Tag Archives: black friday

Stocker Rainbows Adding Color To Fall Fishing Ops In Washington

A number of Western and Central Washington lakes are being stocked with nice-sized trout for fall fishing.

FALL ANGLERS FISH OFF A DOCK AT SEATTLE’S GREEN LAKE, WHICH RECEIVED 1,511 TWO-THIRDS-POUND RAINBOWS IN LATE OCTOBER. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

WDFW says these rainbows average 15-plus inches, with some bouncing the scales at 3 pounds.

Releases are slated to occur prior to Black Friday at:

Clark County: Battle Ground Lake and Klineline Pond
Cowlitz County: Kress Lake
King County: Beaver, Fivemile, Green and Steel Lakes
Klickitat County: Rowland Lake
Lewis County: Fort Borst Park and South Lewis County Park Ponds
Mason County: Spencer Lake
Pacific County: Cases Pond
Pierce County: American and Tanwax Lakes
Skagit County: Clear and Cranberry Lakes
Snohomish County: Ballinger, Silver and Tye Lakes and Gissberg Ponds
Thurston County: Black, Long, and Offut Lakes
Whatcom County: Padden Lake
Yakima County: North Elton Pond

To narrow down the timeframe, keep an eye on https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports/stocking/trout-plants.

THANKS TO STATE HATCHERY RELEASES, WASHINGTON ANGLERS CAN ENJOY CATCHING AND EATING NICE-SIZED RAINBOWS LIKE THESE IN FALL. (JOSHUA MYERS VIA WDFW)

Steel and Padden were scheduled to close after Halloween, but have been kept open past New Year’s Day via a rule change that came out last week, and were both recently stocked and will be again around Thanksgiving.

WDFW is running a pilot program focusing on expanding fishing opportunities in Pugetropolis’s I-5 corridor.

“I’m really excited to offer these fisheries and hopefully it leads to getting more people into the sport,” WDFW biologist Justin Spinelli in Mill Creek told Mark Yuasa for an article in our latest issue. “We’re trying this out in urban-centered areas. We know a lot of people in the cities may be interested in getting outside and going fishing. This allows them to access nearby lakes and it’s not too complicated and doesn’t require a whole bunch of gear.”

In Eastern Washington, Fourth of July Lake on the Adams-Lincoln County line, Hatch and Williams Lakes in Stevens County, and Hog Canyon Lake in Spokane County will open on Black Friday for a winter fishery powered by previous years’ trout fly plants.

“WDFW’s trout stocking and hatchery programs are active year-round,” said Steve Caromile, the agency’s Inland Fish Program manager. “We provide the gift of spending time with friends and family on lakes around the state, at any time of the year.”

Anglers 15 years and older need a freshwater fishing license to dangle worms, eggs and other offerings for trout in lakes. Licenses are available online and at numerous local outlets.

Yuasa: I-5 Fall Trout Releases Boosted, Plus Squid, Crab, Salmon Ops In November

Editor’s note: The following is Mark Yuasa’s monthly fishing newsletter, Get Hooked on Reel Times With Mark, and is run with permission.

By Mark Yuasa, Director of Grow Boating Programs, Northwest Marine Trade Association

We’ve been hanging our salmon fishing lines in the water for more than five months, and I’d like to switch gears and set sights on another exciting opportunity to get through the impending holiday madness.

Yes, take some time to let go of your snobbish salmon attitude and harken back to days when you pursued trout with nothing more than high hopes, a jar of salmon eggs, Power Bait or a container of worms.

Now is the time to hit the refresh button and replay those memorable moments or share it with someone new to fishing.

“We’re trying out a couple of pilot programs, which allowed us to be creative on how we structure trout fisheries in our region, and we’ve kept intact a couple others that have been successful,” said Justin Spinelli, a WDFW biologist in Mill Creek.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

Earlier this year, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) strategized ways to boost trout prospects at a time when many have holiday plans or shopping on their minds.

According to Spinelli, WDFW hatchery staff had space in some hatcheries and funding to raise thousands of rainbow trout to catchable size (8 to 11 inches) this past spring and summer.

“During this pilot program, we plan to monitor and conduct creel surveys so we can get an idea on participation and success,” Spinelli said. “Keeping fish in hatcheries longer was expensive. We need to make sure for budget purposes that it’s worth our effort to provide this special opportunity.”

WDFW is planting 27,000 rainbow trout along the I-5 corridor in 12 lakes within Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish and King counties.

