Tag Archives: 2018

2018 Oregon Spring Bear Hunting Forecast Out

Oregon spring bear hunters will find generally good prospects when seasons open in April, with many parts of the state seeing a lower snowpack than usual and bruins likely active earlier than last year.

Those are among the highlights from ODFW’s annual forecast for the year’s first major big game hunts.

HUNTING MIGHT BE BETTER LATER IN THE SPRING SEASON, BUT BARRETT PROCK DIDN’T WASTE ANY TIME LAST YEAR, BAGGING THIS BRUIN IN THE COAST RANGE WITH A 350-YARD SHOT ON 2017’S OPENING WEEKEND. FRIEND AND PACK MULE CARL LEWALLEN TOOK THE PIC, THEN LOADED UP FOR THE PACK OUT. (BROWNING PHOTO CONTEST)

The agency posted the document this week ahead of the April 1 and April 15 openers for controlled and sold-out first-come tags, though hunting tends to improve as the May 31 end of the season nears.

In Southwest Oregon, where the 4,400 available tags sold out back in January, ODFW reports “stable and relatively high” bear numbers, with the thickest densities “closer to the coast in the Coast Range.”

“This winter has been significantly different that last year,” the agency reports. “While last year was quite wet and winter-like weather persisted well into the spring. This year has been much milder and relatively dry. If this pattern persists bears may become active earlier than in previous years. Typically bear activity increases as the season progresses due to the fact that the bear rut is in late May and June. This should still be the case even if the spring continues to be milder than some other years.

THE NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE’S LATEST SNOWPACK MAP SHOWS SNOW WATER EQUIVALENTS BELOW AVERAGE ACROSS ALL OF OREGON, AND RECENT WARMING TRENDS COULD HELP GREEN UP HILLSIDES AS BEARS EMERGE FROM HIBERNATION. (NRCS)

In the northern Cascades, black bear densities are “good” with best hunting from mid- to late May.

“With snow pack in the northern Cascades at 50 – 69 percent of normal this year, hunters should expect to have access to mid-elevation habitats earlier than normal. However, many of the higher elevation and north facing road systems are expected to remain snow covered and may limit access until late May. Hunters should check road conditions and access before heading out, especially early in the season,” ODFW advises.

In the South Blue Mountains, things are starting to green up in the valleys and hillsides facing south.

” Bear populations are stable or increasing but this hunt is still challenging due to the heavily forested terrain which makes it difficult to spot bears,” the state says. “Hunters can find bears widely distributed through all units but harvest in the spring has been highest in the Desolation unit.”

On the west side of the Blues, in Umatilla County, ODFW reports best bear densities north of I-84, but that’s also where winter arrived late, so it may not be entirely accessible till May. Still, bears will be lower down where there’s fresh greens.

In Wallowa County, home to “high” numbers of bears, glass the canyons, which is where boars will be foraging.

For more information, including hunting tips, good locations and what to watch out for, check out ODFW’s spring bear forecast here.

2018 Columbia Springer Fishery Starts ‘A Little Slow’

The 2018 Lower Columbia spring Chinook fishery is not exactly off to a scintillating start.

“A little SLOW!” emailed Joe Hymer, a supervising fisheries biologist out of WDFW’s Ridgefield office this morning.

PREDAWN GLOOM LOOMS OVER THE LAUNCHING OF A BOAT DURING THE 2015 SPRING CHINOOK FISHERY ON THE LOWER COLUMBIA RIVER. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

He was passing along bleak catch stats for March 1-4 gathered by ODFW’s Jimmy Watts.

During the month’s first four days, 710 anglers had zero salmon and just one steelhead (five others released), according to sampling results from Oregon and Washington creel checkers.

