Tag Archives: 2017 capital budget

Lake, River, Saltwater Access Work Among Projects Funded Thru Rec-Conservation Board

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE

The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Funding Board today announced the award of nearly $116 million in grants to a suite of 276 projects that build and maintain outdoor recreation facilities and conserve wildlife habitat and working farms and forests around the state.

PLANS SHOW THE REDESIGNED AND IMPROVED FISHING ACCESS AND BOAT RAMP AT ROSES LAKE, NEAR CHELAN, WORK FUNDED THROUGH THE RECENTLY PASSED AND SIGNED 2017 WASHINGTON CAPITAL BUDGET. (RCO)

“These grants are important to strengthening Washington’s economy and retaining our way of life,” said Gov. Jay Inslee. “They will build parks, trails and boating facilities, and conserve working farms and critical wildlife habitat – all the things that make Washington a great place to live, work and operate a business.”

With the Legislature’s recent approval of the capital budget, grants are being distributed to cities, counties, state and federal agencies and nonprofit organizations for projects in 35 of the state’s 39 counties.

The grants were awarded through nine different grant programs. Revenue comes from a mix of federal grants, the sale of state bonds, gas taxes and user fees.

Click below to see descriptions of each grant:

Benton County…………………………… $390,969

Chelan County……………………….. $4,157,049

Clallam County……………………….. $1,882,520

Clark County…………………………… $4,999,788

Columbia County…………………………. $75,000

Cowlitz County………………………… $1,809,436

Douglas County………………………. $4,263,945

Ferry County………………………………… $82,000

Garfield County……………………………. $76,903

Grant County…………………………… $1,078,600

Grays Harbor County………………. $3,237,345

Island County………………………….. $3,185,312

Jefferson County…………………….. $4,048,679

King County………………………….. $15,240,822

Kitsap County………………………….. $2,833,306

Kittitas County…………………………. $4,486,957

Klickitat County……………………….. $9,393,175

Lincoln County…………………………….. $65,000

Mason County…………………………. $3,556,688

Okanogan County…………………… $2,496,171

Pacific County…………………………. $2,853,803

Pierce County…………………………. $2,424,080

San Juan County……………………. $7,992,265

Skagit County………………………….. $2,944,830

Skamania County……………………. $1,000,000

Snohomish County…………………. $9,046,418

Spokane County……………………… $4,476,108

Stevens County…………………………. $373,500

Thurston County……………………… $8,585,079

Whatcom County…………………….. $1,282,565

Whitman County………………………… $198,000

Yakima County……………………….. $3,626,088

Multiple Counties…………………... $3,527,952

 A recent study1 noted that outdoor recreation is a huge part of the state’s economy with $21.6 billion spent in Washington on recreation trips and equipment annually, including $3.4 billion by out-of-state visitors. Outdoor recreation also supports nearly 200,000 jobs, rivaling the technology and aerospace industries.

“Investments in outdoor recreation pay many dividends,” said Kaleen Cottingham, director of the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office, which administers these grants. “Not only do these grants bring money and jobs to the economy, but spending time outdoors improves the mental and physical health of both kids and adults, and that saves money down the line in costs for health care. Equally important, preserving and protecting natural areas for us to enjoy conserves habitat for fish and other animals, protects clean air and water and reduces pollution.”

All of the funded projects were evaluated and ranked through a competitive process in which citizen committees with expertise in recreation and conservation issues evaluated the grant proposals and created ranked lists for the Recreation and Conservation Funding Board, and in some cases, the Governor and state Legislature to consider for funding.

“Overall, we have funding only for about half the demand,” Cottingham said. “The process ensures that the state invests strategically in only the best projects.”

The office accepted applications for 529 projects, requesting nearly $239 million. Most of the grant programs require grant applicants to contribute matching resources. This year, the matching resources totaled nearly $107 million, nearly doubling the state’s investment in Washington’s outdoor recreation and conservation efforts.

Of the nearly $116 million in grants, more than $38 million goes to build or improve parks, more than $19 million goes each to improve facilities for boaters and to maintain trails, nearly $7 million goes to conserve working farms and another $31 million goes to protect important wildlife habitat. New this year were grants to protect commercial forests: Two projects were awarded funding for $700,000.

