Tag Archives: association of northwest steelheaders

Registration Open For Steelhead 101 Workshop In Troutdale

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Register by Oct. 25 for a Steelhead 101 fishing workshop Nov. 3 and 10 at Glen Otto Community Park (1106 E Historic Columbia River Hwy, Troutdale).

A JOINT ODFW-STEELHEADERS WORKSHOP INCLUDES CLASSROOM AND ON-THE-WATER INSTRUCTION FOR HOW TO CATCH WINTER-RUNS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The event is co-hosted by ODFW and the Sandy River Chapter, Association of NW Steelheaders. Register online at https://or.outdoorcentral.us/or/license (call Jason at 503-947-6025 if you need help registering). 

The workshop is for beginning anglers to learn the essential elements of steelhead fishing. On Nov. 3, the workshop runs from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and covers selecting the right gear, essential knots, fishing ethics and tips and techniques. Nov. 10’s workshop will be an on-the-water session from 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

The cost is $52 for adults, $22 for youth (minimum age 10). Lunch, equipment and a year-long membership to the Association of NW Steelheaders is included in the price.

ODFW and partners host a variety of workshops teaching people how to hunt, fish, crab and clam. See the Workshops and Events page for more, https://myodfw.com/workshops-and-events

Retired Disabled Vet Building ADA-accessible Blinds At SW WA Refuges, Wildlife Areas

By Brent Lawrence

Rick Spring smiles even as the cold wind and rain blow across his face in the waterfowl blind at Willapa National Wildlife Refuge. The call of cackling geese overhead and the sight of wildlife relax him as he pets Max, his yellow Labrador retriever who doubles as his certified therapy dog.

Being in the outdoors is where Spring finds peace.

RICK SPRING, A DISABLED NAVY VET, BOEING RETIREE AND MEMBER OF ONE OF WASHINGTON’S OLDEST FISH AND GAME CLUBS, THE VANCOUVER WILDLIFE LEAGUE, POSES WITH HIS SERVICE DOG MAX BY ONE OF SEVERAL WHEELCHAIR-ACCESSIBLE WATERFOWL BLINDS HE’S BUILT ON PUBLIC LANDS IN THE LOWER COLUMBIA. (BRENT LAWRENCE, USFWS)

For many people, however, there are barriers to finding that outdoor enjoyment. A disabled Navy veteran himself, Spring knows that spending time hunting, fishing and hiking isn’t always a given for injured veterans or other people with disabilities.

That’s why Spring pours his passion for accessibility to the outdoors into building hunting and birdwatching blinds on federal and state lands that are compliant with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines. A Spring-made blind, for example, is big enough to accommodate two wheelchairs.

SPRING’S BLINDS CAN ACCOMMODATE TWO WHEELCHAIR-BOUND HUNTERS OR BIRDWATCHERS. (BRENT LAWRENCE, USFWS)

He does it as a volunteer, donating countless hours to the cause.

“Before they were disabled, veterans were usually very active people,” says Spring, a Boeing retiree who also served as an E4 3rd Class Petty Officer for three years in the U.S. Navy, running ship-to-shore teletypes and crypto aircraft identification. “Then they get injured and they feel like their time in the field isn’t available anymore. Knowing that these blinds are available, it will help veterans move on and have prosperous lives. They want and need this experience.”

Spring is one of conservation’s good neighbors, creating opportunities that open the door to nature for people who otherwise wouldn’t get to see a flock of mallards coming in to land or even hear the wind whistle through the Douglas firs.

MAX SOAKS UP THE RAYS AT THE JOB SITE ON A WARM SPRING DAY. (BRENT LAWRENCE, USFWS)

Whether they hold a shotgun or a camera, those aiming to connect with nature need access to enjoy the outdoors, regardless of their physical abilities. That’s why Spring hopes to expand the use of his custom-designed blinds to Oregon and then to the national level so more people with disabilities can have access to the outdoors.

It’s impossible to quantify the impact ADA-compliant access has on disabled veterans, says Heath Gunns, outreach manager with Honored American Veterans Afield. The impact on an individual, however, is easy to see when you witness it first-hand.

“You’re a 19-year-old kid and you go to boot camp, where they build you up to think you can do anything. Then you get hurt and the first thing doctors do is tell you the things you’ll no longer be able to do. … That is wrong,” Gunns says.

“Disabled veterans just have to learn to do it differently and that’s where ADA-compliant blinds and other access opportunities come in. The outdoors can’t give them their legs back, but it can give them hope.”

A RIDGEFIELD NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE BLIND SITS NEXT TO A FLOODED FIELD. (BRENT LAWRENCE, USFWS)

Spring is determined to keep that hope alive for people with disabilities. He pulls in partners such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Vancouver Wildlife League, Washington Waterfowl Association, Northwest Steelheaders, and numerous businesses to make it all happen.

The Service manages the National Wildlife Refuges, where Spring does some of his best work.

In addition to the blind at Willapa National Wildlife Refuge, two of his custom ADA-compliant blinds can be found at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, and another at Vancouver Lake. Spring is a member of Washington’s Fish and Wildlife Commission ADA Advisory Committee, and he’s finalizing a proposal to build ADA-compliant blinds in each of the commission’s six state regions.

The importance of Spring’s work is underscored by a surprising statistic: 60 percent of requests for Washington’s reduced-fee or special-use permits come from disabled veterans. Overall, there’s a high level of public interest in ADA-compliant facilities, according to Sam Taylor, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s liaison to the seven-member ADA advisory committee.