Here’s how that stacks up compared to extrapolated estimates from the last three early Marches:

March 1-5, 2017: 1,351 anglers with 12 kept springers and six hatchery steelhead, with no other steelhead released;

March 1-6, 2016: 4,400 angler trips yielding 183 kept springers (12 released) and 39 kept hatchery steelhead, with 75 other steelhead released;

March 1-8, 2015: 5,535 angler trips yielding 37 kept springers (33 released) and 111 kept hatchery steelhead, with 199 other steelhead released.

This year’s forecast is for 248,500 springers of all stocks back to the mouth of the Columbia, with 166,700 of those bound for rivers in Central Idaho, Northeast Oregon and Eastern Washington. That’s a bit more than 2017’s prediction, but down from 2016’s and well below 2015’s.

The river is now open from Buoy 10 to Bonneville, but so far the fish count at the dam shows just two Chinook so far in 2018. Their early January timing suggests late falls instead of springers.

Right now the Columbia at Cascade Island is running at 225,000 cubic feet per second, right around the 10-year average, but about 2 degrees colder than usual, 39.2 versus 41.9.

By next week, Watt says managers should have an estimated catch out for the month of February, which did see at least two hatchery Chinook headed for Lower Columbia tribs checked.

IDFG Upping 2018 Trout Stocking Game With More, Bigger ‘Bows

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRESS RELEASES FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME

Do anglers prefer more trout or larger trout? Idaho Fish and Game is answering that question by providing both in 2018 and beyond.

Fish and Game will stock more rainbow trout throughout the state than in recent years thanks to the 2017 license and tag fee increase, and many trout will be bigger.

RAINBOW TROUT ABOUT TO BE RELEASED IN SOUTHWEST IDAHO. (IDFG)

“Our hatchery managers were proactive and ordered more eggs last summer because they wanted to get more trout in the pipeline for this spring,” said Gary Byrne, Fish and Game’s fish production manager.

Stocking plans for 2018 call for about 123,000 more “catchable” rainbow trout (8 to 11 inches) and 41,000 more 12 to 14-inch trout commonly known as “magnums.” Then in 2019, anglers will get 56,000 more catchables and 180,000 more larger trout compared to 2017 numbers. The 2019 stocking plan will provide the basis for subsequent future years.

The challenge of growing larger “magnum” trout is it takes more food and more time, so it will require extra months to get those larger trout ready to stock, but “a higher proportion of them are going to end up on angler’s hook,” Byrne said.

Fish and Game’s research has shown trout in the 12-inch range can be more cost-effective in some waters if you factor that they’re caught at a higher frequency than the smaller fish. So basically, anglers catch more of those trout, and they’re bigger.

Not only that, in Idaho’s productive lakes and reservoirs, those 12-inch fish will continue to grow after being stocked, and growth rates of an inch per month are common during the prime growing months, which means there will be more trophy-sized trout swimming in Idaho.

“In bodies of water where they can carry over through winter, we should see lots of bigger fish,” Byrne said.

That doesn’t mean all trout stocked will be the larger fish. Depending on the body of water, smaller “catchables” can also be caught at high rates, such as in community ponds, or other waters with high fishing pressure that leads to most of the fish getting caught. Fish and Game stocks trout so anglers can catch them. The fish are sterile, so incapable of reproducing.

Fish and Game stocks trout year round in some waters at low elevations with mild climates, then stocking starts ramping up throughout the state in the spring, which is followed by major stockings prior to peak angling times, such as spring and summer holidays. You can see where stockings take place on Fish and Game’s stocking report page.

Fisheries managers also stock a variety of fish beyond rainbow trout. For example, many of the kokanee salmon caught by anglers in large lakes and reservoirs are stocked as fingerlings. Same goes for high mountain lakes, which typically get an influx of fingerlings on a rotating basis every few years. Those stocking numbers will remain consistent.

Managers also occasionally stock brown trout, westslope cutthroat trout, Lahontan cutthroat, tiger trout (a brown/brook hybrid), and rainbow-cutthroat hybrids in waters around the state, but in much smaller quantities than rainbow trout.