“I’m really excited and hopefully it leads to getting more people into the sport,” he said. “We’re trying this out in urban centered areas. We know a lot of people in the cities may be interested in getting outside and going fishing.”

Spinelli says this offers easy access to nearby lakes and it’s not too complicated of a fishery to learn, doesn’t take a whole bunch of expensive fishing gear and provides fish that are willing to bite.

Two popular local lakes where late-season annual plants have become the norm are Beaver Lake in Issaquah and Goodwin Lake in Snohomish County.

Beaver was expecting a plant – possibly as soon as this week – of 1,250 trout averaging 2 pounds apiece and another 1,250 just prior to Thanksgiving. Goodwin will receive 5,000 in December.

Here are other scheduled plants (most lakes are open year-round except two have seasonal dates):

King County – Green, 3,600 (1,611 planted last week); Steel, 1,600 (open Nov. 1-Jan. 5 only and 804 were planted last week); and Fivemile, 1,200 (616 were planted last week). Snohomish County – Gissburg Ponds, 2,000; Tye, 2,000; Silver, 2,000 (1,005 were planted last week); and Ballinger, 1,600 (804 were planted last week). Skagit County – Clear, 1,500; and Cranberry, 1,750. Whatcom County – Padden, 1,750 (open Nov. 1-Jan. 5 only and 1,000 were planted last week).

“Some lakes we plant will have fish biting for quite a while,” Spinelli said. “I’m thrilled with this new program and hope we can demonstrate that this can be a stimulus for our trout fisheries at a time when choices of fishing activities are much slimmer.”

The popular “Black Friday” trout fisheries also give anglers a chance to get out and burn off the calories from a Thanksgiving feast. This includes thousands of beefy trout averaging 1 to 1.3 pounds going into more than a dozen southwest Washington lakes.

Clark County – Klineline, 2,000; and Battle Ground, 2,000. Cowlitz County – Kress, 2,000. Klickitat County – Rowland, 2,000. Lewis County – Fort Borst Park Pond, 2,000; and South Lewis County Park Pond, 2,000. Pierce County – American, 2,000; and Tanwax, 1,000. Thurston County – Black, 1,000; Ward, 300; Long, 1,000; and Offutt, 1,000.

Millions of fry-size trout were planted this past spring in eastern Washington lakes that are open from Nov. 29 through March 31. These fish should have grown to catchable size (8 to 11 inches). They include Hatch, 10,000, and Williams, 12,000, in Stevens County; Fourth of July, 80,000, on Lincoln/Adams county line; and Hog Canyon, 20,000, in Spokane County.

Elton Pond in Yakima County open from Nov. 29 through March 31 will be planted with 2,000 trout averaging 1.2 pounds.

Be sure to check the WDFW website for additional lakes open year-round, which are expected to be planted in late fall and winter. For weekly stocking reports, go to www.wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly.

Other holiday fishing opportunities

This is a magical time of the year with opportunities blooming for squid, salmon and Dungeness crab just to name a few.

Hitting up many Puget Sound piers has become a nightly affair as millions of tasty squid – known in the culinary society as “calamari” – are pouring into Puget Sound marine waterways from Edmonds south to Tacoma.

Squid jigging is good at the Les Davis Pier in Tacoma; Des Moines Marina Pier; Seacrest Boathouse Pier in West Seattle; Seattle waterfront at Piers 57, 62, 63, 70 or the Seattle Aquarium Pier; Edmonds Pier; A-Dock and Shilshole Pier; Point Defiance Park Pier; Fauntleroy Ferry Dock; Illahee State Park Pier; and the Waterman and Indianola piers in Kitsap County.

Night-time on a flood tide are the best periods to catch squid as they’re attracted to lighted public piers. Squid like to lurk in the darker edges of lighted water and dart out into the light on their unsuspecting prey. The WDFW website has a wealth of information on squid jigging at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/squid/.

Salmon chasers still have opportunities in central Puget Sound (Marine Catch Area 10), which is open for chum and maybe a late coho through Nov. 15. Target chums around Jefferson Head, West Point south of Shilshole Bay, Point Monroe, Kingston, Allen Bank and Southworth near Blake Island, and the east side of Bainbridge Island.

Southern Puget Sound (Area 13) is open year-round and should be fair game for hatchery winter chinook off Fox Island, south of the Narrows Bridge, Anderson Island and Johnson Point.
Hood Canal (Area 12) is often an underfished location in the winter for hatchery chinook around central region at Misery Point and Oak Head.

