastern Oregon (in Hood, White River, and central and SE Cascades) to controlled hunts, both for consistency and because some units are not meeting bull ratio objectives under the general season structure.

Other proposed changes include:

  • Longer, later seasons for pronghorn, bighorn sheep, and Rocky Mountain goat hunts to give hunters who draw one of these prized tags a later opening and more time to hunt.
  • 127 existing hunts being consolidated into 49 hunts.
  • 91 hunt dates expanded, made simpler or made consistent with other hunts.
  • 85 hunt areas expanded to the entire unit or hunt boundaries were made simpler.
  • 57 bag limits made simpler or made consistent with other hunts.
  • Nine new controlled hunt opportunities, including three late season mule deer hunts, two mountain goat hunts, and a pronghorn hunt.

A more complete list of proposed changes is available on MyODFW.com (under Big Game Hunting). ODFW is also hosting public meetings around the state in July to present these ideas and get feedback (meeting schedule will be posted on MyODFW.com in June).

The Fish and Wildlife Commission will be briefed on these concepts at their June 6 meeting in Salem, and make a final decision at their Sept. 13 meeting in Gold Beach when they adopt 2020 Big Game Regulations. Comments on the proposals can also be emailed to odfw.commission@state.or.us

Reward For Info On Poached Jackson Co. Bull Elk Grows

Two thousand dollars is now being offered for information that leads to whomever shot and wasted a bull elk in Southern Oregon two weeks ago.

The Oregon State Police says that in addition to the standing $500 offered through the Turn In Poachers Program, the Rogue Valley chapter of the Oregon Hunter’s Association has chipped in $1,000 while Cascade Ranch is offering another $500.

The incident occurred the evening of Friday, Nov. 16, east of Medford, according to state fish and wildlife troopers.

Investigators found the partially butchered bull off of South Fork Little Butte Creek Road, roughly 2 miles from where it cuts over Lake Creek.

The animal had been shot and according to troopers, and after rifle shots were heard a dark-colored SUV was seen in the area at approximately 9:15.

Anyone with information is being asked to call Sgt. Jim Collom, (541) 841-0416, the TIP hotline (800-452-7888) or *OSP (677).

Tipsters can collect four preference points for big game hunts instead of cash for info that leads to an arrest or citation.

OSP Looking For Tips On Bull Elk Shot, Wasted West Of Roseburg

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers are asking for the public’s assistance in locating and apprehending the person(s) responsible for shooting a 5-point bull elk on the evening of Friday, October 19 or the morning of Saturday, October 20, 2018.

(OSP)

Preliminary investigation revealed that the animal was shot and left to waste in a clear-cut 5 miles west of Cougar Creek Road and approximately 8 miles southwest of Tyee and the Umpqua River.

Two vehicles of interest are a late 1980’s or 1990’s model, red Ford Ranger two door truck occupied by a male and a female approximately 20-30 years of age; and a white full-size 4 door truck occupied by two adult males approximately 40-50 years of age. Anyone with information about these or any other vehicles or individuals seen in the area on or about the timeframe listed is asked to call with information.

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Sr. Trooper Stone at 541-817-4472 or through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or *OSP (677).

Bull Elk Poached Near Silver Falls SP, Only Antlers Taken

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

On April 2, 2018 Troopers from the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division received a call of a dead elk off of Silver Ridge Rd west of Silver Falls State Park.

(OSP)

Troopers located the elk and were able to determine it was a large branch antler bull that had been shot and killed with a high power rifle. The antlers were taken and the entire carcass was left to waste. The antlers were broken off at the bases and will appear similar to a naturally shed antler.

Troopers were able to recover a bullet from the elk carcass and are seeking the public’s help in identifying a suspect. The bull was likely shot over Easter weekend, from Friday, March 30th to Sunday, April 1st.

Any information can be forwarded to Senior Trooper Chris Boeholt in the Salem office of OSP Fish and Wildlife Division via the TIP line: 1-800-452-7888. A TIP reward is available for information leading to a convicti on.

OSP Asking For Help In Case Of Poached, Wasted 5-point Tioga Bull

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s assistance in locating the person(s) responsible for the unlawful killing and waste of a 5×5 bull elk, discovered in a clear cut off of 7000 Road (Weyerhaeuser Permit Area) within the Tioga Unit.