2018 Lower Columbia, Gorge Pools Spring Chinook Fishery Set

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRESS RELEASES FROM THE OREGON AND WASHINGTON DEPARTMENTS OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW

Fishery managers from Oregon and Washington set spring Chinook salmon seasons for the Columbia River today during a joint state hearing.

SPRING CHINOOK ANGLERS PREPARE TO NET ONE ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The lower Columbia River recreational spring Chinook season will take place from Thursday, March 1 through Saturday, April 7 from Buoy 10 upstream to Beacon Rock, plus bank angling from Beacon Rock upstream to the Bonneville Dam deadline.

Above Bonneville Dam, the recreational Chinook season was set for Friday, March 16 through Monday, May 7, with the open area extending from Bonneville Dam upstream to the OR/WA border above McNary Dam. Only bank angling is allowed from Bonneville Dam upstream to the Tower Island powerlines.

The daily bag limit is two adult salmonids (Chinook, coho, or steelhead), of which only one may be a Chinook. Only adipose fin-clipped (hatchery) fish may be retained.

The 2018 seasons are based on a forecast of 248,500 spring Chinook returning to the mouth of the Columbia River. That forecast includes an expected 166,700 spring Chinook bound for areas upstream of Bonneville Dam. This year’s run prediction is slightly larger than last year’s actual return of 208,800 spring Chinook.

Columbia River spring Chinook seasons are driven by guidelines on the number of upriver-origin Chinook that can be killed; therefore, season dates can change during the season if/when guidelines are met. The lower Columbia recreational season will start with an upriver Chinook guideline of 7,157 fish. For the area from Bonneville Dam upstream to the OR/WA border, the recreational guideline is 954 Chinook. The area of the Snake River downstream of the WA/ID border has a guideline of 920 Chinook; seasons will be set by Washington at a later date.

On the Willamette River, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife fishery managers are forecasting a return of 53,800 adult Chinook, which is up from last year’s actual return of 50,800. Fishing for hatchery spring Chinook is allowed seven days a week on the Willamette.

For more information, refer to Columbia River regulation updates at myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/columbia-zone and e-regulations for permanent regulations

The following is a summary of spring recreational fishing seasons, including those adopted at today’s meeting.

CHINOOK SALMON

Columbia River mouth to Bonneville Dam

Prior to March 1, permanent rules for Chinook salmon, as outlined in the 2018 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations, remain in effect.

From March 1 through April 7, boat fishing will be allowed seven days a week from Buoy 10 at the Columbia River mouth upstream to Beacon Rock, which is located approximately four miles below Bonneville Dam. Bank fishing will be allowed during the same timeframe from Buoy 10 upstream to the fishing deadline at Bonneville Dam.

The daily bag limit will be two adipose fin-clipped adult salmon (Chinook or coho) or adipose fin-clipped steelhead in combination, of which no more than one may be a Chinook. The rules also allow retention of up to five adipose fin-clipped jack salmon per day in Oregon.

Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Oregon/Washington border

Prior to March 16, permanent rules for Chinook salmon and steelhead, as outlined in the 2018 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations, remain in effect.

Effective March 16 through May 7, this area will be open to retention of adipose fin-clipped Chinook. Fishing for salmon and steelhead from a boat is prohibited between Bonneville Dam and the Tower Island power lines, which are approximately six miles downstream from The Dalles Dam.

The daily bag limit will be two adipose fin-clipped adult salmon (Chinook or coho) or adipose fin-clipped steelhead in combination, of which no more than one may be a Chinook. The rules also allow retention of up to five adipose fin-clipped jack salmon per day in Oregon.

Select Area Recreational Fisheries

Permanent fishing regulations for recreational harvest in Oregon waters within Youngs Bay and Blind Slough/Knappa Slough are listed in the 2018 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations.

The use of barbed hooks is allowed when angling for salmon, steelhead, or trout in the Youngs Bay and Knappa/Blind Slough Select Areas.