A reminder the daily catch limit is two coho, chum or hatchery chinook in southern Puget Sound (Area 13). The daily limit in Areas 10 is two salmon but only one may be a coho (you can retain chum, pink and coho but need to release chinook).

Central Puget Sound (Area 10) and south-central Puget Sound (Area 11) reopens Jan. 1 for hatchery chinook. Northern Puget Sound (Area 9), San Juan Islands (Area 7) and east side of Whidbey Island (Areas 8-1 and 8-2) reopens Feb. 1 for hatchery chinook.

There’s nothing sweeter than having a plate of Dungeness crab sitting on the holiday dinner table and fishing has been fairly good since it reopened back on Oct. 1. Dungeness crab fishing is open daily through Dec. 31 at Neah Bay east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line (Marine Area 4); Sekiu area in western Strait of Juan de Fuca (5); Port Angeles area eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca (6); San Juan Islands (7); and northern Puget Sound/Admiralty Inlet (9) except for waters south of a line from Olele Point to Foulweather Bluff. The east side of Whidbey Island in Deception Pass, Hope Island, and Skagit Bay (8-1); Port Susan and Port Gardiner (8-2) has closed for crabbing.

Sport crabbers are reminded that setting or pulling traps from a vessel is only allowed from one hour before official sunrise through one hour after official sunset. For more information, go to https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/.

Can you dig it? Coastal razor clam success very good since opening in late September

The coastal razor clam digs have gotten off to a stupendous start and be sure to get some for the holiday dinner table.

The first digs of the 2019-2020 season began Sept. 27-29 at Long Beach and success was excellent with 18,000 diggers taking home 296,000 clams.

(MARK YUASA, NMTA)

“Digging went really well during the first series opener at Long Beach,” said Dan Ayres, the head WDFW coastal shellfish manager. “It was as close to limits as you can get (the first 15 clams dug regardless of size or condition is a daily per person limit).”

Digging this week also was off-the-charts good at Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks. There’s still a last chance on tonight (Nov. 1) at Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Copalis (minus-0.2 feet at 10:38 p.m.). No digging is allowed during PM low tides only.

Many night-time low tide digs are planned in the weeks ahead on Nov. 1, 11, 13, 15, 17, 24, 26, 28 and 30 at Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Copalis; and Nov. 12, 14, 16, 25, 27 and 29 at Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Mocrocks. Dec. 10, 12, 14, 16, 23, 27 and 29 at Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Mocrocks; and Dec. 11, 13, 15, 26 and 28 at Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Copalis.

Final approval is announced by WDFW about one or two weeks prior to each series of digs and are dependent on marine toxin levels being below the cutoff threshold.

WDFW shellfish managers are saying this could be one of the best seasons seen in quite a while for many digs planned from winter through spring. For details, visit https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfishing-regulations/razor-clams.

New name and new events happening in 2020 during the NW Fishing Derby Series

A quick look back at the 2019 derby season saw a total of 6,176 anglers entered into 13 derbies (one was cancelled) which is up from 4,690 in 2018 and there’s plenty of excitement coming up in 2020.

We’ve now hit the refresh button and renamed it the “Northwest Fishing Derby Series” with a tentative 18 derbies scheduled. It will include two lingcod/rockfish “For the Love of Cod Derbies” in Coos Bay, Charleston and Brookings, Oregon in March 21-22 and March 28-29 respectively, and the Something Catchy Kokanee Derby at Lake Chelan in April.

The highlight is a chance enter and win a sleek $75,000 fully loaded, grand-prize all-white KingFisher 2025 Series Hardtop boat powered with Yamaha 200hp and 9.9hp trolling motors on an EZ Loader Trailer. Our newest sponsor of the derby – Shoxs Seats (www.shoxs.com) – has provided a pair of top-of-the-line seats that are engineered for maximum comfort in the roughest of seas.
The good news is anglers who enter any of the 18 derbies don’t need to catch a fish to win this beautiful boat and motor package!

A huge “thank you” to our other 2020 sponsors who make this series such a success are Silver Horde and Gold Star Lures; Scotty Downriggers; Burnewiin Accessories; Raymarine Electronics; WhoDat Tower; Dual Electronics; Tom-n-Jerry’s Marine; Master Marine; NW Sportsman Magazine; The Reel News; Outdoor Emporium and Sportco; Harbor Marine; Prism Graphics; Lamiglas Rods; KIRO/ESPN 710AM The Outdoor Line; Salmon, Steelhead Journal; Rays Bait Works; and Salmon Trout Steelheader Magazine.

