Tag Archives: bonneville dam

Coho, Sturgeon Reopening On Parts Of Lower Columbia

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESS RELEASE

Fisheries managers from Oregon and Washington will reopen the Columbia River to recreational sturgeon and coho fishing.

In a joint state hearing of the fish and wildlife departments from both states late yesterday, fisheries managers decided to open the river for two additional days of recreational sturgeon fishing – Saturday, Oct. 19 and Thursday, Oct. 24 – from the Wauna power lines at River Mile 40 upstream to the fishing deadlines at Bonneville Dam, including the Cowlitz River.

PRIME WATERS ON THE COLUMBIA — IN THIS CASE THE MOUTH OF THE KLICKITAT — WILL REOPEN FOR COHO FISHING OCTOBER 18. HEATHER BAGGLERLY CAUGHT THIS ONE OFF THE WASHINGTON TRIBUTARY DURING 2013’S SEASON. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Approximately 720 fish were landed during the initial three days of the fishery, leaving a balance of about 510 fish on the 1,230 harvest guideline.  Effort and catch rates met expectations for the first retention day but have dropped off sharply since then.

The daily bag limit is one legal-sized white sturgeon and up to two fish may be retained for the year. Anglers are reminded that the annual limit applies to any/all 2019 retention fisheries, including those that occurred earlier this year upstream or downstream of Bonneville Dam.  A legal-sized sturgeon is defined as one measuring 44-50 inches fork length.

Anglers are cautioned to pay close attention to the instructions for measuring sturgeon. Fork length is measured in a straight line from the tip of the nose to the fork in the tail fin with the fish laying on its side on a flat surface and the ruler positioned flat under the fish. (See page 12 of the 2019 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations.)

The states also decided to reopen the mainstem Columbia to retention of coho salmon beginning Friday, Oct. 18, and continuing through Oct. 31, from the Tongue Point/Rocky Point line upstream to The Dalles Dam. The daily adult bag limit is two coho. Only hatchery coho may be retained downstream of the Hood River Bridge. All steelhead and all salmon except coho must be released. All other permanent regulations remain in effect, including retention rules for coho jacks.  For the area from the Tongue Point/Rocky Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam, anglers are reminded that the states previously agreed to allow retention of hatchery coho and hatchery steelhead effective Nov. 1 with a two adult daily bag limit (no more than one steelhead).

For more information and regulation updates, please see ODFW’s Columbia River Zone online.

Steelheading To Close On Clearwater, Snake; IDFG: ‘No Surplus’ For Fishery

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

On Friday, Sept. 20, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission voted to close all steelhead seasons on the Clearwater River because the number of returning adult hatchery fish is less than the number needed for broodstock, and there is no surplus to provide a fishery.

IDAHO’S STEELHEADING CLOSURE MEANS THAT EVEN CATCH-AND-RELEASE FISHING FOR UNCLIPPED A- AND B-RUNS, LIKE THIS ONE LANDED ON THE SOUTH FORK CLEARWATER, WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN THE CLEARWATER DRAINAGE. (DAIWA PHOTO CONTEST)

The closure is effective at midnight on Sept. 29, 2019, and covers the Clearwater River upstream to the confluence of the Middle Fork and South Fork, along with the North Fork, Middle Fork and South Fork tributaries. The section of the Snake River downstream from the Couse Creek boat ramp to the Idaho/Washington state line will also be closed to protect Clearwater-bound steelhead. The closure in the Clearwater River drainage is consistent with harvest restrictions put in place in fisheries on the mainstem Columbia River by the Oregon and Washington Fish and Wildlife Departments.

Consistent with existing rules that prohibit targeting steelhead or salmon where there is no open season, anglers will not be allowed to fish for steelhead in the Clearwater River drainage after the fishery is closed, even catch-and-release.

The Clearwater River drainage closure is in addition to the already-restricted fishery the commission approved for statewide steelhead fishing during their August meeting. The existing seasons remain in place for steelhead fisheries in the Salmon and Snake river basins.

