Tag Archives: BLM

Oregon Senators’ Bill Aiming To Protect Owyhee Canyonlands Lauded

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE NORTHWEST SPORTFISHING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

The Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association (NSIA) today praised the introduction of Malheur County Community Empowerment for the Owyhee Act by Sen. Ron Wyden to permanently protect more than a million acres of public land in Malheur County, including Oregon’s spectacular Owyhee Canyonlands, as wilderness and some 14.7 miles of rivers as wild and scenic.  The conservation measure, which is cosponsored by Sen. Jeff Merkley, would also safeguard the most scenic and ecologically sensitive public land in the region from new mining claims as well as oil and gas development.

AN ANGLER WADES THE OWYHEE RIVER IN SOUTHEAST OREGON. (TIM NEVILLE)

Renowned for wildlife-filled uplands and desert rivers that wind toward the Pacific, the Owyhee Canyonlands in the southeastern corner of Oregon is the largest unprotected, undeveloped area left in the contiguous United States. The region is well known for its blue-ribbon trout fishing and sport fishing.  It is also home to over 200 species of wildlife, including golden eagles, pronghorn antelope, elk, Greater sage-grouse and one of the largest herds of California bighorn sheep in the nation.

“People come from all over the planet to fish in our rivers and to hunt, hike, boat and explore the Owyhee Canyonlands,” said Liz Hamilton, executive director of the  Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association.  “This remote, high desert river canyon teeming with wildlife and fish is a special place that deserves permanent protection. We commend Senators Wyden and Merkley for their commitment to preserving this natural treasure.

“This bill would help keep the water of the Owyhee River and its tributaries clear and pristine for all to enjoy for future generations,” added Hamilton.  “Protecting the Owyhee Canyonlands will help ensure a growing economy.”

Outdoor recreation in Oregon generated $16.4 billion in consumer spending and accounted for 172,000 jobs in one year alone.

A MAP SHOWS AREAS PROPOSED FOR WILDERNESS PROTECTION (DARK BROWN). (BLM)

Efforts have been underway for decades to permanently protect this natural treasure.  In April, Senator Wyden initiated an inclusive process for diverse stakeholders to identify solutions for future management and protection of the Owyhee region.  Participants included sportsmen and women, ranchers, tribal representatives, agency staff, conservationists, and elected officials. NSIA was honored to participate in the effort to nurture the way of life for these small communities, while protecting the grandeur of a region that boasts world class fish and wildlife resources, important cultural resources, unique plant species, unparalleled star gazing and breathtaking scenic views among its many attributes.

“We appreciate Senator Wyden’s commitment to finding a balanced way forward,” said Hamilton.  “It was a long process and not everyone got everything they wanted.  But today we have a conservation measure before Congress that will ensure that this special place will stay as it is for our future anglers, hunters, hikers, and paddlers.  We hope it will be acted on quickly.”

Pronghorn Capture-collar Project Could Identify Key SE Oregon Habitat

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW will capture 155 pronghorn antelope in the southeastern part of the state during the week of Sept. 22 in order to deploy GPS transmitters to identify migration patterns and winter range.

OREGON WILDLIFE MANAGERS PLAN TO CAPTURE AS MANY AS 155 PRONGHORN ANTELOPE TO STUDY THEIR MIGRATIONS AND WINTER RANGE USE IN THE STATE’S SOUTHEASTERN CORNER. THIS BAND WAS PHOTOGRAPHED IN NORTH-CENTRAL OREGON. (CHAD ZOLLER)

In partnership with federal agencies, ODFW wildlife biologists working under the U.S. Department of the Interior’s (DOI) Secretarial Order 3362, aim to improve habitat quality in western big game winter range and migration corridors through this data-collection operation.

Since data are lacking for pronghorn movements across most of southeastern Oregon, this operation will provide important information in identifying where critical corridors occur on the landscape.

The timing of the project primarily falls after the archery deer and elk seasons but before the rifle deer season starts Sept. 28. Some hunters scouting for deer may see the capture crew operating in the Malheur, Harney and north Lake County areas. Hunters should be aware that low-flying helicopter flight patterns during this four to five-day period are targeting pronghorn for capture. ODFW and its contractors will work to avoid impacting deer hunters who are pre-season scouting in the area.

“We don’t expect the helicopters to have an impact on hunters who are scouting,” said Don Whittaker, ODFW ungulate coordinator. “Pronghorn and mule deer should be in different areas during this operation since the animals use different places on the landscape. There are some exceptions such as Steens Mountain and the Trout Creek mountains, but as a whole, there won’t be much overlap,” added Whittaker.