(OSP)

On Sunday, February 18, 2018, a Trooper from the Roseburg Patrol Office was contacted about the location of the bull elk. The elk appeared to have been shot and was left to waste with no meat taken. Troopers from the Roseburg Patrol Office later responded to the area and discovered evidence and injuries consistent with the bull being shot with a rifle. The bull appeared to have been dead for one to two weeks.

A reward is being offered by the Oregon Hunters Association through the Turn-in-Poachers (TIP) program for any information leading to an arrest in this or any other wildlife case.

Anyone with any information is encouraged to contact either the TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888, *OSP (*677) or by calling Oregon State Police Dispatch at 541-776-6111. Callers can remain anonymous.

Reward For Info On Poaching Of Rogue Valley Elk Upped

Thanks to contributions from local hunters, the reward for information on the poaching of a bull elk north of Medford has doubled.

One thousand dollars is now on offer for helping bring the person(s) responsible for illegally shooting the four-point on the morning January 27 to justice.

(OSP)

Oregon fish and wildlife troopers arrived at 9 a.m. to the scene, about a mile south of Highway 234 along Agate Road, south of Sams Valley, and found the mortally wounded bull, which had been shot behind the left shoulder.

“A witness in the area said that two hours prior to the troopers arrival, he had observed a newer, white, full-size truck that had stopped in the roadway just east of where the bull was located,” OSP reported. “The witness reported the passenger of that vehicle fired the shot. The vehicle then left the area.”

Along with the standing offer of $500 through the Turn-In-Poachers fund, the  Rogue Valley Chapter of Oregon Hunters Association has added another $500.

Anyone with information can call the TIP line at (800) 452-7888 or state police dispatch  (541-776-6111).

 

OSP Wildlife Troopers Seek Info On Poaching Of Jackson Co. Bull Elk Last Saturday

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESSS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

On January 27 at approximately 9:00 am, Central Point Fish and Wildlife Troopers were called to the Sam’s Valley area near Agate Road to investigate the possible shooting of a bull elk. This is in Jackson County and is approximately one mile south of Highway 234.

(OSP)

When Troopers arrived they found a four point bull elk standing in a pasture with what appeared to be a bullet wound just behind his left shoulder blade. Shortly after their arrival, the bull succumbed to his injury. A witness in the area said that two hours prior to the Troopers arrival, he had observed a newer, white, full size truck that had stopped in the roadway just east of where the bull was located. The witness reported the passenger of that vehicle fired the shot. The vehicle then left the area.

Anyone with any information is encouraged to contact either the TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or by calling Oregon State Police Dispatch at 541-776-6111.

Judge Hammers Elgin Man For Poaching, Wasting 2 Northeast Oregon Bull Elk

A Northeast Oregon man must serve two months in jail, has lost his hunting license for eight years and will have to pay $17,000 in fines and restitution after pleading guilty to poaching two bull elk at night from a road and with the aid of a light in mid-November 2016, wasting both animals completely.

NATHAN CROUCH AND THE TWO NORTHEAST OREGON BULL ELK HE POACHED AT NIGHT IN MID-NOVEMBER 2016 AND LEFT TO WASTE. (OSP)

Nathan Crouch, 27, who was on the lam in Nevada until last month, was recently sentenced by Union County Circuit Court Judge Thomas Powers for the four wildlife misdemeanors, according to local news outlets.

The case outraged Elgin-area residents, who provided Oregon State Police fish and wildlife troopers with “overwhelming support” in identifying Crouch as well as Dylan Crouch, then 22, and Briana Black, then 18, as suspects.

According to a report today on My Columbia Basin, Nathan Crouch admitted to shooting both elk, six- and five-point bulls.

The La Grande Observer reports that as Dylan Crouch held a spotlight on the bulls, Nathan Crouch shot them.

Black was in the vehicle.

All three are from Elgin.

Last winter Black and Dylan Crouch pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor wildlife violation and were sentenced to five days in jail, three months of probation and a loss of hunting privileges until mid-2020, the Observer‘s Cherise Kaechele reported.

Under Oregon law, poachers who kill a bull elk with six or more points on a side are on the hook for a $15,000 penalty payable to the Department of Fish and Wildlife.

“The defendants in this case just left these animals to rot,” My Columbia Basin reports Union County Senior Deputy District Attorney Christopher L. Storz said. “They took nothing and, by the time they were found, no meat was salvageable. Cases like this one emphasize the need for felonies in the Oregon Game Code, something that currently just isn’t provided for under Oregon law.”