Idaho Fish and Game biologists have been tracking steelhead returns closely, and the number of Clearwater-bound hatchery steelhead has continued to fall short of projections. According to Lance Hebdon, anadromous fishery manager for Idaho Fish and Game, while the return of wild, Clearwater-bound steelhead is tracking close to the preseason forecast, the return of hatchery-origin steelhead to the Clearwater River is substantially below what was expected.

Through Sept. 18, biologists estimate about 1,158 hatchery steelhead destined for the Clearwater River have passed Bonneville Dam based on PIT tags. The small, electronic tags are embedded in fish and help biologists know which river migrating steelhead are destined for. On average, about 50 percent of the hatchery steelhead returning to the Clearwater River would have passed Bonneville Dam by Sept. 18.

“Based on average run timing, we estimate that this will result in approximately 2,300 fish crossing Bonneville Dam by the end of the season,” Hebdon said. “The result for Idaho anglers is that only 1,700 hatchery steelhead destined for the Clearwater River will make it to Lower Granite Dam by the end of the season.”

In order to meet broodstock needs for Clearwater River hatcheries (a total of 1,352 fish), 100 percent of the steelhead destined for the North Fork Clearwater River, and a high percentage of the fish destined for the South Fork Clearwater River would have to be collected, leaving no surplus fish for harvest.

Although the steelhead fishery will be closed in the Clearwater River basin, there will be no changes to the ongoing fall Chinook season, which is scheduled to close on Oct. 13. In addition, the commission approved a Coho salmon fishery in the Clearwater River basin during their conference call on Sept. 20. This Coho fishery is open effective immediately, and will run concurrent with the fall Chinook fishery.

Because these fisheries will close Oct. 13, or earlier if catch limits are attained, any incidental impact on Clearwater hatchery steelhead is expected to be minimal.

“Early in the fall, many of the steelhead in the Clearwater river basin are actually fish destined for the Salmon and Grande Ronde rivers, which have pulled into the Clearwater until water temperatures in the Snake River start to cool off,” Hebdon said. “The main component of the Clearwater River steelhead run starts arriving in the middle of October.”

Columbia-Snake Steelhead Run Again Downgraded; Treaty Salmon Fishery Set

Columbia fishery managers heard more grim news about this year’s steelhead run, now forecast to come in at 71,600, the third downgrade from the preseason forecast.

WILD UNCLIPPED A- AND B-RUN STEELHEAD ARE OUTPACING HATCHERY RETURNS SO FAR AT BONNEVILLE, SOMETHING THAT “HAS NOT BEEN OBSERVED” IN THE QUARTER CENTURY OF TALLYING THE DIFFERENCE AT THE DAM. (BRIAN LULL)

Weaker than expected hatchery A-run numbers continue to largely be to blame, but B-runs, which return later and haven’t been updated, are now also “tracking below expectations.”

The preseason forecast was 118,200 As and Bs, but was dropped to 86,000 on Aug. 28 and 74,000 on Sept. 3.

Unusually, more unclipped summers have been tallied at Bonneville than clipped fish, 29,658 to 26,856 since July 1, something that “has not been observed” at the dam since managers began counting the number of adult steelhead with and without adipose fins in 1994, according to today’s fact sheet.

The new forecast calls for 35,000 unclipped steelhead.

Also troubling — though not concrete — is that Dworshak Hatchery-bound fish are “almost absent, based on PIT tags,” WDFW’s Bill Tweit said during a state-tribal conference call this morning.

PIT tags are passive integrated transponders placed in smolts at the hatchery or in the wild and which record a fish’s passage to and from the ocean.

If the steelhead run comes in at this new low forecast, it would be the worst since at least 1984.

Already, state managers have shut down retention on large sections of the Columbia, extended it in some places and reduced upriver bag limits from three to one for when the fish arrive in Southeast Washington, Northeast Oregon and Central Idaho streams.

The main thrust of today’s call, however, was to hear about CRITFC plans to hold a two-and-a-half-day tribal commercial gillnetting opener in Zone 6, the Bonneville, The Dalles and John Day Pools, from 6 a.m., Monday, Sept. 16 to 6 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 18.