Based on today’s action, effective March 1 through June 15, 2018 on days when the mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam is open to recreational Chinook harvest, the daily adult salmon/steelhead bag limit in Select Area fishing sites will be the same as mainstem Columbia bag limits. On days when the mainstem Columbia is closed to Chinook retention, the permanent bag limits for Select Areas will apply.

Willamette River

Under permanent rules, the Willamette River remains open to retention of adipose fin-clipped adult Chinook salmon and adipose fin-clipped steelhead seven days a week.  The rules also allow retention of up to five adipose fin-clipped jack salmon per day.

The use of barbed hooks is allowed when angling for salmon, steelhead, or trout in the Willamette River downstream of Willamette Falls. From March 1 through August 15, 2018, use of two rods is allowed on the Willamette and Clackamas rivers with purchase of two-rod validation.

The bag limit on the Willamette below Willamette Falls is two adipose fin-clipped adult salmon or steelhead in combination. Above the falls, two adipose fin-clipped adult salmon and three adipose fin-clipped steelhead may be retained in the daily bag.

STEELHEAD & SHAD

Permanent rules for steelhead and shad are in effect, except for the following modifications:

Effective March 16 through May 15, 2018, the Columbia River will be open for retention of adipose fin-clipped steelhead from Buoy 10 to the Highway 395 Bridge, and shad from Buoy 10 to Bonneville Dam, ONLY during days and in areas open for retention of adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook. Beginning May 16 permanent rules resume as listed in the 2018 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations.

 WDFW

Salmon managers from Washington and Oregon have approved sportfishing seasons for spring chinook salmon on the Columbia River, setting the stage for the first major salmon fishery of the year.

Anglers are already catching a few spring chinook in the lower Columbia below the Interstate 5 bridge, but the bulk of the run usually doesn’t arrive until March when the new rules take effect.

According to the preseason forecast, approximately 248,500 spring chinook salmon will return to the Columbia River this year – an increase of 20 percent from 2017. That number includes 166,700 upriver fish bound for waters above Bonneville Dam and 81,820 fish expected to return to rivers below the dam.

Bill Tweit, a special assistant for Columbia River fisheries at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), noted that the upriver forecast is up 44 percent from last year, but still 10 percent below the 10-year average.

“This year’s fishery appears to be shaping up as a fairly normal season,” Tweit said. “Even so, we always have to take a conservative approach in setting fishing seasons until we can determine how many fish are actually moving past Bonneville Dam.”

Based on the preseason projections, the two states approved initial fishing seasons for waters both below and above the dam:

  • Below Bonneville Dam: Catch guidelines approved today allocate 6,680 upriver fish for a 38-day fishing season below Bonneville Dam from March 1 through April 7. The fishery will be open to both boat and bank anglers from Buoy 10 to Beacon Rock, and to bank anglers only upriver to the dam.
  • Above the dam: Spring chinook fishing will also be open March 16 through May 7 from the Tower Island power lines upriver to the Washington/Oregon border near Umatilla. The season will run for 53 days with an initial catch guideline of 900 upriver chinook. Bank fishing will also be allowed from the dam upriver to the power lines.

In both areas, the daily catch limit will be one adult hatchery chinook salmon, as part of a two-fish daily limit that can also include hatchery coho salmon and hatchery steelhead. Anglers fishing the Columbia River will be required to use barbless hooks, and must release any salmon or steelhead not visibly marked as hatchery fish by a clipped adipose fin.

Tweit said this year’s initial catch guidelines include a 30 percent “buffer” in the preseason forecast to guard against overharvesting the run. If actual returns meet or exceed expectations, fish held in reserve will become available for harvest later in the season, he said.

Fishery managers will likely meet in May – when half the run has historically passed Bonneville Dam – to determine if this year’s fishing season can be extended.

To participate in this fishery, anglers age 15 and older must possess a valid fishing license. In addition, anglers fishing upriver from Rocky Point must purchase a Columbia River Salmon/Steelhead Endorsement. Revenue from the endorsement supports salmon or steelhead seasons on many rivers in the Columbia River system, including enforcing fishery regulations and monitoring the upper Columbia River spring chinook fisheries.

