OPT Wolves Involved In 20th Livestock Depredation, WDFW Says

Washington wolf managers are reporting a fresh cattle depredation in a troublesome part of the state.

A TRAIL CAM SHOT CAPTURED A MEMBER OF A NORTHERN FERRY COUNTY WOLF PACK SEVERAL YEARS AGO. (WDFW)

WDFW says that the OPT wolves are responsible for the death of a cow discovered this past Saturday in northern Ferry County, bringing the number of livestock killed or injured by the pack since early September 2018 to 20.

“Director (Kelly) Susewind is now assessing this situation and considering next steps,” the agency stated in an update to its wolf pages.

The livestock producer wasn’t identified, but WDFW said it is the same one who was hit by a string of depredations last summer and fall, meaning the Diamond M Ranch.

They turned out cattle onto Forest Service allotments two weeks later than allowed under their permit, according to the agency, which added that for the past three weeks, there have been “near-daily patrols” of the herds by its staffers, ranchhands, and Jeff Flood, the Ferry-Stevens County wildlife specialist.

WDFW’s report includes more details about proactive, nonlethal measures being taken, along with details on how the cattle have been using the area.

On June 23, fox lights were also deployed to try and keep wolves away from the livestock.

Following last September’s attacks by the OPTs, which occupy the old territory of the Profanity Pack, Susewind authorized¬† incrementally removing members, taking out two of the four known wolves, paused the operation, restarted it again after late October depredations, then it paused again in November.

In January three more depredations occurred, though those don’t count towards considering lethal removal.

A monthly wolf report WDFW sent out yesterday shows that 13 and now 14 depredations with this latest have occurred within the 10-month rolling window for consideration through Saturday, July 6.

Thirteen of the 20 attacks resulted in injured calves or cows, the other seven deaths.

Diamond M operators suffered depredations from the Profanity Peak Pack in 2016 and Wedge Pack in 2012.

There are at least four and possibly five adults in the OPT Pack, along with four juveniles, the agency reports.

Things are otherwise generally quiet with Washington’s wolves, at least according to WDFW’s June report.

It states that six wolves, including two females in the Beaver Creek Pack, an adult female in the Dirty Shirt Pack, a yearling female in the Huckleberry Pack, an adult male in the Lookout Pack, and an adult male in the OPT Pack were all captured and collared last month.

The agency also stated that a collared Teanaway female that dispersed out of Central Washington was legally killed near Douglas Lake in British Columbia, and that members of its pack were also involved in “an interaction” with cattle.

Away from the woods, get ready for more wolf talk later this summer and fall.

“WDFW will begin a public engagement process in August that will propose the development of a post-recovery wolf conservation and management plan,” state managers posted in their monthly update. “The evaluation of wolf translocation will be incorporated into this process. Wolves are currently listed as a state endangered species in Washington. The post-recovery planning process is being initiated proactively because WDFW anticipates it will likely take two to three years to complete. The post-recovery plan will guide WDFW in long-term wolf conservation and management, and will evaluate various wolf management tools, including translocation. WDFW will announce the public scoping for the post-recovery plan and associated public meetings in August.”

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