First up in the series are the Resurrection Salmon Derby on Feb. 1-2; Friday Harbor Salmon Classic on Feb. 6-8; and Roche Harbor Salmon Classic on Feb. 13-15. For details, go to http://www.nwsalmonderbyseries.com/.

In the meantime, take a break from holiday shopping and hit up a lake or open saltwater areas for a feisty fish tugging on the end of your line.

I’ll see you on the water!

Free Fishing, Big Broodstockers On Tap For NW Sportsmen Who #OptOutside

Northwest fishery managers are trying to lure anglers to the water with a mix of just-released lunker rainbows and free days this holiday weekend.

Ahead of Black Friday, both Oregon and Washington have been busy stocking lakes with trout from 15 inches to a whopping 15 pounds, and the Beaver State is also waiving license fees for fishing, crabbing and clamming that day and Saturday.

DUSTIN SHARPE OF SALEM SHOWS OFF A 12-POUND BROODSTOCK RAINBOW CAUGHT EARLY IN 2009 AT WALTER WIRTH LAKE. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

ODFW reports that it has released 400 broodstockers from 5 to 15 pounds at Blue Lake (Fairview), Huddleston Pond (Willamina), Junction City Pond, Sheridan Pond, Timber Linn Pond (Albany) and Walter Wirth Lake (Salem) over the past two weeks.

Timber Linn and Walter Wirth were also on the receiving end of a mess of 1-pounders, as were Canby, Cottage Grove, Junction City, Mt. Hood (Gresham) and West Salish (Fairview) Ponds.

If you prefer clams, Friday and Saturday evenings will see minus tides on Yaquina and other bays. Just remember that Clatsop County beaches are closed for razor clams until next March and that crabbing is closed from Cape Blanco to California, but open inside bays up the rest of the coast.

North of the Columbia, WDFW was releasing trout from 15 inches to 3 pounds at American, Battle Ground, Black, Kress, Long, Offut, Rowland and Tanwax Lakes and Cases, Fort Borst, Klineline, North Elton and South Lewis County Park Ponds specifically for the day after Thanksgiving.

Other lakes including Beaver in Sammamish will receive a fresh slug of fish too for the weekend.

For details, see WDFW’s weekly stocking report.

And remember that three Washington ocean beaches will see clam digs starting tomorrow.

Yes, the weather forecast could be better — rain pretty much a guarantee west of the Cascades in both states on Friday and clearing on Saturday — but Thanksgiving storms will actually bring much-needed precipitation to the region.

The USGS daily streamflow maps for both states looks like somebody spilled cranberry sauce all over them so many rivers are running at flows below the 10th percentile for this time of year.

(USGS)

Somewhere on the Facebookopshere I saw that the Alsea this morning set a new low for the date when it briefly slipped below 90 cubic feet per second overnight.

Ninety cfs in November?!?!

In days of yore, Turkey Day marked the kickoff of winter steelhead saeson, and on a few select rivers catching a chromer is still possible, namely those around Forks, Willapa Bay and the Skykomish.

In Oregon, ODFW points to the Alsea, John Day and Rogue, but other options include the Ana, Crooked, Klamath and Metolius for a mix of trout and whitefish.

Yes, it’ll be tempting to just ooze onto the couch and digest while it rains outside and the Apple Cup and Civil War rage on, but there’s plenty to do this long weekend if you optoutside, as the hash tag goes.

Considering Adding An E-Bike To Your Hunting, Fishing Arsenal?

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL HAS BEEN PROVIDED BY RAD POWER BIKES

By Dan Nelson, Customer Experience Specialist at Rad Power Bikes of Seattle

While much of the use of electric bicycles is geared towards changing the game in urban transportation, we’ve found that there are plenty of uses for those among us looking to get off the beaten path.

E-BIKES CAN PROVIDE NORTHWEST HUNTERS AND ANGLERS FASTER ACCESS BEHIND LOCKED GATES, BUT DO CHECK WITH LANDOWNERS FOR THEIR POLICIES AS THEY VARY BY OWNERSHIP AND JURISDICTION, EVEN BETWEEN WILDLIFE AREAS IN WASHINGTON’S CASE. (RAD POWER BIKES)

Whether you’re interested in nature, an RVer looking for an alternative to a bulky tow-behind, or a hunter or angler needing assistance in getting to your secluded spot, there are countless outdoor enthusiasts that can expand and revolutionize their experiences by adding an electric bicycle to their arsenal of outdoor equipment.

