Tag Archives: BROOKINGS

Memorable Catch: 2 Pink Salmon Caught Off Oregon’s South Coast

Not one but two pink salmon were caught off the far southern end of the Oregon Coast yesterday by sport anglers, the first time that’s happened in more than a quarter century.

AN ANGLER SHOWS OFF ONE OF TWO PINK SALMON CAUGHT OFF OREGON’S EXTREME SOUTH COAST OVER MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND. (BROOKINGS FISHING CHARTERS)

Charter skipper Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters said the pair landed by his clients were released but records he received from ODFW today show that the last time any pinks were hooked off his homeport was in 1993, when four were reported.

The species primarily returns to rivers hundreds of miles to the north, in the Salish Sea, and no more than a few dozen have been reported in any single year on the Oregon Coast since 280 were in 1991, including 54 that year at Brookings.

Mostly they’ve turned up at much more northerly ports — Astoria, Garibaldi, Pacific City, Depoe Bay and Newport, but also Winchester Bay.

The most on record is 7,711 in 1985, well before the era of the mega returns of the early 2000s to Washington’s Puget Sound and British Columbia’s Fraser River.

ODFW’s Eric Schindler didn’t have a good guess why after 26 years two pinks showed up at Brookings, but said it would be interesting if any more are caught there and elsewhere this year.

“We did collect some genetic samples back in the 1980s and all the pinks were identified as coming from the Fraser River, B.C.,” he said.

This is only speculation, but perhaps it says something about ocean conditions.

“Hopefully, those were the good luck pink salmon, and the rest of the year will be just as interesting,” Schindler said.

As for the rest of the Memorial Day catch for Capt. Martin’s crew, it included limits on rockfish, a Chinook, two other released salmon and a mackerel.

Ocean, Bays Closing For Crabbing From Bandon To CA Border

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife announce the immediate closure of all recreational crabbing on the southern Oregon coast from Bandon to the California border due to elevated levels of domoic acid. This includes Dungeness and red rock crab harvested in bays and estuaries, and on beaches, docks, piers, and jetties.

CRABBING ALONG OREGON’S SOUTHERN COAST IS BEING SHUT DOWN DUE TO ELEVATED TOXIN LEVELS IN THE SHELLFISH. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Recreational crab harvesting from Bandon north to the Columbia River (including the Coquille river estuary) remains open in bays and estuaries, and on beaches, docks, piers, and jetties.

Meanwhile, for commercial crabbing, ODA and ODFW are requiring that all crab harvested from Bandon to the California border be eviscerated (gutted) before it can be deemed safe for consumption. Domoic acid levels are elevated only in crab viscera, or the guts, of crab sampled and tested from this area of the Oregon coast.

For recreational crab harvesters, it is recommended that crab always be eviscerated prior to cooking, which includes removal and discard of the viscera, internal organs, and gills.


Concerned about closures in your area? Book the world’s best salmon and halibut fishing in Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands), Canada. Click HERE to learn more.

Because of Oregon’s precautionary management of biotoxins, the crab and shellfish products currently being sold in retail markets and restaurants are safe for consumers.

Domoic acid or amnesic shellfish toxin can cause minor to severe illness and even death. Severe poisoning can result in dizziness, headaches, vomiting and diarrhea. More severe cases can result in memory loss and death. Shellfish toxins are produced by microscopic algae and originate in the ocean. Toxins cannot be removed by cooking, freezing or any other treatment. ODA will continue to test for toxins in the coming weeks. Removal of the advisory requires two consecutive tests in the safe range.

For more information, call ODA’s shellfish safety information hotline at (800) 448-2474 or visit the ODA shellfish closures web page at http://ODA.direct/ShellfishClosures   

For commercial crab biotoxin information, go to: http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/programs/FoodSafety/Shellfish/Pages/CrabBiotoxinInfo.aspx

ODFW Dropping General Marine Bag Limit From 5 To 4 After Strong Spring Catches

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The daily bag limit for general marine fish (rockfish, greenlings, skates, etc.) will be reduced from 5 to 4 beginning July 1.

THE BAG LIMIT ON BLACK AS WELL AS BLUE ROCKFISH LIKE THESE SWIMMING AROUND A PINNACLE IS BEING REDUCED FROM FIVE TO FOUR TO KEEP FISHERIES INSIDE QUOTAS. (ODFW, FLICKR, CC 2.0)

“Participation in this fishery has been really good so far this year with effort higher than even record years seen in two of the past three years,” said Lynn Mattes, Project Leader, ODFW. “Reducing the bag limit to 4 fish on July 1 is necessary to keep black rockfish, other nearshore rockfish and yelloweye rockfish catches within annual limits.”

Cabezon retention also opens on July 1 with a 1-fish sub-bag limit (meaning that of the 4-fish marine bag, no more than 1 can be a cabezon). Bag limits for lingcod, flatfish and the longleader fishery remain the same.

Anglers this year made 40,619 bottomfish trips through May (17,750 in May alone), compared to 24,080 for January-May last year, which until 2018 was the highest effort year on record. Angler effort is only expected to increase as summer fishing peaks.

Last year, recreational bottomfish closed on Sept. 18 after the annual quotas for several species were met early, the first in-season closure since 2004. The closure disrupted coastal charter businesses and anglers. (Typically, recreational bottomfish fishing is open all year, though effort significantly drops off after early fall.)

ODFW has been working to avoid another early closure this year by providing effort and catch rates at more frequent intervals and modeling impacts of various bag limit scenarios.

The Fish and Wildlife Commission heard testimony from coastal sportfishing businesses before deciding on the 5-fish bag limit when it set regulations back in December, with the understanding that in-season adjustments could be necessary to keep the season open through the end of the year.

Get the latest on marine fishing regulations and opportunities at https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/marine-zone