According to the fact sheet, it and a “late fall platform” fishery are modeled to bring the tribal harvest in the fall management period to 28,448 Chinook, including 11,794 upriver brights and 2,152 steelhead, including 425 B-runs.

The fact sheet states that at current run forecasts, that would leave 24,834 URBs for tribal fisheries. It also says that based on typical run timing, the goal of getting at least 60,000 past McNary Dam will be met.

While URBs, which spawn in the Hanford Reach and Snake River and provide sportfisheries there and in the aforementioned pools, are “tracking similar to pre-season expectations,” there is more concern about Columbia Gorge hatchery tule returns meeting broodstock needs.

CRITFC’s Stuart Ellis acknowledged that it “seems likely we will be quite tight” in reaching goals at Spring Creek Hatchery, but that if necessary, Bonneville Hatchery fish could be substituted as they are the same strain.

When ODFW’s John North asked other tribes, WDFW, NOAA and the public for comment on the proposed tribal opener, none was given.

State managers did query Ellis about a preliminary estimated catch of “0” steelhead during last week’s tribal Chinook fishery, to which he explained that none had been sampled, leading to the zero for that week. He also said that actual steelhead catches had been less than were being modeled.

He added that managers need to keep an eye on the Dworshak situation.

ODFW’s Jeff Whistler, who chairs the Technical Advisory Committee, which puts out run updates, said that one for A- and B-run steelhead, URBs and tules was “quite likely” to come out next Monday.

In a weekly newsletter out last Friday evening, NSIA noted that TAC was also reviewing Chinook passage at Bonneville this past Monday and that managers “have committed to acting as quickly as possible to reopen chinook fishing from Warrior Rock to Bonneville if the passage numbers warrant.”

No sport fisheries were proposed today, but next week’s update might show whether any are possible.

2 Keeper Sturgeon Openers Approved For Bonneville-Wauna, Cowlitz

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGOIN DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Recreational fishermen will have two days in September to get out on the Columbia River to catch and retain white sturgeon under rules approved by the Oregon and Washington departments of fish and wildlife. The two-day recreational fishery will take place on consecutive Saturdays – Sept. 21 and Sept. 28.

COLUMBIA RIVER STURGEON ANGLERS WILL HAVE TWO OPPORTUNITIES THIS MONTH TO RETAIN KEEPERS IN THE BIG RIVER BETWEEN BONNEVILLE DAM AND THE WAUNA POWERLINES. CHAD ZOLLER CAUGHT THIS ONE A COUPLE SEASONS AGO. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Recreational fishermen will head to the water this year with an overall harvest guideline of 1,230 fish for the two days. The white sturgeon fishery is guideline-driven, meaning managers may close the season early if the harvest guideline is expected to be exceeded.

The effective area is the Columbia River from the Wauna power lines, which cross the Columbia River about 40 miles from the river mouth, upstream to the fishing deadlines at Bonneville Dam. The Cowlitz River will be open for retention of white sturgeon on the same two days under rules adopted by the State of Washington. The lower Willamette River remains closed to sturgeon retention at this time.

The bag limit is one legal-sized white sturgeon per day and up to two for the year; anglers are reminded that the annual limit applies to any/all 2019 retention fisheries. A legal-sized sturgeon is defined as one measuring 44-50 inches fork length. Anglers are cautioned to pay close attention to the instructions for measuring sturgeon. Fork length is measured in a straight line from the tip of the nose to the fork in the tail fin with the fish laying on its side on a flat surface and the ruler positioned flat under the fish. (See page 12 of the 2019 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations.)

For more information and regulation updates, please see ODFW’s Columbia River Zone online.

Chinook Retention Closing 3 Days Early On Portion Of Lower Columbia

Editor’s note: The following has been updated with a WDFW e-reg at bottom authorizing the retention of two hatchery coho a day on the Warrior Rock-Bonneville stretch of the Columbia starting Sept. 6, three days earlier than previously scheduled

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE AND AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW

Fisheries managers from Oregon and Washington today announced that recreational Chinook salmon retention in the Columbia River between Warrior Rock and Bonneville Dam will close effective Friday, Sept. 6 at 12:01 a.m., three days earlier than originally scheduled.