Additional information about fishing rules in effect during the upcoming spring chinook season is posted on WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/.

2018’s First Free Fishing Weekend In Oregon Coming Up Soon

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

It’s free to fish, crab or clam on the Saturday and Sunday of President’s Day Weekend, Feb. 17-18, so take a friend!

OREGONIANS CAN GO CRABBING, CLAM DIGGING AND FISHING FOR FREE ON THE WEEKEND OF FEB. 17-18. (ODFW)

During these two days, no fishing licenses or tags (including a Combined Angling Tag and a Columbia River Basin Endorsement) are required to fish, crab or clam anywhere in Oregon. Although no licenses or tags are required, all other regulations apply including closures, bag limits and size restrictions.

“Free Fishing Weekends are a great opportunity for friends and families to get out and enjoy a day or two of fishing,” said Mike Gauvin, ODFW recreational fisheries manager. “Winter steelhead, trout, crabbing and clamming are just some of the great opportunities available.” Look for the best opportunities in ODFW’s weekly Recreation Report, which is updated online every Wednesday.

Under statute set by the Oregon State Legislature, ODFW can offer eight days of free fishing each year. The six other days of free fishing in Oregon this year are listed on page 16 of the 2018 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations and are June 2-3, Sept. 1-2 (Sat.-Sun. of Labor Day Weekend) and Nov. 23-24 (the two days after Thanksgiving).

ODFW Sets Jan. 30 Meeting In Newport To Talk 2018 Halibut Seasons With Anglers

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW will be asking for public input on the upcoming spring halibut season for the central Oregon coast at a meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 30 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the ODFW Marine Resources Program conference room, 2040 SE Marine Science Dr., Newport.

OREGON HALIBUT ANGLERS ARE BEING ASKED FOR INPUT ON THE 2018 FISHERIES OFF NEWPORT — WHERE JESSICA HERBORN CAUGHT THIS NICE ONE IN 2016 — AND ELSEWHERE ON THE CENTRAL COAST. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

ODFW staff will give an overview of the results of the International Pacific Halibut Commission Annual meeting and the resulting quotas.  Then meeting participants will be able to provide input on the number and timing of “fixed” and “backup” dates for the Central Oregon Coast Subarea (Cape Falcon to Humbug Mountain) spring all-depth halibut season.

People who cannot attend the meeting in person can still participate in one of two ways:

·        Join the meeting via GoToMeeting (see details below).

·        Complete an online survey, which will be posted on the ODFW halibut webpage. (Both the online survey and background materials for the meeting will be posted by mid-afternoon on Monday, Jan. 29 on the ODFW halibut webpage http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/finfish/halibut/index.asp.

·        Anglers may also provide input by contacting Lynn Mattes (lynn.mattes@state.or.us) or Christian Heath (Christian.t.heath@state.or.us) at the ODFW Marine Resources Program, (541) 867-4741.

GoToMeeting DETAILS 

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/554636005

You can also dial in using your phone.

United States: +1 (872) 240-3412

Access Code: 554-636-005

Washington Razor Clam Bosses Pencil In New Year’s, Midwinter Digs

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

State shellfish managers have proposed the first round of razor clam digs in 2018, starting with the addition of New Year’s Day on two beaches followed by a weeklong dig extending from late January into early February.

A FULL MOON RISES BEHIND A RAZOR CLAM DIGGER AT COPALIS BEACH IN DECEMBER 2017. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will confirm that schedule prior to each dig, provided that upcoming marine toxin tests show the clams are safe to eat.

Under WDFW’s plan, Twin Harbors and Mocrocks beaches will open for digging at noon Jan. 1, extending a dig previously scheduled for New Year’s Eve dig at four ocean beaches. Starting Jan. 28, WDFW then plans to open various beaches for razor-clam digging through Feb. 3.