Background info from DOI SO 3362 State Action Plan

Movement and migration corridors are important biological parameters for ungulate populations. These areas are best delineated using movement data collected from animals using GPS transmitters and modern, rigorous geospatial analyses. While Secretarial Order 3362 recognizes the need for habitat improvement and conservation of migration corridors, more data are needed in Oregon to properly identify where critical corridors occur on the landscape.

In particular, data are lacking for pronghorn movements across most of southeastern Oregon. ODFW is currently collecting GPS data from hundreds of mule deer throughout their eastern Oregon ranges that will facilitate identification of critical movement and migration corridors on all land ownerships, including the timing of migration and potential barriers

The majority of pronghorn habitats in Oregon occur on BLM lands. Rigorous data documenting movement and migration corridors for pronghorn in Oregon is currently extremely limited.

Zinke To BLM, USFWS, NPS: Figure Out How To Increase Fishing, Hunting Access

Federal land managers are being directed to figure out how to provide more fishing and hunting access under a directive signed by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke today, a move lauded by sportsmen’s groups.

It follows on troubling news earlier this week that participation in hunting dropped by 2.2 million between 2011 and 2016, but could help open more lands, so key to the opportunities we enjoy.

MANAGERS OF NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES, BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT GROUND AND THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE ARE BEING ASKED HOW TO INCREASE HUNTING AND FISHING ACCESS UNDER AN ORDER FROM DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR SECRETARY RYAN ZINKE. THAT PROCESS HAS BEEN ONGOING AT PLACES LIKE TURNBULL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, WHERE SPECIAL HUNTS FOR AN INCREASING ELK HERD HAVE BEEN HELD, BUT ZINKE’S ORDER COULD OPEN EVEN MORE OPPORTUNITY. (TURNBULL NWR)

“The more people we can get outdoors, the better things will be for our public lands,” said Zinke in a press release. “As someone who grew up hunting and fishing on our public lands – packing bologna sandwiches and heading out at 4 a.m. with my dad – I know how important it is to expand access to public lands for future generations. Some of my best memories are hunting deer or reeling in rainbow trout back home in Montana, and I think every American should be able to have that experience.”

His order calls for:

  • The Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Park Service to come up with plans within four months for expanding access to hunting and fishing on their lands;
  • Amend management plans for national monuments to specifically ensure hunting and fishing on them;
  • Identify federal lands where those activities are limited;
  • Expand outreach to underserved communities;
  • Develop a “one-stop” website outlining sporting opportunities on all Department of Interior lands;
  • And improve wildlife management collaboration with states, tribes, conservation groups and others.

Ducks Unlimited was supportive, particularly the part of Zinke’s order calling for “significantly” increasing waterfowl populations through habitat projects, as well as more hunting opportunities.

“Wetlands are not only a valuable resource for our nation’s waterfowl, but they also benefit more than 900 other species of wildlife,” noted Dale Hall, DU CEO, in a press release. “Investments in the conservation of wildlife habitats, like wetlands, are vital in preserving, protecting and advancing our nation’s long hunting and angling heritage. At the end of the day, it’s all about ensuring that all Americans and those generations to come, have access to the wildlife and wild places that we enjoy today.”

In recent years, USFWS has gradually been increasing waterfowl, big game and fishing opportunities on Northwest refuges and those across the country.

Land Tawney of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers said his organization looked forward to working with Zinke and Interior.

“Our hunting and fishing traditions rely on both conservation and access, with insufficient access being the No. 1 reason cited by sportsmen for forgoing time afield,” Tawney said in a press release. “The importance of Secretary Zinke’s commitment to sustaining and expanding public access opportunities to the outdoors, therefore, cannot be overstated.”

Others supporting the move included the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation as well as National Rifle Association.

“For too long, sportsmen’s access to our federal lands has been restricted, with lost opportunity replacing the ability to enjoy many of our best outdoor spaces. This extension to Secretarial Order 3356 will go a long way to reversing that trend and help grow the next generation of hunters, fishermen, and recreational shooters,” added Alaska Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski, who chairs the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, in a press release. “I appreciate this new order and am committed to working with Secretary Zinke and my colleagues to do everything we can to expand and enhance access to our federal lands for all Alaskans, and all Americans, so that we can continue our rich sportsmen’s heritage.”