COLUMBIA SALMON MANAGERS ARE CLOSING CHINOOK RETENTION FROM WARRIOR ROCK NEAR THE MOUTH OF THE LEWIS RIVER, WHERE DEEDEE HENSLEY CAUGHT THIS ONE A FEW RUNS BACK, UPSTREAM TO BONNEVILLE DAM. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

The states decided to close the fishery early after reviewing harvest data that indicated recreational fishermen in this river section have already surpassed their preseason Chinook salmon harvest guideline by approximately 40 percent. Other sections of the lower Columbia River closed to Chinook retention in August to help prevent recreational fisheries from exceeding their allocation of upriver bright fall Chinook.

Columbia River salmon harvests are subject to treaties and federal conservation mandates such as the Endangered Species Act that place limits on the number of fish that can be harvested.

For 2019, upriver bright fall Chinook, which include ESA-listed Snake River fish, are the most constraining Chinook stock, The states took a precautionary approach to planning 2019 fisheries as a result of exceeding take limits in recent years.

“Clearly, we need to close the season as soon as possible,” said Tucker Jones, ODFW’s manager of ocean salmon and Columbia River fisheries.

“We will continue to monitor the situation closely, and if there is any indication that we have room to catch more fish, we’ll take action,” he added, referring to ongoing monitoring of the upriver bright run size that can affect harvest guidelines.

In the meantime, coho salmon returns appear to be strong and offer potential for additional recreational fishing opportunity, especially at Buoy 10, according to Jones.

Retention of adult hatchery coho is currently open from Buoy 10 to McNary Dam, with a bag limit of two fish per day. The recreational coho season is scheduled to continue through the end of the year.

In addition, Chinook retention remains open between Bonneville and McNary dams. The fishery will be managed based on actual catches and upriver bright run size.

Steelhead retention is currently closed through September in the Columbia from the mouth of the river at Buoy 10 upstream to McNary Dam, a measure the states adopted and subsequently expanded earlier this year to help reduce impacts to upriver steelhead, which are returning to the river in smaller numbers than expected.

For more information, visit ODFW on line at www.MyODFW.com

WDFW

Portion of Columbia River mainstem closing to recreational Chinook fishing

Action: Closes the sport fishery for Chinook salmon from Warrior Rock Line upstream to Bonneville Dam. Increases adult portion of the daily limit to 2 hatchery coho.

Effective date: Friday, Sept. 6 until further notice.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: Columbia River mainstem, from upstream of the Warrior Rock Line (a line projected from the Warrior Rock lighthouse through Red Buoy 4 to the marker atop the piling dolphin located at the downstream end of Bachelor Island on the Washington shore) to Bonneville Dam.

Reason for action: This fishery was originally scheduled to close on Sunday, Sept. 8. However, the fishery has already exceeded its pre-season planned allocation of Upriver Bright impacts. This closure is necessary to meet conservation goals and pre-season fishing plans agreed upon by co-managers.

Additional information: Salmon and steelhead; min. size 12″, daily limit 6. Up to 2 adult salmon may be retained. Release all salmon and steelhead other than hatchery coho.

Fishery managers will continue to monitor the run and evaluate for possible future openings. Anglers can follow emergency rule changes at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/.

Please see the 2019-20 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for additional rules or visit the WDFW website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations.

Information contact: Region 5, 360-696-6211.

 

Columbia-Snake Steelhead Restrictions Tighten

Washington steelhead managers are tightening already restricted fisheries as this year’s A-run comes in below forecast.

HATCHERY STEELHEAD LIMITS ON WASHINGTON’S GRANDE RONDE AND OTHER STREAMS ARE BEING DROPPED TO ONE FOLLOWING A RUNSIZE DOWNGRADE. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Limits on hatchery fish are being reduced on a number of Blue Mountains streams, including the Walla Walla, Touchet, Tucannon, Snake and Grande Ronde, from three to one starting Sept. 1, per a bevy of WDFW emergency rule change notices out in late morning.