Background on Ebikes The electric bicycle industry has seen a rapid expansion recently because ebikes amplify the benefits of a standard pedal bicycle by also offering the assistance of a powerful, quiet, and efficient electric motor, without significant drawbacks.

Federal regulations allow an electric bicycle to be classified as a traditional bicycle rather than a motorized vehicle as long as its motor is under 750 watts and its assisted speed does not exceed 20 mph, allowing them to be used in many of the same places as standard bicycles.

The addition of a powerful and easy to use motor allows riders to not only breeze up hills, but also to extend their rides further to areas that may otherwise be inaccessible with other alternative modes of transportation.

Motor technologies have been improving significantly, which is great for people riding in the outdoors as they are likely to be pushing them to the limits more often than riders on pavement.

The most common types of motors on ebikes are either rear hub mounted motors, which offer the greatest ease of use and maintenance, and mid-drive motors, which are harder to use and require more maintenance but offer greater efficiency and power.

The options for motor assistance are typically in the form of a throttle, which will fully engage the motor with a twist or the press of a button, or varying levels of pedal assist, which allow the rider to cycle through levels based on how much effort they’re looking to put in.

All of our models are outfitted with a twist throttle and five levels of pedal assistance. This gives all the power to the rider, whether they’re looking to zip up and down the beach with the throttle alone, or they’re instead using the motor to compliment their own pedaling to go for a long ride through the woods on the path less traveled.

Hunters & Anglers The ability to get themselves and their gear through the woods quickly, quietly, and with as little effort as possible, are all very important and luckily, also areas that ebikes excel at.

Most ebikes max out at 20 mph assisted speed, to conform with federal regulations, so doing scouting runs or getting to and from hunting stands and fishing holes can be done much more quickly than on foot.

These speedy passages are also quite stealthy due to the quiet nature of electric motors, which will help hunters avoid frightening wildlife or giving them knowledge of their presence.

A further benefit to help decrease their chance of being noticed is the lack of a scented trail left both by your walking and continued presence. The rubber tires of an ebike leave much less of a human footprint than walking and the lack of effort required will also save you from sweating, further assisting in blending in.

While there are other options that offer similar benefits, ebikes may have a leg up by their regulatory classification being that of a bicycle under federal regulations, meaning that they may be usable in many places where comparable alternatives aren’t allowed to go.

Legality This leads to a difficult topic that has been evolving regarding electric bikes, where should they be allowed?

While the laws pertaining to electric bike legality in cities, on roads, and on bike paths, have been more and more finely tuned recently, whether or not electric bikes are allowed or should be allowed in parks wilderness, and recreation areas that prohibit motorized vehicles is a topic of debate. These rules are rather convoluted and far from all encompassing, so it is highly recommended to check with your local authorities themselves to get their perspective.

The argument is typically centered around congestion and the increased wear and tear that electric bikes would offer trails. Perhaps it is wishful thinking but an alternate perspective is that increasing the number of people that are able to enjoy the outdoors, and in turn creating more stewards of nature, could play an important role in helping to preserve our natural spaces. This could potentially lead to greater advocacy and funding by people whom would otherwise be indifferent.

Conclusion Electric bikes are a great option to help experience the outdoors in a whole new way!

Rad Power Bikes is filled with outdoor lovers, myself included being raised by park rangers turned scientists, so finding ways to help others experience the wonders that the outdoors have to offer, and creating more stewards for mother nature, is something that we take a lot of pride in.

Check out the community photos collection on our website to see what you’re missing, or share your own so that your favorite spot can be appreciated by others as well. Whether you’re a seasoned outdoorsmen or somebody that rarely leaves the pavement, we’d love to see where ebikes take you!

Note: Seattle-based Rad Power Bikes is offering between $300 and $400 off their 2018 ebike models this holiday season.

The sale will launch on Black Friday and Small Business Saturday at their Ballard and Vancouver, B.C. showrooms, then take place nationally online on Cyber Monday.

Because Rad Power Bikes already has wholesale prices through their consumer-direct approach, this is their only sale of the year.

Stores open at 9am PT on Black Friday, and the following Saturday and Sunday. For Cyber Monday, purchase at www.radpowerbikes.com starting at 12:01am PT. For updates, visit: https://www.radpowerbikes.com/pages/black-friday-cyber-monday

 

SW WA, Columbia Fishing Report (11-27-17)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ORIGINATED FROM ODFW AND WDFW AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon, Steelhead and Shad

The salmonid creel program on the lower Columbia has ended for the year and will resume February of 2018.