No digging will be allowed at any beach before noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said the Jan. 1 opening is designed to give families a chance to ring in the new year digging clams on the beach.

“We know that digging razor clams is a New Year’s tradition for many families and we want to help them keep tradition alive,” Ayres said.

That and other digs are proposed on the following beaches, dates and evening low tides:

  • Dec. 31Sunday5:12 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks (previously announced and pending final toxin results)
  • Jan. 1Monday6:02 p.m.; -1.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Jan. 28Sunday4:06 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Mocrocks
  • Jan. 29Monday4:59 p.m.; -1.0 feet; Copalis
  • Jan. 30Tuesday5:47 p.m.; -1.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Jan. 31Wednesday6:33 p.m.; -1.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Feb. 1Thursday7:17 p.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Feb. 2Friday8:00 p.m.; -1.0 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Feb. 3Saturday8:42 p.m.; -0.4; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

2018 Columbia Fall Salmon Outlook, SW WA Tribs Springer Forecasts Issued

Columbia salmon managers are offering more glimpses at how 2018 returns to the big river may shape up.

Following on last week’s spring Chinook forecast, this afternoon they’ve issued outlooks for fall Chinook and coho stocks.

RETURNS OF FALL BRIGHTS TO THE HANFORD REACH ARE EXPECTED TO RETURN AT PRE-2013 LEVELS, WHICH IS TO SAY, NOT AS GOOD AS WE’VE BEEN SEEING IN RECENT SEASONS. CLAY AND WILLIAM HULL SHOW OFF ONE CAUGHT ON THE HANFORD REACH THIS YEAR. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

But where the year’s first salmon is predicted to see an uptick, it doesn’t look as positive for the year’s last major runs.

Here’s what the just-issued report says in full:

COLUMBIA RIVER FALL CHINOOK
2017 PRELIMINARY RETURNS AND
OUTLOOK FOR 2018

2017 Preliminary Returns
? Adult fall Chinook returns were predicted to be 614,000 fish.
? Preliminary returns are about three-fourths of the forecast.
? Bright stock jack returns are similar to last year.

2018 Outlook
? Bright stocks should be similar to years prior to 2013.
? Tule stocks should be less than the recent 10 year average.
? Poor ocean conditions along the Oregon and Washington coasts could potentially have negative impacts on tule fall Chinook and Coho returns.

Columbia River Coho
? 2017 preliminary return is a little over half of the preseason forecast of 319,300.
? Jack returns to the Columbia River are about 70% of the recent 3-year average.

Tule Stocks
LRH – Lower River Hatchery stock
BPH – Bonneville Pool Hatchery stock
Bright Stocks
URB – Upriver Bright stock
PUB – Pool Upriver Bright stock
BUB – Bonneville Bright stock
LRW – Lower River Wild stock
SAB – Select Area Bright stock

And in one final burst of foresoothery, WDFW’S Region 5 office put predictions for the Cowlitz, Kalama and Lewis:

ODFW Hosting Dec. 6 Meeting In Bend On 2018 Wickiup Koke Regs

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW invites the public to participate in a discussion regarding fish management for Wickiup Reservoir, a favorite destination for anglers seeking large brown trout and kokanee. The meeting will be held on Dec. 6 from 6-8 p.m. at Central Oregon Community College, Room 190 in the Health Career Center building.

WICKIUP RESERVOIR KOKANEE ANGLERS ARE INVITED TO AN EARLY DECEMBER MEETING IN BEND FOCUSING ON CHANGING REGULATIONS AT THE UPPER DESCHUTES IMPOUNDMENT, WHERE STEPHANIE PEMBLE CAUGHT THIS ONE WHILE TROLLING A PLUG WITH GUIDE JON WILEY. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Fishing regulations are changing at Wickiup Reservoir beginning in 2018. The “bonus” bag limit for kokanee will change from 25 to 5 and the Deschutes River Arm will close Aug. 31 (one month earlier than in 2017).