While the best fishing really isn’t until midfall, anglers will be required to quit steelheading once they’ve retained their daily limit.

There’s also a 28-inch maximum size on the Snake from its mouth up to the Couse Creek boat launch near the mouth of Hells Canyon in eastern Asotin County to protect a low return of larger B-runs.

It follows this week’s downgrade from 118,200 As and Bs expected back to now just 86,000.

A fact sheet out today says the decrease is mainly due to fin-clipped A-runs “tracking lower than forecast.”

ODFW and WDFW also extended the steelhead retention closure on the Columbia below The Dalles Dam through Sept. 30. It had been scheduled to reopen Sept. 1.

“Due to the recent run downgrade for upriver steelhead (primarily clipped A-Index fish), concerns exist regarding achieving hatchery broodstock needs,” the fact sheet states.

Inland Northwest steelhead returns have been struggling in recent years and managers have implemented a series of rolling closures going up the Columbia to protect the runs.

They’ve also closed fishing in the cool plume at the mouth of the Deschutes River, a thermal refuge where steelhead as well as salmon hunker to get out of the warmer Columbia.

The fact sheet says that the big river is running at 71 degrees, average over the past 10 years and down a degree since early August, and at about 116,000 cubic feet per second, or about 18,000 cfs lower than typical.

If there’s any good news, it’s that the forecast for unclipped/wild/natural-origin A- and B-run steelhead has dropped less sharply versus the preseason estimate, from 40,250 to 38,000, and that fall Chinook and coho returns so far at Bonneville Dam are “similar” and “consistent” with expectations.

The fact sheet states that king catches and release mortalities at Buoy 10 stayed within expectations during the keeper season, but staffers recommended that a planned nontreaty netting opener this week be rescinded because “it appears the majority of the URB sub-allocation planned preseason for August mainstem non-treaty commercial fisheries has been achieved” and managers did subsequently follow through on that.

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Welcome To The Shadosphere: Bonneville Count Tops 7 Million

Cue the fireworks, the shad count at Bonneville not only eclipsed the 7-million mark but topped last year’s record run by 1 million fish yesterday.

The tally at the first dam on the Columbia stands at 7,061,784, and while we’re on the back end of the return now, it could still go up by another hundred thousand or two.

A FISH PASSAGE GRAPH SHOWS THIS YEAR’S RECORD SHAD RUN (RED LINE). (FPC)

This year’s run demolished the former record, 2018’s 6,059,933 on June 21, and even with that run factored in, it is also three times larger than the 10-year average.

More shad also go through the locks and tens of millions likely spawn in the Columbia below the dam.

Combining 2019 and 2018, more have been counted at Bonneville than the previous five years together. Interestingly, this year’s run was relatively early timed while last year’s was later.

Why is this happening? I’m obviously not a biologist and it’s aggravating that Chinook, coho, sockeye and steelhead numbers aren’t also jumping off the charts, but it suggests better in-river spawning and rearing and ocean feeding conditions for shad than salmonids in recent years.

(If there’s good news, it’s that the sockeye run has picked up some steam since last week and will likely meet the downgraded forecast of 58,000, though whether it gets back up to the preseason prediction of 99,400 is another matter.)

How high numbers of shad may impact salmon stocks merits more study.

“I think it’s interesting — all the work we do to monitor salmon yields very little information about what shad are doing,” WDFW’s Bill Tweit told Northwest Fishletter in an interesting story. “Other than the fish ladder counts, we don’t have a real clear idea of what they’re doing.”

While the Columbia is currently closed for salmon fishing, shad are providing good fishing at Bonneville, where 244 bank anglers kept 1,136 and 10 boat anglers kept 68, according to WDFW’s mid-June weekly fishing report.

Over 2.25 million have passed McNary Dam, with nearly 350,000 of those turning right and heading up the Snake to be counted at Ice Harbor Dam.