“Our population is growing, and prices are going nowhere but up,” Cottingham said. “The best time to invest in outdoor recreation is right now. The more we invest now, the more we save in the future, and the more future generations will benefit.”

[1]Tania Briceno and Greg Schundler,“Economic Analysis of Outdoor Recreation in Washington State,” Earth Economics, Tacoma, WA, January 2015, pp. ix-xi.

$53 Million For Salmon Habitat Projects In 29 WA Counties Awarded

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE WASHINGTON RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE

The Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board and the Puget Sound Partnership today announced the award of more than $53 million in grants for projects that will protect and restore salmon habitat statewide.

EXAMPLES OF PAST STREAM RESTORATION PROJECTS INCLUDE REMOVING PERCHED CULVERTS THAT MAKE IT IMPOSSIBLE FOR SALMON AND OTHER STOCKS TO SWIM UPSTREAM … (WASHINGTON RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE)

“Salmon are vitally important to Washington’s economy and to our way of life. They are one of our state’s most precious resources,” said Gov. Jay Inslee. “These projects will help tackle some of the fundamental problems that are destroying our salmon populations. By making these investments we are taking steps to increase the number of salmon so there will be enough fish for future generations, orcas and for the communities and jobs that rely on the fishing industry.”

… REMOVING INVASIVE JAPANESE KNOTWEED AND REPLACING IT WITH NATIVE VEGETATION … (WASHINGTON RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE)

With the Legislature’s recent approval of the capital budget, grants are being distributed for 163 projects to organizations in 29 of the state’s 39 counties. The grants will be used to remove barriers that prevent salmon from migrating, increase the types and amount of habitat for salmon, protect pristine areas and restore critical habitat so salmon have places to spawn, feed, rest and grow.

… CONSTRUCTING LOGJAMS SO RIVERS CAN REVERT TO MORE NATURAL FLOWS AND PROVIDE FISH PLACES TO REST AND HIDE … (WASHINGTON RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE)

Grants were given to projects in the counties below. Click to see details on each project:

Asotin County……………………….. $150,110

Chelan County………………….. $1,368,201

Clallam County………………….. $6,142,176

Clark County…………………………. $240,570

Columbia County……………………. $22,000

Cowlitz County…………………… $1,567,061

Garfield County………………………. $83,300

Grays Harbor County……………. $483,911

Island County……………………….. $825,533

Jefferson County……………….. $1,693,673

King County…………………….. $11,671,127

Kitsap County……………………….. $520,558

Kittitas County………………………. $862,119

Klickitat County…………………….. $598,787

Lewis County…………………….. $1,000,794

Mason County……………………. $4,549,648

Okanogan County………………… $487,599

Pacific County………………………. $357,679

Pend Oreille County……………… $342,000

Pierce County……………………. $3,528,850

San Juan County…………………. $745,591

Skagit County…………………….. $5,392,282

Skamania County…………………. $521,548

Snohomish County……………. $2,986,311

Thurston County………………… $1,254,429

Wahkiakum County………………. $507,612

Walla Walla County…………… $1,052,637

Whatcom County……………….. $2,934,300

Yakima County……………………… $228,000

Multiple Counties………………. $1,096,161

“Salmon are the lifeblood of the Pacific Northwest,” said Sheida R. Sahandy, executive director of the Puget Sound Partnership. The Partnership’s Leadership Council is the regional salmon recovery organization for most of Puget Sound’s salmon species. “They feed our families, support our culture and fuel our economy. They are also a critical link in the entire food web of the Puget Sound ecosystem. These funds support projects that will help to renew our salmon populations.”

… ADDING WOODY DEBRIS BACK INTO STREAMS, MANY OF WHICH WERE CLEANED OF WHAT TURNED OUT TO A BE KEY INGREDIENT, PER SE, FOR FISH SEVERAL DECADES BACK … (WASHINGTON RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE)

What is the Problem?