“This is an amazing volunteer advisory group,” Taylor says. “They’re having a real impact on hunting and fishing opportunities in the state. Rick is doing some great work, and not only with the blinds. He’s also working on a shooting range that is ADA compliant and looking at some other opportunities for fishing piers.”

POSITIONED NEAR A TREELINE AND WATER, A RIDGEFIELD NWR BLIND SITS IN A GOOD LOCATION FOR DUCK HUNTERS AND OTHERS. (BRENT LAWRENCE, USFWS)

That access-for-all-people policy plays an important role in public lands recreation. A recent Service report shows the outdoors has a strong allure. In 2016, an estimated 101.6 million Americans – 40 percent of the U.S. population 16 years old and older – participated in hunting, fishing, wildlife-watching and related activities. The findings reflect a continued interest in engaging in the outdoors. These activities are drivers behind an economic powerhouse, where participants spent $156 billion in 2016.

Spring reached out to Jackie Ferrier, project leader at Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex, last year to discuss opportunities for adding a new blind. They had never met prior to the call, but Ferrier quickly seized the opportunity to improve recreational opportunities for the public.

“We had a discussion about some of his work at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, and we had an instant rapport. I realized we had an amazing opportunity to partner with him on this,” Ferrier  says. “He and his team of volunteers were amazing.”

Willapa Refuge plans to add another ADA-compliant blind once some habitat restoration is complete on a different part of the refuge.

“Access is a priority for us, and Rick will make sure it happens. He gets things done,” Ferrier says. Spring, she notes, is a part of the refuge’s hunter working group that provides input on hunting opportunities. “He’s an incredibly dedicated, positive and inspirational person to work with.”

“HE’S AN INCREDIBLY DEDICATED, POSITIVE AND INSPIRATIONAL PERSON TO WORK WITH,” SAYS WILLAPA NWR’S JACKIE FERRIER OF SPRING. (BRENT LAWRENCE, USFWS)

When not helping veterans get into the field, Spring and Max bring that inspiration to the Veterans Affairs hospital in Vancouver. Two days a week they spend time with veterans and their families at the hospital, often devoting hours to patients in hospice care.

Just like he does in the hunting blind, Max will gently nudge his big yellow head alongside the hand of a veteran.

Spring watches as they slowly rub Max’s head with their fingers, hoping it brings them the same peace, hope and memories of the outdoors.

Editor’s note: Brent Lawrence is a public affairs specialist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Pacific Region in Portland. Governmental agencies and non-profit groups interested in connecting with Rick Spring’s regarding his blinds may contact the author at brent_lawrence@fws.gov.

‘Removal Of Barrier Culverts Would Be Lifeline For Salmon, Fishing Families’ – NSIA Et Al In SCOTUS Brief

Regional fishing organizations filed a brief on Monday supporting the removal of culverts to help recover Western Washington salmon, a case that will be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in less than two weeks.

GRANSTROM CREEK, A TRIBUTARY OF THE SAUK RIVER, FLOWS THROUGH A BOX CULVERT PUT IN BY SKAGIT COUNTY. IT REPLACED A PERCHED CULVERT. THE WHITE PLASTIC TUBES AND YOUNG TREES AT RIGHT ARE PART OF A LARGER SEATTLE CITY LIGHT HABITAT RESTORATION PROJECT TO BENEFIT SALMON AND WILDLIFE. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The “friend of the court” arguments from the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association, Association of Northwest Steelheaders, Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations and others urge justices to uphold a 2016 Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that the state must make hundreds of stream barriers more passable to Chinook, coho, steelhead and other stocks.

“Salmon fishing has provided economic opportunity and a way of life for generations. Culverts owned by the State of Washington block access to vast areas of salmon habitat and spawning grounds, crippling these fisheries. Harm to Washington’s salmon fisheries directly harms fishing families and businesses throughout the Northwest and Alaska,” the group’s attorneys write.

Even as the state is bringing culverts up to snuff, the overall cost of the fixes and that some might not actually help fish led state Attorney General Bob Ferguson to appeal the Ninth’s ruling “on behalf of the taxpayers” to the highest court in the land.

But with fishing businesses and fisheries increasingly feeling the pinch as kings, silvers and steelies decline, NSIA et al are “skeptical” the state would hold to doing the repairs if the proverbial fish bonker of court action wasn’t hovering over its head.

“With salmon populations hovering at such precariously low levels, the significant increase of spawning and rearing habitat that will result from removal of the state’s barrier culverts would be a lifeline for salmon and fishing families alike,” the organizations argue. “The district court correctly found that removal of the state’s barrier culverts would immediately benefit these imperiled populations, and the district court’s injunction is an essential step to preserving these valuable runs.”

COHO IN PARTICULAR AS WELL AS STEELHEAD CAN BENEFIT FROM THE REMOVAL OF PASSAGE-BLOCKING CULVERTS BELOW WASHINGTON ROADS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The case is essentially a continuation of 1974’s massive Boldt Decision and could have as strong of ramifications, except not just on state and tribal fishermen alone this time.

It was originally brought by the Suquamish Tribe, who were joined by other tribes in Western Washington, and the basic argument, per the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, is that “tribal treaty rights to harvest salmon include the right to have those salmon protected so they are available for harvest.”

In recent weeks a number of parties have signed on in support of one side or the other.

Besides NSIA and others, former Washington Governor Dan Evans, a conservation-minded Republican, a number of area public officials, along with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Navajo Nation and others have filed amicus curiae briefs on behalf of the petitioners, or federal government.

Lining up with Washington are 11 other states, including Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, a number of home-building organizations and farm bureaus, and the American Forest & Paper Association and National Mining Association.

A decision is expected in June.