Columbia Sockeye Run Downgraded Sharply

Columbia salmon managers have downgraded their expectations for this year’s sockeye run by nearly 42 percent, and it could come in as the smallest in a dozen years.

The Technical Advisory Committee now believe only 58,000 will return to the mouth of the big river, well below the preseason forecast of 99,400.

A FISH PASSAGE CENTER GRAPH CHARTS THIS YEAR’S SOCKEYE COUNT AT BONNEVILLE (RED LINE) AGAINST LAST YEAR’S (BLUE LINE) AND THE 10-YEAR AVERAGE. (FPC)

It’s the opposite direction of last year’s run, which was initially forecast at 99,000 but came in above 210,000.

So far 31,889 sockeye have been counted at Bonneville, and if a Fish Passage Center graph based on daily counts at the first dam on the Columbia is any indication, this year’s run has peaked and is on the downhill slide.

It’s a far cry from just a few years ago, when 512,455 and 651,146 sockeye entered the river, but this year’s run’s parents were also poached by the Blob’s very warm waters in early summer 2015, with large numbers likely dying in the reservoirs and Okanogan and Wenatchee Rivers well before they reached their spawning grounds.

In 2007, just 26,604 returned to the Columbia before runs mushroomed following habitat work and better flow management on the Canadian side of the Okanogan River.

There is no scheduled recreational sockeye (or summer Chinook) fishery on the mainstem this season. Preliminary figures from today’s fact sheet show a tribal platform, ceremonial and commercial catch of just under 800 sockeye so far.

Meanwhile, Lake Washington’s sockeye are also coming in low. After several 0-fish days that made the graph look not unlike a rock skipping across the water, the count has picked up, but the best case scenario is that the all-time-low forecast of 15,000 and change is topped.

Right now 1,124 of the salmon have gone through the Ballard Locks.

LAKE WASHINGTON SOCKEYE COUNTS. (WDFW)

That system’s issues are largely linked to smolt predation in the lake and poor adult survival due to disease after the salmon swim through the warm ship canal.

But to the north on the Baker Lake system the count is tracking fairly tightly to the five-year average of just under 21,000 to the Baker River trap.

This one will be watched closely in the coming days and weeks.

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SW WA, Lower Columbia Fishing Report (6-19-19)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Lower Columbia Mainstem Sport June 10-16

Salmon and steelhead:

Bonneville bank: 5 anglers with 1 released adult Chinook and nothing else
Camas/Washougal bank: No report
I-5 area bank: 1 angler with nothing
Vancouver bank:  17 anglers with nothing
Woodland bank:  36 anglers with nothing
Kalama bank: 17 anglers with 1 jack Chinook and nothing else
Longview bank: 171 anglers with 1 adult Chinook released, 14 steelhead kept and 3 steelhead released
Cathlamet bank: 11 anglers with 2 steelhead kept and nothing else
Private boats/bank: 15 anglers with 2 steelhead kept and 1 steelhead released

Bonneville boat: 4 anglers with nothing
Camas/Washougal boat: No report
I-5 area boat:  No report
Vancouver boat:  10 anglers with 7 adult Chinook released and 2 steelhead released
Woodland boat: No report
Kalama boat:  3 anglers with nothing
Cowlitz boat: No report
Longview boat:  72 anglers with 3 adult Chinook released, 19 steelhead kept and 6 steelhead released
Cathlamet boat:  4 anglers with 8 steelhead kept
Private boats/bank:  5 anglers with 2 steelhead kept

THE BIG RUN OF SHAD CONTINUES, WITH NEARLY 5.7 MILLION OVER BONNEVILLE AS OF JUNE 18, AND 1.23 MILLION AT MCNARY DAM SO FAR. THE LATTER AREA IS WHERE RENEE MORTIMER AND HER DAD PAUL CAUGHT THIS TRIO, PLUS A WALLEYE EARLIER THIS MONTH. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Shad:

Bonneville bank: 272 anglers with 1,758 kept and 151 released
Bonneville boat: 9 anglers with 97 kept and 15 released
Camas/Washougal bank: No report
Camas/Washougal boat: 5 anglers with 3 kept
I-5 area bank: No report
I-5 area boat: No report
Vancouver bank: No report
Vancouver boat:  1 angler with nothing
Woodland bank: 1 angler with nothing
Woodland boat: 4 anglers with 5 kept
Kalama bank:  No report
Kalama boat:  No report
Cowlitz bank: No report
Cowlitz boat: No report
Longview bank: 1 angler with nothing
Longview boat: 6 anglers with 14 kept

Sturgeon:

Bonneville bank: No report
Bonneville boat: 4 anglers with 2 sublegals released
Camas/Washougal bank: No report
Camas/Washougal boat: No report
I-5 area bank: No report
I-5 area boat: No report
Vancouver bank: No report
Vancouver boat: 5 anglers with 20 sublegals released and 1 legal released
Woodland bank: No report
Woodland boat; No report
Kalama bank: No report
Kalama boat: No report
Cowlitz bank: No report
Cowlitz boat: No report
Longview bank: No report
Longview boat: 7 anglers with 2 sublegals released, 2 legals released and 1 oversize released
Cathalmet bank: No report
Cathlamet boat: No report
Chinook/Elochoman bank: No report
Chinook/Elochoman boat: No report
Ilwaco bank: No report
Ilwaco boat: No report
Ilwaco charter: No report

almon/Steelhead:

Columbia River mainstem

During Saturday’s flight 58 salmonid boats and 122 Washington bank anglers were counted from Skamokawa upstream to the I-5 Bridge.

Shad:

Effort is holding steady with nearly 400 shad anglers counted on the Washington shore just below Bonneville Dam during Saturday’s flight (6/15).  Yesterday’s dam count (June 17) was just over 200,000 fish, which pushes the season total over 5.4 million to date.

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 4 bank rods had no catch.  2 boats/4 rods had no catch.

Above the I-5 Br:  7 bank rods had no catch.  19 boats/65 rods kept 15 steelhead and released 1 steelhead.

Tacoma Power employees recovered 51 spring Chinook adults, 10 spring Chinook jacks, 15 mini jacks, and 36 summer-run steelhead adults during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released six spring Chinook adults and five spring Chinook jacks into Lake Scanewa located in Randle.

To date, Tacoma Power employees have recycled 130 summer-run steelhead to the lower Cowlitz River.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 2,940 cubic feet per second on Monday, June 17. Water visibility is 11 feet and the water temperature is 50 F.

Kalama River – 15 bank anglers had no catch.

Lewis River – 1 bank angler had no catch.  2 boats/3 rods had no catch.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Klickitat above #5 Fishway – 1 bank angler had no catch.

 

  •      Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

 

Pikeminnow Sport – Reward Fishery Program:

The program operates from May 1 to September 30 in the lower Columbia River (mouth to Priest Rapids Dam) and the Snake River (mouth to Hells Canyon Dam).  http://www.pikeminnow.org/

Columbia, SW WA Fishing Report (6-12-19)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS FORWARDED BY BRYANT SPELLMAN, WDFW

Lower Columbia Mainstem Sport June 3-9

Salmon and steelhead:

Vancouver bank: 38 anglers with 1 adult Chinook released and 1 steelhead released
Woodland bank:  72 anglers with 1 adult Chinook released
Kalama bank:  33 anglers with zilch
Longview bank:  173 anglers with 1 adult Chinook released, 15 steelhead kept and 2 steelhead released
Cathlamet bank:  39 anglers with 1 Chinook jack kept and 3 steelhead kept
private boats/bank: 5 anglers with 1 steelhead kept