Bonneville Pool (Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam): Weekly checking showed 15 adult coho kept, plus one Chinook and adult coho released for 10 boats (22 anglers).

OUTDOOR REPORTER TERRY OTTO OF THE COLUMBIAN AND WADE RAMSEY SHOW OFF A PAIR OF BLACK FRIDAY LIMITS CAUGHT AT ROWLAND LAKE IN THE SPACE OF JUST A COUPLE HOURS. THEY WERE TROLLING 2.5 MAG LIP. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

The Dalles Pool (The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam): No report.

John Day Pool (Columbia River above John Day Dam and John Day Arm): Weekly checking showed no catch for five boats (15 anglers).

STURGEON

Lower Columbia River (below Bonneville Dam): Closed for retention. No report.

Bonneville Pool: Closed for retention. No report.

The Dalles Pool: Closed for retention. No report.

John Day Pool: Closed for retention. No report.

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (one angler).

The Dalles Pool: Weekly checking showed no catch for two boats (three anglers).

John Day Pool: No report.

……………………………………………..

Salmon/Steelhead

Mainstem Grays from the mouth upstream to the Hwy. 4 Bridge and West Fork from 300 yards below the salmon hatchery road bridge upstream to the hatchery intake/footbridge – Effective November 16, the night closure, anti-snagging rules, and stationary gear rule restrictions are no longer be in effect.

Mainstem Grays from Hwy. 4 Bridge upstream to the South Fork and West Fork Grays River from mouth upstream to 300 yards below hatchery road bridge – Opens to fishing for hatchery steelhead, hatchery coho, and adipose and/or ventral fin clipped Chinook beginning December 1.

Green River, North Fork Toutle River, and mainstem Toutle River from mouth to forks – November 30 is the last day to fish for hatchery steelhead and hatchery coho.

Outlet Creek (Cowlitz Co.) – November 30 is the last day to fish for hatchery steelhead and hatchery salmon.

South Fork Toutle River – From 4100 Bridge upstream, November 30 is the last day to fish for hatchery steelhead and hatchery coho. The mouth to the bridge remains open to fishing for hatchery steelhead with selective gear rules in effect beginning December 1.

Mill Creek (tributary to Cowlitz River) – Beginning December 1, opens to fishing for hatchery steelhead, hatchery sea run cutthroats, and hatchery salmon from the mouth to the salmon hatchery road crossing culvert. Selective gear rules, night closures and anti-snagging rules will be in effect for this one month fishery.

Cowlitz River – From the I-5 Br. downstream:  11 bank rods had no catch.  No boat anglers were sampled.  Upstream from the I-5 Br:  18 bank rods kept 1 jack and 8 adult coho and released 7 adult coho.  1 boat rod had no catch.

Under permanent rules, the night closure and anti-snagging rule is lifted from Mill Creek upstream to the Barrier Dam effective Dec. 1.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 4,494 coho adults, 132 coho jacks, 21 fall Chinook adults, two fall Chinook jacks, 32 cutthroat trout, and 25 summer-run steelhead during four days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

During the past week, Tacoma Power employees released 833 coho adults and 14 coho jacks into the Cispus River near the mouth of Yellow Jacket Creek, and they released 421 coho adults at Franklin Bridge in Packwood.

Tacoma Power released 948 coho adults, 20 coho jacks, 21 fall Chinook adults, two fall Chinook jacks and three cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton and they released 546 coho adults and 17 coho jacks into Lake Scanewa near Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 14,400 cubic feet per second (cfs) on Monday, November 27. Water visibility is four feet and water temperature is 48.3 degrees F.

North Fork Lewis River – 10 bank and 4 boat rods had no catch.  Flows below Merwin Dam are currently 11,600 cfs, nearly twice the long-term mean for this date.

Under permanent rules, effective December 1 the night closure and anti-snagging rules will no longer be in effect from Johnson Creek (below the salmon hatchery) upstream to Colvin Creek (above the salmon hatchery).

Klickitat River – Under permanent rules, the Klickitat River from Fishway #5 upstream closes to fishing for salmon and trout (including hatchery steelhead) beginning December 1. The whitefish only season from 400 feet above Fishway #5 upstream to the Yakama Reservation boundary begins December 1. Whitefish gear rules will be in effect.