As people moved to Washington and built cities and towns around the water, many of the places salmon live were destroyed. In 1991, the federal government declared the first salmon as threatened with extinction. By the end of that decade, salmon populations had dwindled so much that salmon and bull trout were listed as threatened or endangered in three-quarters of the state.

… AND INSTALLING WIDER, MORE FISH-FRIENDLY CULVERTS TO OPEN UP MILES AND MILES OF LOST OR POTENTIAL SPAWNING HABITAT. (WASHINGTON RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE)

“These projects are keeping us from losing salmon entirely,” said David Troutt, chair of the Salmon Recovery Funding Board. “Salmon are in trouble, but we know what to do. We have federally-approved recovery plans in place and the people to make them happen. We must continue these investments if we are to return salmon to healthy and sustainable numbers.”

How Projects are Chosen

Funding for the grants comes from the Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration fund, the state capital budget and federal sources. The projects all are linked to federally-approved recovery plans.

“Projects are thoroughly reviewed by local citizens and regional and state technical experts,” said Kaleen Cottingham, director of the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office, which administers the grants. “This multi-level approach ensures we invest the money in projects that we will know will make a difference and help us recover salmon.”

With Passage Of Capital Budget (Finally!), $74 Million For Hatcheries, Habitat, Access On Way To WDFW

With Washington’s 2017 Capital Budget finally approved by lawmakers yesterday and now on Governor Inslee’s desk for his signature this afternoon, tens of millions of dollars worth of repairs and upgrades to Washington hatcheries are set to begin.

THE JUST-PASSED 2017 CAPITAL BUDGET INCLUDES $2 MILLION FOR IMPROVEMENTS AT THE WALLACE SALMON HATCHERY NEAR GOLD BAR WHICH REARS COHO, SUMMER CHINOOK AND STEELHEAD. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The package also includes $5 million to improve the health of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s forestlands, $1.5 million for Tucannon River floodplain restoration, $1.2 million for elk-damaged fencing, $1 million for Lake Rufus Woods access and $600,000 for waterfowl habitat across the state, among other projects.

“We very much welcome the Legislature’s action,” said Tim Burns, who heads up WDFW’s Capital and Asset Management Program. “The budget includes $74 million in direct appropriations and grant authority that will enable WDFW to continue making major improvements at our hatcheries, wildlife areas, and other facilities across the state.”

The budget wasn’t passed last year due to disagreements over how to address the state Supreme Court’s Hirst Decision and its impacts on rural landowners.

But this week saw a breakthrough compromise from lawmakers. It involves a mix of limiting how much water new small wells can withdraw, $300 million for inbasin conservation work and shifts the onus of permitting back to the Department of Ecology instead of counties, per the Tacoma News Tribune.

Among WDFW’s fish hatcheries that will benefit from the deal and the work it funds:

Naselle: $8 million for renovations
Minter Creek: $6.5 million for work on intakes
Clarks Creek: $6.35 million for rebuilding
Hoodsport: $4.756 million for holding pond renovations
Forks Creek: $2.425 million for work on intakes, diversion
Wallace: $2.001 million for replacing intakes, holding pond
Soos Creek: $2 million for renovations
Eells Spring: $1.4 million for renovations
Kalama Falls: $816,000 for work on raceways
Dungeness: $615,000 for replacing main intake
Samish: $350,000 for work on intakes

The Capital Budget also includes grants for habitat, recreation and fish passage barrier removals, including:

South Coast: $7.242 million for 14 Coastal Restoration Initiative projects
Buford Creek (Asotin Co.): $4.7 million for a fish passage barrier removal project
Lower Chehalis River: $4.079 million for surge plain protection project
Chico Creek: $3.875 million for fish passage barrier removal project
Woodard Bay: $3.233 million for wetland restoration project
Big Bend Wildlife Area: $3 million for critical habitat project
Cowiche Watershed: $3 million for critical habitat project
Klickitat Canyon: $2.4 million for critical habitat project
Simcoe Wildlife Area: $2.14 million for critical habitat project
Kennedy Creek: $2.111 million riparian project
Sinlahekin Wildlife Area: $245,000 for a campground project
Samish River access: $182,000 for parking, recreation project