The new approach is intended to protect naturally reproducing fish populations and sustain quality recreational fishing opportunities into the future. During the meeting, ODFW will also provide insight on how current water management in the upper Deschutes River impacts the reservoir fishery.

Meeting attendees will find free parking on College Way and at the Library. The link below provides a detailed map of Central Oregon Community College campus.
https://culinary.cocc.edu/uploadedfiles/departments_/community_learning/cocc-bend-campus-map.pdf

‘Sea Change’ Of Sorts Coming To Seattle Boat Show: 3rd Location, More Watercraft Added

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE NORTHWEST MARINE TRADE ASSOCIATION

January 2018 marks a sea change for the Seattle Boat Show. For the first time in the show’s 71-year history, there will be three locations – indoors at CenturyLink Field Event Center and afloat at South Lake Union and the newly added Bell Harbor Marina.

THE 2018 SEATTLE BOAT SHOW, BILLED AS THE LARGEST ON THE WEST COAST, RUNS JAN. 26-FEB. 3 AT CENTURYLINK FIELD, SOUTH LAKE UNION AND – NEW THIS YEAR – BELL HARBOR MARINA ON THE WATERFRONT. (SEATTLE BOAT SHOW)

 

What this means for attendees is that there will be more to see and do at what was already the west coast’s largest boat show and the third largest in North America. The 2018 show will have more boats on display and more free shuttles conveniently transporting attendees between all three locations. Additionally, there are more hotels offering special packages for out-of-town attendees to choose from and more new seminar topics and presenters. The show opens Friday, Jan. 26 and runs through Saturday, Feb 3, 2018.

More boats

The addition of Bell Harbor Marina to the mix provides attendees with not only more locations but also more boats to check out. At press time, show applications were still flooding in, but all indications are that there will be a record number of boats on display for the 2018 show.

(SEATTLE BOAT SHOW)

More new seminars

One of the most popular features year in and year out at the Seattle Boat Show is the extensive line-up of free boating and fishing seminars and the advanced training classes for a fee through Boat Show University. No other show in North America matches the Seattle seminar schedule in terms of the quality, variety and number of seminars offered. Regular seminar attendees will be pleased to note the number of new speakers and seminars for 2018. There are 25 new presenters, more panels and more new seminars focused on technology, electronics, communications and navigation. On the fishing stage alone there will be 19 new topics. Boat Show University will have more classes on weather, maintenance and cruising the Inside Passage

More parking

With the addition of Bell Harbor Marina comes convenient access to the Bell Street Parking Garage across the street. Even better, parking there will be free – all nine days of the show –  with the purchase of an e-ticket. There will also be free weekend parking at South Lake Union at the 300 Yale Street garage.

“SO WE COULD PUT A ‘RIGGER MOUNT HERE, AND A CUP HOLDER FOR OUR BABY BOTTLES HERE … (SEATTLE BOAT SHOW)

More hotels.

For 2018 the Seattle Boat Show is partnering with six local hotels –  Courtyard Pioneer Square; Crowne Plaza Seattle; Silver Cloud Hotel Stadium; Marriott Residence Inn; Marriott Courtyard; and the Silver Cloud Lake Union– offering more choices than ever before for out-of-town showgoers. Visit http://www.seattleboatshow.com/official-hotels for special rates and discount codes.

About the Seattle Boat Show

The show features three locations, 1,000 recreational vessels and more than 400 exhibitors. There are more than three acres of the latest innovations in accessories, technology and boating gear on display indoors, plus hundreds of world-class yachts on the water at South Lake Union and Bell Harbor Marina. There are approximately 200 free seminars during the nine days of the show and advanced training classes for a fee through Boat Show University. A free shuttle runs continuously between all three locations.

For a complete list of exhibitors, seminars, travel package and ticket prices, please visit www.SeattleBoatShow.com  E-tickets go on sale Dec. 1, 2017.