Trout

Swift Reservoir from the dam upstream to the Eagle Cliff Bridge – No report on angling success.  Remains open to fishing through November 30. Until then, the daily limit is 10 hatchery rainbows. Landlocked salmon rules are in effect (salmon count towards the trout daily limit); however, all salmon larger than 15 inches must be released.

Recent plants of one-pound rainbows into SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish per Pound
Hatchery
Notes

* BATTLE GROUND LK (CLAR)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=BATTLE%20GROUND%20LK%20(CLAR)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Nov 20, 2017
Rainbow
1,000
0.92
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

* FORT BORST PRK LK (LEWI)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=FORT%20BORST%20PRK%20LK%20(LEWI)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Nov 22, 2017
Rainbow
750
1
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

Nov 21, 2017
Rainbow
1,000
0.8
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

* KLINELINE PD (CLAR)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=KLINELINE%20PD%20(CLAR)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Nov 20, 2017
Rainbow
1,500
0.92
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

* KRESS LK (COWL)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=KRESS%20LK%20(COWL)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Nov 22, 2017
Rainbow
750
1
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

Nov 21, 2017
Rainbow
1,500
0.97
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Nov 21, 2017
Rainbow
1,000
0.8
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

* LEWIS CO PRK PD-S (LEWI)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LEWIS%20CO%20PRK%20PD-S%20(LEWI)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Nov 22, 2017
Rainbow
750
1
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

Nov 21, 2017
Rainbow
1,000
0.8
MOSSYROCK HATCHERY

* ROWLAND LK (KLIC)<http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=ROWLAND%20LK%20(KLIC)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>

Nov 21, 2017
Rainbow
1,242
0.97
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Nov 20, 2017
Rainbow
547
0.92
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Nov 20, 2017
Rainbow
463
0.97
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Rainbow Fishing Good, About To Get Better On Black Friday

“The trout bite is heating up like a frozen turkey dropped into the fryer.”

So reported angler Jerry Han of the Tri-Cities area following an outing on a “local lake” in Central Washington last weekend.

He didn’t share GPS coordinates of said pond, but if we had to bet, we’d put whole pots full of Thanksgiving Day leftovers on it being a well-known water north of his Kennewick dental practice.

Han was accompanied by friend Rick Beery, a “self-professed fly guy,” who reportedly “made some interesting gagging sounds” when directed to bring along some nightcrawlers to bait up sons Paul and Joseph’s lures.

RICK BEERY AND SONS PAUL AND JOSEPH SHOW OFF A REAL NICE CENTRAL WASHINGTON RAINBOW CAUGHT LAST WEEKEND WITH JERRY HAN. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Their trolling programs included Wedding Rings behind dodgers, as well as Berkley Flicker Minnows.

“Good action, but we had to work for them,” notes Han.

They caught at least four nice-sized trout, including one that may have helped out with bug boy Beery’s gag-reflex issues.

“Apparently catching a 23-inch rainbow magically clears up that illness,” Dr. Han reports.

THAT AIN’T A CARTON OF SAN JUAN WORMS IN FLYRODDER BEERY’S LEFT HAND! NIGHTCRAWLERS ACCOUNTED FOR HIS HEFTY RAINBOW. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Elsewhere in Washington, if you’re able to waddle out of the house on Black Friday, tons of trout are awaiting anglers. WDFW announced earlier this month it will have stocked these lakes for post-Thanksgiving fishing:

  • Battle Ground Lake (2,000) and Klineline Pond (2,000) in Clark County
  • Kress Lake (2,000) in Cowlitz County
  • Fort Borst Park Pond (2,000) and South Lewis County Park Pond (2,000) in Lewis County
  • American (2,500) and Tanwax (1,000) Lakes in Pierce County
  • Rowland Lake (2,000) in Klickitat County
  • Black (3,000), Long (1,000) and Offutt (1,000) Lakes in Thurston County
  • Elton Pond North (2,000) in Yakima County

Missing from this list but also recently stocked is Beaver Lake in Sammamish, which got another 700 broodstockers.

While several of the above lakes are closed until Friday, Beaver’s open now.

For more rainbow releases, go here.

What A Deal! Free Fishing In Oregon On Black Friday, Small Biz Saturday

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW is waiving all fishing licensing requirements on the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving to encourage people to #optoutside with friends and family during the long holiday weekend.

(ANDY WALGAMOTT)

On Nov. 24 and 25, 2017, all fishing, crabbing and clamming in Oregon will be free for both Oregon residents and non-residents. That means no licenses, tags or endorsements are needed on those days. All other fishing regulations apply.