SHAD ARE NOW BEING CAUGHT WELL ABOVE BONNEVILLE DAM AND THE LOWER COLUMBIA. RENEE MORTIMER CAUGHT THIS ONE YESTERDAY ON THE MIDDLE RIVER WHILE FISHING WITH HER DAD AND TRI-CITIES ANGLER JERRY HAN. “WE FOUND THEM IN 14 TO 20 FEET OF WATER,” REPORTS HAN. “RUNNING SIZE 30 JET DIVERS 70 FEET BACK WITH 5 FEET OF 10-POUND LEADER TO A SILVER DICK NITE SPOON” WORKED WELL BEFORE DAM OPERATORS STOPPED SPILLING WATER OUT OF MCNARY AND THE BITE TURNED OFF. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

I-5 area boat: 1 angler with nothing
Vancouver boat:  5 anglers with nothing
Kalama boat:  4 anglers with nothing
Cowlitz boat:  No report
Longview boat:  19 anglers with 10 steelhead kept and 1 released
Cathlamet boat: 13 anglers with 11 steelhead kept and 2 released
private boats/bank:  2 anglers with 1 steelhead kept

Shad:

Bonneville bank: 215 anglers with 1,520 kept and 12 released
Bonneville boat:  15 anglers with 276 kept and 0 released
Camas/Washougal bank:  No report
Camas/Washougal boat: 4 anglers with 20 kept and 31 released
I-5 area bank: No report
I-5 area boat:  1 angler with 0 kept and 15 released
Vancouver bank:  3 anglers with a big zero
Vancouver boat:  9 anglers with 0 kept and 1 released
Woodland bank:  No report
Woodland boat:  No report
Kalama bank:  No report
Kalama boat:  21 anglers with 57 kept and 11 released
Cowlitz bank: No report
Cowlitz boat:  No report
Longview bank:  No report
Longview boat: 9 anglers with 57 kept and 0 released

Sturgeon:

Chinook/Elochoman bank: 69 anglers with 2 sublegals and 2 oversize released
Kalama boat: 5 anglers with 2 legals, 1 sublegal and 2 oversize released
Cathlamet boat:  35 anglers with 19 sublegals and 6 oversize released
Chinook/Elochoman boat:  458 anglers with 105 legals kept, and 135 sublegals and 238 oversize released
Ilwaco boat:  132 anglers with 20 legals kept and 13 sublegals and 41 oversize released
Charter boats: 118 anglers with 54 legals kept and 42 sublegals and 280 oversize released

Columbia River Tributaries

Salmon/Steelhead:

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River mainstem

Bank and boat anglers are catching steelhead from Longview downstream to Cathlamet.

Shad:

On the Washington shore over 850 bank anglers just below Bonneville Dam were counted on last Saturday’s flight.  Yesterday’s (June 10) dam count was close to 355,000 which brings the season total up to nearly 3.9 million to date.

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Elochoman River– 6 bank anglers kept 3 steelhead.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 15 bank rods kept 2 steelhead.

Above the I-5 Br:  8 bank rods released 1 steelhead.  18 boats/46 rods kept 17 steelhead.

Tacoma Power employees recovered 49 spring Chinook adults, 10 spring Chinook jacks, 22 summer-run steelhead adults, two winter-run steelhead adults, and one cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week Tacoma Power employees released eight spring Chinook adults and five spring Chinook jacks into Lake Scanewa located in Randle and they released one cutthroat trout into the Tilton River in Morton.

To date, Tacoma Power employees have recycled 96 summer-run steelhead to the lower river.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 2,960 cubic feet per second on Monday, June 10. Water visibility is 11 feet and the water temperature is 50 F.

Kalama River 44 bank anglers kept 2 Chinook, 2 steelhead and released 2 steelhead.  1 boat/2 rods had no catch.

Lewis River – 2 bank anglers had no catch.  3 boats/4 rods kept 1 steelhead.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – 3 bank anglers kept 1 Chinook jack.

Klickitat above #5 Fishway – 8 bank anglers had no catch.  1 boat/2 rods released 2 steelhead.

 

  •      Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.

 

Pikeminnow Sport – Reward Fishery Program:

The program operates from May 1 to September 30 in the lower Columbia River (mouth to Priest Rapids Dam) and the Snake River (mouth to Hells Canyon Dam).  http://www.pikeminnow.org/