Below are some good bets for fishing, crabbing or clamming on Thanksgiving weekend. For more, check ODFW’s Recreation Report, which is updated on Wednesday each week. Be sure to check water conditions and the weather forecast before heading out and dress appropriately. If you’re heading to the coast, be wary of high surf.

Trout: Lakes and reservoirs across Oregon have been stocked with trout in recent weeks, and several western Oregon lakes will be stocked the week of Nov. 20 including: Waverly Lake (Albany), Emigrant Lake (Ashland), Hyatt Reservoir (SE of Ashland), Applegate Reservoir (SW of Ashland), Expo Pond (Central Point), Faraday Lake (Estacada), Blue Lake (Fairview), St Louis Ponds (Gervais), Reinhard Park Pond (Grants Pass),  Mt Hood Pond (MHCC-Gresham), Junction City Pond, Medco Pond (east of Lost Creek Lake), Willow Lake (east of Medford), Agate Reservoir (White City/Medford), Garrison Lake (Port Orford), Walter Wirth Lake and Walling Pond (Salem), Alton Baker Canal (Springfield) and Progress Lake (Tigard).

Winter steelhead: Thanksgiving usually marks the beginning of winter steelhead season on the coast, and some early returning hatchery fish have already been caught. Check the Recreation Report for the latest on conditions.

Crabbing and clamming: While some crabbing closures are in effect due to domoic acid and ocean crabbing is closed, recreational crabbing is open in bays and estuaries and on beaches, docs, and piers from the north jetty of Coos Bay to Tahkenitch Creek and from north of Cape Foulweather to the Columbia River. Always check ODA’s shellfish page before crabbing or clamming for the latest information on any closures due to domoic acid http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/programs/FoodSafety/Shellfish/Pages/ShellfishClosures.aspx  Bay clam and mussel harvesting are currently open along the entire Oregon coast and razor clamming is open on Clatsop County beaches.

For tips on how and where to fish, crab and clam, visit ODFW’s new webpage www.myodfw.com

 

Heck With Holiday Shopping — Try Trout Lake Hopping This Black Friday

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is offering anglers opportunities for tight lines rather than long lines on the day after Thanksgiving.

The “holiday specials” include thousands of large trout averaging 15 to 16 inches in length and weighing up to three pounds.

Klickitat County’s Rowland Lake is one of the waters where now-retired state fisheries biologist John Weinheimer (left) kicked off the Fish Friday campaign in November 2011, while fall releases at the Issaquah-area’s Beaver Lake stretch back to at least 2003. Weinheimer and Wade Ramsey caught these trout trolling 2.5 and 3.0 Mag Lip plugs and crawl-retrieving 3-inch PowerBait Trout Worms. (BUZZ RAMSEY)

The department is currently preparing to stock lakes in time for Black Friday, Nov. 24.

Additionally, the department stocks millions of smaller trout each spring, many of which will have grown to catchable size.

“This is a great reason to avoid the holiday shopping stress just a little longer and enjoy a fun day on the water with family and friends,” said Steve Thiesfeld, WDFW inland fish program manager.

Some of the lakes scheduled to receive fish before Black Friday include:

Battle Ground Lake and Klineline Pond in Clark County
Kress Lake in Cowlitz County
Fort Borst Park Pond and South Lewis County Park Pond in Lewis County
American and Tanwax lakes in Pierce County
Rowland Lake in Klickitat County
Black, Long, and Offutt lakes in Thurston County
Elton Pond North in Yakima County

Many of those lakes will be closed to fishing the Monday before Thanksgiving Day until Thanksgiving Day to facilitate stocking efforts as noted in the fishing regulations: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/

On the eastside, WDFW has been stocking lakes with fry plants in recent years, which should mean hefty fish in Hatch Lake in Stevens County; Fourth of July Lake in Lincoln and Adams counties; and Lake Roosevelt in Lincoln, Stevens and Ferry counties.

Some of these eastside lakes will open Nov. 24 and remain open through March 31, 2018 as noted in the fishing regulations: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/

For up-to-date stocking information this fall, anglers should follow the department on Twitter or Facebook, accessible from http://wdfw.wa.gov, or see the department’s weekly catchable trout stocking report at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/

Anglers 15 years and older must have a current Washington freshwater fishing license valid through March 31, 2018, to participate.

Licenses can be purchased by telephone at 1-866-246-9453, at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov, or at hundreds of license vendors across the state.

For details on license vendor locations, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/